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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.


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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
dionysia Cosgrove (2022) 49, 50
Ekroth (2013) 33, 34, 136
Fabian Meinel (2015) 244
Gygax (2016) 79, 151, 155, 175
Lalone (2019) 218, 230
Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020) 115
Martin (2009) 28, 29, 30, 31, 34, 35, 36
Panoussi(2019) 117, 118
Simon (2021) 300, 301, 318
Stavrianopoulou (2006) 275, 276
Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020) 63, 65, 69
dionysia, abuses, at the great Jouanna (2018) 184
dionysia, aeschylus, in the great Jouanna (2018) 181, 651, 652
dionysia, alexandria, great Stavrianopoulou (2006) 104
dionysia, alexandrian tribe Bernabe et al (2013) 454
dionysia, aristophanes, on the great Jouanna (2018) 181, 182
dionysia, aristotle, victories at the, non-extant Liapis and Petrides (2019) 327
dionysia, at acharnai, epimeletai, of Mikalson (2016) 61, 151
dionysia, athena festivals with tragic performances, other than itonia, festival of Liapis and Petrides (2019) 92, 156
dionysia, athens, city Steiner (2001) 107
dionysia, attica Naiden (2013) 213
dionysia, birds, the, aristophanes, on the great Jouanna (2018) 181, 182
dionysia, chairemon, father of Czajkowski et al (2020) 2, 3
dionysia, city Henderson (2020) 13, 173, 181, 222, 228, 230, 232, 242, 243
Humphreys (2018) 561, 643, 659, 704, 796, 803, 806, 1014, 1080
Seaford (2018) 13, 57, 103, 179
Sommerstein and Torrance (2014) 135, 236, 340, 359
dionysia, city, dionysia, great Bernabe et al (2013) 72, 82, 94, 273, 285, 303, 308, 311, 381, 409
dionysia, comedy, at the great Jouanna (2018) 181, 182
dionysia, crown, at Martin (2009) 16, 19, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 30, 31, 208
dionysia, daughter of chairemon Czajkowski et al (2020) 2, 3, 326, 417, 433
dionysia, democracy, in athens, and the Jouanna (2018) 78, 651
dionysia, demosthenes role at Martin (2009) 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 245
dionysia, dramatic festivals, great Barbato (2020) 26
dionysia, dramatic festivals, rural Barbato (2020) 27
dionysia, epimeletai, of pompe of city Mikalson (2016) 24, 27, 71, 94, 114, 151, 197, 209, 212, 214, 237
dionysia, festival Athanassaki and Titchener (2022) 33, 78, 134
Bernabe et al (2013) 101
dionysia, festival, , at athens, ‘great’ Csapo (2022) 18, 19, 34, 35, 66, 71, 194
dionysia, festival, , at naucratis Csapo (2022) 47
dionysia, festival, , at opous Csapo (2022) 122
dionysia, festival, , at ptolemais Csapo (2022) 46, 47
dionysia, festival, , at teos Csapo (2022) 79
dionysia, festivals Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 180, 182, 252, 263, 267, 469
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than agrionia, at thebes Liapis and Petrides (2019) 165, 171
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than amphiaraia-rhomaia, at oropos Liapis and Petrides (2019) 171
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than antigoneia, at samos Liapis and Petrides (2019) 162, 177
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than aristonikeia, at karystos Liapis and Petrides (2019) 162
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than asklepieia-apollonia, at epidaurus Liapis and Petrides (2019) 162, 177
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than charitesia, at orchomenos Liapis and Petrides (2019) 171
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than demetrieia, various Liapis and Petrides (2019) 162, 177
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than heraia, various Liapis and Petrides (2019) 162, 171
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than homoloia, at orchomenos Liapis and Petrides (2019) 171
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than letoa-rhomaia, at caunus Liapis and Petrides (2019) 162, 171
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than mouseia, at thespiae Liapis and Petrides (2019) 162, 165, 171
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than naia, at dodona Liapis and Petrides (2019) 162, 171
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than olympia, at dion Liapis and Petrides (2019) 152, 153, 156
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than panathenaia, at ilium Liapis and Petrides (2019) 162
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than ptolemaia, at delos Liapis and Petrides (2019) 162, 174
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than pythia, at delphi Liapis and Petrides (2019) 165
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than rhomaia, various Liapis and Petrides (2019) 171
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than sarapieia, at tanagra Liapis and Petrides (2019) 171, 219
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than soteria, at delphi Liapis and Petrides (2019) 162, 170, 171, 175
dionysia, festivals with tragic performances, other than soteria, various Liapis and Petrides (2019) 171
dionysia, festivals, dionysos, bacchus, god Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 180, 181, 182, 184, 252, 263, 267, 469
dionysia, festivals, great or city d. Liapis and Petrides (2019) 8, 32, 36, 38, 121, 153, 154, 180, 181, 182, 195, 236, 272, 276, 291, 326, 342, 343
dionysia, festivals, outside attica Liapis and Petrides (2019) 155, 159, 168, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177, 179
dionysia, festivals, rural d. Liapis and Petrides (2019) 27
dionysia, great Jouanna (2018) 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 197, 198, 458, 459, 460
Riess (2012) 1, 56, 57, 58, 82, 83, 93, 146, 291
dionysia, great and tribute Jouanna (2018) 18
dionysia, law on Martin (2009) 19, 20
dionysia, of spartans Mikalson (2010) 89
dionysia, piraeus Parker (2005) 318, 468
dionysia, priestess of isis Griffiths (1975) 183, 288
dionysia, procession Martin (2009) 68, 285
dionysia, rural Bernabe et al (2013) 103, 375, 376
Humphreys (2018) 704, 796, 808, 810, 909, 973, 992, 1013, 1014, 1079, 1080, 1100, 1118, 1119, 1153, 1163, 1195
Lupu(2005) 138
Naiden (2013) 79
Parker (2005) 67, 74, 316, 317, 467
dionysia, salamis Henderson (2020) 255
dionysia, scholars/scholarship, ancient and byzantine, on tragedy, on the competitions at the Liapis and Petrides (2019) 334
dionysia, the Cadwallader (2016) 132, 137, 144, 147, 148
dionysia, thespis, in the great Jouanna (2018) 181
dionysias Pinheiro et al (2012a) 58, 68, 69

List of validated texts:
27 validated results for "dionysias"
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.130-6.140 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • City Dionysia • Great Dionysia, City Dionysia

 Found in books: Bernabe et al (2013) 303; Seaford (2018) 13


6.130. οὐδὲ γὰρ οὐδὲ Δρύαντος υἱὸς κρατερὸς Λυκόοργος 6.131. δὴν ἦν, ὅς ῥα θεοῖσιν ἐπουρανίοισιν ἔριζεν· 6.132. ὅς ποτε μαινομένοιο Διωνύσοιο τιθήνας 6.133. σεῦε κατʼ ἠγάθεον Νυσήϊον· αἳ δʼ ἅμα πᾶσαι 6.134. θύσθλα χαμαὶ κατέχευαν ὑπʼ ἀνδροφόνοιο Λυκούργου 6.135. θεινόμεναι βουπλῆγι· Διώνυσος δὲ φοβηθεὶς 6.136. δύσεθʼ ἁλὸς κατὰ κῦμα, Θέτις δʼ ὑπεδέξατο κόλπῳ 6.137. δειδιότα· κρατερὸς γὰρ ἔχε τρόμος ἀνδρὸς ὁμοκλῇ. 6.138. τῷ μὲν ἔπειτʼ ὀδύσαντο θεοὶ ῥεῖα ζώοντες, 6.139. καί μιν τυφλὸν ἔθηκε Κρόνου πάϊς· οὐδʼ ἄρʼ ἔτι δὴν 6.140. ἦν, ἐπεὶ ἀθανάτοισιν ἀπήχθετο πᾶσι θεοῖσιν·''. None
6.130. Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.134. Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. ' "6.135. But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; " "6.139. But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; " '6.140. and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus: ''. None
2. Euripides, Bacchae, 58-59, 64, 67, 78-82, 123-134, 142-143, 145, 225, 485-486, 605, 623, 632, 998, 1020, 1124, 1145 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Bacchanalia • Dionysia • Dionysia festivals, Rural D. • Dionysia, Great and Rural (festivals) • Great Dionysia, City Dionysia

 Found in books: Bernabe et al (2013) 273, 311; Gorain (2019) 15, 16, 25; Liapis and Petrides (2019) 27; Lipka (2021) 112; Panoussi(2019) 117


58. αἴρεσθε τἀπιχώριʼ ἐν πόλει Φρυγῶν 59. τύμπανα, Ῥέας τε μητρὸς ἐμά θʼ εὑρήματα,
64. Ἀσίας ἀπὸ γᾶς
67. Βάκχιον εὐαζομένα.
78. τά τε ματρὸς μεγάλας ὄργια 123. ἔνθα τρικόρυθες ἄντροις 124. βυρσότονον κύκλωμα τόδε 125. μοι Κορύβαντες ηὗρον· 126. βακχείᾳ δʼ ἀνὰ συντόνῳ 127. κέρασαν ἁδυβόᾳ Φρυγίων 128. αὐλῶν πνεύματι ματρός τε Ῥέας ἐς 129. χέρα θῆκαν, κτύπον εὐάσμασι Βακχᾶν· 130. παρὰ δὲ μαινόμενοι Σάτυροι 131. ματέρος ἐξανύσαντο θεᾶς, 132. ἐς δὲ χορεύματα 133. συνῆψαν τριετηρίδων, 134. αἷς χαίρει Διόνυσος. Χορός
142. ῥεῖ δὲ γάλακτι πέδον, ῥεῖ δʼ οἴνῳ, ῥεῖ δὲ μελισσᾶν 143. νέκταρι.
145. ὁ Βακχεὺς ἀνέχων
145. πυρσώδη φλόγα πεύκας
225. τὴν δʼ Ἀφροδίτην πρόσθʼ ἄγειν τοῦ Βακχίου.
485. τὰ δʼ ἱερὰ νύκτωρ ἢ μεθʼ ἡμέραν τελεῖς; Διόνυσος 486. νύκτωρ τὰ πολλά· σεμνότητʼ ἔχει σκότος. Πενθεύς
605. πρὸς πέδῳ πεπτώκατʼ; ᾔσθησθʼ, ὡς ἔοικε, Βακχίου
623. ἀνετίναξʼ ἐλθὼν ὁ Βάκχος δῶμα καὶ μητρὸς τάφῳ
632. πρὸς δὲ τοῖσδʼ αὐτῷ τάδʼ ἄλλα Βάκχιος λυμαίνεται·
998. περὶ σὰ Βάκχιʼ, ὄργια ματρός τε σᾶς
1020. ἴθʼ, ὦ Βάκχε, θηραγρευτᾷ βακχᾶν'
1124. ἐκ Βακχίου κατείχετʼ, οὐδʼ ἔπειθέ νιν. 1
145. τειχέων ἔσω τῶνδʼ, ἀνακαλοῦσα Βάκχιον '. None
58. But, you women who have left Tmolus, the bulwark of Lydia , my sacred band, whom I have brought from among the barbarians as assistants and companions to me, take your drums, native instruments of the city of the Phrygians, the invention of mother Rhea and myself,
64. From the land of Asia ,
67. having left sacred Tmolus, I am swift to perform for Bromius my sweet labor and toil easily borne, celebrating the god Bacchus Lit. shouting the ritual cry εὐοῖ . . Who is in the way? Who is in the way? Who? Let him get out of the way indoors, and let everyone keep his mouth pure E. R. Dodds takes this passage Let everyone come outside being sure to keep his mouth pure . He does not believe that there should be a full stop after the third τίς . ,
78. has his soul initiated into the Bacchic revels, dancing in inspired frenzy over the mountains with holy purifications, and who, revering the mysteries of great mother Kybele, 80. brandishing the thyrsos, garlanded with ivy, serves Dionysus.Go, Bacchae, go, Bacchae, escorting the god Bromius, child of a god,
123. O secret chamber of the Kouretes and you holy Cretan caves, parents to Zeus, where the Korybantes with triple helmet invented for me in their caves this circle, 125. covered with stretched hide; and in their excited revelry they mingled it with the sweet-voiced breath of Phrygian pipes and handed it over to mother Rhea, resounding with the sweet songs of the Bacchae; 130. nearby, raving Satyrs were fulfilling the rites of the mother goddess, and they joined it to the dances of the biennial festivals, in which Dionysus rejoices. Choru
142. Phrygian, the Lydian mountains, and the leader of the dance is Bromius, evoe! A ritual cry of delight. The plain flows with milk, it flows with wine, it flows with the nectar of bees.
145. The Bacchic one, raising the flaming torch of pine on his thyrsos, like the smoke of Syrian incense, darts about, arousing the wanderers with his racing and dancing, agitating them with his shouts,
225. but they consider Aphrodite before Bacchus.As many of them as I have caught, servants keep in the public strongholds with their hands bound, and as many as are absent I will hunt from the mountains, I mean Ino and Agave, who bore me to Echion, and
485. Do you perform the rites by night or by day? Dionysu 486. Mostly by night; darkness conveys awe. Pentheu
605. o stricken with fear? You have, so it seems, felt Bacchus shaking the house of Pentheus. But get up and take courage, putting a stop to your trembling. Chorus Leader
623. breathing out fury, dripping sweat from his body, gnashing his teeth in his lips. But I, being near, sitting quietly, looked on. Meanwhile, Bacchus came and shook the house and kindled a flame on his mother’s tomb. When Pentheus saw this, thinking that the house was burning,
632. created a phantom in the courtyard. Pentheus rushed at it headlong, stabbing at the shining air, as though slaughtering me. Besides this, Bacchus inflicted other damage on him: he knocked his house to the ground, and everything was shattered into pieces, while he saw my bitter chains. From fatigue,
998. Whoever with wicked mind and unjust rage regarding your rites, Bacchus, and those of your mother, comes with raving heart
1020. Go, Bacchus, with smiling face throw a deadly noose around the hunter of the Bacchae as he falls beneath the flock of Maenads. Second Messenger'
1124. Pity me, mother, and do not kill me, your child, for my sins. But she, foaming at the mouth and twisting her eyes all about, not thinking as she ought, was possessed by Bacchus, and he did not persuade her. 1
145. on the ill-fated prey, calling Bacchus her fellow hunter, her accomplice in the chase, the glorious victor—in whose service she wins a triumph of tears.And as for me, I will depart out of the way of this calamity before Agave reaches the house. '. None
3. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia (festival)\n, at Athens (‘Great’) • festivals with tragic performances (other than Dionysia), Olympia, at Dion

 Found in books: Csapo (2022) 66; Liapis and Petrides (2019) 152


659b. ἐπεκαλέσατο μέλλων κρίνειν, ἐκ τούτου ψευδόμενον ἀποφαίνεσθαι ῥᾳθύμως τὴν κρίσιν· οὐ γὰρ μαθητὴς ἀλλὰ διδάσκαλος, ὥς γε τὸ δίκαιον, θεατῶν μᾶλλον ὁ κριτὴς καθίζει, καὶ ἐναντιωσόμενος τοῖς τὴν ἡδονὴν μὴ προσηκόντως μηδὲ ὀρθῶς ἀποδιδοῦσι θεαταῖς. ἐξῆν γὰρ δὴ τῷ παλαιῷ τε καὶ Ἑλληνικῷ νόμῳ, οὐ καθάπερ ὁ Σικελικός τε καὶ Ἰταλικὸς νόμος νῦν, τῷ πλήθει τῶν θεατῶν ἐπιτρέπων καὶ τὸν νικῶντα διακρίνων χειροτονίαις, διέφθαρκε μὲν τοὺς ποιητὰς αὐτούς''. None
659b. For, rightly speaking, the judge sits not as a pupil, but rather as a teacher of the spectators, being ready to oppose those who offer them pleasure in a way that is unseemly or wrong; and that is what the present law of Sicily and Italy actually does: by entrusting the decision to the spectators, who award the prize by show of hands, not only has it corrupted the poet''. None
4. Sophocles, Antigone, 1115-1152 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia, Great • Dionysia, Great and Rural (festivals) • Great Dionysia, City Dionysia

 Found in books: Bernabe et al (2013) 273; Jouanna (2018) 458; Lipka (2021) 112


1115. God of many names, glory of the Cadmeian bride and offspring of loud-thundering Zeus, you who watch over far-famed Italy and reign'1116. God of many names, glory of the Cadmeian bride and offspring of loud-thundering Zeus, you who watch over far-famed Italy and reign 1120. in the valleys of Eleusinian Deo where all find welcome! O Bacchus, denizen of Thebes , the mother-city of your Bacchants, dweller by the wet stream of Ismenus on the soil 1125. of the sowing of the savage dragon’s teeth! 1126. The smoky glare of torches sees you above the cliffs of the twin peaks, where the Corycian nymphs move inspired by your godhead, 1130. and Castalia’s stream sees you, too. The ivy-mantled slopes of Nysa ’s hills and the shore green with many-clustered vines send you, when accompanied by the cries of your divine words, 1135. you visit the avenues of Thebes . 1137. Thebes of all cities you hold foremost in honor, together with your lightning-struck mother. 1140. And now when the whole city is held subject to a violent plague, come, we ask, with purifying feet over steep Parnassus , 1145. or over the groaning straits! 1146. O Leader of the chorus of the stars whose breath is fire, overseer of the chants in the night, son begotten of Zeus, 1150. appear, my king, with your attendant Thyiads, who in night-long frenzy dance and sing you as Iacchus the Giver! '. None
5. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Rural Dionysia • festival, Dionysia

 Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022) 134; Parker (2005) 317


6. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aeschylus, in the Great Dionysia • Aristophanes, on the Great Dionysia • Birds, The (Aristophanes), on the Great Dionysia • Dionysia, Demosthenes role at • Dionysia, Great • Dionysia, Great and Rural (festivals) • Great Dionysia, City Dionysia • Rural Dionysia • Thespis, in the Great Dionysia • comedy, at the Great Dionysia • crown, at Dionysia • dramatic festivals, Great Dionysia

 Found in books: Barbato (2020) 26; Bernabe et al (2013) 273, 375; Jouanna (2018) 181, 182; Lipka (2021) 22; Martin (2009) 24; Naiden (2013) 79; Parker (2005) 316, 467


7. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia • Dionysia, City

 Found in books: Cosgrove (2022) 49; Humphreys (2018) 659


8. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia (festival)\n, at Athens (‘Great’) • Dionysia, City

 Found in books: Csapo (2022) 66; Henderson (2020) 13


9. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia, City • Dionysia, Great and Rural (festivals)

 Found in books: Humphreys (2018) 643; Lipka (2021) 22


10. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia, Great and Rural (festivals) • Great Dionysia, City Dionysia

 Found in books: Bernabe et al (2013) 273, 381; Lipka (2021) 112


11. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia, City • epimeletai, of pompe of City Dionysia

 Found in books: Henderson (2020) 13; Mikalson (2016) 237


12. None, None, nan (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Rural Dionysia • epimeletai, of pompe of City Dionysia

 Found in books: Bernabe et al (2013) 103; Mikalson (2016) 71


13. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Bacchanalia affair • Dionysia

 Found in books: Dijkstra and Raschle (2020) 91; Panoussi(2019) 118


14. Plutarch, Cimon, 8.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia festivals, Great or City D. • democracy, in Athens, and the Dionysia

 Found in books: Jouanna (2018) 78; Liapis and Petrides (2019) 342, 343


8.7. ἔθεντο δʼ εἰς μνήμην αὐτοῦ καὶ τὴν τῶν τραγῳδῶν κρίσιν ὀνομαστὴν γενομένην. πρώτην γὰρ διδασκαλίαν τοῦ Σοφοκλέους ἔτι νέου καθέντος, Ἀψεφίων ὁ ἄρχων, φιλονεικίας οὔσης καὶ παρατάξεως τῶν θεατῶν, κριτὰς μὲν οὐκ ἐκλήρωσε τοῦ ἀγῶνος, ὡς δὲ Κίμων μετὰ τῶν συστρατήγων προελθὼν εἰς τὸ θέατρον ἐποιήσατο τῷ θεῷ τὰς νενομισμένας σπονδάς, οὐκ ἀφῆκεν αὐτοὺς ἀπελθεῖν, ἀλλʼ ὁρκώσας ἠνάγκασε καθίσαι καὶ κρῖναι δέκα ὄντας, ἀπὸ φυλῆς μιᾶς ἕκαστον.''. None
8.7. ''. None
15. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.2.5, 1.29.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia • Dionysia, City • Great Dionysia, City Dionysia

 Found in books: Bernabe et al (2013) 285, 409; Ekroth (2013) 33; Humphreys (2018) 659


1.2.5. ἡ δὲ ἑτέρα τῶν στοῶν ἔχει μὲν ἱερὰ θεῶν, ἔχει δὲ γυμνάσιον Ἑρμοῦ καλούμενον· ἔστι δὲ ἐν αὐτῇ Πουλυτίωνος οἰκία, καθʼ ἣν παρὰ τὴν ἐν Ἐλευσῖνι δρᾶσαι τελετὴν Ἀθηναίων φασὶν οὐ τοὺς ἀφανεστάτους· ἐπʼ ἐμοῦ δὲ ἀνεῖτο Διονύσῳ. Διόνυσον δὲ τοῦτον καλοῦσι Μελπόμενον ἐπὶ λόγῳ τοιῷδε ἐφʼ ὁποίῳ περ Ἀπόλλωνα Μουσηγέτην. ἐνταῦθά ἐστιν Ἀθηνᾶς ἄγαλμα Παιωνίας καὶ Διὸς καὶ Μνημοσύνης καὶ Μουσῶν, Ἀπόλλων τε ἀνάθημα καὶ ἔργον Εὐβουλίδου, καὶ δαίμων τῶν ἀμφὶ Διόνυσον Ἄκρατος· πρόσωπόν ἐστίν οἱ μόνον ἐνῳκοδομημένον τοίχῳ. μετὰ δὲ τὸ τοῦ Διονύσου τέμενός ἐστιν οἴκημα ἀγάλματα ἔχον ἐκ πηλοῦ, βασιλεὺς Ἀθηναίων Ἀμφικτύων ἄλλους τε θεοὺς ἑστιῶν καὶ Διόνυσον. ἐνταῦθα καὶ Πήγασός ἐστιν Ἐλευθερεύς, ὃς Ἀθηναίοις τὸν θεὸν ἐσήγαγε· συνεπελάβετο δέ οἱ τὸ ἐν Δελφοῖς μαντεῖον ἀναμνῆσαν τὴν ἐπὶ Ἰκαρίου ποτὲ ἐπιδημίαν τοῦ θεοῦ.
1.29.2. Ἀθηναίοις δὲ καὶ ἔξω πόλεως ἐν τοῖς δήμοις καὶ κατὰ τὰς ὁδοὺς θεῶν ἐστιν ἱερὰ καὶ ἡρώων καὶ ἀνδρῶν τάφοι· ἐγγυτάτω δὲ Ἀκαδημία, χωρίον ποτὲ ἀνδρὸς ἰδιώτου, γυμνάσιον δὲ ἐπʼ ἐμοῦ. κατιοῦσι δʼ ἐς αὐτὴν περίβολός ἐστιν Ἀρτέμιδος καὶ ξόανα Ἀρίστης καὶ Καλλίστης· ὡς μὲν ἐγὼ δοκῶ καὶ ὁμολογεῖ τὰ ἔπη τὰ Πάμφω, τῆς Ἀρτέμιδός εἰσιν ἐπικλήσεις αὗται, λεγόμενον δὲ καὶ ἄλλον ἐς αὐτὰς λόγον εἰδὼς ὑπερβήσομαι. καὶ ναὸς οὐ μέγας ἐστίν, ἐς ὃν τοῦ Διονύσου τοῦ Ἐλευθερέως τὸ ἄγαλμα ἀνὰ πᾶν ἔτος κομίζουσιν ἐν τεταγμέναις ἡμέραις.''. None
1.2.5. One of the porticoes contains shrines of gods, and a gymnasium called that of Hermes. In it is the house of Pulytion, at which it is said that a mystic rite was performed by the most notable Athenians, parodying the Eleusinian mysteries. But in my time it was devoted to the worship of Dionysus. This Dionysus they call Melpomenus (Minstrel), on the same principle as they call Apollo Musegetes (Leader of the Muses). Here there are images of Athena Paeonia (Healer), of Zeus, of Mnemosyne (Memory) and of the Muses, an Apollo, the votive offering and work of Eubulides, and Acratus, a daemon attendant upon Apollo; it is only a face of him worked into the wall. After the precinct of Apollo is a building that contains earthen ware images, Amphictyon, king of Athens, feasting Dionysus and other gods. Here also is Pegasus of Eleutherae, who introduced the god to the Athenians. Herein he was helped by the oracle at Delphi, which called to mind that the god once dwelt in Athens in the days of Icarius.
1.29.2. Outside the city, too, in the parishes and on the roads, the Athenians have sanctuaries of the gods, and graves of heroes and of men. The nearest is the Academy, once the property of a private individual, but in my time a gymnasium. As you go down to it you come to a precinct of Artemis, and wooden images of Ariste (Best) and Calliste (Fairest). In my opinion, which is supported by the poems of Pamphos, these are surnames of Artemis. There is another account of them, which I know but shall omit. Then there is a small temple, into which every year on fixed days they carry the image of Dionysus Eleuthereus.''. None
16. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia, priestess of Isis • Dionysias

 Found in books: Griffiths (1975) 183; Pinheiro et al (2012a) 69


17. Demosthenes, Orations, 18.180, 19.287, 21.10, 21.15-21.17, 21.61, 21.74, 21.115, 21.143, 21.147, 21.226, 44.37, 59.85
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia • Dionysia festivals, Great or City D. • Dionysia, City • Dionysia, Demosthenes role at • Dionysia, Great • Dionysia, law on • Dionysia, procession • Piraeus Dionysia • Rural Dionysia • crown, at Dionysia • dramatic festivals, Rural Dionysia • epimeletai, of pompe of City Dionysia

 Found in books: Barbato (2020) 27; Henderson (2020) 173; Humphreys (2018) 803; Liapis and Petrides (2019) 182; Martin (2009) 16, 19, 20, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 34, 35, 36, 68; Mikalson (2016) 209; Parker (2005) 74, 318; Riess (2012) 1, 56, 57, 58, 83, 93, 146; Rutter and Sparkes (2012) 167


18.180. What part do you wish me to assign to you, Aeschines, and what to myself, in the drama of that great day? Am I to be cast for the part of Battalus, Battalus, perhaps stammerer, a nickname of the nursery; capable also of an indecent interpretation, and therefore maliciously revived by Aeschines. as you dub me when you scold me so scornfully, and you for no vulgar role but to play some hero of legendary tragedy, Cresphontes, or Creon, or, shall we say, Oenomaus, whom you once murdered by your bad acting at Collytus? Anyhow, on that occasion Battalus of Paeania deserved better of his country than Oenomaus of Cothocidae. You were utterly useless; I did everything that became a good citizen. Please read the decree.
19.287. The man who for your sake proposed the prohibition, under penalty of death, of carrying arms to Philip is vilified and disgraced; the man who surrendered to Philip the armaments of our allies is his accuser. Immorality—save the mark!—was the theme of his speech, while at his side stood his two brothers-in-law, the very sight of whom is enough to set you in an uproar,—the disgusting Nicias, who went to Egypt as the hireling of Chabrias, and the abominable Cyrebio, Cyrebrio, a nickname, offal ( κυρήβια = bran); the man’s real name was Epicrates. the unmasked harlequin of the pageants. But that was nothing: under his eyes sat his brother Aphobetus. In truth, on that day all that declaiming against immorality was like water flowing upstream. For this metaphor to express topsyturvydom cf. Eur. Med. 410 — ἄνω ποταμῶν ἱερῶν χωροῦσι παγαί, καὶ δίκα καὶ πάντα πάλιν στρέφεται .
21.10. Now I want to read to you the next law as well, because it will illustrate to all of you the self-restraint of the citizens in general and the hardihood of the defendant. Read the law. The Law Evegorus proposed that, on the occasion of the procession in honor of Dionysus in Peiraeus with the comedies and tragedies, the procession at the Lenaeum with the comedies and tragedies, the procession at the City Dionysia with the boys’ contests and the revel and the comedies and tragedies. and also at the procession and contest of the Thargelia, it shall not be lawful on those days to distrain or to seize any debtors’ property, even if they are defaulters. If anyone transgresses any of these regulations, he shall be liable to prosecution by the aggrieved party, and public plaints against him as an offender may be lodged at the meeting of the Assembly in the temple of Dionysus, as is provided by statute in the case of other offenders.
21.15. Now the trouble that he caused by opposing the exemption of our chorus from military service, or by putting himself forward as overseer at the Dionysia and demanding election, these and other similar annoyances I will pass over in silence; for I am not unaware that although to myself, the victim of his persecution and insolence, each of these acts caused as much irritation as any really serious offence, yet to the rest of you, who were not directly concerned, these things in themselves would hardly seem to call for litigation. I shall therefore confine myself to what will excite indignation in all of you alike. 21.16. His subsequent conduct, which I am now going to describe, passes all limits; and indeed I should never have ventured to arraign him today, had I not previously secured his immediate conviction in the Assembly. The sacred apparel—for all apparel provided for use at a festival I regard as being sacred until after it has been used—and the golden crowns,which I ordered for the decoration of the chorus, he plotted to destroy,men of Athens, by a nocturnal raid on the premises of my goldsmith. And he did destroy them, though not completely, for that was beyond his power. And no one can say that he ever yet heard of anyone daring or perpetrating such an outrage in this city. 21.17. But not content with this, men of Athens, he actually corrupted the trainer of my chorus; and if Telephanes, the flute-player, had not proved the staunchest friend to me, if he had not seen through the fellow’s game and sent him about his business, if he had not felt it his duty to train the chorus and weld them into shape himself, we could not have taken part in the competition, Athenians; the chorus would have come in untrained and we should have been covered with ignominy. Nor did his insolence stop even there. It was so unrestrained that he bribed the crowned Archon himself; he banded the choristers against me; he bawled and threatened, standing beside the umpires as they took the oath he blocked the gangways from the wings, Rooms projecting R. and L. from the back-scene, and giving access to the orchestra for the dithyrambic chorus. Meidias apparently compelled them to enter by the πάροδοι, like a tragic chorus. See Haigh’s Attic Theatre, p. 117. nailing up those public thoroughfares without public authority; he never ceased to cause me untold damage and annoyance.
21.61. Then is not this, gentlemen of the jury, a shocking and intolerable position? On the one hand, chorus-masters, who think that such a course might bring them victory and who have in many cases spent all their substance on their public services, have never dared to lay hands even on one whom the law permits them to touch, but show such caution, such piety, such moderation that, in spite of their expenditure and their eager competition, they restrain themselves and respect your wishes and your zeal for the festival. Meidias, on the other hand, a private individual who has been put to no expense, just because he has fallen foul of a man whom he hates—a man, remember, who is spending his money as chorus-master and who has full rights of citizenship—insults him and strikes him and cares nothing for the festival, for the laws, for your opinion, or for the god’s honor.
21.74. But I was assaulted by a personal enemy early in the day, when he was sober, prompted by insolence, not by wine, in the presence of many foreigners as well as citizens, and above all in a temple which I was strictly obliged to enter by virtue of my office. And, Athenians, I consider that I was prudent, or rather happily inspired, when I submitted at the time and was not impelled to any irremediable action; though I fully sympathize with Euaeon and anyone else who, when provoked, takes the law into his own hands.
21.115. he suffered me as head of the Sacred Embassy to lead it in the name of the city to the Nemean shrine of Zeus; he raised no objection when I was chosen with two colleagues to inaugurate the sacrifice to the Dread Goddesses. The Eumenides (Furies), whose sanctuary was a cave under the Areopagus. Would he have allowed all this, if he had had one jot or tittle of proof for the charges that he was trumping up against me? I cannot believe it. So then this is conclusive proof that he was seeking in mere wanton spite to drive me from my native land.
21.143. History tells us that Alcibiades lived at Athens in the good old days of her prosperity, and I want you to consider what great public services stand to his credit and how your ancestors dealt with him when he thought fit to behave like a ruffian and a bully. And assuredly it is not from any desire to compare Meidias with Alcibiades that I mention this story. I am not so foolish or infatuated. My object, men of Athens, is that you may know and feel that there is not, and never will be, anything—not birth, not wealth, not power—that you, the great mass of citizens, ought to tolerate, if it is coupled with insolence.
21.147. Yet what was his insolence compared with what has been proved of Meidias today? He boxed the ears of Taureas, when the latter was chorus-master. Granted; but it was as chorus-master to chorus-master that he did it, and he did not transgress the present law, for it had not yet been made. Another story is that he imprisoned the painter Agatharchus. Yes, but he had caught him in an act of trespass, or so we are told; so that it is unfair to blame him for that. He was one of the mutilators of the Hermae. All acts of sacrilege, I suppose, ought to excite the same indignation, but is not complete destruction of sacred things just as sacrilegious as their mutilation? Well, that is what Meidias has been convicted of.
21.226. Those of you who were spectators at the Dionysia hissed and hooted Meidias when he entered the theater; you gave every indication of your abhorrence, though you had not yet heard what I had to say about him. Were you so indigt before the case was investigated, that you urged me to demand vengeance for my wrongs and applauded me when I brought my plaint before the Assembly?
44.37. He got together some of the Otrynians with the demarch, and persuaded them at the opening of the adult register to inscribe his name. And after that on the occasion of the great Panathenaea The great Panathenea, the most important of all Athenian festivals, was held every four years in the month of Hecatombaeon (July). at the time of the distribution, he came to get his admission fee, and when the other demesmen were receiving it, he demanded that it be given him also, and that he should be entered on the register under the name of Archiades. But when we entered a solemn protest, and all the others declared that what he was doing was an outrage, he went away without either having his name inscribed or receiving the admission fee.
59.85. (To the clerk.) Now take, please, the law bearing upon these matters, and read it; for I would have you know that a woman of her character, who has done what she has done, ought not only to have kept aloof from these sacred rites, to have abstained from beholding them, from offering sacrifices, and from performing on the city’s behalf any of the ancestral rites which usage demands, but that she should have been excluded also from all other religious ceremonials in Athens. For a woman who has been taken in adultery is not permitted to attend any of the public sacrifices, although the laws have given both to the alien woman and the slave the right to attend these, whether to view the spectacle or to offer prayer.' '. None
18. Epigraphy, Ig I , 82, 254
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia, City • Dionysia, Rural • epimeletai, of Dionysia at Acharnai • epimeletai, of pompe of City Dionysia

 Found in books: Humphreys (2018) 704, 803; Mikalson (2016) 24, 27, 61, 209


82. Gods. Prokles son of Atarbos of Euonymon was secretary, in the archonship of Aristion (421/0). The Council and the People decided, Hippothontis was the prytany, Prokles was secretary, (5) . . . was chairman, Aristion was archon (421/0), Hyperbolos? proposed: . . . quadrennial festival (pentet-) (?) . . . . . . . . . . . . (10) . . . . . . in the agora . . . . . . to the demesmen (demotesi) . . . . . . one hundred and fif?ty . . . . . . of the music just as . . . (15) . . . of Hephaistos and Athena . . . . . . for the Athenians, from where they must take the money . . . . . . religious officials who hold office . . . shall be chosen by lot . . . from the - one from each tribe, from the . . . (?) the -archs (-choi) shall choose them by lot with those from the Council; and they shall choose by lot . . . (20) . . . of the Council; and those chosen by lot shall receive a salary just as . . . they manage these things; and the payment officers (kolakretai) shall pay them the money; and the Council shall choose by lot among themselves ten men as religious officials, one from each tribe; and they shall give three oxen to the metics; of these three the religious officials shall distribute the meat to them raw; and the religious officials shall take care of the procession, (25) so that it is conducted in the most beautiful way possible, and if anyone behaves at all disorderly, they shall have the authority to impose fines of up to fifty drachmas and communicate it in writing to the -; and if anyone deserves a higher punishment, they shall set the fine as high as they think right and introduce the case to the law court of the archon; and the oxen . . . shall be lead to the altar to the sound of the trumpet; and the religious officials (30) shall - two hundred Athenians to lift them . . . ; and the torch- . . . at the quadrennial festival . . . the Hephaistia; and the religious officials . . . shall make the . . . lay on the torch-race and the rest of the competitions just as the . . . gymnasiarchs? make the spectacle (?); and for the future, if it seems good . . . to Poseidon . . . the religious officials, and to Apollo . . . (35) . . . ; and the gymnasiarchs that were chosen for the Promethia . . . . . . they shall choose . . . ; and the altar for Hephaistos . . . . . . the Council shall make it as seems to it best . . . . . . and . . . daily on the last day (?) . . . . . . and announce the results of each competition; (40) and the religious officials and the competitors . . . ; and those selected . . . . . . and the religious officials shall take care of? the writing up of the prizes . . . proposed: in other respects as proposed by the Council; but to write up this decree on a stone stele and set it down in the sanctuary; and the secretary of the Council shall take care of the writing up; and the payment officers shall pay? the money . . . (45) . . . text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG I3
82 - Decree concerning the festival (of Hephaistos?)

254. . . . the stele . . . The Ikarians decided. Menestratos proposed: to - from the demesmen and those resident at Ikarion two men from those who have not been choral sponsors (achoregeton) who are . . . (5) . . . ; and there shall be an exchange (antidosin) of property . . . before the demarch (within) twenty days . . . or there shall not? be an exchange (antidosin) . . . ; the demarch . . . shall declare (apophainen) . . . the (two) sponsors three times? . . . . . . shall register (katalegen) the members of the tragic chorus (tragoidos) (10) . . . the members of the tragic chorus? and the (two) sponsors shall claim exemption under oath . . . . . . (within) ten days or there shall be no claim of exemption under oath . . . touch the statue . . . . . . of the demarch and the . . . . . . them. The chorus leaders? (protochorois) (15) . . . shall claim exemption under oath from leading? . . . . . . . - fifteen? . . . . . . . For the chorus leaders . . . . . . whenever each year . . . . . . shall send them away if they are not? . . . (20) . . . or be fined five . . . . . . members of the tragic chorus. The two choral sponsors . . . . . . fifteen men for each? . . . . . . for each . . . . . . of Dionysos; - shall exact . . . (25) . . . festival the two choral sponsors . . . . . . or pay a fine . . . . . . the festival . . . . . . on the seventeenth of the month? . . . . . . the fifth day from? . . . (30) . . . in the Pythion . . . . . . or pay a fine . . . . . . the choral sponsor(s?). . . . . . . shall sing the phallic song . . . . . . the tragic chorus member(s?) . . . (35) . . . the chorus . . . . . . or be fined . . . . . . the demarch shall exact . . . . . . nor . . . . . . conduct the business on the - (of the month)? . . . (40) . . . drachmas and . . . . . . and be exacted . . . . . . . For the chor- . . . . . . was allotted . . . . . . (whoever) does not give? . . . (45) . . . . This . . . . . . the . . . . . . complete? . . . . . . . . . text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG I3
254 - Decree of Ikarion regulating Rural Dionysia
''. None
19. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 713.9-713.10
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia • Dionysia (Attica) • Dionysia (festival)\n, at Athens (‘Great’) • Dionysia festivals, Great or City D. • Dionysia festivals, Rural D. • Dionysia, City • Dionysia, Rural • Dionysos (Bacchus, god), Dionysia festivals • dramatic festivals, Great Dionysia • dramatic festivals, Rural Dionysia • epimeletai, of Dionysia at Acharnai • epimeletai, of pompe of City Dionysia • festivals, Dionysia

 Found in books: Barbato (2020) 26, 27; Csapo (2022) 71; Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 469; Ekroth (2013) 33, 34; Humphreys (2018) 808, 1079, 1080, 1100, 1118; Liapis and Petrides (2019) 27, 181, 182, 326; Mikalson (2016) 61, 71, 114, 151; Naiden (2013) 213


713.9. Decree 1 . . . . . . . . . he received . . . . . . the prytany secretary shall inscribe the decree by which Ariston received (5) the grant on a stone stele and stand it on the acropolis; and for the inscription of the stele the board of administrators shall allocate 20 drachmas. Decree 2 Demades son of Demeas of Paiania proposed: so that (10) the Dionysia might be as fine as possible for the god, the People shall decide, since Ariston son of Echthatios of Thebes the pipe-player? continues to compete in the competitions of the Dionysia well and with love of honour (philotimōs) and for (15) the Athenian People . . . . . . and the Council . . . . . . text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG II2 713 - Honours for a Theban pipe-player? 1177. . . . the demarch in office at any time shall take care of the Thesmophorion together with the priestess, that no-one releases anything or gathers a thiasos or installs sacred objects (5) or performs purification rites or approaches the altars or the pit (megaron) without the priestess except when it is the festival of the Thesmophoria or the Plerosia or the Kalamaia (10) or the Skira or another day on which the women come together according to ancestral tradition; that the Piraeans shall resolve: if anyone does any of these things in contravention of these provisions, the demarch (15) shall impose a penalty and bring him before a law court under the laws that are in place with respect to these things; and concerning the gathering of wood in the sanctuaries, if anyone gathers wood, may the old laws (archaious nomous) (20) be valid, those that are in place with respect to these matters; and the boundary officers (horistas) shall inscribe this decree together with the demarch and stand it by the way up to the Thesmophorion. text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG II2 1177 - Decree of deme Piraeus concerning the Thesmophorion 1178. Painting? Kallippos proposed: that the Ikarians shall resolve to praise Nikon the demarch and crown him with an ivy crown, and the herald shall announce that the Ikarians crown (5)Nikon and the deme of the Ikarians their demarch, for his fine and just conduct of the festival for Dionysos and the competition; and to praise also the choral sponsors (chorēgos) Epikrates and Praxias and crown them with an ivy (10) crown and announce it as for the demarch. text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG II2 1178 - Decree of Ikarion honouring demarch and choregoi 1202. Relief In the archonship of Theophrastos (340/39?), at the principal meeting; the Aixoneans decided; Glaukides son of Sosippos of Aixone proposed: that the Aixoneans shall resolve; since Kallikrates son of Glaukon of Aixone and (5) Aristokrates son of Aristophanes of Aixone are good men and honour-loving (philotimoi) concerning the deme of Aixone, to praise them for their excellence and justice towards the deme of Aixone and crown them with a gold crown of five hundred drachmas each; (10)and the money for the crowns shall be paid from the surplus money from the budget (dioikēseōs) of the year of Theophrastos\' archonship (340/39?); and Hegesileos the demarch and the treasurers shall give them the money for the crowns; and they shall announce at the (15)Dionysia in the comedies at Aixone in the theatre, that the deme of the Aixoneans crowns them for their excellence and justice towards the deme of Aixone and the common property (koina) of the Aixoneans; and the demarch Hegesileos and the treasurers shall inscribe (20)this decree on a stone stele and stand it in the theatre at Aixone. Crown Crown text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG II2 1202 - Decree of Aixone honouring Kallikrates and Aristokrates, 340/339 BC (?) 3090. Gnathis son of Timokedes and Anaxandrides son of Timagoras, serving as sponsors (chorēgontes), were victors in comedy: Aristophanes directed (edidasken); another victory in tragedy: (5) Sophokles directed (edidasken). text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG II2 3090 - Choregic dedication from Eleusis commemorating victorious performances directed by Aristophanes and Sophocles 3092. A Front Left Mnesistratos son of Misgon (and) Diopeithes son of Diodoros were sponsors (echorēgon), Dikaiogenes was director (edidasken). A Front Right Mnesimachos son of Mnesistratos (and) Theotimos son of Diotimos were sponsors (echorēgon), Ariphron was director (edidasken), Polychares son of Komon was director (edidasken). B Right Side Theotimos son of Diotimos, Mnesi- . . . were sponsors (echorēgon), Thersandros was director (edidasken). text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG II2 3092 - Choregic dedication (Acharnai) ' '. None
20. Epigraphy, Seg, 2.7, 22.117, 43.26, 50.168
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia, City • Dionysia, Rural • Rural Dionysia • epimeletai, of Dionysia at Acharnai • epimeletai, of pompe of City Dionysia

 Found in books: Humphreys (2018) 806, 808, 1013, 1080, 1153; Mikalson (2016) 24, 61; Parker (2005) 67


22.117. The Ikarians shall decide.? - proposed: since -aios son of -igenes of Ikarion made the sacrifices to all the gods and heroes? . . . and managed . . . well and with love of honour (philotimōs), and announced that they were fine and salutary? . . . by the? revel (kōmōi) of the Ikarians? the crops turned out well throughout the countryside . . . and since he has presented the account (logon) on the tenth of Hekatombaion (5) . . . declares the surplus funds, having accounted for (logisamenos) the income (prosodous) and the expenditure (analōmata) . . . so that he was deemed to have performed his office well and justly, and handed over the surplus money? to Thoukydides the demarch after him . . . to praise -aios and crown him with a gold crown of 1000 drachmas for his excellence and justice towards the demesmen; and to inscribe this decree in the Dionysion; and to announce the crown at the Dionysia in the tragedies. text from Attic Inscriptions Online, SEG
22.117 - Decree of Ikarion honouring demarch

43.26. Decree 1 Diogenes son of Naukydes proposed: since Phanomachos the treasurer in the archonship of Praxiboulos (315/4) both sacrificed all the sacrifices to the gods and heroes in the year on behalf of the demesmen (5) and managed the Dionysia well and with love of honour (philotimōs) with the demarch Oinophilos and made a libation bowl (phialēn) of silver weighing a mina (= 100 dr.) according to the law and has given a full account of his ficial administration (hōn diōikēsen) both to the (10) city and to the demesmen within the times specified in the laws of the city and the demesmen and has deposited (katabeblēken) with the Acharnians the surplus of the money from his ficial administration (dioikēseōs), 329 drachmas, and rendered (15) his accounts (euthunas), in which he was deemed to have held office as treasurer justly, and managed everything else that the Acharnians required of him well and with love of honour (philotimōs); the Acharnians shall resolve, to praise Phanomachos son of Nikodemos of Acharnai and (20) crown him with a foliage crown for his love of honour (philotimias) and justice towards the demesmen; and the secretary of the demesmen shall inscribe this decree on a stone stele and stand it in the sanctuary of Athena Hippia; (25) and the treasurer shall give 20 drachmas for inscribing the stele and account for it to the demesmen. Decree 2 Diogenes son of Naukydes proposed: since the demarch Oinophilos and the treasurer Phanomachos and (30) the manager of the Dionysia have managed well and with love of honour (philotimōs) both the sacrifice to Dionysos and the procession and the competition and are administering (dioikousin) everything else on behalf of the demesmen according to the laws, the Acharnians shall resolve, (35) to praise the demarch Oinophilos son of Oinophilos and the treasurer Phanomachos son of Nikodemos and the manager, Leon son of Dion, and crown each of them with an ivy crown and the demarch shall announce these (40)crowns at the Dionysia in Acharnai in the competition; and the demarch Oinophilos shall inscribe this decree on a stone stele and stand it in the sanctuary of Athena Hippia; and the treasurer Phanomachos shall give 20 drachmas (45)for inscribing the stele and account for it to the demesmen; and they shall have a seat of honour, themselves and their descendants, for all time at the Dionysia at Acharnai in the competition, in the front row (epi tou prōtou bathrou). text from Attic Inscriptions Online, SEG
43.26 - Two honorific decrees of the deme Acharnai, 315/4 BC

50.168. Face A col. 1 . . . fourth quarter, (5) Mounichion, for - Prakterios, a ram, 12 dr.; Thargelion, . . . by the tower, a sheep, 12 dr.; Skirophorion, (10) . . . in the agora, a ram, 12 dr., on the eleventh or twelfth?, for Zeus Horios, a sheep, 12 dr., for . . . , a sheep, 11 dr., ...? the following . . . . . . in the year of the - in (?) . . . each (15) . . . in order as is written . . . the one on the . . . by the Eleusinion . . . in Kynosoura . . . by the Herakleion;11 (20) ...? fourth quarter, Mounichion, . . . a sheep, 12 dr.; ...? first quarter, Hekatombaion, (25) on the date, for Apollo? Apotropaios, a goat, 12 dr.; second quarter, Pyanopsion, . . . a pregt sheep, 17 dr.; fourth quarter, Mounichion, (30) . . . a goat, 12 dr., . . . 12 dr.; ...? fourth quarter, Mounichion, . . . -aios, a goat, 12 dr., (35) . . . , a sheep, 12 dr., . . . , a sheep, 12 dr., . . . , a sheep, 12 dr.; . . . prior? sequence (dramosunē), (40) second quarter, Pyanopsion, . . . , a bovine, 90 dr.; third quarter, Gamelion, . . . -idai, a pregt sow, 70 (?) dr.; fourth quarter, Mounichion, (45) . . . Nymphagetes, a goat, 12 dr.; Thargelion? . . . river (?), a ram, 12 dr., . . . a goat, 12 dr., . . . a ram, 12 dr., (50) . . . a goat, 12 dr., . . . a sheep, 12 dr., . . . a sheep, 11 dr.; Skirophorion?, . . . a sheep, 12 dr., (55) for Athena Hellotis,10 a piglet, 3 dr., . . . col. 2 . . . these the demarch of Marathon sacrifices . . . within ten days, for the hero . . . a piglet, 3 dr., table for the hero, 1 dr.?; (5) Boedromion, before the Mysteries . . . a bovine, 90 dr., a sheep, 12 dr., for Kourotrophos a sheep, 11 dr.?; second quarter, Posideon . . . a bovine, 150 dr., a sheep, 12 dr., for the heroine a sheep, 11 dr.?, priestly dues (hierōsuna), 7 dr., for Earth in the fields (Gēi eg guais), a pregt bovine, 90 (?) dr., priestly dues (hierōsuna), 4 dr.?, (10) at the rite (teletēi), baskets (?) (spuridia??), 40 dr.; third quarter, Gamelion . . . for Daira, a pregt sheep, 16 dr., priestly dues (hierōsuna), 1 dr., for Earth at the oracle (Gēi epi tōi manteiōi), a sheep, 11 dr., for Zeus Hypatos? . . . for Ioleus, a sheep, 12 dr., for Kourotrophos, a piglet, 3 dr., a table, (15) 1 dr., priestly dues (hierōsuna), 2 dr. 1½ ob., for the hero Pheraios a sheep, 12 dr. ?, for the heroine, a sheep, 11 dr., priestly dues (hierōsuna), 3 dr.; Elaphebolion, on the tenth, for Earth at the oracle (Gēi epi tōi manteiōi), a completely black he-goat, 15 dr., priestly dues (hierōsuna) . . . ; fourth quarter, Mounichion, for Aristomachos, (20) a bovine, 90 dr., a sheep, 12 dr., for the heroine, a sheep, 11 dr., priestly dues (hierōsuna), 7 dr., for the Youth (Neaniai), a bovine, 90 dr., a sheep, 12 dr., a piglet 3 dr., for the heroine, a sheep, 11 dr., priestly dues (hierōsuna), 7 dr. 1½ ob.; these the demarch of Marathon sacrifices, for the hero in Drasileia, a sheep, 12 dr., a table, 1 dr., for the heroine, a sheep, 11 dr., (25) for the hero by the marsh sanctuary (Hellōtion), a sheep, 12 dr., a table, 1 dr., for the heroine, a sheep, 11 dr.; Thargelion, for Achaia, a ram, 12 dr., a female (i.e. a ewe), 11 dr., priestly dues (hierōsuna), 3 dr., for the Fates (Moirais), a piglet, 3 dr., priestly dues (hierōsuna), 1½ ob.; (30) Skirophorion, before Skira, for Hyttenios, the annual offerings (hōraia), a sheep, 12 dr., for Kourotrophos, a piglet, 3 dr., priestly dues (hierōsuna), 2 dr. 1½ ob., for the Tritopatreis, a sheep, 12 dr.?, priestly dues (hierōsuna), 2 dr., for the Akamantes, a sheep, 12 dr., priestly dues (hiereōsuna), 2 dr.; these every other year, prior sequence (protera dramosunē), (35) Hekatombaion, for Athena Hellotis,10 a bovine, 90 dr., three sheep, 33 dr., a piglet, 3 dr., priestly dues (hierōsuna), 7 dr. 1½ ob., for Kourotrophos, a sheep, 11 dr., a piglet, 3 dr., priestly dues (hierōsuna), 1 dr. 1½ ob., for the laurel-bearers (daphnēphorois), 7 dr.; these are sacrificed every other year, after the archonship of Euboulos (40) for the Tetrapoleis, posterior sequence (hustera dramosunē), Hekatombaion, for Athena Hellotis,10 a sheep, 11 dr., for Kourotrophos, a piglet, 3 dr., priestly dues (hierōsuna), 1 dr. 1½ ob.; Metageitnion, for Eleusinia, a bovine, 90 dr., for the Girl (Korēi), a ram, 12 dr., 3 piglets, 9 dr., priestly dues (hierōsuna), (45) 6 dr. 4½ ob., a sixth (hekteus) of barley, 4 ob., a chous of wine 1 dr., for Kourotrophos, a sheep, 11 dr., priestly dues (hierōsuna), 1 dr., for Zeus Anthaleus, a sheep, 12 dr., priestly dues (hierōsuna), 2 dr.; Anthesterion, for Eleusinia, a pregt sow, 70 (?) dr., priestly dues (hierōsuna), 1 dr., for Chloe by the property of Meidylos, a pregt sow, 70 dr.?, (50) priestly dues (hierōsuna), 1 dr., a sixth (hekteus) of barley, 4 ob., a chous of wine 1 dr.; Skirophorion, before Skira, for Galios, a ram, 12 dr., priestly dues (hierōsuna), 2 dr., for the well (?) (phreatos), 6 dr., for the Tritopatreis, a table, 1 dr.. At Trikorynthos these every year, first quarter, (55) Metageitnion, for Hera,12 a bovine, 90 dr., a sheep, 11 dr. . . . for Kourotrophos . . . Face B . . . -sistratos of Marathon . . . of Marathon, 20 dr., Archenautes of Marathon, 22 (?) dr., . . . (≥) 10 dr., Hegesistratos of Marathon, . . . -doros . . . Isodikos of Oinoe, (≥) 10 dr., (5) . . . -gonos, Hagnostratos of Marathon, . . . , Patrokles of Oinoe, (≥) 10 dr., . . . 612 dr. 3 ob. (?), . . . of Marathon, . . . of Oinoe, . . . . . . -chos . . . of Marathon . . . . . . (≥) 30 dr. (?) . . . (≥) 20 dr. (?) (10) . . . (≥) 20 dr. (?) . . . . . . of Marathon . . . . . . (≥) 11 dr. (?) . . . (15) . . . (≥) 20 dr. (?) . . . . . . . . . (≥) 3 dr. (?) . . . of Marathon, 60 dr. (?) . . . of Marathon, 12 dr. (?) (20) . . . . . . About 28 lines illegible (50) . . . Hagetor of Probalinthos (?) . . . . . . (≥) 70 dr. . . . . . . . of Marathon, 11 dr. (?), . . . About 8 lines illegible (61) . . . (≥) 2 dr. (?) . . . . . . text from Attic Inscriptions Online, SEG
50.168 - The sacrificial calendar of the Marathonian Tetrapolis
' '. None
21. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia, City • epimeletai, of pompe of City Dionysia

 Found in books: Humphreys (2018) 803; Mikalson (2016) 209, 237


22. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia (festival)\n, at Athens (‘Great’) • Great Dionysia, City Dionysia

 Found in books: Bernabe et al (2013) 94; Csapo (2022) 194


23. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia (Attica) • Dionysos (Bacchus, god), Dionysia festivals • festivals, Dionysia

 Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 469; Naiden (2013) 213


24. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia, rural • Rural Dionysia

 Found in books: Lupu(2005) 138; Parker (2005) 74


25. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia, City • Dionysia, Rural • epimeletai, of Dionysia at Acharnai • epimeletai, of pompe of City Dionysia

 Found in books: Humphreys (2018) 704, 803; Mikalson (2016) 24, 27, 61, 209


26. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia (festival)\n, at Ptolemais • festivals with tragic performances (other than Dionysia), Agrionia, at Thebes • festivals with tragic performances (other than Dionysia), Mouseia, at Thespiae • festivals with tragic performances (other than Dionysia), Pythia, at Delphi

 Found in books: Csapo (2022) 46; Liapis and Petrides (2019) 165


27. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysia • Dionysia, Demosthenes role at • crown, at Dionysia

 Found in books: Gygax (2016) 175; Martin (2009) 25





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