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72 results for "dress"
1. Homer, Iliad, 3.125-3.127 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 206
3.125. / She found Helen in the hall, where she was weaving a great purple web of double fold, and thereon was broidering many battles of the horse-taming Trojans and the brazen-coated Achaeans, that for her sake they had endured at the hands of Ares. Close to her side then came Iris, swift of foot, and spake to her, saying: 3.126. / She found Helen in the hall, where she was weaving a great purple web of double fold, and thereon was broidering many battles of the horse-taming Trojans and the brazen-coated Achaeans, that for her sake they had endured at the hands of Ares. Close to her side then came Iris, swift of foot, and spake to her, saying: 3.127. / She found Helen in the hall, where she was weaving a great purple web of double fold, and thereon was broidering many battles of the horse-taming Trojans and the brazen-coated Achaeans, that for her sake they had endured at the hands of Ares. Close to her side then came Iris, swift of foot, and spake to her, saying:
2. Cicero, Post Reditum In Senatu, 12 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 31
12. idemque postea, cum innumerabilis multitudo bonorum de Capitolio supplex ad eum sordidata venisset, cumque adulescentes nobilissimi cunctique equites Romani se ad lenonis impudicissimi pedes abiecissent, quo vultu cincinnatus ganeo non solum civium lacrimas verum etiam patriae preces repudiavit! neque eo contentus fuit, sed etiam in contionem escendit escendit P : descendit B ς t : ascendit GHb ς s ε eaque dixit quae, si eius vir Catilina revixisset, dicere non esset ausus, se Nonarum Decembrium quae me consule fuissent clivique Capitolini poenas ab equitibus Romanis esse repetiturum. neque solum id dixit, sed quos ei commodum fuit compellavit, Lucium Lucium P rell. praeter s (L.) vero Lamiam Lamiam ε s : iam PHGc all. , equitem Romanum, praestanti dignitate hominem et saluti meae pro familiaritate, rei publicae pro fortunis suis amicissimum, consul imperiosus exire ex ex ε ( prob. Zielinski ): om. rell. urbe iussit. et cum vos vestem mutandam censuissetis cunctique mutassetis atque idem omnes boni iam ante fecissent, ille unguentis oblitus cum toga praetexta, quam omnes praetores aedilesque tum abiecerant, inrisit squalorem vestrum et luctum gratissimae civitatis, fecitque, quod nemo umquam tyrannus, ut quo minus cum (quom) ante quo minus add. J. S. Reid occulte vestrum malum gemeretis nihil diceret nihil diceret codd. : nihil terreret Reid : nihil se intercedere ediceret Madv. : nihil diceret esse quod obstaret Lahmann : num nihil diceret impedire? ne aperte ... ediceret s. l. P2 : om. Madv. Cf. Sest. xiv: Planc. § 87 edictoque suo non luctum patribus conscriptis sed indicia luctus ademerint : in Pis. § 18 maerorem relinquis, maeroris aufers insignia , ne aperte incommoda patriae lugeretis ediceret.
3. Cicero, Letters To Quintus, None (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 31
4. Cicero, Letters, None (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 31
5. Cicero, Pro Caelio, 25.61 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 190
6. Cicero, Pro Cluentio, 18 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 44
7. Cicero, Pro Plancio, 21 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 44
8. Cicero, Pro Rabirio Postumo, 26 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 81
9. Varro, Menippeae, 313 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 27
10. Terence, The Eunuch, 313-316, 318, 317 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 147
317. Color verus, corpus solidum et succi plenum. Pa. Anni? Ch. Anni? sedecim. Pa.
11. Polybius, Histories, 6.53.7, 30.18.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 27, 29
6.53.7. οὗτοι δὲ προσαναλαμβάνουσιν ἐσθῆτας, ἐὰν μὲν ὕπατος ἢ στρατηγὸς ᾖ γεγονώς, περιπορφύρους, ἐὰν δὲ τιμητής, πορφυρᾶς, ἐὰν δὲ καὶ τεθριαμβευκὼς ἤ τι τοιοῦτον κατειργασμένος, διαχρύσους. 30.18.3. ὅς γε πρῶτον μέν, πρεσβευτῶν παραγεγονότων Ῥωμαϊκῶν πρὸς αὐτόν, ἐξυρημένος τὴν κεφαλὴν καὶ πιλίον ἔχων λευκὸν καὶ τήβενναν καὶ καλικίους ἀπήντα τούτοις, καὶ καθόλου τοιαύτῃ διασκευῇ κεχρημένος οἵαν ἔχουσιν οἱ προσφάτως ἠλευθερωμένοι παρὰ Ῥωμαίοις, οὓς καλοῦσι λιβέρτους· 6.53.7.  These representatives wear togas, with a purple border if the deceased was a consul or praetor, whole purple if he was a censor, and embroidered with gold if he had celebrated a triumph or achieved anything similar. 30.18.3.  In the first place when some Roman legates had come to his court, he went to meet them with his head shorn, and wearing a white hat and toga and shoes, exactly the costume worn at Rome by slaves recently manumitted or "liberti" as the Romans call them.
12. Cicero, Philippicae, 13.13.28 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 27
13. Cicero, Pro Sestio, 53 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 31
14. Varro, On The Latin Language, 5.124 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 190
15. Seneca The Elder, Suasoriae, 2.21 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 190
16. Livy, History, 5.41, 34.7.1-34.7.3, 34.7.11, 45.44 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 27, 28, 29, 147
17. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 4.969-4.970 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 215
4.969. nos agere hoc autem et naturam quaerere rerum 4.970. semper et inventam patriis exponere chartis.
18. Nicolaus of Damascus, Fragments, 4.8-4.10 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 53
19. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.624, 3.210 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 147, 190
1.624. rend= 3.210. rend=
20. Ovid, Fasti, 4.619-4.620, 5.355-5.356 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 12
4.619. alba decent Cererem: vestis Cerialibus albas 4.620. sumite; nunc pulli velleris usus abest. 5.355. cur tamen, ut dantur vestes Cerialibus albae, 5.356. sic haec est cultu versicolore decens? 4.619. White is fitting for Ceres: dress in white clothes for Ceres’ 4.620. Festival: on this day no one wears dark-coloured thread. 5.355. And warns us to use life’s beauty while it’s in bloom: 5.356. The thorn is spurned when the rose has fallen.
21. Ovid, Remedia Amoris, 354, 353 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 190
22. Horace, Sermones, 1.6.24-1.6.29 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 27
23. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 36.16.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 31
24. Propertius, Elegies, 1.2.1-1.2.6, 4.11.33-4.11.35, 4.11.61-4.11.62 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 27, 44, 198
25. Vergil, Georgics, 1.24-1.42, 4.560-4.563 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 211
1.24. tuque adeo, quem mox quae sint habitura deorum 1.25. concilia, incertum est, urbisne invisere, Caesar, 1.26. terrarumque velis curam et te maximus orbis 1.27. auctorem frugum tempestatumque potentem 1.28. accipiat, cingens materna tempora myrto, 1.29. an deus inmensi venias maris ac tua nautae 1.30. numina sola colant, tibi serviat ultima Thule 1.31. teque sibi generum Tethys emat omnibus undis, 1.32. anne novum tardis sidus te mensibus addas, 1.33. qua locus Erigonen inter Chelasque sequentis 1.34. panditur—ipse tibi iam bracchia contrahit ardens 1.35. Scorpius et caeli iusta plus parte reliquit— 1.36. quidquid eris,—nam te nec sperant Tartara regem 1.37. nec tibi regdi veniat tam dira cupido, 1.38. quamvis Elysios miretur Graecia campos 1.39. nec repetita sequi curet Proserpina matrem— 1.40. da facilem cursum atque audacibus adnue coeptis 1.41. ignarosque viae mecum miseratus agrestis 1.42. ingredere et votis iam nunc adsuesce vocari. 4.560. et super arboribus, Caesar dum magnus ad altum 4.561. fulminat Euphraten bello victorque volentes 4.562. per populos dat iura viamque adfectat Olympo. 4.563. Illo Vergilium me tempore dulcis alebat
26. Tibullus, Elegies, 1.8.9-1.8.16 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 198
27. Juvenal, Satires, 2.93-2.97, 7.130 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 182, 190
28. Persius, Satires, 5.30, 5.33 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 54, 141
29. Suetonius, Caligula, 52 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 34
30. Persius, Saturae, 5.30, 5.33 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 54, 141
31. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 60.3, 78.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 190
32. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 60.3, 78.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 190
33. Martial, Epigrams, 5.8, 5.14, 5.23, 5.25, 5.27, 5.35, 5.38, 5.41, 7.2.7-7.2.8, 8.28, 9.37, 9.49, 11.8, 14.62 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 44, 99, 182, 190, 219
34. Martial, Epigrams, 5.8, 5.14, 5.23, 5.25, 5.27, 5.35, 5.38, 5.41, 7.2.7-7.2.8, 8.28, 9.37, 9.49, 11.8, 14.62 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 44, 99, 182, 190, 219
35. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 9.60.127, 9.62.135, 9.113, 20.152, 34.19-34.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 53, 80, 81, 190
36. Suetonius, Nero, 32.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 32
37. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.33-1.66 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 211
38. Suetonius, Tiberius, 13 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 81
39. Suetonius, Augustus, 40.3-40.5, 44.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 23, 32, 33
40. Silius Italicus, Punica, 7.120-7.122 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 215
41. Tacitus, Annals, 2.33 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 32
2.33. Proximo senatus die multa in luxum civitatis dicta a Q. Haterio consulari, Octavio Frontone praetura functo; decretumque ne vasa auro solida ministrandis cibis fierent, ne vestis serica viros foedaret. excessit Fronto ac postulavit modum argento, supellectili, familiae: erat quippe adhuc frequens senatoribus, si quid e re publica crederent, loco sententiae promere. contra Gallus Asinius disseruit: auctu imperii adolevisse etiam privatas opes, idque non novum, sed e vetustissimis moribus: aliam apud Fabricios, aliam apud Scipiones pecuniam; et cuncta ad rem publicam referri, qua tenui angustas civium domos, postquam eo magnificentiae venerit, gliscere singulos. neque in familia et argento quaeque ad usum parentur nimium aliquid aut modicum nisi ex fortuna possidentis. distinctos senatus et equitum census, non quia diversi natura, sed ut locis ordi- nibus dignationibus antistent, ita iis quae ad requiem animi aut salubritatem corporum parentur, nisi forte clarissimo cuique pluris curas, maiora pericula subeunda, delenimentis curarum et periculorum carendum esse. facilem adsensum Gallo sub nominibus honestis confessio vitiorum et similitudo audientium dedit. adiecerat et Tiberius non id tempus censurae nec, si quid in moribus labaret, defuturum corrigendi auctorem. 2.33.  At the next session, the ex-consul, Quintus Haterius, and Octavius Fronto, a former praetor, spoke at length against the national extravagance; and it was resolved that table-plate should not be manufactured in solid gold, and that Oriental silks should no longer degrade the male sex. Fronto went further, and pressed for a statutory limit to silver, furniture, and domestics: for it was still usual for a member to precede his vote by mooting any point which he considered to be in the public interest. Asinius Gallus opposed:— "With the expansion of the empire, private fortunes had also grown; nor was this new, but consot with extremely ancient custom. Wealth was one thing with the Fabricii, another with the Scipios; and all was relative to the state. When the state was poor, you had frugality and cottages: when it attained a pitch of splendour such as the present, the individual also throve. In slaves or plate or anything procured for use there was neither excess nor moderation except with reference to the means of the owner. Senators and knights had a special property qualification, not because they differed in kind from their fellow-men, but in order that those who enjoyed precedence in place, rank, and dignity should enjoy it also in the easements that make for mental peace and physical well-being. And justly so — unless your distinguished men, while saddled with more responsibilities and greater dangers, were to be deprived of the relaxations compensating those responsibilities and those dangers." — With his virtuously phrased confession of vice, Gallus easily carried with him that audience of congenial spirits. Tiberius, too, had added that it was not the time for a censorship, and that, if there was any loosening of the national morality, a reformer would be forthcoming.
42. Appian, Civil Wars, 2.24 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 44
43. Plutarch, Camillus, 33 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 147, 148
44. Plutarch, Cato The Elder, 18 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 32
45. Plutarch, Cato The Younger, 44.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 44
46. Plutarch, Cicero, 31, 30 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 31
47. Plutarch, Pompey, 24.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 29
24.6. πλεῖστα δὲ Ῥωμαίοις ἐνυβρίσαντες, ἔτι καὶ τὰς ὁδοὺς αὐτῶν ἀναβαίνοντες ἀπὸ θαλάσσης ἐληΐζοντο καὶ τὰς ἐγγὺς ἐπαύλεις ἐξέκοπτον. ἥρπασαν δέ ποτε καὶ στρατηγοὺς δύο Σεξτίλιον καὶ Βελλῖνον ἐν ταῖς περιπορφύροις, καὶ τούς ὑπηρέτας ἅμα καὶ ῥαβδοφόρους ᾤχοντο σὺν αὐτοῖς ἐκείνοις ἔχοντες. ἥλω δὲ καὶ θυγάτηρ Ἀντωνίου, θριαμβικοῦ ἀνδρός, εἰς ἀγρὸν βαδίζουσα, καὶ πολλῶν χρημάτων ἀπελυτρώθη. 24.6.
48. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 3.6.7, 6.4.4, 6.5.2, 8.10.2, 9.12.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 31, 44
49. Plutarch, Tiberius And Gaius Gracchus, 10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 31
50. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 2.8-2.9, 7.6, 7.8-7.9, 8.27, 9.12, 9.30 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 241, 242
51. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 5.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 23
5.6. To Domitius Apollinaris. I was charmed with the kind consideration which led you, when you heard that I was about to visit my Tuscan villa in the summer, to advise me not to do so during the season when you consider the district unhealthy. Undoubtedly, the region along the Tuscan coast is trying and dangerous to the health, but my property lies well back from the sea; indeed, it is just under the Apennines, which are the healthiest of our mountain ranges. However, that you may not have the slightest anxiety on my account, let me tell you all about the climatic conditions, the lie of the land, and the charms of my villa. It will be as pleasant reading for you as it is pleasant writing for me. In winter the air is cold and frosty The contour of the district is most beautiful. Picture to yourself an immense amphitheatre, such as only Nature can create, with a wide-spreading plain ringed with hills, and the summits of the hills themselves covered with tall and ancient forests. There is plentiful and varied hunting to be had. Down the mountain slopes there are stretches of timber woods, and among these are rich, deep-soiled hillocks - where if you look for a stone you will have hard work to find one - which are just as fertile as the most level plains, and ripen just as rich harvests, though later in the season. Below these, along the whole hillsides, stretch the vineyards which present an unbroken line far and wide, on the borders and lowest level of which comes a fringe of trees. Then you reach the meadows and the fields - fields which only the most powerful oxen and the stoutest ploughs can turn. The soil is so tough and composed of such thick clods that when it is first broken up it has to be furrowed nine times before it is subdued. The meadows are jewelled with flowers, and produce trefoil and other herbs, always tender and soft, and looking as though they were always fresh. For all parts are well nourished by never-failing streams, and even where there is most water there are no swamps, for the slope of the land drains off into the Tiber all the moisture that it receives and cannot itself absorb. The Tiber runs through the middle of the plain; it is navigable for ships, and all the grain is carried downstream to the city, at least in winter and spring. In summer the volume of water dwindles away, leaving but the name of a great river to the dried-up bed, but in the autumn it recovers its flood. You would be delighted if you could obtain a view of the district from the mountain height, for you would think you were looking not so much at earth and fields as at a beautiful landscape picture of wonderful loveliness. Such is the variety, such the arrangement of the scene, that wherever the eyes fall they are sure to be refreshed. My villa, though it lies at the foot of the hill, enjoys as fine a prospect as though it stood on the summit; the ascent is so gentle and easy, and the gradient so unnoticeable, that you find yourself at the top without feeling that you are ascending. The Apennines lie behind it, but at a considerable distance, and even on a cloudless and still day it gets a breeze from this range, never boisterous and rough, for its strength is broken and lost in the distance it has to travel. Most of the house faces south; in summer it gets the sun from the sixth hour, and in winter considerably earlier, inviting it as it were into the portico, which is broad and long to correspond, and contains a number of apartments and an old-fashioned hall. In front, there is a terrace laid out in different patterns and bounded with an edging of box; then comes a sloping ridge with figures of animals on both sides cut out of the box-trees, while on the level ground stands an acanthus-tree, with leaves so soft that I might almost call them liquid. Round this is a walk bordered by evergreens pressed and trimmed into various shapes; then comes an exercise ground, round like a circus, which surrounds the box-trees that are cut into different forms, and the dwarf shrubs that are kept clipped. Everything is protected by an enclosure, which is hidden and withdrawn from sight by the tiers of box-trees. Beyond is a meadow, as well worth seeing for its natural charm as the features just described are for their artificial beauty, and beyond that there stretches an expanse of fields and a number of other meadows and thickets. At the head of the portico there runs out the dining-room, from the doors of which can be seen the end of the terrace with the meadow and a good expanse of country beyond it, while from the windows the view on the one hand commands one side of the terrace and the part of the villa which juts out, and on the other the grove and foliage of the adjoining riding-school. Almost opposite to the middle of the portico is a summer-house standing back a little, with a small open space in the middle shaded by four plane-trees. Among them is a marble fountain, from which the water plays upon and lightly sprinkles the roots of the plane-trees and the grass plot beneath them. In this summer-house there is a bed-chamber which excludes all light, noise, and sound, and adjoining it is a dining-room for my friends, which faces upon the small court and the other portico, and commands the view enjoyed by the latter. There is another bed-chamber, which is leafy and shaded by the nearest plane-tree and built of marble up to the balcony; above is a picture of a tree with birds perched in the branches equally beautiful with the marble. Here there is a small fountain with a basin around the latter, and the water runs into it from a number of small pipes, which produce a most agreeable sound. In the corner of the portico is a spacious bed-chamber leading out of the dining-room, some of its windows looking out upon the terrace, others upon the meadow, while the windows in front face the fish-pond which lies just beneath them, and is pleasant both to eye and ear, as the water falls from a considerable elevation and glistens white as it is caught in the marble basin. This bed-chamber is beautifully warm even in winter, for it is flooded with an abundance of sunshine. The heating chamber for the bath adjoins it, and on a cloudy day we turn in steam to take the place of the sun's warmth. Next comes a roomy and cheerful undressing room for the bath, from which you pass into a cool chamber containing a large and shady swimming bath. If you prefer more room or warmer water to swim in, there is a pond in the court with a well adjoining it, from which you can make the water colder when you are tired of the warm. Adjoining the cold bath is one of medium warmth, for the sun shines lavishly upon it, but not so much as upon the hot bath which is built farther out. There are three sets of steps leading to it, two exposed to the sun, and the third out of the sun though quite as light. Above the dressing-room is a ball court where various kinds of exercise can be taken, and a number of games can be played at once. Not far from the bath-room is a staircase leading to a covered passage, at the head of which are three rooms, one looking out upon the courtyard with the four plane-trees, the second upon the meadow, and the third upon the vineyards, so each therefore enjoys a different view. At the end of the passage is a bed-chamber constructed out of the passage itself, which looks out upon the riding-course, the vineyards, and the mountains. Connected with it is another bed-chamber open to the sun, and especially so in winter time. Leading out of this is an apartment which adjoins the riding-course of the villa. Such is the appearance and the use to which the front of my house is put. At the side is a raised covered gallery, which seems not so much to look out upon the vineyards as to touch them; in the middle is a dining-room which gets the invigorating breezes from the valleys of the Apennines, while at the other side, through the spacious windows and the folding doors, you seem to be close upon the vineyards again with the gallery between. On the side of the room where there are no windows is a private winding staircase by which the servants bring up the requisites for a meal. At the end of the gallery is a bed-chamber, and the gallery itself affords as pleasant a prospect from there as the vineyards. Underneath runs a sort of subterranean gallery, which in summer time remains perfectly cool, and as it has sufficient air within it, it neither admits any from without nor needs any. Next to both these galleries the portico commences where the dining-room ends, and this is cold before mid-day, and summery when the sun has reached his zenith. This gives the approach to two apartments, one of which contains four beds and the other three, and they are bathed in sunshine or steeped in shadow, according to the position of the sun. But though the arrangements of the house itself are charming, they are far and away surpassed by the riding-course. It is quite open in the centre, and the moment you enter your eye ranges over the whole of it. Around its borders are plane-trees clothed with ivy, and so while the foliage at the top belongs to the trees themselves, that on the lower parts belongs to the ivy, which creeps along the trunk and branches, and spreading across to the neighbouring trees, joins them together. Between the plane-trees are box shrubs, and on the farther side of the shrubs is a ring of laurels which mingle their shade with that of the plane-trees. At the far end, the straight boundary of the riding-course is curved into semi-circular form, which quite changes its appearance. It is enclosed and covered with cypress-trees, the deeper shade of which makes it darker and gloomier than at the sides, but the inner circles - for there are more than one - are quite open to the sunshine. Even roses grow there, and the warmth of the sun is delightful as a change from the cool of the shade. When you come to the end of these various winding alleys, the boundary again runs straight, or should I say boundaries, for there are a number of paths with box shrubs between them. In places there are grass plots intervening, in others box shrubs, which are trimmed to a great variety of patterns, some of them being cut into letters forming my name as owner and that of the gardener. Here and there are small pyramids and apple-trees, and now and then in the midst of all this graceful artificial work you suddenly come upon what looks like a real bit of the country planted there. The intervening space is beautified on both sides with dwarf plane-trees; beyond these is the acanthus-tree that is supple and flexible to the hand, and there are more boxwood figures and names. At the upper end is a couch of white marble covered with a vine, the latter being supported by four small pillars of Carystian marble. Jets of water flow from the couch through small pipes and look as if they were forced out by the weight of persons reclining thereon, and the water is caught in a stone cistern and then retained in a graceful marble basin, regulated by pipes out of sight, so that the basin, while always full, never overflows. The heavier dishes and plates are placed at the side of the basin when I dine there, but the lighter ones, formed into the shapes of little boats and birds, float on the surface and travel round and round. Facing this is a fountain which receives back the water it expels, for the water is thrown up to a considerable height and then falls down again, and the pipes that perform the two processes are connected. Directly opposite the couch is a bed-chamber, and each lends a grace to the other. It is formed of glistening marble, and through the projecting folding doors you pass at once among the foliage, while both from the upper and lower windows you look out upon the same green picture. Within is a little cabinet which seems to belong at once to the same and yet another bed-chamber. This contains a bed and it has windows on every side, yet the shade is so thick outside that very little light enters, for a wonderfully luxuriant vine has climbed up to the roof and covers the whole building. You can fancy you are in a grove as you lie there, only that you do not feel the rain as you do among trees. Here too a fountain rises and immediately loses itself underground. There are a number of marble chairs placed up and down, which are as restful for persons tired with walking as the bed-chamber itself. Near these chairs are little fountains, and throughout the whole riding-course you hear the murmur of tiny streams carried through pipes, which run wherever you please to direct them. These are used to water the shrubs, sometimes in one part, sometimes in another, and at other times all are watered together. I should long since have been afraid of boring you, had I not set out in this letter to take you with me round every corner of my estate. For I am not at all apprehensive that you will find it tedious to read about a place which certainly would not tire you to look at, especially as you can get a little rest whenever you desire, and can sit down, so to speak, by laying down the letter. Moreover, I have been indulging my affection for the place, for I am greatly attached to anything that is mainly the work of my own hands or that someone else has begun and I have taken up. In short - for there is no reason is there? why I should not be frank with you, whether my judgments are sound or unsound - I consider that it is the first duty of a writer to select the title of his work and constantly ask himself what he has begun to write about. He may be sure that so long as he keeps to his subject-matter he will not be tedious, but that he will bore his readers to distraction if he starts dragging in extraneous matter to make weight. Observe the length with which Homer describes the arms of Achilles, and Virgil the arms of Aeneas - yet in both cases the description seems short, because the author only carries out what he intended to. Observe how Aratus hunts up and brings together even the tiniest stars - yet he does not exceed due limits. For his description is not an excursus, but the end and aim of the whole work. It is the same with myself, if I may compare my lowly efforts with their great ones. I have been trying to give you a bird's eye view of the whole of my villa, and if I have introduced no extraneous matter and have never wandered off my subject, it is not the letter containing the description which is to be considered of excessive size, but rather the villa which has been described. However, let me get back to the point I started from, lest I give you an opportunity of justly condemning me by my own law, by not pursuing this digression any farther. I have explained to you why I prefer my Tuscan house to my other places at Tusculum, Tibur and Praeneste. For in addition to all the beauties I have described above, my repose here is more profound and more comfortable, and therefore all the freer from anxiety. There is no necessity to don the toga, no neighbour ever calls to drag me out; everything is placid and quiet; and this peace adds to the healthiness of the place, by giving it, so to speak, a purer sky and a more liquid air. I enjoy better health both in mind and body here than anywhere else, for I exercise the former by study and the latter by hunting. Besides, there is no place where my household keep in better trim, and up to the present I have not lost a single one of all whom I brought with me. I hope Heaven will forgive the boast, and that the gods will continue my happiness to me and preserve this place in all its beauty. Farewell.
52. Festus Sextus Pompeius, De Verborum Significatione, 8, 474 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 54
53. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 37.21.3-37.21.4, 38.14.7, 38.16, 43.43.1-43.43.2, 48.31.3, 49.16.1, 53.26.5, 54.35.5, 56.31.2, 57.13.5, 57.15.1, 60.6.9, 60.7.4, 69.18.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 23, 28, 29, 31, 32, 33, 34, 44
37.21.3.  He did not, however, add any other title to his name, but was satisfied with that of Magnus alone, which, of course, he had gained even before these achievements. Nor did he contrive to receive any other extravagant honour, or even accept such as had been voted him in his absence, except on a single occasion. 37.21.4.  These consisted in the privilege of always wearing the laurel wreath at all public games, and arraying himself in the cloak of a general at all of them, as well as in the triumphal garb at the horse-races. They had been granted him chiefly through the coöperation of Caesar, and contrary to the advice of Marcus Cato. 38.14.7.  For this reason he vigorously opposed Clodius' measure in every way; in particular, he discarded his senatorial dress and went about in the garb of the knights, paying court meanwhile, as he went the rounds, day and night alike, to all who had any influence, not only of his friends but also of his opponents, and especially to Pompey and even Caesar, inasmuch as the latter concealed his enmity toward him. 38.16. 1.  On the basis of these calculations, then, he hoped to win, since he was now unreasonably confident, even as he had before been unduly terrified; and fearing that his withdrawal from the city would seem to have been occasioned by a bad conscience, he listened to Pompey, though he said that he was considerably obliged to Caesar.,2. And thus Cicero, deceived in this wise, was preparing as if for a great victory over his enemies. For, in addition to the grounds for hope already mentioned, the knights assembled on the Capitol and sent envoys in his behalf to the consuls and senate, some from their own number,,3.  and also the senators Quintus Hortensius and Gaius Curio. Ninnius, too, in addition to his assistance in other ways urged the populace to change their apparel, as if for a general calamity. And many of the senators also did this, and would not change back until the consuls rebuked them by an edict.,4. The forces of his adversaries were more powerful, however. Clodius would not allow Ninnius to take any action on his behalf, and Gabinius would not grant the knights access to the senate; on the contrary, he drove one of them, who was very insistent, out of the city, and rebuked Hortensius and Curio for having been present in the assembly of the knights and for having undertaken the mission.,5.  Moreover, Clodius brought them before the populace, where they were soundly belaboured for their mission by some appointed agents. After this Piso, though he seemed well-disposed towards Cicero and had advised him, on seeing that it was impossible for him to attain safety by any other means, to slip away in time, nevertheless, when the other took offence at this counsel,,6.  came before the assembly at the first opportunity (he was too ill most of the time) and to the question of Clodius as to what opinion he held regarding the proposed measure said: "No deed of cruelty or sadness pleases me." Gabinius, too, on being asked the same question, not only failed to praise Cicero but even accused both the knights and the senate. 43.43.1.  Such was his gift to Rome. For himself, he wore the triumphal garb, by decree, at all the games, and was adorned with the laurel crown always and everywhere alike. The excuse that he gave for it was that his forehead was bald; yet he gave occasion for talk by this very circumstance that at that time, though well past youth, he still bestowed attention upon his appearance. 43.43.2.  He used to show among all men his pride in rather loose clothing, and the footwear which he used later on was sometimes high and of a reddish colour, after the style of the kings who had once reigned in Alba, for he claimed that he was related to them through Iulus. 48.31.3.  But a short time before they had brought the two rulers into the city mounted on horses as if at a triumph, had bestowed upon them the triumphal dress just as upon those who celebrated triumphs, had allowed them to view the festivals seated upon their chairs of state, and had espoused to Antony Caesar's sister, Octavia, now that her husband was dead, though she was pregt; 49.16.1.  These were the privileges bestowed upon Caesar by the senate. And Caesar on his own responsibility enrolled among the augurs, above the proper number, Valerius Messalla, whom he had previously in the proscriptions condemned to death, made the people of Utica citizens, and gave orders that no one should wear the purple dress except the senators who were acting as magistrates; for some ordinary individuals were already using it. 53.26.5.  For this and his other exploits of this period a triumph, as well as the title, was voted to Augustus; but as he did not care to celebrate it, a triumphal arch was erected in the Alps in his honour and he was granted the right always to wear both the crown and the triumphal garb on the first day of the year. After these achievements in the wars Augustus closed the precinct of Janus, which had been opened because of these wars. 54.35.5.  He himself delivered the funeral oration there, and Drusus delivered one from the rostra; for the mourning was publicly observed and the senators had changed their dress. Her body was carried in the procession by her sons-in‑law; but not all the honours voted for her were accepted by Augustus. 56.31.2.  The body of Augustus was carried from Nola by the foremost men of each city in succession. When it drew near Rome, the knights took it in charge and conveyed it by night into the city. On the following day there was a meeting of the senate, to which the majority came wearing the equestrian costume, but the magistrates the senatorial garb except for the purple-bordered toga. 57.13.5.  Not a few men, also, were wearing a great deal of purple clothing, though this had formerly been forbidden; yet he neither rebuked nor fined any of them, but when a rain came up during a certain festival, he himself put on a dark woollen cloak. After that none of them longer dared assume any different kind of garb. 57.15.1.  These were the events of that year. In the consulship of Statilius Taurus and Lucius Libo, Tiberius forbade any man to wear silk clothing and also forbade anyone to use golden vessels except for sacred ceremonies. 60.6.9.  His own name also he carved on the stage (not because he had built it, but because he had dedicated it), but on no other building. Furthermore, he did not wear the triumphal dress throughout the entire festival, though permission to do so had been voted, but appeared in it merely when offering the sacrifice; the rest of the festival he superintended clad in the purple-bordered toga.   60.7.4.  But Claudius now set apart for the senators the section which still belongs to them, and he furthermore permitted any members who so desired to sit elsewhere and even appear in citizen's dress. After this he banqueted the senators and their wives, the knights, and also the tribes.   69.18.3.  In this connexion the following anecdote is related of Cornelius Fronto, who was the foremost Roman of the time in pleading before the courts. One night he was returning home from dinner very late, and ascertained from a man whose counsel he had promised to be that Turbo was already holding court. Accordingly, just as he was, in his dinner dress, he went into Turbo's court-room and greeted him, not with the morning salutation, Salve, but with the one appropriate to the evening, Vale.
54. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 5.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 23
5.6. To Domitius Apollinaris. I was charmed with the kind consideration which led you, when you heard that I was about to visit my Tuscan villa in the summer, to advise me not to do so during the season when you consider the district unhealthy. Undoubtedly, the region along the Tuscan coast is trying and dangerous to the health, but my property lies well back from the sea; indeed, it is just under the Apennines, which are the healthiest of our mountain ranges. However, that you may not have the slightest anxiety on my account, let me tell you all about the climatic conditions, the lie of the land, and the charms of my villa. It will be as pleasant reading for you as it is pleasant writing for me. In winter the air is cold and frosty The contour of the district is most beautiful. Picture to yourself an immense amphitheatre, such as only Nature can create, with a wide-spreading plain ringed with hills, and the summits of the hills themselves covered with tall and ancient forests. There is plentiful and varied hunting to be had. Down the mountain slopes there are stretches of timber woods, and among these are rich, deep-soiled hillocks - where if you look for a stone you will have hard work to find one - which are just as fertile as the most level plains, and ripen just as rich harvests, though later in the season. Below these, along the whole hillsides, stretch the vineyards which present an unbroken line far and wide, on the borders and lowest level of which comes a fringe of trees. Then you reach the meadows and the fields - fields which only the most powerful oxen and the stoutest ploughs can turn. The soil is so tough and composed of such thick clods that when it is first broken up it has to be furrowed nine times before it is subdued. The meadows are jewelled with flowers, and produce trefoil and other herbs, always tender and soft, and looking as though they were always fresh. For all parts are well nourished by never-failing streams, and even where there is most water there are no swamps, for the slope of the land drains off into the Tiber all the moisture that it receives and cannot itself absorb. The Tiber runs through the middle of the plain; it is navigable for ships, and all the grain is carried downstream to the city, at least in winter and spring. In summer the volume of water dwindles away, leaving but the name of a great river to the dried-up bed, but in the autumn it recovers its flood. You would be delighted if you could obtain a view of the district from the mountain height, for you would think you were looking not so much at earth and fields as at a beautiful landscape picture of wonderful loveliness. Such is the variety, such the arrangement of the scene, that wherever the eyes fall they are sure to be refreshed. My villa, though it lies at the foot of the hill, enjoys as fine a prospect as though it stood on the summit; the ascent is so gentle and easy, and the gradient so unnoticeable, that you find yourself at the top without feeling that you are ascending. The Apennines lie behind it, but at a considerable distance, and even on a cloudless and still day it gets a breeze from this range, never boisterous and rough, for its strength is broken and lost in the distance it has to travel. Most of the house faces south; in summer it gets the sun from the sixth hour, and in winter considerably earlier, inviting it as it were into the portico, which is broad and long to correspond, and contains a number of apartments and an old-fashioned hall. In front, there is a terrace laid out in different patterns and bounded with an edging of box; then comes a sloping ridge with figures of animals on both sides cut out of the box-trees, while on the level ground stands an acanthus-tree, with leaves so soft that I might almost call them liquid. Round this is a walk bordered by evergreens pressed and trimmed into various shapes; then comes an exercise ground, round like a circus, which surrounds the box-trees that are cut into different forms, and the dwarf shrubs that are kept clipped. Everything is protected by an enclosure, which is hidden and withdrawn from sight by the tiers of box-trees. Beyond is a meadow, as well worth seeing for its natural charm as the features just described are for their artificial beauty, and beyond that there stretches an expanse of fields and a number of other meadows and thickets. At the head of the portico there runs out the dining-room, from the doors of which can be seen the end of the terrace with the meadow and a good expanse of country beyond it, while from the windows the view on the one hand commands one side of the terrace and the part of the villa which juts out, and on the other the grove and foliage of the adjoining riding-school. Almost opposite to the middle of the portico is a summer-house standing back a little, with a small open space in the middle shaded by four plane-trees. Among them is a marble fountain, from which the water plays upon and lightly sprinkles the roots of the plane-trees and the grass plot beneath them. In this summer-house there is a bed-chamber which excludes all light, noise, and sound, and adjoining it is a dining-room for my friends, which faces upon the small court and the other portico, and commands the view enjoyed by the latter. There is another bed-chamber, which is leafy and shaded by the nearest plane-tree and built of marble up to the balcony; above is a picture of a tree with birds perched in the branches equally beautiful with the marble. Here there is a small fountain with a basin around the latter, and the water runs into it from a number of small pipes, which produce a most agreeable sound. In the corner of the portico is a spacious bed-chamber leading out of the dining-room, some of its windows looking out upon the terrace, others upon the meadow, while the windows in front face the fish-pond which lies just beneath them, and is pleasant both to eye and ear, as the water falls from a considerable elevation and glistens white as it is caught in the marble basin. This bed-chamber is beautifully warm even in winter, for it is flooded with an abundance of sunshine. The heating chamber for the bath adjoins it, and on a cloudy day we turn in steam to take the place of the sun's warmth. Next comes a roomy and cheerful undressing room for the bath, from which you pass into a cool chamber containing a large and shady swimming bath. If you prefer more room or warmer water to swim in, there is a pond in the court with a well adjoining it, from which you can make the water colder when you are tired of the warm. Adjoining the cold bath is one of medium warmth, for the sun shines lavishly upon it, but not so much as upon the hot bath which is built farther out. There are three sets of steps leading to it, two exposed to the sun, and the third out of the sun though quite as light. Above the dressing-room is a ball court where various kinds of exercise can be taken, and a number of games can be played at once. Not far from the bath-room is a staircase leading to a covered passage, at the head of which are three rooms, one looking out upon the courtyard with the four plane-trees, the second upon the meadow, and the third upon the vineyards, so each therefore enjoys a different view. At the end of the passage is a bed-chamber constructed out of the passage itself, which looks out upon the riding-course, the vineyards, and the mountains. Connected with it is another bed-chamber open to the sun, and especially so in winter time. Leading out of this is an apartment which adjoins the riding-course of the villa. Such is the appearance and the use to which the front of my house is put. At the side is a raised covered gallery, which seems not so much to look out upon the vineyards as to touch them; in the middle is a dining-room which gets the invigorating breezes from the valleys of the Apennines, while at the other side, through the spacious windows and the folding doors, you seem to be close upon the vineyards again with the gallery between. On the side of the room where there are no windows is a private winding staircase by which the servants bring up the requisites for a meal. At the end of the gallery is a bed-chamber, and the gallery itself affords as pleasant a prospect from there as the vineyards. Underneath runs a sort of subterranean gallery, which in summer time remains perfectly cool, and as it has sufficient air within it, it neither admits any from without nor needs any. Next to both these galleries the portico commences where the dining-room ends, and this is cold before mid-day, and summery when the sun has reached his zenith. This gives the approach to two apartments, one of which contains four beds and the other three, and they are bathed in sunshine or steeped in shadow, according to the position of the sun. But though the arrangements of the house itself are charming, they are far and away surpassed by the riding-course. It is quite open in the centre, and the moment you enter your eye ranges over the whole of it. Around its borders are plane-trees clothed with ivy, and so while the foliage at the top belongs to the trees themselves, that on the lower parts belongs to the ivy, which creeps along the trunk and branches, and spreading across to the neighbouring trees, joins them together. Between the plane-trees are box shrubs, and on the farther side of the shrubs is a ring of laurels which mingle their shade with that of the plane-trees. At the far end, the straight boundary of the riding-course is curved into semi-circular form, which quite changes its appearance. It is enclosed and covered with cypress-trees, the deeper shade of which makes it darker and gloomier than at the sides, but the inner circles - for there are more than one - are quite open to the sunshine. Even roses grow there, and the warmth of the sun is delightful as a change from the cool of the shade. When you come to the end of these various winding alleys, the boundary again runs straight, or should I say boundaries, for there are a number of paths with box shrubs between them. In places there are grass plots intervening, in others box shrubs, which are trimmed to a great variety of patterns, some of them being cut into letters forming my name as owner and that of the gardener. Here and there are small pyramids and apple-trees, and now and then in the midst of all this graceful artificial work you suddenly come upon what looks like a real bit of the country planted there. The intervening space is beautified on both sides with dwarf plane-trees; beyond these is the acanthus-tree that is supple and flexible to the hand, and there are more boxwood figures and names. At the upper end is a couch of white marble covered with a vine, the latter being supported by four small pillars of Carystian marble. Jets of water flow from the couch through small pipes and look as if they were forced out by the weight of persons reclining thereon, and the water is caught in a stone cistern and then retained in a graceful marble basin, regulated by pipes out of sight, so that the basin, while always full, never overflows. The heavier dishes and plates are placed at the side of the basin when I dine there, but the lighter ones, formed into the shapes of little boats and birds, float on the surface and travel round and round. Facing this is a fountain which receives back the water it expels, for the water is thrown up to a considerable height and then falls down again, and the pipes that perform the two processes are connected. Directly opposite the couch is a bed-chamber, and each lends a grace to the other. It is formed of glistening marble, and through the projecting folding doors you pass at once among the foliage, while both from the upper and lower windows you look out upon the same green picture. Within is a little cabinet which seems to belong at once to the same and yet another bed-chamber. This contains a bed and it has windows on every side, yet the shade is so thick outside that very little light enters, for a wonderfully luxuriant vine has climbed up to the roof and covers the whole building. You can fancy you are in a grove as you lie there, only that you do not feel the rain as you do among trees. Here too a fountain rises and immediately loses itself underground. There are a number of marble chairs placed up and down, which are as restful for persons tired with walking as the bed-chamber itself. Near these chairs are little fountains, and throughout the whole riding-course you hear the murmur of tiny streams carried through pipes, which run wherever you please to direct them. These are used to water the shrubs, sometimes in one part, sometimes in another, and at other times all are watered together. I should long since have been afraid of boring you, had I not set out in this letter to take you with me round every corner of my estate. For I am not at all apprehensive that you will find it tedious to read about a place which certainly would not tire you to look at, especially as you can get a little rest whenever you desire, and can sit down, so to speak, by laying down the letter. Moreover, I have been indulging my affection for the place, for I am greatly attached to anything that is mainly the work of my own hands or that someone else has begun and I have taken up. In short - for there is no reason is there? why I should not be frank with you, whether my judgments are sound or unsound - I consider that it is the first duty of a writer to select the title of his work and constantly ask himself what he has begun to write about. He may be sure that so long as he keeps to his subject-matter he will not be tedious, but that he will bore his readers to distraction if he starts dragging in extraneous matter to make weight. Observe the length with which Homer describes the arms of Achilles, and Virgil the arms of Aeneas - yet in both cases the description seems short, because the author only carries out what he intended to. Observe how Aratus hunts up and brings together even the tiniest stars - yet he does not exceed due limits. For his description is not an excursus, but the end and aim of the whole work. It is the same with myself, if I may compare my lowly efforts with their great ones. I have been trying to give you a bird's eye view of the whole of my villa, and if I have introduced no extraneous matter and have never wandered off my subject, it is not the letter containing the description which is to be considered of excessive size, but rather the villa which has been described. However, let me get back to the point I started from, lest I give you an opportunity of justly condemning me by my own law, by not pursuing this digression any farther. I have explained to you why I prefer my Tuscan house to my other places at Tusculum, Tibur and Praeneste. For in addition to all the beauties I have described above, my repose here is more profound and more comfortable, and therefore all the freer from anxiety. There is no necessity to don the toga, no neighbour ever calls to drag me out; everything is placid and quiet; and this peace adds to the healthiness of the place, by giving it, so to speak, a purer sky and a more liquid air. I enjoy better health both in mind and body here than anywhere else, for I exercise the former by study and the latter by hunting. Besides, there is no place where my household keep in better trim, and up to the present I have not lost a single one of all whom I brought with me. I hope Heaven will forgive the boast, and that the gods will continue my happiness to me and preserve this place in all its beauty. Farewell.
55. Gellius, Attic Nights, 6.12.3, 13.22.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 33, 44
56. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Hadrian, 22.2 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 33
57. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 24.242-24.327 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 215
58. Claudianus, De Quarto Consulatu Honorii, 565-584, 586-601, 655-656, 585 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 225, 226
59. Servius, Commentary On The Aeneid, 10.538 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 54
60. Lydus Johannes Laurentius, De Mensibus, 4.29 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 44
61. Isidore of Seville, Etymologies, 19.22-19.34 (6th cent. CE - 7th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 13
62. Papyri, P.Oxy., 471  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 44
63. Claudian, De Iii Consulatu Honorii, 106-110, 523-529  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 148
64. Epigraphy, Roman Statutes, 25  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 44
65. Asconius, Ad Ciceronis Pro Scauro, 29  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 44
66. Manilius, Astronomica, 1.7, 4.932  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 211
67. Anon., Appendix Vergiliana. Ciris, 10, 18-22, 29-38, 40-41, 9, 39  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 206, 207, 211, 215
68. Epigraphy, Ils, 1757  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 44
69. Epigraphy, Cil, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 44, 182, 190
70. Pseudo-Quintilian, Minor Declamations, 340.13  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 141
71. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 2.40.2  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 34
72. Tibullus, Suplicia, 3.8, 3.16  Tagged with subjects: •dress, colour Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 198