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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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subject book bibliographic info
draco Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 91
Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 180
Gilbert, Graver and McConnell (2023), Power and Persuasion in Cicero's Philosophy. 45
Heymans (2021), The Origins of Money in the Iron Age Mediterranean World, 191, 200
Liddel (2020), Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives, 34, 148
Mackay (2022), Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica, 205, 206, 207, 213, 214, 218
Martens (2003), One God, One Law: Philo of Alexandria on the Mosaic and Greco-Roman Law, 95
Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 122, 125, 278
Meinel (2015), Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy, 115
Raaflaub Ober and Wallace (2007), Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece, 45, 55, 59, 60, 66
Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 79, 80, 81
draco's, legistlation Papazarkadas (2011), Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens, 72
draco, and dike Meinel (2015), Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy, 118, 121
draco, cf. homicide statute/law Riess (2012), Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens, 25, 36, 90, 143
draco, edict of excommunication Meinel (2015), Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy, 59, 60, 61, 177, 178
draco, ekdemos Meinel (2015), Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy, 37, 38, 172
draco, ephebic oath Meinel (2015), Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy, 82
draco, feigning pollution Meinel (2015), Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy, 142
draco, homicide statute/law, cf. Riess (2012), Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens, 25, 36, 39, 40, 42, 43, 44, 54, 90, 134
draco, laws, of Marincola et al. (2021), Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians, 118, 119
draco, serpent Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 79, 80, 81
serpent/draco, logos Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 29, 79, 81, 83, 98, 213, 214, 215, 230, 231

List of validated texts:
15 validated results for "draco"
1. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 7.8-7.12 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Draco • Dragon, see also Serpent • Dragons • Hands, Dragon, of • Logos, serpent/Draco • Serpent, Draco

 Found in books: Levison (2023), The Greek Life of Adam and Eve. 699; Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 79, 81; Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 264

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7.8 וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה אֶל־מֹשֶׁה וְאֶל־אַהֲרֹן לֵאמֹר׃ 7.9 כִּי יְדַבֵּר אֲלֵכֶם פַּרְעֹה לֵאמֹר תְּנוּ לָכֶם מוֹפֵת וְאָמַרְתָּ אֶל־אַהֲרֹן קַח אֶת־מַטְּךָ וְהַשְׁלֵךְ לִפְנֵי־פַרְעֹה יְהִי לְתַנִּין׃' '7.11 וַיִּקְרָא גַּם־פַּרְעֹה לַחֲכָמִים וְלַמְכַשְּׁפִים וַיַּעֲשׂוּ גַם־הֵם חַרְטֻמֵּי מִצְרַיִם בְּלַהֲטֵיהֶם כֵּן׃ 7.12 וַיַּשְׁלִיכוּ אִישׁ מַטֵּהוּ וַיִּהְיוּ לְתַנִּינִם וַיִּבְלַע מַטֵּה־אַהֲרֹן אֶת־מַטֹּתָם׃'' None
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7.8 And the LORD spoke unto Moses and unto Aaron, saying: 7.9 ’When Pharaoh shall speak unto you, saying: Show a wonder for you; then thou shalt say unto Aaron: Take thy rod, and cast it down before Pharaoh, that it become a serpent.’ 7.10 And Moses and Aaron went in unto Pharaoh, and they did so, as the LORD had commanded; and Aaron cast down his rod before Pharaoh and before his servants, and it became a serpent. 7.11 Then Pharaoh also called for the wise men and the sorcerers; and they also, the magicians of Egypt, did in like manner with their secret arts. 7.12 For they cast down every man his rod, and they became serpents; but Aaron’s rod swallowed up their rods.'' None
2. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 1.2, 3.15 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Animal, dragon • Draco • Dragon, see also Serpent • Leviathan, as red dragon • Logos, serpent/Draco • Serpent, Draco • dragon, red • dragon, versus YHWH

 Found in books: Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 70, 79, 80, 81, 83, 86, 89, 98, 215; Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun (2014), The History of Religions School Today : Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts 24; Sneed (2022), Taming the Beast: A Reception History of Behemoth and Leviathan, 59, 95

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1.2 וְהָאָרֶץ הָיְתָה תֹהוּ וָבֹהוּ וְחֹשֶׁךְ עַל־פְּנֵי תְהוֹם וְרוּחַ אֱלֹהִים מְרַחֶפֶת עַל־פְּנֵי הַמָּיִם׃
1.2
וַיֹּאמֶר אֱלֹהִים יִשְׁרְצוּ הַמַּיִם שֶׁרֶץ נֶפֶשׁ חַיָּה וְעוֹף יְעוֹפֵף עַל־הָאָרֶץ עַל־פְּנֵי רְקִיעַ הַשָּׁמָיִם׃
3.15
וְאֵיבָה אָשִׁית בֵּינְךָ וּבֵין הָאִשָּׁה וּבֵין זַרְעֲךָ וּבֵין זַרְעָהּ הוּא יְשׁוּפְךָ רֹאשׁ וְאַתָּה תְּשׁוּפֶנּוּ עָקֵב׃' ' None
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1.2 Now the earth was unformed and void, and darkness was upon the face of the deep; and the spirit of God hovered over the face of the waters.
3.15
And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed; they shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise their heel.’' ' None
3. Hebrew Bible, Job, 26.13, 38.8-38.11 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Bel and the Dragon • Hands, Dragon, of • dragon, etymology

 Found in books: Gunderson (2022), The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White, 22; Levison (2023), The Greek Life of Adam and Eve. 698; Sneed (2022), Taming the Beast: A Reception History of Behemoth and Leviathan, 49

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26.13 בְּרוּחוֹ שָׁמַיִם שִׁפְרָה חֹלֲלָה יָדוֹ נָחָשׁ בָּרִיחַ׃
38.8
וַיָּסֶךְ בִּדְלָתַיִם יָם בְּגִיחוֹ מֵרֶחֶם יֵצֵא׃ 38.9 בְּשׂוּמִי עָנָן לְבֻשׁוֹ וַעֲרָפֶל חֲתֻלָּתוֹ׃' '38.11 וָאֹמַר עַד־פֹּה תָבוֹא וְלֹא תֹסִיף וּפֹא־יָשִׁית בִּגְאוֹן גַּלֶּיךָ׃'' None
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26.13 By His breath the heavens are serene; His hand hath pierced the slant serpent.
38.8
Or who shut up the sea with doors, When it broke forth, and issued out of the womb; 38.9 When I made the cloud the garment thereof, And thick darkness a swaddlingband for it, 38.10 And prescribed for it My decree, And set bars and doors, 38.11 And said: ‘Thus far shalt thou come, but no further; And here shall thy proud waves be stayed’?'' None
4. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 74.12-74.17 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Bel and the Dragon • Hands, Dragon, of • Leviathan, as red dragon • dragon, etymology • dragon, red • dragon, versus YHWH

 Found in books: Gunderson (2022), The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White, 22; Levison (2023), The Greek Life of Adam and Eve. 698, 699; Sneed (2022), Taming the Beast: A Reception History of Behemoth and Leviathan, 51, 59, 95

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74.12 וֵאלֹהִים מַלְכִּי מִקֶּדֶם פֹּעֵל יְשׁוּעוֹת בְּקֶרֶב הָאָרֶץ׃ 74.13 אַתָּה פוֹרַרְתָּ בְעָזְּךָ יָם שִׁבַּרְתָּ רָאשֵׁי תַנִּינִים עַל־הַמָּיִם׃ 74.14 אַתָּה רִצַּצְתָּ רָאשֵׁי לִוְיָתָן תִּתְּנֶנּוּ מַאֲכָל לְעָם לְצִיִּים׃ 74.15 אַתָּה בָקַעְתָּ מַעְיָן וָנָחַל אַתָּה הוֹבַשְׁתָּ נַהֲרוֹת אֵיתָן׃ 74.16 לְךָ יוֹם אַף־לְךָ לָיְלָה אַתָּה הֲכִינוֹתָ מָאוֹר וָשָׁמֶשׁ׃ 74.17 אַתָּה הִצַּבְתָּ כָּל־גְּבוּלוֹת אָרֶץ קַיִץ וָחֹרֶף אַתָּה יְצַרְתָּם׃' ' None
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74.12 Yet God is my King of old, Working salvation in the midst of the earth. 74.13 Thou didst break the sea in pieces by Thy strength; Thou didst shatter the heads of the sea-monsters in the waters. 74.14 Thou didst crush the heads of leviathan, Thou gavest him to be food to the folk inhabiting the wilderness. 74.15 Thou didst cleave fountain and brook; Thou driedst up ever-flowing rivers. 74.16 Thine is the day, Thine also the night; Thou hast established luminary and sun. 74.17 Thou hast set all the borders of the earth; Thou hast made summer and winter.' ' None
5. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 27.1 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Hands, Dragon, of • Leviathan, as red dragon • dragon, etymology • dragon, red

 Found in books: Levison (2023), The Greek Life of Adam and Eve. 698, 699; Sneed (2022), Taming the Beast: A Reception History of Behemoth and Leviathan, 49, 95

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27.1 בַּיּוֹם הַהוּא יִפְקֹד יְהוָה בְּחַרְבוֹ הַקָּשָׁה וְהַגְּדוֹלָה וְהַחֲזָקָה עַל לִוְיָתָן נָחָשׁ בָּרִחַ וְעַל לִוְיָתָן נָחָשׁ עֲקַלָּתוֹן וְהָרַג אֶת־הַתַּנִּין אֲשֶׁר בַּיָּם׃27.1 כִּי עִיר בְּצוּרָה בָּדָד נָוֶה מְשֻׁלָּח וְנֶעֱזָב כַּמִּדְבָּר שָׁם יִרְעֶה עֵגֶל וְשָׁם יִרְבָּץ וְכִלָּה סְעִפֶיהָ׃ ' None
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27.1 In that day the LORD with his sore and great and strong sword will punish leviathan the slant serpent, and leviathan the tortuous serpent; and He will slay the dragon that is in the sea.'' None
6. Euripides, Bacchae, 537-544 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Dragon, • dragon

 Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 301, 315, 316; Del Lucchese (2019), Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture, 27

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537 οἵαν οἵαν ὀργὰν'538 ἀναφαίνει χθόνιον 539 γένος ἐκφύς τε δράκοντός 540 ποτε Πενθεύς, ὃν Ἐχίων 541 ἐφύτευσε χθόνιος, 542 ἀγριωπὸν τέρας, οὐ φῶτα word split in text 543 βρότειον, φόνιον δʼ ὥστε word split in text 544 γίγαντʼ ἀντίπαλον θεοῖς· ' None
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537 What rage, what rage does the earth-born race show, and Pentheus,'538 What rage, what rage does the earth-born race show, and Pentheus, 540 once descended from a serpent—Pentheus, whom earth-born Echion bore, a fierce monster, not a mortal man, but like a bloody giant, hostile to the gods. ' None
7. None, None, nan (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Draco

 Found in books: Heymans (2021), The Origins of Money in the Iron Age Mediterranean World, 200; Martens (2003), One God, One Law: Philo of Alexandria on the Mosaic and Greco-Roman Law, 95; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace (2007), Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece, 55

8. Anon., 1 Enoch, 60.7-60.10 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Dragon, the • dragon, as muzzled

 Found in books: Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 193; Sneed (2022), Taming the Beast: A Reception History of Behemoth and Leviathan, 139

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60.7 And on that day were two monsters parted, a female monster named Leviathan, to dwell in the 60.8 abysses of the ocean over the fountains of the waters. But the male is named Behemoth, who occupied with his breast a waste wilderness named Duidain, on the east of the garden where the elect and righteous dwell, where my grandfather was taken up, the seventh from Adam, the first 60.9 man whom the Lord of Spirits created. And I besought the other angel that he should show me the might of those monsters, how they were parted on one day and cast, the one into the abysse 60.10 In the year 500, in the seventh month, on the fourteenth day of the month in the life of Enoch. In that Parable I saw how a mighty quaking made the heaven of heavens to quake, and the host of the Most High, and the angels, a thousand thousands and ten thousand times ten thousand, were,disquieted with a great disquiet. And the Head of Days sat on the throne of His glory, and the angels and the righteous stood around Him.,And a great trembling seized me, And fear took hold of me, And my loins gave way, And dissolved were my reins, And I fell upon my face.,And Michael sent another angel from among the holy ones and he raised me up, and when he had raised me up my spirit returned; for I had not been able to endure the look of this host, and the,commotion and the quaking of the heaven. And Michael said unto me: \' Why art thou disquieted with such a vision Until this day lasted the day of His mercy; and He hath been merciful and",long-suffering towards those who dwell on the earth. And when the day, and the power, and the punishment, and the judgement come, which the Lord of Spirits hath prepared for those who worship not the righteous law, and for those who deny the righteous judgement, and for those who take His name in vain-that day is prepared, for the elect a covet, but for sinners an inquisition.,When the punishment of the Lord of Spirits shall rest upon them, it shall rest in order that the punishment of the Lord of Spirits may not come, in vain, and it shall slay the children with their mothers and the children with their fathers. Afterwards the judgement shall take place according to His mercy and His patience.\',And on that day were two monsters parted, a female monster named Leviathan, to dwell in the,abysses of the ocean over the fountains of the waters. But the male is named Behemoth, who occupied with his breast a waste wilderness named Duidain, on the east of the garden where the elect and righteous dwell, where my grandfather was taken up, the seventh from Adam, the first,man whom the Lord of Spirits created. And I besought the other angel that he should show me the might of those monsters, how they were parted on one day and cast, the one into the abysses,of the sea, and the other unto the dry land of the wilderness. And he said to me: \' Thou son of man, herein thou dost seek to know what is hidden.\',And the other angel who went with me and showed me what was hidden told me what is first and last in the heaven in the height, and beneath the earth in the depth, and at the ends of the,heaven, and on the foundation of the heaven. And the chambers of the winds, and how the winds are divided, and how they are weighed, and (how) the portals of the winds are reckoned, each according to the power of the wind, and the power of the lights of the moon, and according to the power that is fitting: and the divisions of the stars according to their names, and how all the divisions,are divided. And the thunders according to the places where they fall, and all the divisions that are made among the lightnings that it may lighten, and their host that they may at once obey.,For the thunder has places of rest (which) are assigned (to it) while it is waiting for its peal; and the thunder and lightning are inseparable, and although not one and undivided, they both go together,through the spirit and separate not. For when the lightning lightens, the thunder utters its voice, and the spirit enforces a pause during the peal, and divides equally between them; for the treasury of their peals is like the sand, and each one of them as it peals is held in with a bridle, and turned back by the power of the spirit, and pushed forward according to the many quarters of the earth.,And the spirit of the sea is masculine and strong, and according to the might of his strength he draws it back with a rein, and in like manner it is driven forward and disperses amid all the mountains,of the earth. And the spirit of the hoar-frost is his own angel, and the spirit of the hail is a good,angel. And the spirit of the snow has forsaken his chambers on account of his strength -There is a special spirit therein, and that which ascends from it is like smoke, and its name is frost. And the spirit of the mist is not united with them in their chambers, but it has a special chamber; for its course is glorious both in light and in darkness, and in winter and in summer, and in its chamber is an angel.,And the spirit of the dew has its dwelling at the ends of the heaven, and is connected with the chambers of the rain, and its course is in winter and summer: and its clouds and the clouds of the,mist are connected, and the one gives to the other. And when the spirit of the rain goes forth from its chamber, the angels come and open the chamber and lead it out, and when it is diffused over the whole earth it unites with the water on the earth. And whensoever it unites with the water on,the earth . . . For the waters are for those who dwell on the earth; for they are nourishment for the earth from the Most High who is in heaven: therefore there is a measure for the rain,,and the angels take it in charge. And these things I saw towards the Garden of the Righteous.",And the angel of peace who was with me said to me: \' These two monsters, prepared conformably to the greatness of God, shall feed . . .'' None
9. Hebrew Bible, Daniel, 7.23 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Dragon, the • Leviathan, as red dragon • dragon, red

 Found in books: Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 193; Sneed (2022), Taming the Beast: A Reception History of Behemoth and Leviathan, 95

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7.23 כֵּן אֲמַר חֵיוְתָא רְבִיעָיְתָא מַלְכוּ רביעיא רְבִיעָאָה תֶּהֱוֵא בְאַרְעָא דִּי תִשְׁנֵא מִן־כָּל־מַלְכְוָתָא וְתֵאכֻל כָּל־אַרְעָא וּתְדוּשִׁנַּהּ וְתַדְּקִנַּהּ׃'' None
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7.23 Thus he said: ‘The fourth beast shall be a fourth kingdom upon earth, which shall be diverse from all the kingdoms, and shall devour the whole earth, and shall tread it down, and break it in pieces.'' None
10. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Animal, dragon • dragon

 Found in books: Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 209; Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun (2014), The History of Religions School Today : Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts 24

11. New Testament, Apocalypse, 12.3-12.4, 12.6-12.9, 12.13, 12.15-12.18, 13.2, 13.4, 13.7, 13.11-13.13, 18.23, 20.2, 20.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Animal, dragon • Dragon, see also Serpent • Dragon, the • Hands, Dragon, of • Jesus, as dragon-slayer • Leviathan, as red dragon • Revelation (Apocalypse of John), the war with the Dragon • dragon • dragon, as muzzled • dragon, red

 Found in books: Collins (2016), The Apocalyptic Imagination: An Introduction to Jewish Apocalyptic Literature, 342, 343, 345, 346, 347; Levison (2023), The Greek Life of Adam and Eve. 699; Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 153, 155, 157, 191, 192, 193, 209; Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 86; Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun (2014), The History of Religions School Today : Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts 24; Schaaf (2019), Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World. 29; Sneed (2022), Taming the Beast: A Reception History of Behemoth and Leviathan, 93, 94, 95, 139

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12.3 καὶ ὤφθη ἄλλο σημεῖον ἐν τῷ οὐρανῷ, καὶ ἰδοὺ δράκων μέγας πυρρός, ἔχων κεφαλὰς ἑπτὰ καὶκέρατα δέκακαὶ ἐπὶ τὰς κεφαλὰς αὐτοῦ ἑπτὰ διαδήματα, 12.4 καὶ ἡ οὐρὰ αὐτοῦ σύρει τὸ τρίτοντῶν ἀστέρων τοῦ οὐρανοῦ, καὶ ἔβαλεναὐτοὺςεἰς τὴν γῆν.καὶ ὁ δράκων ἔστηκεν ἐνώπιον τῆς γυναικὸς τῆς μελλούσης τεκεῖν, ἵνα ὅταν τέκῃ τὸ τέκνον αὐτῆς καταφάγῃ·
12.6
καὶ ἡ γυνὴ ἔφυγεν εἰς τὴν ἔρημον, ὅπου ἔχει ἐκεῖ τόπον ἡτοιμασμένον ἀπὸ τοῦ θεοῦ, ἵνα ἐκεῖ τρέφωσιν αὐτὴν ἡμέρας χιλίας διακοσίας ἑξήκοντα. 12.7 Καὶ ἐγένετο πόλεμος ἐν τῷ οὐρανῷ, ὁΜιχαὴλκαὶ οἱ ἄγγελοι αὐτοῦτοῦ πολεμῆσαιμετὰ τοῦ δράκοντος. καὶ ὁ δράκων ἐπολέμησεν καὶ οἱ ἄγγελοι αὐτοῦ, 12.8 καὶ οὐκ ἴσχυσεν, οὐδὲ τόπος εὑρέθη αὐτῶν ἔτι ἐν τῷ οὐρανῷ. 12.9 καὶ ἐβλήθη ὁ δράκων ὁ μέγας,ὁ ὄφιςὁ ἀρχαῖος, ὁ καλούμενοςΔιάβολοςκαὶ ὉΣατανᾶς,ὁ πλανῶν τὴν οἰκουμένην ὅλην, — ἐβλήθη εἰς τὴν γῆν, καὶ οἱ ἄγγελοι αὐτοῦ μετʼ αὐτοῦ ἐβλήθησαν.
12.13
Καὶ ὅτε εἶδεν ὁ δράκων ὅτι ἐβλήθη εἰς τὴν γῆν, ἐδίωξεν τὴν γυναῖκα ἥτις ἔτεκεν τὸν ἄρσενα.
12.15
καὶ ἔβαλεν ὁ ὄφις ἐκ τοῦ στόματος αὐτοῦ ὀπίσω τῆς γυναικὸς ὕδωρ ὡς ποταμόν, ἵνα αὐτὴν ποταμοφόρητον ποιήσῃ. 12.16 καὶ ἐβοήθησεν ἡ γῆ τῇ γυναικί, καὶ ἤνοιξεν ἡ γῆ· τὸ στόμα αὐτῆς καὶ κατέπιεν τὸν ποταμὸν ὃν ἔβαλεν ὁ δράκων ἐκ τοῦ στόματος αὐτοῦ· 12.17 καὶ ὠργίσθη ὁ δράκων ἐπὶ τῇ γυναικί, καὶ ἀπῆλθεν ποιῆσαι πόλεμον μετὰ τῶν λοιπῶν τοῦ σπέρματος αὐτῆς, τῶν τηρούντων τὰς ἐντολὰς τοῦ θεοῦ καὶ ἐχόντων τὴν μαρτυρίαν Ἰησοῦ·
13.2
καὶ τὸθηρίονὃ εἶδον ἦνὅμοιον παρδάλει,καὶ οἱ πόδες αὐτοῦὡς ἄρκου,καὶ τὸ στόμα αὐτοῦὡςστόμαλέοντος. καὶ ἔδωκεν αὐτῷ ὁ δράκων τὴν δύναμιν αὐτοῦ καὶ τὸν θρόνον αὐτοῦ καὶ ἐξουσίαν μεγάλην.
13.4
καὶ ἐθαυμάσθη ὅλη ἡ γῆ ὀπίσω τοῦ θηρίου, καὶ προσεκύνησαν τῷ δράκοντι ὅτι ἔδωκεν τὴν ἐξουσίαν τῷ θηρίῳ, καὶ προσεκύνησαν τῷ θηρίῳ λέγοντες Τίς ὅμοιος τῷ θηρίῳ, καὶ τίς δύναται πολεμῆσαι μετʼ αὐτοῦ;
13.7
καὶ ἐδόθη αὐτῷποιῆσαι πόλεμον μετὰ τῶν ἁγίων καὶ νικῆσαι αὐτούς, καὶ ἐδόθη αὐτῷ ἐξουσία ἐπὶ πᾶσαν φυλὴν καὶ λαὸν καlt*gt γλῶσσαν καὶ ἔθνος.
13.11
Καὶ εἶδον ἄλλο θηρίον ἀναβαῖνον ἐκ τῆς γῆς, καὶ εἶχεν κέρατα δύο ὅμοια ἀρνίῳ, καὶ ἐλάλει ὡς δράκων. 13.12 καὶ τὴν ἐξουσίαν τοῦ πρώτου θηρίου πᾶσαν ποιεῖ ἐνώπιον αὐτοῦ. καὶ ποιεῖ τὴν γῆν καὶ τοὺς ἐν αὐτῇ κατοικοῦντας ἵνα προσκυνήσουσιν τὸ θηρίον τὸ πρῶτον, οὗ ἐθεραπεύθη ἡ πληγὴ τοῦ θανάτου αὐτοῦ. 13.13 καὶ ποιεῖ σημεῖα μεγάλα, ἵνα καὶ πῦρ ποιῇ ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ καταβαίνειν εἰς τὴν γῆν ἐνώπιον τῶν ἀνθρώπων.
18.23
καὶ φῶς λύχνουοὐ μὴ φάνῃ ἐν σοὶ ἔτι,καὶ φωνὴ νυμφίου καὶ νύμφηςοὐ μὴ ἀκουσθῇ ἐν σοὶ ἔτι· ὅτι οἱἔμποροίσου ἦσανοἱ μεγιστᾶνες τῆς γῆς,ὅτιἐν τῇ φαρμακίᾳ σουἐπλανήθησαν πάντα τὰ ἔθνη,
20.2
καὶ ἐκράτησεν τὸν δράκοντα,ὁ ὄφιςὁ ἀρχαῖος, ὅς ἐστινΔιάβολοςκαὶὉ Σατανᾶς,καὶ ἔδησεν αὐτὸν χίλια ἔτη,
20.10
καὶ ὁ διάβολος ὁ πλανῶν αὐτοὺς ἐβλήθη εἰς τὴν λίμνην τοῦπυρὸς καὶ θείου,ὅπου καὶ τὸ θηρίον καὶ ὁ ψευδοπροφήτης, καὶ βασανισθήσονται ἡμέρας καὶ νυκτὸς εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας τῶν αἰώνων.' ' None
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12.3 Another sign was seen in heaven. Behold, a great red dragon, having seven heads and ten horns, and on his heads seven crowns. 12.4 His tail drew one third of the stars of the sky, and threw them to the earth. The dragon stood before the woman who was about to give birth, so that when she gave birth he might devour her child.
12.6
The woman fled into the wilderness, where she has a place prepared by God, that there they may nourish her one thousand two hundred sixty days. 12.7 There was war in the sky. Michael and his angels made war on the dragon. The dragon and his angels made war. ' "12.8 They didn't prevail, neither was a place found for him any more in heaven." '12.9 The great dragon was thrown down, the old serpent, he who is called the devil and Satan, the deceiver of the whole world. He was thrown down to the earth, and his angels were thrown down with him.
12.13
When the dragon saw that he was thrown down to the earth, he persecuted the woman who gave birth to the male child.
12.15
The serpent spewed water out of his mouth after the woman like a river, that he might cause her to be carried away by the stream. 12.16 The earth helped the woman, and the earth opened its mouth and swallowed up the river which the dragon spewed out of his mouth.' "12.17 The dragon grew angry with the woman, and went away to make war with the rest of her seed, who keep God's commandments and hold Jesus' testimony. " 13.2 The beast which I saw was like a leopard, and his feet were like those of a bear, and his mouth like the mouth of a lion. The dragon gave him his power, his throne, and great authority.
13.4
They worshiped the dragon, because he gave his authority to the beast, and they worshiped the beast, saying, "Who is like the beast? Who is able to make war with him?"
13.7
It was given to him to make war with the saints, and to overcome them. Authority over every tribe, people, language, and nation was given to him.
13.11
I saw another beast coming up out of the earth. He had two horns like a lamb, and he spoke like a dragon. 13.12 He exercises all the authority of the first beast in his presence. He makes the earth and those who dwell in it to worship the first beast, whose fatal wound was healed. 13.13 He performs great signs, even making fire come down out of the sky on the earth in the sight of men.
18.23
The light of a lamp will shine no more at all in you. The voice of the bridegroom and of the bride will be heard no more at all in you; for your merchants were the princes of the earth; for with your sorcery all the nations were deceived.
20.2
He seized the dragon, the old serpent, which is the devil and Satan, who deceives the whole inhabited earth, and bound him for a thousand years,
20.10
The devil who deceived them was thrown into the lake of fire and sulfur, where the beast and the false prophet are also. They will be tormented day and night forever and ever.' ' None
12. Plutarch, Solon, 23.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Draco • Draco, cf. homicide statute/law • homicide statute/law, cf. Draco

 Found in books: Heymans (2021), The Origins of Money in the Iron Age Mediterranean World, 200; Riess (2012), Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens, 36

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23.1 ὅλως δὲ πλείστην ἔχειν ἀτοπίαν οἱ περὶ τῶν γυναικῶν νόμοι τῷ Σόλωνι δοκοῦσι. μοιχὸν μὲν γὰρ ἀνελεῖν τῷ λαβόντι δέδωκεν· ἐὰν δʼ ἁρπάσῃ τις ἐλευθέραν γυναῖκα καὶ βιάσηται, ζημίαν ἑκατὸν δραχμὰς ἔταξε· κἂν προαγωγεύῃ, δραχμὰς εἴκοσι, πλὴν ὅσαι πεφασμένως πωλοῦνται, λέγων δὴ τὰς ἑταίρας. αὗται γὰρ ἐμφανῶς φοιτῶσι πρὸς τοὺς διδόντας.'' None
sup>
23.1 But in general Solon’s laws concerning women seem very absurd. For instance, he permitted an adulterer caught in the act to be killed; but if a man committed rape upon a free woman, he was merely to be fined a hundred drachmas; and if he gained his end by persuasion, twenty drachmas, unless it were with one of those who sell themselves openly, meaning of course the courtesans. For these go openly to those who offer them their price.'' None
13. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Dragon, the • Revelation (Apocalypse of John), the war with the Dragon • dragon

 Found in books: Collins (2016), The Apocalyptic Imagination: An Introduction to Jewish Apocalyptic Literature, 346; Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 191

14. None, None, nan (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Dragon, see also Serpent • dragon, archon

 Found in books: Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 89, 90; Williams (2009), Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46), 99

15. Demosthenes, Orations, 23.22, 23.40-23.41, 23.53-23.57, 23.60-23.61, 23.80
 Tagged with subjects: • Draco • Draco, cf. homicide statute/law • homicide statute/law, cf. Draco

 Found in books: Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 122; Riess (2012), Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens, 25, 36, 43, 134, 143

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23.22 Now take and read the actual statutes, that I may prove thereby the illegality of their proposal. One of the Statutes of the Areopagus Concerning Homicide The Council of the Areopagus shall take cognizance in cases of homicide, of intentional wounding, of arson, and of poisoning, if a man kill another by giving poison.
23.40
Or take the words, from Amphictyonic sacrifices. Why did he also exclude the murderer from them? He debars the offender from everything in which the deceased used to participate in his lifetime; first from his own country and from all things therein, whether permitted or sacred, assigning the frontier-market as the boundary from which he declares him excluded; and secondly from the observances at Amphictyonic assemblies, because the deceased, if a Hellene, also took part therein. And from the games, —why from the games? Because the athletic contests of Hellas are open to all men,—the sufferer was concerned in them because everybody was concerned in them; therefore the murderer must absent himself. 23.41 Accordingly the law excludes the murderer from all these places; but if anyone puts him to death elsewhere, outside the places specified, the same retribution is provided as when an Athenian is slain. He did not describe the fugitive by the name of the city, for in that name he has no part, but by that of the act for which he is chargeable. Accordingly he says: if any man kill the murderer; and afterwards, when he prescribed the places from which the man is debarred, he introduces the name of the City for the lawful assignment of punishment: he shall be liable to the same penalty as if he killed an Athenian. Gentlemen, that phrase is very different from the wording of the decree before us.
23.53
Read another statute. Statute If a man kill another unintentionally in an athletic contest, or overcoming him in a fight on the highway, or unwittingly in battle, or in intercourse with his wife, or mother, or sister, or daughter, or concubine kept for procreation of legitimate children, he shall not go into exile as a manslayer on that account. Many statutes have been violated, men of Athens, in the drafting of this decree, but none more gravely than that which has just been read. Though the law so clearly gives permission to slay, and states under what conditions, the defendant ignores all those conditions, and has drawn his penal clause without any suggestion as to the manner of the slaying. 23.54 Yet mark how righteously and admirably these distinctions are severally defined by the lawgiver who defined them originally. If a man kill another in an athletic contest, he declared him to be not guilty, for this reason, that he had regard not to the event but to the intention of the agent. That intention is, not to kill his man, but to vanquish him unslain. If the other combatant was too weak to support the struggle for victory, he considered him responsible for his own fate, and therefore provided no retribution on his account. 23.55 Again, if in battle unwittingly —the man who so slays is free of bloodguiltiness. Good: If I have destroyed a man supposing him to be one of the enemy, I deserve, not to stand trial, but to be forgiven. Or in intercourse with his wife, or mother, or sister, or daughter, or concubine kept for the procreation of legitimate children. He lets the man who slays one so treating any of these women go scot-free; and that acquittal, men of Athens, is the most righteous of all. 23.56 Why? Because in the defence of those for whose sake we fight our enemies, to save them from indignity and licentiousness, he permitted us to slay even our friends, if they insult them and defile them in defiance of law. Men are not our friends and our foes by natural generation: they are made such by their own actions; and the law gives us freedom to chastise as enemies those whose acts are hostile. When there are so many conditions that justify the slaying of anyone else, it is monstrous that that man should be the only man in the world whom, even under those conditions, it is to be unlawful to slay. 23.57 Let us suppose that a fate that has doubtless befallen others before now should befall him—that he should withdraw from Thrace and come and live somewhere in a civilized community; and that, though no longer enjoying the licence under which he now commits many illegalities, he should be driven by his habits and his lusts to attempt the sort of behavior I have mentioned, will not a man be obliged to allow himself to be insulted by Charidemus in silence? It will not be safe to put him to death, nor, by reason of this decree, to obtain the satisfaction provided by law.
23.60
Read the next statute. Statute If any man while violently and illegally seizing another shall be slain straightway in self-defence, there shall be no penalty for his death. Here are other conditions of lawful homicide. If any man, while violently and illegally seizing another, shall be straightway slain in self-defence, the legislator ordains that there shall be no penalty for his death. I beg you to observe the wisdom of this law. By adding the word straightway after indicating the conditions of lawful homicide, the legislator has excluded any long premeditation of injury and by the expression, in self-defence, he makes it clear that he is giving indulgence to the actual sufferer, and to no other man. Thus the law permits homicide in immediate self-defence; but Aristocrates has made no such exception. He says, without qualification, if anyone ever kills, —that is, even if he kill righteously, or as the laws permit. 23.61 I shall be told that this is a quibble of ours; who will ever be violently and illegally seized by Charidemus? Everybody. Surely you are aware that any man who has troops at command lays hands on whomsoever he thinks he can overpower, demanding ransom. Heaven and Earth! Is it not monstrous, is it not manifestly contrary to law,—I do not mean merely to the statute law but to the unwritten law of our common humanity,—that I should not be permitted to defend myself against one who violently seizes my goods as though I were an enemy? And that will be so, if the slaying of Charidemus is forbidden even on those terms,—if even though he be iniquitously plundering another man’s property, his slayer is to be liable to seizure, though the statute ordains that he who takes life under such conditions shall have impunity.
23.80
In addition to all these provisions for legal redress there is a sixth, which the defendant has equally defied in his decree. Suppose that a man is ignorant of all the processes I have mentioned, or that the proper time for taking such proceedings has elapsed, that for any other reasons he does not choose to prosecute by those methods; if he sees the homicide frequenting places of worship or the market, he may arrest him and take him to jail; but not, as you have permitted, to his own house or wherever he chooses. When under arrest he will suffer no injury in jail until after his trial; but, if he is found guilty, he will be punished with death. On the other hand, if the person who arrested him does not get a fifth part of the votes, he will be fined a thousand drachmas.'' None



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