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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
dress Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 159, 161, 162, 164, 165
Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 33, 47, 48, 49, 50, 94, 95, 110, 116, 119, 200, 209, 222, 223, 227, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 259, 285, 301
Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 87, 106, 110, 116, 117, 205, 206, 231, 240, 241
dress, african Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 257, 259, 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, 270, 271, 272, 273, 274, 280, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291
dress, and respectability, women Huebner and Laes (2019), Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae', 169
dress, armament, philosophers Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 148, 150, 154, 155, 158, 161, 640
dress, augural Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 12, 13, 33, 38, 43, 82, 83, 91, 161, 162
dress, babylonian rabbis, sages, distinctive Kalmin (1998), The Sage in Jewish Society of Late Antiquity, 8, 118
dress, barbarian Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 57
Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 37, 39, 46, 164, 232
dress, beggar’s Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 240, 243, 255
dress, boy’s Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 22, 26, 36, 47, 48, 49, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 94, 105, 141, 142, 144, 151, 152, 153, 163, 166, 174
dress, bridal Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 13, 27, 48, 63, 114, 142, 143, 156, 163, 187, 229, 230, 289, 290
dress, bride, and Rubin (2008) Time and the Life Cycle in Talmud and Midrash: Socio-Anthropological Perspectives. 105, 108
dress, censors’ Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 29, 38, 72
dress, centurions’ Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 123, 240
dress, christian Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 158, 159, 174, 175, 176, 177, 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, 270, 271, 272, 273, 280, 286
dress, citizen’s Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 37, 38, 39, 40, 44, 51, 54, 55, 56, 63, 64, 69, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 86, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 123, 142, 147, 148, 187, 191, 219, 221, 259, 264, 268, 269
dress, civic magistrates’ Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 30, 240, 286
dress, clothing van 't Westeinde (2021), Roman Nobilitas in Jerome's Letters: Roman Values and Christian Asceticism for Socialites, 77, 89, 94, 96, 100, 109, 128, 129, 140, 167
dress, coan Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 43
Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 168, 193, 194, 195, 209, 214
dress, colour Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 12, 13, 23, 27, 28, 29, 31, 32, 33, 34, 44, 53, 54, 80, 81, 99, 141, 147, 148, 182, 190, 198, 206, 207, 211, 215, 219, 225, 226, 241, 242
dress, consular Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 38, 74, 82, 83, 91, 92, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 235, 236, 237, 261
dress, curule magistrates’ Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 25, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 38, 54, 72, 80, 81, 82, 83, 108, 142, 286
dress, dining Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 23, 36
dress, dorian Papadodima (2022), Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II, 143
dress, elegiac Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201
dress, elite Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 12, 27, 29, 33, 34, 37, 38, 47, 48, 49, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 86, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 96, 97, 108, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 147, 148, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 198, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 255, 256, 259, 261, 263, 264, 266
dress, elites, and Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 220, 222, 223
dress, embroidered Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 29, 72, 77, 92, 94, 208, 210, 212, 213, 215, 218, 219, 241, 274
dress, emperor’s Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 12, 17, 24, 33, 34, 36, 37, 43, 44, 74, 84, 92, 94, 218, 219, 225, 226, 269
dress, equestrian, knight’s Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 24, 27, 29, 30, 31, 32, 38, 42, 79, 81, 90, 91, 94, 99, 108, 110, 151
dress, etymology, of terms Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 3, 562
dress, fancy Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 8
dress, female Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 12, 22, 24, 26, 38, 39, 44, 45, 53, 64, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 147, 148, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 168, 169, 170, 172, 173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 242, 249, 271, 272, 273, 274, 280, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291
dress, flavian period, literature Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 222, 223, 330, 335, 350, 351, 381, 389, 399
dress, foreign Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 25, 35, 37, 81, 164
dress, freeborn Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 47, 48, 49, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 94, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 123, 124, 125, 141, 142, 147, 148, 152, 221, 243, 264
dress, freedmen Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 30, 32, 42, 97, 108, 118, 120, 141, 153, 264, 274
dress, funerary Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 42, 71, 72, 73, 90
Seaford (2018), Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 374, 375
dress, girl’s Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 22, 26, 42, 47, 48, 53, 60, 94, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 147, 148, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 158, 162, 163, 166, 174, 182
dress, gladiatorial Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 113, 114, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134
dress, greek Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 12, 21, 22, 25, 35, 36, 43, 44, 74, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 84, 120, 130, 131, 144, 145, 154, 155, 159, 160, 161, 163, 164, 165, 170, 205, 208, 209, 210, 212, 213, 250, 259, 260, 262, 264, 265, 268, 269
Papadodima (2022), Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II, 143
dress, groom’s Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 156
dress, himation Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 15, 162
dress, himation and chiton Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 137
dress, himation only Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 162
dress, hunting Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 74, 77, 154, 290
dress, imperial Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 94, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 235, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 255, 256, 257, 259, 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, 270, 271, 272, 273, 274, 280, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291
dress, islamic Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 158, 269
dress, julio-claudian period, authors Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 221, 329, 342, 343, 344, 362, 399, 553
dress, labor, and Richlin (2018), Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy, 187, 275
dress, leisure Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 81, 82, 103
dress, long robes Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 105, 106
dress, luxury Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 27, 32, 33, 35, 36, 184, 188, 193, 194, 195, 198, 219, 222, 224, 243, 290
dress, masculine Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 12, 13, 17, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 86, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 235, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 255, 256, 257, 259, 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, 270, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291
dress, matron’s, veste maritali Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 24, 27, 38, 41, 45, 156, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 168, 169, 170, 199, 200, 240, 272, 286
dress, military Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 19, 44, 137, 162
Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 12, 22, 25, 28, 29, 34, 74, 77, 78, 79, 81, 83, 88, 89, 116, 119, 247, 249, 264, 268, 269
dress, mourning Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 13, 27, 29, 30, 31, 42, 44, 82, 94, 160, 162, 166, 249, 252, 273, 288
dress, non-citizen’s Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 23, 24, 25, 32
dress, non-elites Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 221
dress, non-elites, and Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 221
dress, of hierophant Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 95, 334
dress, orator’s Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 23, 44, 56, 65, 94, 109, 177, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 255, 256, 264
dress, ordinary Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 23, 32, 46, 54, 66, 69, 81, 94, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 123, 181, 219, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 255, 256, 273, 274
dress, oriental Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 36, 37, 156, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201
dress, patrician Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 13, 27, 28, 43, 45, 46
dress, persian Papadodima (2022), Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II, 140, 143
dress, philosopher’s Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 73, 74, 77, 82, 88, 89, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 255, 256, 259, 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, 270
dress, phrygian Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 38
dress, plebeian Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 27, 35, 43
dress, prostitutes Huebner and Laes (2019), Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae', 169
dress, public ceremonial Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 86, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 108, 113, 130, 131, 141, 145, 151, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 168, 169, 170, 173, 184, 200, 213, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 235, 236, 237
dress, religious Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 12, 23, 39, 43, 44, 47, 48, 49, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 83, 86, 88, 145, 156, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 168, 169, 170, 177, 184, 185, 186, 240, 241, 263, 272, 273, 288
dress, republican Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 22, 28, 32, 33, 34, 48, 56, 71, 72, 73, 79, 117, 151, 183, 219, 221, 235
dress, roman Bruun and Edmondson (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, 408
dress, royal Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 25, 26, 28, 30, 43, 84, 219, 220, 221
dress, senatorial Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 33, 35, 43, 61, 191
dress, slave’s Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 17, 27, 30, 32, 45, 54, 102, 103, 104, 105, 122, 145, 148, 153, 168, 222, 223, 240, 241, 242, 261, 262, 264, 268
dress, soldier’s Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 25, 116, 117, 119, 120, 165, 174, 187, 232, 247, 264
dress, studies Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 12, 13, 17
dress, tertullian of carthage Cain (2023), Mirrors of the Divine: Late Ancient Christianity and the Vision of God, 45
dress, toga Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 57, 162
dress, triumphal Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 25, 28, 29, 34, 35, 37, 38, 43, 72, 80, 83, 90, 91, 92, 94, 98, 109, 218, 219, 224, 225, 232, 249
dress, vase paintings, sympotic Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 105
dress, wedding Seaford (2018), Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays, 263, 269
dress, widow’s Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 13, 27
dress, women’s Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 235, 236
dress, working Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 12, 39, 46, 100, 103, 105, 186, 241, 252, 253
dress/robe, stola Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 301, 302, 303, 304, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 322, 323, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 336, 337, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 346, 347, 348, 350, 351, 353, 354, 368
dressed, aphrodite, nude versus Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 265, 267, 268, 280
dressed, as, isia, queen Bricault et al. (2007), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 372
dressed, in lionskin of heracles, artemis Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 194
dressed, like matron and carried in sedan-chair, bear Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 8, 177, 352
dressed, the temple Hellholm et al. (2010), Ablution, Initiation, and Baptism: Late Antiquity, Early Judaism, and Early Christianity, 245
dressing, and dionysus, cross Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 439
dressing, as men, women Dilley (2019), Monasteries and the Care of Souls in Late Antique Christianity: Cognition and Discipline, 244, 245
dressing, at oschophoria, cross Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 173, 209, 213
dressing, by booners, cross Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 323, 324
dressing, initiatory?, cross Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 209
dressing, texts, god Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 105, 106, 108, 127
dressing, thecla, hairstyle and Kraemer (2010), Unreliable Witnesses: Religion, Gender, and History in the Greco-Roman Mediterranean, 136, 137

List of validated texts:
34 validated results for "dress"
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.289 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dress • dress, masculine

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 216; Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 106

sup>
6.289 ἔνθʼ ἔσάν οἱ πέπλοι παμποίκιλα ἔργα γυναικῶν'' None
sup>
6.289 then might I deem that my heart had forgotten its woe. So spake he, and she went to the hall and called to her handmaidens; and they gathered together the aged wives throughout the city. But the queen herself went down to the vaulted treasurechamber wherein were her robes, richly broidered, the handiwork of Sidonian women, '' None
2. Euripides, Bacchae, 821, 833, 935-936, 957-958 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • funerary dress • stola (dress/robe) • transvestism and cross-dressing, in ephebic rituals • transvestism and cross-dressing, of Pentheus • transvestism and cross-dressing, of Thoas by Hypsipyle

 Found in books: Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 155, 257; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 306; Seaford (2018), Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays, 374, 375

sup>
821 στεῖλαί νυν ἀμφὶ χρωτὶ βυσσίνους πέπλους. Πενθεύς833 πέπλοι ποδήρεις· ἐπὶ κάρᾳ δʼ ἔσται μίτρα. Πενθεύς
935
ζῶναί τέ σοι χαλῶσι κοὐχ ἑξῆς πέπλων 936 στολίδες ὑπὸ σφυροῖσι τείνουσιν σέθεν. Πενθεύς
957
καὶ μὴν δοκῶ σφᾶς ἐν λόχμαις ὄρνιθας ὣς 958 λέκτρων ἔχεσθαι φιλτάτοις ἐν ἕρκεσιν. Διόνυσος ' None
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821 Put linen clothes on your body then. Pentheu833 A robe down to your feet. And you will wear a headband. Pentheu
935
Your girdle has come loose, and the pleats of your gown do not extend regularly down around your ankles. Pentheu
957
Oh, yes! I imagine that like birds they are in the bushes held in the sweetest grips of love. Dionysu ' None
3. Xenophon, The Education of Cyrus, 8.8.15, 8.8.20 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dress

 Found in books: Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 241, 244; Fabre-Serris et al. (2021), Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity, 37

sup>
8.8.15 ἀλλὰ μὴν καὶ θρυπτικώτεροι πολὺ νῦν ἢ ἐπὶ Κύρου εἰσί. τότε μὲν γὰρ ἔτι τῇ ἐκ Περσῶν παιδείᾳ καὶ ἐγκρατείᾳ ἐχρῶντο, τῇ δὲ Μήδων στολῇ καὶ ἁβρότητι· νῦν δὲ τὴν μὲν ἐκ Περσῶν καρτερίαν περιορῶσιν ἀποσβεννυμένην, τὴν δὲ τῶν Μήδων μαλακίαν διασῴζονται.
8.8.20
τά γε μὴν πολεμικὰ πῶς οὐκ εἰκότως νῦν τῷ παντὶ χείρους ἢ πρόσθεν εἰσίν; οἷς ἐν μὲν τῷ παρελθόντι χρόνῳ ἐπιχώριον εἶναι ὑπῆρχε τοὺς μὲν τὴν γῆν ἔχοντας ἀπὸ ταύτης ἱππότας παρέχεσθαι, οἳ δὴ καὶ ἐστρατεύοντο εἰ δέοι στρατεύεσθαι, τοὺς δὲ φρουροῦντας πρὸ τῆς χώρας μισθοφόρους εἶναι· νῦν δὲ τούς τε θυρωροὺς καὶ τοὺς σιτοποιοὺς καὶ τοὺς ὀψοποιοὺς καὶ οἰνοχόους καὶ λουτροχόους καὶ παρατιθέντας καὶ ἀναιροῦντας καὶ κατακοιμίζοντας καὶ ἀνιστάντας, καὶ τοὺς κοσμητάς, οἳ ὑποχρίουσί τε καὶ ἐντρίβουσιν αὐτοὺς καὶ τἆλλα ῥυθμίζουσι, τούτους πάντας ἱππέας οἱ δυνάσται πεποιήκασιν, ὅπως μισθοφορῶσιν αὐτοῖς.'' None
sup>
8.8.15 Furthermore, they are much more effeminate now than they were in Cyrus’s day. For at that time they still adhered to the old discipline and the old abstinence that they received from the Persians, but adopted the Median garb and Median luxury; now, on the contrary, they are allowing the rigour of the Persians to die out, while they keep up the effeminacy of the Medes.
8.8.20
'' None
4. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Etymology (of dress terms) • dress, Christian • dress, boy’s • dress, bridal • dress, citizen’s • dress, curule magistrates’ • dress, elite • dress, equestrian (knight’s) • dress, female • dress, freeborn • dress, freedmen • dress, funerary • dress, girl’s • dress, imperial • dress, masculine • dress, mourning • dress, orator’s • dress, ordinary • dress, public ceremonial • dress, religious • dress, republican

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 42, 142, 151, 152, 177, 181; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 562

5. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.31-1.32, 2.258, 3.210 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Flavian period (literature, dress) • dress, bridal • dress, citizen’s • dress, colour • dress, elite • dress, emperor’s • dress, equestrian (knight’s) • dress, female • dress, girl’s • dress, groom’s • dress, imperial • dress, masculine • dress, matron’s (veste maritali) • dress, non-citizen’s • dress, oriental • dress, public ceremonial • dress, religious • stola (dress/robe)

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 24, 41, 156, 169, 190; Elsner (2007), Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text, 218; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 222, 301, 309, 334

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1.31 Este procul, vittae tenues, insigne pudoris, 1.32 rend=
2.258
rend=
3.210
rend='' None
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1.31 Nor Clio , nor her sisters, have I seen,' "1.32 As Hesiod saw them on the shady green: Ovid names Clio only, of all the nine, in this place. The fable tells us, she and her sisters were born of Jupiter 's caresses of Mnemosyne, that is, memory." "
2.258
If she's at law, be sure commend the laws;" 3.210 The losses they sustain by various ways.'' None
6. Ovid, Fasti, 4.133-4.134 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dress, female • dress, luxury • dress, matron’s (veste maritali) • dress, public ceremonial • dress, religious • stola (dress/robe)

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 169, 184; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 301, 334

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4.133 Rite deam colitis Latiae matresque nurusque 4.134 et vos, quis vittae longaque vestis abest.'' None
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4.133 Perform the rites of the goddess, Roman brides and mothers, 4.134 And you who must not wear the headbands and long robes.'' None
7. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 8.744 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dress, Greek • dress, Phrygian • dress, female • dress, matron’s (veste maritali) • dress, public ceremonial • dress, religious

 Found in books: Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 38; Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 170

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8.744 una nemus; vittae mediam memoresque tabellae'' None
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8.744 in the great fame of his victorious son,'' None
8. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Flavian period (literature, dress) • dress, Coan • dress, elegiac • dress, female • dress, luxury • dress, oriental

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 195; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 222

9. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dress, citizen’s • dress, emperor’s • dress, equestrian (knight’s) • dress, female • dress, imperial • dress, masculine • dress, matron’s (veste maritali) • dress, non-citizen’s • dress, public ceremonial • dress, religious • stola (dress/robe)

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 24, 41, 169; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 308, 334, 339

10. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Flavian period (literature, dress) • dress, Greek • dress, citizen’s • dress, colour • dress, emperor’s • dress, female • dress, imperial • dress, masculine • dress, mourning • dress, orator’s • dress, public ceremonial • dress, religious • stola (dress/robe)

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 44; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 222, 301, 338

11. Lucan, Pharsalia, 2.363-2.364 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Flavian period (literature, dress) • dress, boy’s • dress, bridal • dress, elite • dress, female • dress, freedmen • dress, girl’s • dress, slave’s • stola (dress/robe)

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 143, 153; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 222, 319

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2.363 Shall give Hesperia peace and end her toils. Who then will reign shall find no need for war. You ask, \'Why follow Magnus? If he wins He too will claim the Empire of the world.\' Then let him, conquering with my service, learn Not for himself to conquer." Thus he spoke And stirred the blood that ran in Brutus\' veins Moving the youth to action in the war. Soon as the sun dispelled the chilly night, The sounding doors flew wide, and from the tomb 2.364 Shall give Hesperia peace and end her toils. Who then will reign shall find no need for war. You ask, \'Why follow Magnus? If he wins He too will claim the Empire of the world.\' Then let him, conquering with my service, learn Not for himself to conquer." Thus he spoke And stirred the blood that ran in Brutus\' veins Moving the youth to action in the war. Soon as the sun dispelled the chilly night, The sounding doors flew wide, and from the tomb '' None
12. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 11.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Thecla, hairstyle and dressing • dress, Christian • dress, Greek • dress, Islamic • dress, female • dress, girl’s • dress, matron’s (veste maritali) • dress, public ceremonial • dress, religious

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 158, 159; Kraemer (2010), Unreliable Witnesses: Religion, Gender, and History in the Greco-Roman Mediterranean, 136

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11.6 εἰ γὰρ οὐ κατακαλύπτεται γυνή, καὶ κειράσθω· εἰ δὲ αἰσχρὸν γυναικὶ τὸ κείρασθαι ἢ ξυρᾶσθαι, κατακαλυπτέσθω.'' None
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11.6 For if a woman is not covered, let her also be shorn.But if it is shameful for a woman to be shorn or shaved, let her becovered.'' None
13. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 11.3.138 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Flavian period (literature, dress) • dress, Greek • dress, boy’s • dress, centurions’ • dress, citizen’s • dress, elite • dress, embroidered • dress, emperor’s • dress, equestrian (knight’s) • dress, female • dress, foreign • dress, freeborn • dress, girl’s • dress, gladiatorial • dress, imperial • dress, luxury • dress, masculine • dress, matron’s (veste maritali) • dress, military • dress, mourning • dress, orator’s • dress, ordinary • dress, philosopher’s • dress, plebeian • dress, public ceremonial • dress, senatorial • dress, triumphal

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 35, 41, 94, 123, 249; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 223

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11.3.138 \xa0Consequently it follows that in view of the fact that their arms were, like those of the Greeks, covered by the garment, they must have employed a different form of gesture in the exordium from that which is now in use. However, I\xa0am speaking of our own day. The speaker who has not the right to wear the broad stripe, will wear his girdle in such a way that the front edges of the tunic fall a little below his knees, while the edges in rear reach to the middle of his hams. For only women draw them lower and only centurions higher.'' None
14. Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria, 11.3.138-11.3.139 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Flavian period (literature, dress) • Nero,, dress • dress, Greek • dress, boy’s • dress, centurions’ • dress, citizen’s • dress, elite • dress, embroidered • dress, emperor’s • dress, equestrian (knight’s) • dress, female • dress, foreign • dress, freeborn • dress, girl’s • dress, gladiatorial • dress, imperial • dress, luxury • dress, masculine • dress, matron’s (veste maritali) • dress, military • dress, mourning • dress, orator’s • dress, ordinary • dress, philosopher’s • dress, plebeian • dress, public ceremonial • dress, senatorial • dress, triumphal • senators absences,, dress

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 35, 41, 94, 123, 249; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 223; Talbert (1984), The Senate of Imperial Rome, 217

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11.3.138 \xa0Consequently it follows that in view of the fact that their arms were, like those of the Greeks, covered by the garment, they must have employed a different form of gesture in the exordium from that which is now in use. However, I\xa0am speaking of our own day. The speaker who has not the right to wear the broad stripe, will wear his girdle in such a way that the front edges of the tunic fall a little below his knees, while the edges in rear reach to the middle of his hams. For only women draw them lower and only centurions higher. 11.3.139 \xa0If we wear the purple stripe, it requires but little care to see that it falls becomingly; negligence in this respect sometimes excites criticism. Among those who wear the broad stripe, it is the fashion to let it hang somewhat lower than in garments that are retained by the girdle. The toga itself should, in my opinion, be round, and cut to fit, otherwise there are a\xa0number of ways in which it may be unshapely. Its front edge should by preference reach to the middle of the shin, while the back should be higher in proportion as the girdle is higher behind than in front.'' None
15. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 114.4, 114.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Flavian period (literature, dress) • dress • dress, female • dress, imperial • dress, masculine • dress, matron’s (veste maritali) • dress, patrician • dress, public ceremonial • dress, slave’s

 Found in books: Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 244; Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 45; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 222

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114.4 How Maecenas lived is too well-known for present comment. We know how he walked, how effeminate he was, and how he desired to display himself; also, how unwilling he was that his vices should escape notice. What, then? Does not the looseness of his speech match his ungirt attire?3 Are his habits, his attendants, his house, his wife,4 any less clearly marked than his words? He would have been a man of great powers, had he set himself to his task by a straight path, had he not shrunk from making himself understood, had he not been so loose in his style of speech also. You will therefore see that his eloquence was that of an intoxicated man – twisting, turning, unlimited in its slackness.
114.4
If one might behold such a face, more exalted and more radiant than the mortal eye is wont to behold, would not one pause as if struck dumb by a visitation from above, and utter a silent prayer, saying: "May it be lawful to have looked upon it!"? And then, led on by the encouraging kindliness of his expression, should we not bow down and worship? Should we not, after much contemplation of a far superior countece, surpassing those which we are wont to look upon, mild-eyed and yet flashing with life-giving fire – should we not then, I say, in reverence and awe, give utterance to those famous lines of our poet Vergil: ' "
114.21
You note this tendency in those who pluck out, or thin out, their beards, or who closely shear and shave the upper lip while preserving the rest of the hair and allowing it to grow, or in those who wear cloaks of outlandish colours, who wear transparent togas, and who never deign to do anything which will escape general notice; they endeavour to excite and attract men's attention, and they put up even with censure, provided that they can advertise themselves. That is the style of Maecenas and all the others who stray from the path, not by hazard, but consciously and voluntarily. "' None
16. Suetonius, Caligula, 52 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Flavian period (literature, dress) • dress • dress, Greek • dress, barbarian • dress, boy’s • dress, citizen’s • dress, colour • dress, dining • dress, elite • dress, emperor’s • dress, female • dress, foreign • dress, girl’s • dress, imperial • dress, luxury • dress, masculine • dress, matron’s (veste maritali) • dress, military • dress, oriental • dress, patrician • dress, public ceremonial • dress, republican • dress, slave’s • dress, triumphal

 Found in books: Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 233, 240, 242; Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 22, 34, 36, 37, 45; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 223

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52 In his clothing, his shoes, and the rest of his attire he did not follow the usage of his country and his fellow-citizens; not always even that of his sex; or in fact, that of an ordinary mortal. He often appeared in public in embroidered cloaks covered with precious stones, with a long-sleeved tunic and bracelets; sometimes in silk and in a woman's robe; now in slippers or buskins, again in boots, such as the emperor's body-guard wear, and at times in the low shoes which are used by females. But oftentimes he exhibited himself with a golden beard, holding in his hand a thunderbolt, a trident, or a caduceus, emblems of the gods, and even in the garb of Venus. He frequently wore the dress of a triumphing general, even before his campaign, and sometimes the breastplate of Alexander the Great, which he had taken from his sarcophagus."" None
17. Suetonius, Nero, 51 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dress • dress, Greek • dress, boy’s • dress, dining • dress, emperor’s • dress, female • dress, imperial • dress, luxury • dress, masculine • dress, matron’s (veste maritali) • dress, oriental • dress, patrician • dress, public ceremonial • dress, slave’s

 Found in books: Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 159; Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 36, 45

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51 He was about the average height, his body marked with spots and malodorous, his hair light blond, his features regular rather than attractive, his eyes blue and somewhat weak, his neck over thick, his belly prominent, and his legs very slender. His health was good, for though indulging in every kind of riotous excess, he was ill but three times in all during the fourteen years of his reign, and even then not enough to give up wine or any of his usual habits. He was utterly shameless in the care of his person and in his dress, always having his hair arranged in tiers of curls, and during the trip to Greece also letting it grow long and hang down behind; and he often appeared in public in a dining-robe, with a handkerchief bound about his neck, ungirt and unshod.'' None
18. Suetonius, Otho, 12.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dress • dress, female • dress, luxury

 Found in books: Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 231; Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 188

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12.1 \xa0Neither Otho's person nor his bearing suggested such great courage. He is said to have been of moderate height, splay-footed and bandy-legged, but almost feminine in his care of his person. He had the hair of his body plucked out, and because of the thinness of his locks wore a wig so carefully fashioned and fitted to his head, that no one suspected it. Moreover, they say that he used to shave every day and smear his face with moist bread, beginning the practice with the appearance of the first down, so as never to have a beard; also that he used to celebrate the rites of Isis publicly in the linen garment prescribed by the cult."" None
19. Tacitus, Annals, 2.33, 14.12-14.13 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • aedile,, dress • dress • dress, citizen’s • dress, colour • dress, equestrian (knight’s) • dress, freedmen • dress, imperial • dress, luxury • dress, masculine • dress, non-citizen’s • dress, ordinary • dress, public ceremonial • dress, republican • dress, slave’s • dress,, order of speeches • dress,, supplicatio • magistrates (in senate) absence,, dress • senators absences,, dress

 Found in books: Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 209; Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 32; Talbert (1984), The Senate of Imperial Rome, 218, 247, 389

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2.33 Proximo senatus die multa in luxum civitatis dicta a Q. Haterio consulari, Octavio Frontone praetura functo; decretumque ne vasa auro solida ministrandis cibis fierent, ne vestis serica viros foedaret. excessit Fronto ac postulavit modum argento, supellectili, familiae: erat quippe adhuc frequens senatoribus, si quid e re publica crederent, loco sententiae promere. contra Gallus Asinius disseruit: auctu imperii adolevisse etiam privatas opes, idque non novum, sed e vetustissimis moribus: aliam apud Fabricios, aliam apud Scipiones pecuniam; et cuncta ad rem publicam referri, qua tenui angustas civium domos, postquam eo magnificentiae venerit, gliscere singulos. neque in familia et argento quaeque ad usum parentur nimium aliquid aut modicum nisi ex fortuna possidentis. distinctos senatus et equitum census, non quia diversi natura, sed ut locis ordi- nibus dignationibus antistent, ita iis quae ad requiem animi aut salubritatem corporum parentur, nisi forte clarissimo cuique pluris curas, maiora pericula subeunda, delenimentis curarum et periculorum carendum esse. facilem adsensum Gallo sub nominibus honestis confessio vitiorum et similitudo audientium dedit. adiecerat et Tiberius non id tempus censurae nec, si quid in moribus labaret, defuturum corrigendi auctorem.
14.12
Miro tamen certamine procerum decernuntur supplicationes apud omnia pulvinaria, utque Quinquatrus quibus apertae insidiae essent ludis annuis celebrarentur; aureum Minervae simulacrum in curia et iuxta principis imago statuerentur; dies natalis Agrippinae inter nefastos esset. Thrasea Paetus silentio vel brevi adsensu priores adulationes transmittere solitus exiit tum senatu ac sibi causam periculi fecit, ceteris libertatis initium non praebuit. prodigia quoque crebra et inrita intercessere: anguem enixa mulier et alia in concubitu mariti fulmine exanimata; iam sol repente obscu- ratus et tactae de caelo quattuordecim urbis regiones. quae adeo sine cura deum eveniebant ut multos post annos Nero imperium et scelera continuaverit. ceterum quo gravaret invidiam matris eaque demota auctam lenitatem suam testificaretur, feminas inlustris Iuniam et Calpurniam, praetura functos Valerium Capitonem et Licinium Gabolum sedibus patriis reddidit, ab Agrippina olim pulsos. etiam Lolliae Paulinae cineres reportari sepulcrumque extrui permisit; quosque ipse nuper relegaverat, Iturium et Calvisium poena exolvit. nam Silana fato functa erat, longinquo ab exilio Tarentum regressa labante iam Agrippina, cuius inimicitiis conciderat, vel mitigata. 14.13 Tamen cunctari in oppidis Campaniae, quonam modo urbem ingrederetur, an obsequium senatus, an studia plebis reperiret anxius: contra deterrimus quisque, quorum non alia regia fecundior extitit, invisum Agrippinae nomen et morte eius accensum populi favorem disserunt: iret intrepidus et venerationem sui coram experiretur; simul praegredi exposcunt. et promptiora quam promiserant inveniunt, obvias tribus, festo cultu senatum, coniugum ac liberorum agmina per sexum et aetatem disposita, extructos, qua incederet, spectaculorum gradus, quo modo triumphi visuntur. hinc superbus ac publici servitii victor Capitolium adiit, grates exolvit seque in omnis libidines effudit quas male coercitas qualiscumque matris reverentia tardaverat.'' None
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2.33 \xa0At the next session, the ex-consul, Quintus Haterius, and Octavius Fronto, a former praetor, spoke at length against the national extravagance; and it was resolved that table-plate should not be manufactured in solid gold, and that Oriental silks should no longer degrade the male sex. Fronto went further, and pressed for a statutory limit to silver, furniture, and domestics: for it was still usual for a member to precede his vote by mooting any point which he considered to be in the public interest. Asinius Gallus opposed:â\x80\x94 "With the expansion of the empire, private fortunes had also grown; nor was this new, but consot with extremely ancient custom. Wealth was one thing with the Fabricii, another with the Scipios; and all was relative to the state. When the state was poor, you had frugality and cottages: when it attained a pitch of splendour such as the present, the individual also throve. In slaves or plate or anything procured for use there was neither excess nor moderation except with reference to the means of the owner. Senators and knights had a special property qualification, not because they differed in kind from their fellow-men, but in order that those who enjoyed precedence in place, rank, and dignity should enjoy it also in the easements that make for mental peace and physical well-being. And justly so â\x80\x94 unless your distinguished men, while saddled with more responsibilities and greater dangers, were to be deprived of the relaxations compensating those responsibilities and those dangers." â\x80\x94 With his virtuously phrased confession of vice, Gallus easily carried with him that audience of congenial spirits. Tiberius, too, had added that it was not the time for a censor­ship, and that, if there was any loosening of the national morality, a reformer would be forthcoming.' "
2.33
\xa0At the next session, the ex-consul, Quintus Haterius, and Octavius Fronto, a former praetor, spoke at length against the national extravagance; and it was resolved that table-plate should not be manufactured in solid gold, and that Oriental silks should no longer degrade the male sex. Fronto went further, and pressed for a statutory limit to silver, furniture, and domestics: for it was still usual for a member to precede his vote by mooting any point which he considered to be in the public interest. Asinius Gallus opposed:â\x80\x94 "With the expansion of the empire, private fortunes had also grown; nor was this new, but consot with extremely ancient custom. Wealth was one thing with the Fabricii, another with the Scipios; and all was relative to the state. When the state was poor, you had frugality and cottages: when it attained a pitch of splendour such as the present, the individual also throve. In slaves or plate or anything procured for use there was neither excess nor moderation except with reference to the means of the owner. Senators and knights had a special property qualification, not because they differed in kind from their fellow-men, but in order that those who enjoyed precedence in place, rank, and dignity should enjoy it also in the easements that make for mental peace and physical well-being. And justly so â\x80\x94 unless your distinguished men, while saddled with more responsibilities and greater dangers, were to be deprived of the relaxations compensating those responsibilities and those dangers." â\x80\x94 With his virtuously phrased confession of vice, Gallus easily carried with him that audience of congenial spirits. Tiberius, too, had added that it was not the time for a censorship, and that, if there was any loosening of the national morality, a reformer would be forthcoming. <
14.12
\xa0However, with a notable spirit of emulation among the magnates, decrees were drawn up: thanksgivings were to be held at all appropriate shrines; the festival of Minerva, on which the conspiracy had been brought to light, was to be celebrated with annual games; a\xa0golden statue of the goddess, with an effigy of the emperor by her side, was to be erected in the curia, and Agrippina's birthday included among the inauspicious dates. Earlier sycophancies Thrasea Paetus had usually allowed to pass, either in silence or with a curt assent: this time he walked out of the senate, creating a source of danger for himself, but implanting no germ of independence in his colleagues. Portents, also, frequent and futile made their appearance: a\xa0woman gave birth to a serpent, another was killed by a thunderbolt in the embraces of her husband; the sun, again, was suddenly obscured, and the fourteen regions of the capital were struck by lightning â\x80\x94 events which so little marked the concern of the gods that Nero continued for years to come his empire and his crimes. However, to aggravate the feeling against his mother, and to furnish evidence that his own mildness had increased with her removal, he restored to their native soil two women of high rank, Junia and Calpurnia, along with the ex-praetors Valerius Capito and Licinius Gabolus â\x80\x94 all of them formerly banished by Agrippina. He sanctioned the return, even, of the ashes of Lollia Paulina, and the erection of a tomb: Iturius and Calvisius, whom he had himself relegated some little while before, he now released from the penalty. As to Silana, she had died a natural death at Tarentum, to which she had retraced her way, when Agrippina, by whose enmity she had fallen, was beginning to totter or to relent. <" "
14.12
\xa0However, with a notable spirit of emulation among the magnates, decrees were drawn up: thanksgivings were to be held at all appropriate shrines; the festival of Minerva, on which the conspiracy had been brought to light, was to be celebrated with annual games; a\xa0golden statue of the goddess, with an effigy of the emperor by her side, was to be erected in the curia, and Agrippina's birthday included among the inauspicious dates. Earlier sycophancies Thrasea Paetus had usually allowed to pass, either in silence or with a curt assent: this time he walked out of the senate, creating a source of danger for himself, but implanting no germ of independence in his colleagues. Portents, also, frequent and futile made their appearance: a\xa0woman gave birth to a serpent, another was killed by a thunderbolt in the embraces of her husband; the sun, again, was suddenly obscured, and the fourteen regions of the capital were struck by lightning â\x80\x94 events which so little marked the concern of the gods that Nero continued for years to come his empire and his crimes. However, to aggravate the feeling against his mother, and to furnish evidence that his own mildness had increased with her removal, he restored to their native soil two women of high rank, Junia and Calpurnia, along with the ex-praetors Valerius Capito and Licinius Gabolus â\x80\x94 all of them formerly banished by Agrippina. He sanctioned the return, even, of the ashes of Lollia Paulina, and the erection of a tomb: Iturius and Calvisius, whom he had himself relegated some little while before, he now released from the penalty. As to Silana, she had died a natural death at Tarentum, to which she had retraced her way, when Agrippina, by whose enmity she had fallen, was beginning to totter or to relent." '14.13 \xa0And yet he dallied in the towns of Campania, anxious and doubtful how to make his entry into Rome. Would he find obedience in the senate? enthusiasm in the crowd? Against his timidity it was urged by every reprobate â\x80\x94 and a court more prolific of reprobates the world has not seen â\x80\x94 that the name of Agrippina was abhorred and that her death had won him the applause of the nation. Let him go without a qualm and experience on the spot the veneration felt for his position! At the same time, they demanded leave to precede him. They found, indeed, an alacrity which surpassed their promises: the tribes on the way to meet him; the senate in festal dress; troops of wives and of children disposed according to their sex and years, while along his route rose tiers of seats of the type used for viewing a triumph. Then, flushed with pride, victor over the national servility, he made his way to the Capitol, paid his grateful vows, and abandoned himself to all the vices, till now retarded, though scarcely repressed, by some sort of deference to his mother. < 14.13 \xa0And yet he dallied in the towns of Campania, anxious and doubtful how to make his entry into Rome. Would he find obedience in the senate? enthusiasm in the crowd? Against his timidity it was urged by every reprobate â\x80\x94 and a court more prolific of reprobates the world has not seen â\x80\x94 that the name of Agrippina was abhorred and that her death had won him the applause of the nation. Let him go without a qualm and experience on the spot the veneration felt for his position! At the same time, they demanded leave to precede him. They found, indeed, an alacrity which surpassed their promises: the tribes on the way to meet him; the senate in festal dress; troops of wives and of children disposed according to their sex and years, while along his route rose tiers of seats of the type used for viewing a triumph. Then, flushed with pride, victor over the national servility, he made his way to the Capitol, paid his grateful vows, and abandoned himself to all the vices, till now retarded, though scarcely repressed, by some sort of deference to his mother.'' None
20. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dress, Greek • dress, augural • dress, citizen’s • dress, colour • dress, curule magistrates’ • dress, dining • dress, elite • dress, emperor’s • dress, equestrian (knight’s) • dress, female • dress, freeborn • dress, freedmen • dress, girl’s • dress, imperial • dress, luxury • dress, masculine • dress, non-citizen’s • dress, orator’s • dress, ordinary • dress, public ceremonial • dress, religious • dress, republican • dress, senatorial • dress, slave’s • stola (dress/robe)

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 23, 32, 33, 108, 145; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 353

21. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dress, Greek • dress, barbarian • dress, gladiatorial • dress, masculine • dress, public ceremonial • dress, toga

 Found in books: Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 57; Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 130

22. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Flavian period (literature, dress) • dress, Greek • dress, barbarian • dress, citizen’s • dress, elite • dress, female • dress, freeborn • dress, gladiatorial • dress, imperial • dress, masculine • dress, ordinary • dress, public ceremonial • dress, religious • dress, working • stola (dress/robe)

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 39, 96, 130; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 223, 354, 381

23. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Flavian period (literature, dress) • dress, elegiac • dress, female • dress, oriental

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 201; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 223

24. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dress, clothing • dress, female • dress, luxury

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 188; van 't Westeinde (2021), Roman Nobilitas in Jerome's Letters: Roman Values and Christian Asceticism for Socialites, 96

25. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • cross dressing • dress, boy’s • dress, elite • dress, freeborn • dress, masculine • dress, public ceremonial • dress, religious

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 67; Stephens and Winkler (1995), Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary, 359

26. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Flavian period (literature, dress) • dress, elegiac • dress, female • dress, oriental

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 201; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 389

27. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 57.15.1, 59.26.6-59.26.10, 72.21.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • aedile,, dress • dress • dress, citizen’s • dress, civic magistrates’ • dress, colour • dress, curule magistrates’ • dress, equestrian (knight’s) • dress, female • dress, freedmen • dress, imperial • dress, luxury • dress, masculine • dress, matron’s (veste maritali) • dress, mourning • dress, non-citizen’s • dress, ordinary • dress, patrician • dress, public ceremonial • dress, republican • dress, royal • dress, senatorial • dress, slave’s • magistrates (in senate) absence,, dress • senators absences,, dress

 Found in books: Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 231, 238, 242; Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 30, 32, 45; Talbert (1984), The Senate of Imperial Rome, 218

sup>
57.15.1 \xa0These were the events of that year. In the consulship of Statilius Taurus and Lucius Libo, Tiberius forbade any man to wear silk clothing and also forbade anyone to use golden vessels except for sacred ceremonies.
59.26.6
\xa0because he had bridged so great an expanse of sea; he also impersonated Hercules, Bacchus, Apollo, and all the other divinities, not merely males but also females, often taking the rôle of Juno, Diana, or Venus. Indeed, to match the change of name he would assume all the rest of the attributes that belonged to the various gods, so that he might seem really to resemble them. 59.26.7 \xa0Now he would be seen as a woman, holding a wine-bowl and (Opens in another window)\')" onMouseOut="nd();" thyrsus, and again he would appear as a man equipped with a club and lion\'s skin or perhaps a helmet and shield. He would be seen at one time with a smooth chin and later with a full beard. Sometimes he wielded a trident and again he brandished a thunderbolt. Now he would impersonate a maiden equipped for hunting or for war, and a little later would play the married woman. 59.26.8 \xa0Thus by varying the style of his dress, and by the use of accessories and wigs, he achieved accuracy inasmuch diverse parts; and he was eager to appear to be anything rather than a human being and an emperor. Once a Gaul, seeing him uttering oracles from a lofty platform in the guise of Jupiter, was moved to laughter, 59.26.9 \xa0whereupon Gaius summoned him and inquired, "What do\xa0I seem to you to be?" And the other answered (I\xa0give his exact words):"A\xa0big humbug." Yet the man met with no harm, for he was only a shoemaker. Thus it is, apparently, that persons of such rank as Gaius can bear the frankness of the common herd more easily than that of those who hold high position. 59.26.10 \xa0The attire, now, that I\xa0have described was what he would assume whenever he pretended to be a god; and suitable supplications, prayers, and sacrifices would then be offered to him. At other times he usually appeared in public in silk or in triumphal dress.' ' None
28. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 4.11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Flavian period (literature, dress) • dress, imperial • dress, masculine • dress, matron’s (veste maritali) • dress, public ceremonial

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 41; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 223

sup>
4.11 To Cornelius Minicianus. Have you heard that Valerius Licinianus is teaching rhetoric in Sicily? I do not think you can have done, for the news is quite fresh. He is of praetorian rank, and he used at one time to be considered one of our most eloquent pleaders at the bar, but now he has fallen so low that he is an exile instead of being a senator, and a mere teacher of rhetoric instead of being a prominent advocate. Consequently in his opening remarks he exclaimed, sorrowfully and solemnly You will say that this is all very sad and pitiful, but that a man who defiled his profession of letters by the guilt of incest deserves to suffer. It is true that he confessed his guilt, but it is an open question whether he did so because he was guilty or because he feared an even heavier punishment if he denied it. For Domitian was in a great rage and was boiling over with fury because his witnesses had left him in the lurch. His mind was set upon burying alive Cornelia, the chief of the Vestal Virgins, as he thought to make his age memorable by such an example of severity, and, using his authority as pontifex maximus, or rather exercising the cruelty of a tyrant and the wanton caprice of a ruler, he summoned the rest of the pontiffs not to the Palace but to his Villa at Alba. There, with a wickedness just as monstrous as the crime which he pretended to be punishing, he declared her guilty of incest, without summoning her before him and giving her a hearing, though he himself had not only committed incest with his brother\'s daughter but had even caused her death, for she died of abortion during her widowhood. He immediately despatched some of the pontiffs to see that his victim was buried alive and put to death. Cornelia invoked in turns the aid of Vesta and of the rest of the deities, and amid her many cries this was repeated most frequently Moreover, when Celer, the Roman knight who was accused of having intrigued with Cornelia, was being scourged with rods in the forum, he did nothing but cry out, "What have I done? I have done nothing." Consequently Domitian\'s evil reputation for cruelty and injustice blazed up on all hands. He fastened upon Licinianus for hiding a freedwoman of Cornelia on one of his farms. Licinianus was advised by his friends who interested themselves on his behalf to take refuge in making a confession and beg for pardon, if he wished to escape being flogged in the forum, and he did so. Herennius Senecio spoke for him in his absence very much in the words of Homer, "Patroclus is fallen;" ** for he said, "Instead of being an advocate, I am the bearer of news You see how careful I am to obey your wishes, as I not only give you the news of the town, but news from abroad, and minutely trace a story from its very beginning. I took for granted that, as you were away from Rome at the time, all you heard of Licinianus was that he had been banished for incest. For rumour only gives one the gist of the matter, not the various stages through which it passes. Surely I deserve that you should return the compliment and write and tell me what is going on in your town and neighbourhood, for something worthy of note is always happening. But say what you will, provided you give me the news in as long a letter as I have written to you. I shall count up not only the pages, but the lines and the syllables. Farewell. '' None
29. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Bear, dressed like matron and carried in sedan-chair • dress, elite • dress, imperial • dress, masculine • dress, orator’s • dress, ordinary • dress, philosopher’s

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 244; Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 352

30. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Nero,, dress • dress, augural • dress, citizen’s • dress, colour • dress, elite • dress, emperor’s • dress, female • dress, imperial • dress, luxury • dress, masculine • dress, public ceremonial • dress, republican • dress, senatorial • senators absences,, dress

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 33, 191; Talbert (1984), The Senate of Imperial Rome, 217

31. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dress • dress, female • dress, luxury

 Found in books: Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 231, 240; Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 188

32. None, None, nan (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Julio-Claudian period (authors, dress) • dress, boy’s • dress, elite • dress, freeborn • dress, masculine • dress, ordinary • dress, public ceremonial • dress, religious • stola (dress/robe)

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 66; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 322, 323, 362

33. None, None, nan (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • senators absences,, dress • stola (dress/robe)

 Found in books: Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 336; Talbert (1984), The Senate of Imperial Rome, 216

34. Vergil, Aeneis, 7.403, 9.616, 11.480-11.481
 Tagged with subjects: • Bona Dea and Hercules, transvestism and cross-dressing in ephebic rituals • Flavian period (literature, dress) • dress, Greek • dress, female • dress, gladiatorial • dress, masculine • dress, matron’s (veste maritali) • dress, public ceremonial • dress, religious • dress, soldier’s • transvestism and cross-dressing, in ephebic rituals • transvestism and cross-dressing, of Thoas by Hypsipyle

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 133, 165, 170; Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 155, 162; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 222

sup>
9.616 et tunicae manicas et habent redimicula mitrae.
11.480
causa mali tanti, oculos deiecta decoros. 11.481 Succedunt matres et templum ture vaporant' ' None
sup>
7.403 let me seek strength in war, come whence it will!
9.616
have lasting music, no remotest age
11.480
for peace, O Turnus! and, not less than peace, 11.481 its one inviolable pledge. Behold, '' None



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