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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.


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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
anti-donatist, polemic, donatists Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 125, 134, 241, 242, 247, 248, 254, 261, 263
donatist van 't Westeinde (2021), Roman Nobilitas in Jerome's Letters: Roman Values and Christian Asceticism for Socialites, 233
donatist, biblical compendium handbook Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 297, 298
donatist, conference, carthage Cheuk-Yin Yam (2019), Trinity and Grace in Augustine, 153, 384, 391
donatist, controversy, donatists de Ste. Croix et al. (2006), Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy, 50, 51, 52, 70, 162, 184, 192, 206, 209, 212, 215, 216, 217, 218, 248, 309, 358
donatist, controversy/donatists, Dijkstra and Raschle (2020), Religious Violence in the Ancient World: From Classical Athens to Late Antiquity, 239, 269, 277, 278, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283
donatist, council of bagai Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 265
donatist, cresconius Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 267
donatist, cresconius the Pollmann and Vessey (2007), Augustine and the Disciplines: From Cassiciacum to Confessions, 154, 158
donatist, crispinus bishop Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 262, 263
donatist, donatism Cheuk-Yin Yam (2019), Trinity and Grace in Augustine, 153, 367, 384, 388, 391, 575
donatist, eusebius bishop Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 232
donatist, fulgentius polemicist Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 297
donatist, petilianus bishop Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 188, 246
donatist, schism, lucilla, and the Ashbrook Harvey et al. (2015), A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer, 155, 156, 157, 159, 160, 161
donatist, tyconius the Lunn-Rockliffe (2007), The Letter of Mara bar Sarapion in Context, 33
donatist, use of allegory see also typology Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 203
donatist, uses of root, radix Nisula (2012), Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence, 160
donatist, victoria, martyr Moss (2010), The Other Christs: Imitating Jesus in Ancient Christian Ideologies of Martyrdom, 54
donatists Burton (2009), Dionysus and Rome: Religion and Literature, 92, 110
Geljon and Vos (2020), Rituals in Early Christianity: New Perspectives on Tradition and Transformation, 40, 138, 143, 147
Glowalsky (2020), Rhetoric and Scripture in Augustine’s Homiletic Strategy: Tracing the Narrative of Christian Maturation, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 123
Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 222, 229, 230, 255, 256, 258
Kahlos (2019), Religious Dissent in Late Antiquity, 350-450, 25, 32, 51, 52, 53, 75, 76, 78, 79, 88, 89, 109, 111, 118, 121, 123, 126, 127, 130, 131, 133, 158, 192
Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 1, 3, 50, 69, 85, 89, 107, 115, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 160, 162, 167, 168, 172, 176, 220, 269
Kitzler (2015), From 'Passio Perpetuae' to 'Acta Perpetuae', 75, 90, 91, 92, 106, 107, 109, 113, 121
Moss (2012), Ancient Christian Martyrdom: Diverse Practices, Theologies, and Traditions, 201
Nisula (2012), Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence, 213, 268
O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 4, 5, 33, 34
Poorthuis and Schwartz (2006), A Holy People: Jewish And Christian Perspectives on Religious Communal Identity. 288
Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 28, 29, 30, 32, 72, 90, 164
Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 74, 104, 113, 118, 119, 120, 125, 130, 133, 134, 146, 157, 169, 187, 206, 219, 224, 225, 234, 241, 242, 245, 247, 248, 254, 261, 263, 267, 281, 282, 284
donatists, adversus ecclesiam traditorum Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 193, 194
donatists, and pseudo-cyprianic treatises Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 152, 154
donatists, and vetus latina Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 22
donatists, and violence Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 244
donatists, as schismatics Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 267
donatists, augustine, psalm against the Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 238
donatists, biblical interpretation Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 193, 194, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205
donatists, bishops, acting in court Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 187, 188, 189
donatists, bishops, as advocates Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 187, 188, 189
donatists, bishops, legal training of Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 188, 189
donatists, catalogue of heresies Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 230
donatists, categorization as heretics Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 267
donatists, catholics’ efforts to eliminate Kraemer (2020), The Mediterranean Diaspora in Late Antiquity: What Christianity Cost the Jews, 181, 182, 212, 213
donatists, church, ecclesiastical structure of Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 246
donatists, compendium Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 297, 298
donatists, controversy concerning baptism Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 266
donatists, conversion to catholicism Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 267
donatists, cult of the martyrs Ployd (2023), Augustine, Martyrdom, and Classical Rhetoric, 12, 13, 14
donatists, cult, and Ployd (2023), Augustine, Martyrdom, and Classical Rhetoric, 12, 13
donatists, cyprian’s influence Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 194
donatists, donatism Gunderson (2022), The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White, 205, 206
donatists, ecclesiastical views Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 201, 202, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210
donatists, forced conversion to nicene christianity and Kraemer (2020), The Mediterranean Diaspora in Late Antiquity: What Christianity Cost the Jews, 78
donatists, heretics see also manichaeans, in contextual exegesis Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 129, 130
donatists, heretics see also manichaeans, tertullian’s scriptural interpretation against Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 95, 96, 97, 98
donatists, honorius’s suppression of Kraemer (2020), The Mediterranean Diaspora in Late Antiquity: What Christianity Cost the Jews, 172
donatists, in north africa Kraemer (2020), The Mediterranean Diaspora in Late Antiquity: What Christianity Cost the Jews, 181, 212, 213
donatists, internal schisms Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 265, 266
donatists, jews and Kraemer (2020), The Mediterranean Diaspora in Late Antiquity: What Christianity Cost the Jews, 208, 212
donatists, legislation against Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 267
donatists, mandatum Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 296
donatists, orthodoxy, and the Ando and Ruepke (2006), Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome, 117
donatists, parmenian’s influence Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 193
donatists, persecution Ployd (2023), Augustine, Martyrdom, and Classical Rhetoric, 84, 85, 90, 91, 93, 94, 96, 100, 101, 102, 103
donatists, prophetiae ex omnibus libris collectae Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 297
donatists, prosecution of Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 232, 244
donatists, second baptism and Kraemer (2020), The Mediterranean Diaspora in Late Antiquity: What Christianity Cost the Jews, 86, 181
donatists, sermo in natali sanctorum innocentium Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 304, 305, 306
donatists, threefold concupiscence, triplex cupiditas, describing the Nisula (2012), Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence, 190
donatists, tyconius’s literary connection to Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 303, 304, 305, 306
donatists, use of imperial laws against Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 267
donatists, virtue Ployd (2023), Augustine, Martyrdom, and Classical Rhetoric, 90

List of validated texts:
32 validated results for "donatists"
1. Hebrew Bible, Song of Songs, 4.12 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatism • Donatism, African theology • Donatism, Donatist theology • Donatism, baptism • Donatists • Parmenian the Donatist • baptism, Donatist views

 Found in books: Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 964; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 141

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4.12 גַּן נָעוּל אֲחֹתִי כַלָּה גַּל נָעוּל מַעְיָן חָתוּם׃'' None
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4.12 A garden shut up is my sister, my bride; A spring shut up, a fountain sealed.'' None
2. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 6.16.2-6.16.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • politics, honors for donations • public building, avoidance of donations for

 Found in books: Gygax and Zuiderhoek (2021), Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity, 75; Satlow (2013), The Gift in Antiquity, 50

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6.16.2 οἱ γὰρ Ἕλληνες καὶ ὑπὲρ δύναμιν μείζω ἡμῶν τὴν πόλιν ἐνόμισαν τῷ ἐμῷ διαπρεπεῖ τῆς Ὀλυμπίαζε θεωρίας, πρότερον ἐλπίζοντες αὐτὴν καταπεπολεμῆσθαι, διότι ἅρματα μὲν ἑπτὰ καθῆκα, ὅσα οὐδείς πω ἰδιώτης πρότερον, ἐνίκησα δὲ καὶ δεύτερος καὶ τέταρτος ἐγενόμην καὶ τἆλλα ἀξίως τῆς νίκης παρεσκευασάμην. νόμῳ μὲν γὰρ τιμὴ τὰ τοιαῦτα, ἐκ δὲ τοῦ δρωμένου καὶ δύναμις ἅμα ὑπονοεῖται. 6.16.3 καὶ ὅσα αὖ ἐν τῇ πόλει χορηγίαις ἢ ἄλλῳ τῳ λαμπρύνομαι, τοῖς μὲν ἀστοῖς φθονεῖται φύσει, πρὸς δὲ τοὺς ξένους καὶ αὕτη ἰσχὺς φαίνεται. καὶ οὐκ ἄχρηστος ἥδ’ ἡ ἄνοια, ὃς ἂν τοῖς ἰδίοις τέλεσι μὴ ἑαυτὸν μόνον ἀλλὰ καὶ τὴν πόλιν ὠφελῇ.'' None
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6.16.2 The Hellenes, after expecting to see our city ruined by the war, concluded it to be even greater than it really is, by reason of the magnificence with which I represented it at the Olympic games, when I sent into the lists seven chariots, a number never before entered by any private person, and won the first prize, and was second and fourth, and took care to have everything else in a style worthy of my victory. Custom regards such displays as honourable, and they cannot be made without leaving behind them an impression of power. 6.16.3 Again, any splendour that I may have exhibited at home in providing choruses or otherwise, is naturally envied by my fellow-citizens, but in the eyes of foreigners has an air of strength as in the other instance. And this is no useless folly, when a man at his own private cost benefits not himself only, but his city: '' None
3. Hebrew Bible, Daniel, 2.35 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatism • Donatism, • Donatism, African theology • Donatism, theological diversity • Tyconius, Donatist exegete • Tyconius, Donatist exegete, Book of Rules • Tyconius, Donatist exegete, doctrine of the church

 Found in books: Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 969; Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 237

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2.35 בֵּאדַיִן דָּקוּ כַחֲדָה פַּרְזְלָא חַסְפָּא נְחָשָׁא כַּסְפָּא וְדַהֲבָא וַהֲווֹ כְּעוּר מִן־אִדְּרֵי־קַיִט וּנְשָׂא הִמּוֹן רוּחָא וְכָל־אֲתַר לָא־הִשְׁתֲּכַח לְהוֹן וְאַבְנָא דִּי־מְחָת לְצַלְמָא הֲוָת לְטוּר רַב וּמְלָת כָּל־אַרְעָא׃'' None
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2.35 Then was the iron, the clay, the brass, the silver, and the gold, broken in pieces together, and became like the chaff of the summer threshing-floors; and the wind carried them away, so that no place was found for them; and the stone that smote the image became a great mountain, and filled the whole earth.'' None
4. Septuagint, 1 Maccabees, 1.21-1.23 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • donation of land • donor, donation, individuals

 Found in books: Dignas (2002), Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor, 43; Levine (2005), The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years, 397

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1.21 He arrogantly entered the sanctuary and took the golden altar, the lampstand for the light, and all its utensils. 1.22 He took also the table for the bread of the Presence, the cups for drink offerings, the bowls, the golden censers, the curtain, the crowns, and the gold decoration on the front of the temple; he stripped it all off. 1.23 He took the silver and the gold, and the costly vessels; he took also the hidden treasures which he found.'' None
5. New Testament, 1 John, 4.2-4.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatism • Donatism, African theology • Donatism, theological diversity • Donatists • Donatists, anti-Donatist polemic • Tyconius, Donatist exegete • Tyconius, Donatist exegete, doctrine of the church

 Found in books: Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 970; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 242

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4.2 Ἐν τούτῳ γινώσκετε τὸ πνεῦμα τοῦ θεοῦ· πᾶν πνεῦμα ὃ ὁμολογεῖ Ἰησοῦν Χριστὸν ἐν σαρκὶ ἐληλυθότα ἐκ τοῦ θεοῦ ἐστίν, 4.3 καὶ πᾶν πνεῦμα ὃ μὴ ὁμολογεῖ τὸν Ἰησοῦν ἐκ τοῦ θεοῦ οὐκ ἔστιν· καὶ τοῦτό ἐστιν τὸ τοῦ ἀντιχρίστου, ὃ ἀκηκόατε ὅτι ἔρχεται, καὶ νῦν ἐν τῷ κόσμῳ ἐστὶν ἤδη.'' None
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4.2 By this you know the Spirit of God: every spirit who confesses that Jesus Christ has come in the flesh is of God, ' "4.3 and every spirit who doesn't confess that Jesus Christ has come in the flesh is not of God, and this is the spirit of the antichrist, of whom you have heard that it comes. Now it is in the world already. "' None
6. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 1.30-1.31, 4.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Cresconius the Donatist • Donatism • Donatism, African theology • Donatism, theological diversity • Donatists • Donatists, anti-Donatist polemic • Tyconius, Donatist exegete • Tyconius, Donatist exegete, Book of Rules • Tyconius, Donatist exegete, doctrine of the church • omnia mundum/whole world, in Enar. Ps./anti-Donatist

 Found in books: Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 969; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 85, 136, 148; Pollmann and Vessey (2007), Augustine and the Disciplines: From Cassiciacum to Confessions, 158; Poorthuis and Schwartz (2006), A Holy People: Jewish And Christian Perspectives on Religious Communal Identity. 288; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 248

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1.30 ἐξ αὐτοῦ δὲ ὑμεῖς ἐστὲ ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ, ὃς ἐγενήθη σοφία ἡμῖν ἀπὸ θεοῦ, δικαιοσύνη τε καὶ ἁγιασμὸς καὶ ἀπολύτρωσις, ἵνα καθὼς γέγραπται 1.31 Ὁ καυχώμενος ἐν Κυρίῳ καυχάσθω.
4.7
τίς γάρ σε διακρίνει; τί δὲ ἔχεις ὃ οὐκ ἔλαβες; εἰ δὲ καὶ ἔλαβες, τί καυχᾶσαι ὡς μὴ λαβών;'' None
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1.30 But of him, you are in ChristJesus, who was made to us wisdom from God, and righteousness andsanctification, and redemption: 1.31 that, according as it iswritten, "He who boasts, let him boast in the Lord."' "
4.7
For who makes you different? And what doyou have that you didn't receive? But if you did receive it, why do youboast as if you had not received it?"' None
7. New Testament, 1 Timothy, 1.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatists • Lucilla, and the Donatist schism

 Found in books: Ashbrook Harvey et al. (2015), A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer, 159; Grove (2021), Augustine on Memory, 119

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1.13 τὸ πρότερον ὄντα βλάσφημον καὶ διώκτην καὶ ἱβριστήν· ἀλλὰ ἠλεήθην, ὅτι ἀγνοῶν ἐποίησα ἐν ἀπιστίᾳ,'' None
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1.13 although I was before a blasphemer, a persecutor, and insolent. However, I obtained mercy, because I did it ignorantly in unbelief. '' None
8. New Testament, Acts, 9.3-9.7, 19.1-19.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatism • Donatism, African theology • Donatism, Donatist theology • Donatism, baptism • Donatists • Donatists, whole Christ and • Parmenian the Donatist • baptism, Donatist views • whole Christ (totus Christus), and Donatism

 Found in books: Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 964; Grove (2021), Augustine on Memory, 78, 118; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 138, 151; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 225

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9.3 Ἐν δὲ τῷ πορεύεσθαι ἐγένετο αὐτὸν ἐγγίζειν τῇ Δαμασκῷ, ἐξέφνης τε αὐτὸν περιήστραψεν φῶς ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ, 9.4 καὶ πεσὼν ἐπὶ τὴν γῆν ἤκουσεν φωνὴν λέγουσαν αὐτῷ Σαούλ Σαούλ, τί με διώκεις; 9.5 εἶπεν δέ Τίς εἶ, κύριε; ὁ δέ Ἐγώ εἰμι Ἰησοῦς ὃν σὺ διώκεις· 9.6 ἀλλὰ ἀνάστηθι καὶ εἴσελθε εἰς τὴν πόλιν, καὶ λαληθήσεταί σοι ὅτι σε δεῖ ποιεῖν. 9.7 οἱ δὲ ἄνδρες οἱ συνοδεύοντες αὐτῷ ἱστήκεισαν ἐνεοί, ἀκούοντες μὲν τῆς φωνῆς μηδένα δὲ θεωροῦντες.
19.1
Ἐγένετο δὲ ἐν τῷ τὸν Ἀπολλὼ εἶναι ἐν Κορίνθῳ Παῦλον διελθόντα τὰ ἀνωτερικὰ μέρη ἐλθεῖν εἰς Ἔφεσον καὶ εὑρεῖν τινὰς μαθητάς, 19.2 εἶπέν τε πρὸς αὐτούς Εἰ πνεῦμα ἅγιον ἐλάβετε πιστεύσαντες; οἱ δὲ πρὸς αὐτόν Ἀλλʼ οὐδʼ εἰ πνεῦμα ἅγιον ἔστιν ἠκούσαμεν. 1
9.3
εἶπέν τε Εἰς τί οὖν ἐβαπτίσθητε; οἱ δὲ εἶπαν Εἰς τὸ Ἰωάνου βάπτισμα. 19.4 εἶπεν δὲ Παῦλος Ἰωάνης ἐβάπτισεν βάπτισμα μετανοίας, τῷ λαῷ λέγων εἰς τὸν ἐρχόμενον μετʼ αὐτὸν ἵνα πιστεύσωσιν, τοῦτʼ ἔστιν εἰς τὸν Ἰησοῦν. 19.5 ἀκούσαντες δὲ ἐβαπτίσθησαν εἰς τὸ ὄνομα τοῦ κυρίου Ἰησοῦ·'' None
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9.3 As he traveled, it happened that he got close to Damascus, and suddenly a light from the sky shone around him. 9.4 He fell on the earth, and heard a voice saying to him, "Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?" 9.5 He said, "Who are you, Lord?"The Lord said, "I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting. 9.6 But rise up, and enter into the city, and you will be told what you must do." 9.7 The men who traveled with him stood speechless, hearing the voice, but seeing no one.
19.1
It happened that, while Apollos was at Corinth, Paul, having passed through the upper country, came to Ephesus, and found certain disciples. 19.2 He said to them, "Did you receive the Holy Spirit when you believed?"They said to him, "No, we haven\'t even heard that there is a Holy Spirit." 1
9.3
He said, "Into what then were you baptized?"They said, "Into John\'s baptism." 19.4 Paul said, "John indeed baptized with the baptism of repentance, saying to the people that they should believe in the one who would come after him, that is, on Jesus." 19.5 When they heard this, they were baptized into the name of the Lord Jesus. '' None
9. New Testament, Ephesians, 5.27 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatism • Donatism, • Donatism, African theology • Donatism, Donatist theology • Donatists • Petilian the Donatist

 Found in books: Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 966; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 142; Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 131

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5.27 ἵνα παραστήσῃ αὐτὸς ἑαυτῷ ἔνδοξον τὴν ἐκκλησίαν, μὴ ἔχουσαν σπίλον ἢ ῥυτίδα ἤ τι τῶν τοιούτων, ἀλλʼ ἵνα ᾖ ἁγία καὶ ἄμωμος.'' None
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5.27 that he might present the assembly to himself gloriously, not having spot or wrinkle or any such thing; but that it should be holy and without blemish. '' None
10. New Testament, Romans, 2.24, 4.5, 5.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatism, • Donatist, Donatism • Donatists • Donatists, anti-Donatist polemic

 Found in books: Cheuk-Yin Yam (2019), Trinity and Grace in Augustine, 367; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 136, 143, 154; Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 131; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 119, 130, 224, 245, 254

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2.24 τὸγὰρὅνομα τοῦ θεοῦ διʼ ὑμᾶς βλασφημεῖται ἐν τοῖς ἔθνεσιν,καθὼς γέγραπται.
4.5
τῷ δὲ μὴ ἐργαζομένῳ, πιστεύοντι δὲ ἐπὶ τὸν δικαιοῦντα τὸν ἀσεβῆ, λογίζεται ἡ πίστις αὐτοῦ εἰς δικαιοσύνην,
5.5
ἡ δὲἐλπὶς οὐ καταισχύνει.ὅτι ἡ ἀγάπη τοῦ θεοῦ ἐκκέχυται ἐν ταῖς καρδίαις ἡμῶν διὰ πνεύματος ἁγίου τοῦ δοθέντος ἡμῖν·'' None
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2.24 For "the name of God is blasphemed among the Gentiles because of you," just as it is written. ' "
4.5
But to him who doesn't work, but believes in him who justifies the ungodly, his faith is accounted for righteousness. " "
5.5
and hope doesn't disappoint us, because God's love has been poured out into our hearts through the Holy Spirit who was given to us. "' None
11. New Testament, John, 3.5, 6.44 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatists • Donatists, anti-Donatist polemic • Donatists, donatism

 Found in books: Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 146, 148, 151; Pignot (2020), The Catechumenate in Late Antique Africa (4th–6th Centuries): Augustine of Hippo, His Contemporaries and Early Reception, 143; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 119, 120, 134, 187, 225

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3.5 ἀπεκρίθη ὁ Ἰησοῦς Ἀμὴν ἀμὴν λέγω σοι, ἐὰν μή τις γεννηθῇ ἐξ ὕδατος καὶ πνεύματος, οὐ δύναται εἰσελθεῖν εἰς τὴν βασιλείαν τοῦ θεοῦ.
6.44
οὐδεὶς δύναται ἐλθεῖν πρός με ἐὰν μὴ ὁ πατὴρ ὁ πέμψας με ἑλκύσῃ αὐτόν, κἀγὼ ἀναστήσω αὐτὸν ἐν τῇ ἐσχάτῃ ἡμέρᾳ.'' None
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3.5 Jesus answered, "Most assuredly I tell you, unless one is born of water and spirit, he can\'t enter into the Kingdom of God!
6.44
No one can come to me unless the Father who sent me draws him, and I will raise him up in the last day. '' None
12. New Testament, Luke, 14.23 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatists • Donatists, anti-Donatist polemic

 Found in books: Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 151; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 224, 263

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14.23 καὶ εἶπεν ὁ κύριος πρὸς τὸν δοῦλον Ἔξελθε εἰς τὰς ὁδοὺς καὶ φραγμοὺς καὶ ἀνάγκασον εἰσελθεῖν, ἵνα γεμισθῇ μου ὁ οἶκος·'' None
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14.23 "The lord said to the servant, \'Go out into the highways and hedges, and compel them to come in, that my house may be filled. '' None
13. New Testament, Matthew, 13.29-13.30 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatism • Donatism, African theology • Donatism, Donatist theology • Donatists • Petilian the Donatist

 Found in books: Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 966; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 143

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13.29 ὁ δέ φησιν Οὔ, μή ποτε συλλέγοντες τὰ ζιζάνια ἐκριζώσητε ἅμα αὐτοῖς τὸν σῖτον· 13.30 ἄφετε συναυξάνεσθαι ἀμφότερα ἕως τοῦ θερισμοῦ· καὶ ἐν καιρῷ τοῦ θερισμοῦ ἐρῶ τοῖς θερισταῖς Συλλέξατε πρῶτον τὰ ζιζάνια καὶ δήσατε αὐτὰ εἰς δέσμας πρὸς τὸ κατακαῦσαι αὐτά, τὸν δὲ σῖτον συνάγετε εἰς τὴν ἀποθήκην μου.'' None
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13.29 "But he said, \'No, lest perhaps while you gather up the darnel, you root up the wheat with them. 13.30 Let both grow together until the harvest, and in the harvest time I will tell the reapers, "First, gather up the darnel, and bind them in bundles to burn them; but gather the wheat into my barn."\'"'' None
14. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 10.5.18-10.5.19 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Constantine, response to Donatism • Donatism, impact of Constantine • Donatist controversy/Donatists • Donatists, Donatist controversy

 Found in books: Dijkstra and Raschle (2020), Religious Violence in the Ancient World: From Classical Athens to Late Antiquity, 239; Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 1079; de Ste. Croix et al. (2006), Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy, 217

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10.5.18 Constantine Augustus to Miltiades, bishop of Rome, and to Marcus. Since many such communications have been sent to me by Anulinus, the most illustrious proconsul of Africa, in which it is said that Caecilianus, bishop of the city of Carthage, has been accused by some of his colleagues in Africa, in many matters; and since it seems to me a very serious thing that in those provinces which Divine Providence has freely entrusted to my devotedness, and in which there is a great population, the multitude are found following the baser course, and dividing, as it were, into two parties, and the bishops are at variance — 10.5.19 it has seemed good to me that Caecilianus himself, with ten of the bishops that appear to accuse him, and with ten others whom he may consider necessary for his defense, should sail to Rome, that there, in the presence of yourselves and of Retecius and Maternus and Marinus, your colleagues, whom I have commanded to hasten to Rome for this purpose, he may be heard, as you may understand to be in accordance with the most holy law.'' None
15. None, None, nan (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatism, • Donatism, and scripture • Donatism, church of the martyrs • Donatism, persecution • Donatism, proprium • persecution, Donatists

 Found in books: Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 51; Ployd (2023), Augustine, Martyrdom, and Classical Rhetoric, 91

16. Augustine, Confessions, 1.9.14, 3.4.8 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Cresconius the Donatist • Donatists • Donatists, donatism

 Found in books: Pignot (2020), The Catechumenate in Late Antique Africa (4th–6th Centuries): Augustine of Hippo, His Contemporaries and Early Reception, 39, 54, 55, 56; Pollmann and Vessey (2007), Augustine and the Disciplines: From Cassiciacum to Confessions, 158; Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 164

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1.9.14 14. O my God! What miseries and mockeries did I then experience, when obedience to my teachers was set before me as proper to my boyhood, that I might flourish in this world, and distinguish myself in the science of speech, which should get me honour among men, and deceitful riches! After that I was put to school to get learning, of which I (worthless as I was) knew not what use there was; and yet, if slow to learn, I was flogged! For this was deemed praiseworthy by our forefathers; and many before us, passing the same course, had appointed beforehand for us these troublesome ways by which we were compelled to pass, multiplying labour and sorrow upon the sons of Adam. But we found, O Lord, men praying to You, and we learned from them to conceive of You, according to our ability, to be some Great One, who was able (though not visible to our senses) to hear and help us. For as a boy I began to pray to You, my help and my refuge, and in invoking You broke the bands of my tongue, and entreated You though little, with no little earnestness, that I might not be beaten at school. And when You heard me not, giving me not over to folly thereby, my elders, yea, and my own parents too, who wished me no ill, laughed at my stripes, my then great and grievous ill. 15. Is there any one, Lord, with so high a spirit, cleaving to You with so strong an affection - for even a kind of obtuseness may do that much - but is there, I say, any one who, by cleaving devoutly to You, is endowed with so great a courage that he can esteem lightly those racks and hooks, and varied tortures of the same sort, against which, throughout the whole world, men supplicate You with great fear, deriding those who most bitterly fear them, just as our parents derided the torments with which our masters punished us when we were boys? For we were no less afraid of our pains, nor did we pray less to You to avoid them; and yet we sinned, in writing, or reading, or reflecting upon our lessons less than was required of us. For we wanted not, O Lord, memory or capacity, of which, by Your will, we possessed enough for our age - but we delighted only in play; and we were punished for this by those who were doing the same things themselves. But the idleness of our elders they call business, while boys who do the like are punished by those same elders, and yet neither boys nor men find any pity. For will any one of good sense approve of my being whipped because, as a boy, I played ball, and so was hindered from learning quickly those lessons by means of which, as a man, I should play more unbecomingly? And did he by whom I was beaten do other than this, who, when he was overcome in any little controversy with a co-tutor, was more tormented by anger and envy than I when beaten by a playmate in a match at ball? ' "
3.4.8
7. Among such as these, at that unstable period of my life, I studied books of eloquence, wherein I was eager to be eminent from a damnable and inflated purpose, even a delight in human vanity. In the ordinary course of study, I lighted upon a certain book of Cicero, whose language, though not his heart, almost all admire. This book of his contains an exhortation to philosophy, and is called Hortensius. This book, in truth, changed my affections, and turned my prayers to Yourself, O Lord, and made me have other hopes and desires. Worthless suddenly became every vain hope to me; and, with an incredible warmth of heart, I yearned for an immortality of wisdom, and began now to arise Luke 15:18 that I might return to You. Not, then, to improve my language - which I appeared to be purchasing with my mother's means, in that my nineteenth year, my father having died two years before - not to improve my language did I have recourse to that book; nor did it persuade me by its style, but its matter. 8. How ardent was I then, my God, how ardent to fly from earthly things to You! Nor did I know how You would deal with me. For with You is wisdom. In Greek the love of wisdom is called philosophy, with which that book inflamed me. There be some who seduce through philosophy, under a great, and alluring, and honourable name coloring and adorning their own errors. And almost all who in that and former times were such, are in that book censured and pointed out. There is also disclosed that most salutary admonition of Your Spirit, by Your good and pious servant: Beware lest any man spoil you through philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the world, and not after Christ: for in Him dwells all the fullness of the Godhead bodily. Colossians 2:8-9 And since at that time (as Thou, O Light of my heart, know) the words of the apostle were unknown to me, I was delighted with that exhortation, in so far only as I was thereby stimulated, and enkindled, and inflamed to love, seek, obtain, hold, and embrace, not this or that sect, but wisdom itself, whatever it were; and this alone checked me thus ardent, that the name of Christ was not in it. For this name, according to Your mercy, O Lord, this name of my Saviour Your Son, had my tender heart piously drunk in, deeply treasured even with my mother's milk; and whatsoever was without that name, though never so erudite, polished, and truthful, took not complete hold of me. "' None
17. Augustine, De Baptismo Contra Donatistas, 1.11.15, 4.4.5, 6.14.23 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatists • Donatists, donatism • Donatists, ecclesiastical views

 Found in books: Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 136, 141, 144; Pignot (2020), The Catechumenate in Late Antique Africa (4th–6th Centuries): Augustine of Hippo, His Contemporaries and Early Reception, 105; Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 208

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1.11.15 15. They ask also, "Whether sins are remitted in baptism in the party of Donatus:" so that, if we say that they are remitted, they may answer, then the Holy Spirit is there; for when by the breathing of our Lord the Holy Spirit was given to the disciples, He then went on to say, "Baptize all nations in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost." Matthew 28:19 Whose soever sins ye remit, they are remitted unto them; and whose soever sins ye retain, they are retained." John 20:23 And if it is so, they say, then our communion is the Church of Christ; for the Holy Spirit does not work the remission of sins except in the Church. And if our communion is the Church of Christ, then your communion is not the Church of Christ. For that is one, wherever it is, of which it is said, "My dove is but one; she is the only one of her mother;" Song of Songs 6:9 nor can there be just so many churches as there are schisms. But if we should say that sins are not there remitted, then, say they, there is no true baptism there; and therefore ought you to baptize those whom you receive from us. And since you do not do this, you confess that you are not in the Church of Christ. 16. To these we reply, following the Scriptures, by asking them to answer themselves what they ask of us. For I beg them to tell us whether there is any remission of sins where there is not charity; for sins are the darkness of the soul. For we find St. John saying, "He that hates his brother is still in darkness." 1 John 2:11 But none would create schisms, if they were not blinded by hatred of their brethren. If, therefore, we say that sins are not remitted there, how is he regenerate who is baptized among them? And what is regeneration in baptism, except the being renovated from the corruption of the old man? And how can he be so renovated whose past sins are not remitted? But if he be not regenerate, neither does he put on Christ; from which it seems to follow that he ought to be baptized again. For the apostle says, "For as many of you as have been baptized into Christ have put on Christ;" Galatians 3:27 and if he has not so put on Christ, neither should he be considered to have been baptized in Christ. Further, since we say that he has been baptized in Christ, we confess that he has put on Christ; and if we confess this, we confess that he is regenerate. And if this be so, how does St. John say, "He that hates his brother remains still in darkness," if remission of his sins has already taken place? Can it be that schism does not involve hatred of one\'s brethren? Who will maintain this, when both the origin of, and perseverance in schism consists in nothing else save hatred of the brethren? 17. They think that they solve this question when they say: "There is then no remission of sins in schism, and therefore no creation of the new man by regeneration, and accordingly neither is there the baptism of Christ." But since we confess that the baptism of Christ exists in schism, we propose this question to them for solution: Was Simon Magus endued with the true baptism of Christ? They will answer, Yes; being compelled to do so by the authority of holy Scripture. I ask them whether they confess that he received remission of his sins. They will certainly acknowledge it. So I ask why Peter said to him that he had no part in the lot of the saints. Because, they say, he sinned afterwards, wishing to buy with money the gift of God, which he believed the apostles were able to sell.
4.4.5
6. We do not, therefore, "acknowledge the baptism of heretics," when we refuse to baptize after them; but because we acknowledge the ordice to be of Christ even among evil men, whether openly separated from us, or secretly severed while within our body, we receive it with due respect, having corrected those who were wrong in the points wherein they went astray. However as I seem to be hard pressed when it is said to me, "Does then a heretic confer remission of sins?" so I in turn press hard when I say, Does then he who violates the commands of Heaven, the avaricious man, the robber, the usurer, the envious man, does he who renounces the world in words and not in deeds, confer such remission? If you mean by the force of God\'s sacrament, then both the one and the other; if by his own merit, neither of them. For that sacrament, even in the hands of wicked men, is known to be of Christ; but neither the one nor the other of these men is found in the body of the one uncorrupt, holy, chaste dove, which has neither spot nor wrinkle. And just as baptism is of no profit to the man who renounces the world in words and not in deeds, so it is of no profit to him who is baptized in heresy or schism; but each of them, when he amends his ways, begins to receive profit from that which before was not profitable, but was yet already in him. 7. "He therefore that is baptized in heresy does not become the temple of God; but does it therefore follow that he is not to be considered as baptized? For neither does the avaricious man, baptized within the Church, become the temple of God unless he depart from his avarice; for they who become the temple of God certainly inherit the kingdom of God. But the apostle says, among many other things, "Neither the covetous, nor extortioners, shall inherit the kingdom of God." 1 Corinthians 6:10 For in another place the same apostle compares covetousness to the worship of idols: "Nor covetous man," he says, "who is an idolater;" Ephesians 5:5 which meaning the same Cyprian has so far extended in a letter to Antonianus, that he did not hesitate to compare the sin of covetousness with that of men who in time of persecution had declared in writing that they would offer incense. The man, then, who is baptized in heresy in the name of the Holy Trinity, yet does not become the temple of God unless he abandons his heresy, just as the covetous man who has been baptized in the same name does not become the temple of God unless he abandons his covetousness, which is idolatry. For this, too, the same apostle says: "What agreement has the temple of God with idols?" 2 Corinthians 6:16 Let it not, then, be asked of us "of what God he is made the temple" when we say that he is not made the temple of God at all. Yet he is not therefore unbaptized, nor does his foul error cause that what he has received, consecrated in the words of the gospel, should not be the holy sacrament; just as the other man\'s covetousness (which is idolatry) and great uncleanness cannot prevent what he receives from being holy baptism, even though he be baptized with the same words of the gospel by another man covetous like himself.
6.14.23
22. Lucius of Castra Galb said: "Since the Lord has said in His gospel, \'You are the salt of the earth: but if the salt have lost his savor, that which is salted from it shall be thenceforth good for nothing, but to be cast out, and to be trodden under foot of men.\' and seeing that again, after His resurrection, when sending forth His apostles, He commanded them, saying, \'All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth: go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost,\' Matthew 28:18-19 - since then it is plain that heretics, that is, the enemies of Christ, have not the full confession of the sacrament, also that schismatics cannot reason with spiritual wisdom, since they themselves, by withdrawing when they have lost their savor from the Church, which is one, have become contrary to it, let that be done which is written, \'The houses of those that are opposed to the law must needs be cleansed.\' and it therefore follows that those who have been polluted by being baptized by men opposed to Christ should first be cleansed, and only then baptized." 23. Lucius of Castra Galb has brought forward a proof from the gospel, in the words of the Lord, "You are the salt of the earth: but if the salt have lost his savor, that which is salted from it shall be good for nothing, but to be cast out, and to be trodden under foot of men;" just as though we maintained that men when cast out were of any profit for the salvation either of themselves or of any one else. But those also who, though seeming to be within, are yet of such a kind, not only are without spiritually, but will in the end be separated in the body also. For all such are for nothing. But it does not therefore follow that the sacrament of baptism which is in them is nothing. For even in the very men who are cast out, if they return to their senses and come back, the salvation which had departed from them returns; but the baptism does not return, because it never had departed. And in what the Lord says, "Go therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost," He did not permit any to baptize except the good, inasmuch as He did not say to the bad, "Whosesoever sins ye remit, they are remitted unto them; and whosesoever sins ye retain, they are retained." John 20:23 How then do the wicked baptize within, who cannot remit sins? How also is it that they baptize the wicked whose hearts are not changed, whose sins are yet upon them, as John says, "He that hates his brother is in darkness even until now?" 1 John 2:9 But if the sins of these men are remitted when they join themselves in the close bonds of love to the good and just, through whom sins are remitted in the Church, though they have been baptized by the wicked, so the sins of those also are remitted who come from without and join themselves by the inner bond of peace to the same framework of the body of Christ. Yet the baptism of Christ should be acknowledged in both, and held invalid in none, whether before they are converted, though then it profit them nothing, or after they are converted, that so it may profit them, as he says, "Since they themselves, by withdrawing when they have lost their savor from the Church, which is one, have become contrary to it, let that be done which is written, \'The houses of those that are opposed to the law must need be cleansed.\' And it therefore follows," he goes on to say, "that those who have been polluted by being baptized by men opposed to Christ should first be cleansed, and only then baptized." What then? Are thieves and murderers not contrary to the law, which says, "You shall not kill; you shall not steal?""They must therefore needs be cleansed." Who will deny it? And yet not only those who are baptized by such within the Church, but also those who, being such themselves, are baptized without being changed in heart, are nevertheless exempt from further baptism when they are so changed. So great is the force of the sacrament of mere baptism, that though we allow that a man who has been baptized and continues to lead an evil life requires to be cleansed, we yet forbid him to be any more baptized. '' None
18. Augustine, On Christian Doctrine, 3.33.46 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatism • Donatism, African theology • Donatism, theological diversity • Donatists • Tyconius, Donatist exegete • Tyconius, Donatist exegete, Book of Rules • Tyconius, Donatist exegete, doctrine of the church

 Found in books: Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 969; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 50

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3.33.46 46. The third rule relates to the promises and the law, and may be designated in other terms as relating to the spirit and the letter, which is the name I made use of when writing a book on this subject. It may be also named, of grace and the law. This, however, seems to me to be a great question in itself, rather than a rule to be applied to the solution of other questions. It was the want of clear views on this question that originated, or at least greatly aggravated, the Pelagian heresy. And the efforts of Tichonius to clear up this point were good, but not complete. For, in discussing the question about faith and works, he said that works were given us by God as the reward of faith, but that faith itself was so far our own that it did not come to us from God; not keeping in mind the saying of the apostle: Peace be to the brethren, and love with faith, from God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Ephesians 6:23 But he had not come into contact with this heresy, which has arisen in our time, and has given us much labor and trouble in defending against it the grace of God which is through our Lord Jesus Christ, and which (according to the saying of the apostle, There must be also heresies among you, that they which are approved may be made manifest among you 1 Corinthians 11:19) has made us much more watchful and diligent to discover in Scripture what escaped Tichonius, who, having no enemy to guard against, was less attentive and anxious on this point, namely, that even faith itself is the gift of Him who has dealt to every man the measure of faith. Romans 12:3 Whence it is said to certain believers: Unto you it is given, in the behalf of Christ, not only to believe in Him, but also to suffer for His sake. Philippians 1:29 Who, then, can doubt that each of these is the gift of God, when he learns from this passage, and believes, that each of them is given? There are many other testimonies besides which prove this. But I am not now treating of this doctrine. I have, however, dealt with it, one place or another, very frequently. '' None
19. Augustine, De Peccatorum Meritis Et Remissione Et De Baptismo Parvulorum, 1.34.63 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Carthage Donatist Conference • Donatist, Donatism • Donatists • Donatists, donatism • Donatists, donatism, Initiation

 Found in books: Cheuk-Yin Yam (2019), Trinity and Grace in Augustine, 384, 388, 391; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 172; Pignot (2020), The Catechumenate in Late Antique Africa (4th–6th Centuries): Augustine of Hippo, His Contemporaries and Early Reception, 114; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 157

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1.34.63 The Christians of Carthage have an excellent name for the sacraments, when they say that baptism is nothing else than salvation, and the sacrament of the body of Christ nothing else than life. Whence, however, was this derived, but from that primitive, as I suppose, and apostolic tradition, by which the Churches of Christ maintain it to be an inherent principle, that without baptism and partaking of the supper of the Lord it is impossible for any man to attain either to the kingdom of God or to salvation and everlasting life? So much also does Scripture testify, according to the words which we already quoted. For wherein does their opinion, who designate baptism by the term salvation, differ from what is written: He saved us by the washing of regeneration? Titus 3:5 or from Peter's statement: The like figure whereunto even baptism does also now save us? 1 Peter 3:21 And what else do they say who call the sacrament of the Lord's Supper life, than that which is written: I am the living bread which came down from heaven; John 6:51 and The bread that I shall give is my flesh, for the life of the world; John 6:51 and Unless you eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink His blood, you shall have no life in you? John 6:53 If, therefore, as so many and such divine witnesses agree, neither salvation nor eternal life can be hoped for by any man without baptism and the Lord's body and blood, it is vain to promise these blessings to infants without them. Moreover, if it be only sins that separate man from salvation and eternal life, there is nothing else in infants which these sacraments can be the means of removing, but the guilt of sin - respecting which guilty nature it is written, that no one is clean, not even if his life be only that of a day. Job 14:4 Whence also that exclamation of the Psalmist: Behold, I was shapen in iniquity; and in sin did my mother conceive me! This is either said in the person of our common humanity, or if of himself only David speaks, it does not imply that he was born of fornication, but in lawful wedlock. We therefore ought not to doubt that even for infants yet to be baptized was that precious blood shed, which previous to its actual effusion was so given, and applied in the sacrament, that it was said, This is my blood, which shall be shed for many for the remission of sins. Matthew 26:28 Now they who will not allow that they are under sin, deny that there is any liberation. For what is there that men are liberated from, if they are held to be bound by no bondage of sin? " " None
20. None, None, nan (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatists • Donatists, donatism • Donatists, donatism, Initiation

 Found in books: Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 139; Pignot (2020), The Catechumenate in Late Antique Africa (4th–6th Centuries): Augustine of Hippo, His Contemporaries and Early Reception, 111

21. None, None, nan (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatism, • Donatists, donatism • Donatists, donatism, Initiation

 Found in books: Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 22; Pignot (2020), The Catechumenate in Late Antique Africa (4th–6th Centuries): Augustine of Hippo, His Contemporaries and Early Reception, 111

22. None, None, nan (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatism • Donatism, • Donatism, African theology • Donatism, Donatist theology • Donatism, political disaffection • Donatism, relevant conditions in North Africa • Donatism, social context • Donatists • Donatists, church, ecclesiastical structure of • Donatists, donatism • Donatists, ecclesiastical views • Parmenian the Donatist • Petilian the Donatist • Petilianus (Donatist bishop) • root (radix), Donatist uses of

 Found in books: Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 957, 965; Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 246; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 89; Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 43; Nisula (2012), Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence, 160; Pignot (2020), The Catechumenate in Late Antique Africa (4th–6th Centuries): Augustine of Hippo, His Contemporaries and Early Reception, 59, 60, 61; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 119; Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 210

23. None, None, nan (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatists

 Found in books: Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 50; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 118

24. None, None, nan (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatism, • Donatists • Donatists, anti-Donatist polemic • Donatists, donatism • Donatists, donatism, Initiation • Donatists, whole Christ and • omnia mundum/whole world, in Enar. Ps./anti-Donatist • whole Christ (totus Christus), and Donatism

 Found in books: Grove (2021), Augustine on Memory, 77, 174, 175; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 138; Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 254; Pignot (2020), The Catechumenate in Late Antique Africa (4th–6th Centuries): Augustine of Hippo, His Contemporaries and Early Reception, 109; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 248

25. None, None, nan (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatist, Donatism • Donatists • Donatists, donatism

 Found in books: Cheuk-Yin Yam (2019), Trinity and Grace in Augustine, 388, 575; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 1, 85; Pignot (2020), The Catechumenate in Late Antique Africa (4th–6th Centuries): Augustine of Hippo, His Contemporaries and Early Reception, 84; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 225

26. None, None, nan (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatist, Donatism • Donatists • Donatists, anti-Donatist polemic • Donatists, donatism • Donatists, donatism, Initiation • Donatists, whole Christ and • omnia mundum/whole world, in Enar. Ps./anti-Donatist • whole Christ (totus Christus), and Donatism

 Found in books: Cheuk-Yin Yam (2019), Trinity and Grace in Augustine, 388; Grove (2021), Augustine on Memory, 175; Pignot (2020), The Catechumenate in Late Antique Africa (4th–6th Centuries): Augustine of Hippo, His Contemporaries and Early Reception, 109; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 219, 261

27. None, None, nan (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatists, Donatist controversy • orthodoxy, and the Donatists

 Found in books: Ando and Ruepke (2006), Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome, 117; de Ste. Croix et al. (2006), Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy, 216, 217

28. None, None, nan (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatism, church of the martyrs • Donatism, persecution • Donatists, Donatist controversy • persecution, Donatists

 Found in books: Ployd (2023), Augustine, Martyrdom, and Classical Rhetoric, 96; de Ste. Croix et al. (2006), Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy, 216, 358

29. None, None, nan (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Cresconius, Donatist • Crispinus (Donatist bishop) • Donatism • Donatism, African theology • Donatism, alternative views of church • Donatism, church of the martyrs • Donatism, circumcellions/agonistici • Donatism, economic grievance • Donatism, persecution • Donatism, relevant conditions in North Africa • Donatism, social context • Donatist controversy/Donatists • Donatists • Donatists, Honorius’s suppression of • Donatists, as schismatics • Donatists, categorization as heretics • Donatists, catholics’ efforts to eliminate • Donatists, conversion to Catholicism • Donatists, donatism • Donatists, donatism, Initiation • Donatists, legislation against • Donatists, second baptism and • Donatists, use of imperial laws against • North Africa, Donatists in • persecution, Donatists

 Found in books: Dijkstra and Raschle (2020), Religious Violence in the Ancient World: From Classical Athens to Late Antiquity, 277; Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 959, 962; Farag (2021), What Makes a Church Sacred? Legal and Ritual Perspectives from Late Antiquity, 219; Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 262, 263, 267; Kahlos (2019), Religious Dissent in Late Antiquity, 350-450, 89, 158; Kraemer (2020), The Mediterranean Diaspora in Late Antiquity: What Christianity Cost the Jews, 172, 181, 182, 213; O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 4, 5; Pignot (2020), The Catechumenate in Late Antique Africa (4th–6th Centuries): Augustine of Hippo, His Contemporaries and Early Reception, 110; Ployd (2023), Augustine, Martyrdom, and Classical Rhetoric, 96, 100; Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 72

30. None, None, nan (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustine , respect for the Donatist Tyconius • Donatism • Donatism, • Donatism, African theology • Donatism, Donatist theology • Donatism, theological diversity • Tyconius, Donatist exegete • Tyconius, Donatist exegete, Book of Rules • Tyconius, Donatist exegete, doctrine of the church

 Found in books: Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 967; Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 21, 22, 221

31. None, None, nan (7th cent. CE - 7th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatism • Donatism, • Donatism, African theology • Donatism, alternative views of church • Donatism, and scripture • Donatism, church of the martyrs • Donatism, circumcellions/agonistici • Donatism, economic grievance • Donatism, parum plena • Donatism, persecution • Donatism, proprium • Donatism, relatio criminis • Donatism, relevant conditions in North Africa • Donatism, social context • Donatist controversy/Donatists • Donatist(s) • Donatists • Donatists, donatism • Donatists, donatism, Initiation • Donatists, prosecution of • Eusebius (Donatist bishop) • persecution, Donatists

 Found in books: Dijkstra and Raschle (2020), Religious Violence in the Ancient World: From Classical Athens to Late Antiquity, 277, 278, 279, 280, 282, 283; Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 961, 962; Geljon and Vos (2020), Rituals in Early Christianity: New Perspectives on Tradition and Transformation, 147; Glowalsky (2020), Rhetoric and Scripture in Augustine’s Homiletic Strategy: Tracing the Narrative of Christian Maturation, 83; Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 232; Kahlos (2019), Religious Dissent in Late Antiquity, 350-450, 79; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 150, 151, 176; Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 24; O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 33, 34; Pignot (2020), The Catechumenate in Late Antique Africa (4th–6th Centuries): Augustine of Hippo, His Contemporaries and Early Reception, 53, 109, 111, 227; Ployd (2023), Augustine, Martyrdom, and Classical Rhetoric, 89, 91, 94, 100, 101, 102, 103; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 225

32. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatism, • Donatists, Sermo in natali sanctorum innocentium • Donatists, Tyconius’s literary connection to

 Found in books: Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 55, 57; Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 303, 306




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For a list of book indices included, see here.