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60 results for "dinocrates"
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.212-2.220 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 170, 171, 183
2.212. / thundereth on the long beach, and the deep roareth.Now the others sate them down and were stayed in their places, only there still kept chattering on Thersites of measureless speech, whose mind was full of great store of disorderly words, wherewith to utter revilings against the kings, idly, and in no orderly wise, 2.213. / thundereth on the long beach, and the deep roareth.Now the others sate them down and were stayed in their places, only there still kept chattering on Thersites of measureless speech, whose mind was full of great store of disorderly words, wherewith to utter revilings against the kings, idly, and in no orderly wise, 2.214. / thundereth on the long beach, and the deep roareth.Now the others sate them down and were stayed in their places, only there still kept chattering on Thersites of measureless speech, whose mind was full of great store of disorderly words, wherewith to utter revilings against the kings, idly, and in no orderly wise, 2.215. / but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. 2.216. / but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. 2.217. / but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. 2.218. / but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. 2.219. / but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. 2.220. / Hateful was he to Achilles above all, and to Odysseus, for it was they twain that he was wont to revile; but now again with shrill cries he uttered abuse against goodly Agamemnon. With him were the Achaeans exceeding wroth, and had indignation in their hearts.
2. Tyrtaeus, Fragments, None (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 175, 176
3. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 175, 176
4. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 175, 176
5. Isocrates, Antidosis, 250 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 176
6. Herodotus, Histories, 7.22-7.24 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 186
7.22. Since those who had earlier attempted to sail around Athos had suffered shipwreck, for about three years preparations had been underway there. Triremes were anchored off Elaeus in the Chersonese; with these for their headquarters, all sorts of men in the army were compelled by whippings to dig a canal, coming by turns to the work; the inhabitants about Athos also dug. ,Bubares son of Megabazus and Artachaees son of Artaeus, both Persians, were the overseers of the workmen. Athos is a great and famous mountain, running out into the sea and inhabited by men. At the mountain's landward end it is in the form of a peninsula, and there is an isthmus about twelve stadia wide; here is a place of level ground or little hills, from the sea by Acanthus to the sea opposite Torone. ,On this isthmus which is at the end of Athos, there stands a Greek town, Sane; there are others situated seaward of Sane and landward of Athos, and the Persian now intended to make them into island and not mainland towns; they are Dion, Olophyxus, Acrothoum, Thyssus, and Cleonae. 7.23. These are the towns situated on Athos. The foreigners dug as follows, dividing up the ground by nation: they made a straight line near the town of Sane; when the channel had been dug to some depth, some men stood at the bottom of it and dug, others took the dirt as it was dug out and delivered it to yet others that stood higher on stages, and they again to others as they received it, until they came to those that were highest; these carried it out and threw it away. ,For all except the Phoenicians, the steep sides of the canal caved in, doubling their labor; since they made the span the same breadth at its mouth and at the bottom, this was bound to happen. ,But the Phoenicians showed the same skill in this as in all else they do; taking in hand the portion that fell to them, they dug by making the topmost span of the canal as wide again as the canal was to be, and narrowed it as they worked lower, until at the bottom their work was of the same span as that of the others. ,There is a meadow there, where they made a place for buying and marketing; much ground grain frequently came to them from Asia. 7.24. As far as I can judge by conjecture, Xerxes gave the command for this digging out of pride, wishing to display his power and leave a memorial; with no trouble they could have drawn their ships across the isthmus, yet he ordered them to dig a canal from sea to sea, wide enough to float two triremes rowed abreast. The same men who were assigned the digging were also assigned to join the banks of the river Strymon by a bridge.
7. Eupolis, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 175, 176
8. Eupolis, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 175, 176
9. Plato, Meno, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 183
80a. σοι ὅτι σὺ οὐδὲν ἄλλο ἢ αὐτός τε ἀπορεῖς καὶ τοὺς ἄλλους ποιεῖς ἀπορεῖν· καὶ νῦν, ὥς γέ μοι δοκεῖς, γοητεύεις με καὶ φαρμάττεις καὶ ἀτεχνῶς κατεπᾴδεις, ὥστε μεστὸν ἀπορίας γεγονέναι. καὶ δοκεῖς μοι παντελῶς, εἰ δεῖ τι καὶ σκῶψαι, ὁμοιότατος εἶναι τό τε εἶδος καὶ τἆλλα ταύτῃ τῇ πλατείᾳ νάρκῃ τῇ θαλαττίᾳ· καὶ γὰρ αὕτη τὸν ἀεὶ πλησιάζοντα καὶ ἁπτόμενον ναρκᾶν ποιεῖ, καὶ σὺ δοκεῖς μοι νῦν ἐμὲ τοιοῦτόν τι πεποιηκέναι, ναρκᾶν · ἀληθῶς γὰρ ἔγωγε καὶ 80a. that yours was just a case of being in doubt yourself and making others doubt also: and so now I find you are merely bewitching me with your spells and incantations, which have reduced me to utter perplexity. And if I am indeed to have my jest, I consider that both in your appearance and in other respects you are extremely like the flat torpedo sea-fish; for it benumbs anyone who approaches and touches it, and something of the sort is what I find you have done to me now. For in truth
10. Xenophon, Symposium, 5.5-5.7 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 183
11. Plato, Symposium, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 182
12. Aristotle, Rhetoric, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 145
13. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 175, 176
14. Cicero, Orator, 207, 70, 37 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 145
15. Cicero, Letters To His Friends, 5.12 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 148
16. Cicero, Republic, None (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 149, 185, 186
17. Cicero, Philippicae, 2.63, 2.75, 2.84-2.87 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 168
18. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 4.70 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 168
4.70. Sed poëtas ludere sinamus, quorum fabulis in hoc flagitio versari ipsum videmus Iovem: ad at G 1 magistros virtutis philosophos veniamus, qui amorem quimorem quā orem K 1 -i amorem in r. G 2 negant stupri esse St. fr. 3, 653 Epic. 483 et in eo litigant cum Epicuro non multum, ut opinio mea fert, mentiente. quis est enim iste ista K 1 amor amicitiae? cur neque deformem adulescentem quisquam amat neque formosum senem? mihi quidem haec in Graecorum gymnasiis nata consuetudo videtur, in quibus isti liberi et concessi sunt amores. bene ergo Ennius: Ennius sc. 395 Fla/giti flagitii X cives G(?)R rec princi/pium est nudare i/nter civis co/rpora. qui ut sint, quod fieri posse video, pudici, solliciti tamen et anxii sunt, eoque magis, quod se ipsi continent et coërcent.
19. Cicero, On Old Age, 17 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 184
20. Cicero, De Oratore, 1.13-1.15, 1.34 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 145, 148, 170, 171
1.13. Ac ne illud quidem vere dici potest aut pluris ceteris inservire aut maiore delectatione aut spe uberiore aut praemiis ad perdiscendum amplioribus commoveri. Atque ut omittam Graeciam, quae semper eloquentiae princeps esse voluit, atque illas omnium doctrinarum inventrices Athenas, in quibus summa dicendi vis et inventa est et perfecta, in hac ipsa civitate profecto nulla umquam vehementius quam eloquentiae studia viguerunt. 1.14. Nam postea quam imperio omnium gentium constituto diuturnitas pacis otium confirmavit, nemo fere laudis cupidus adulescens non sibi ad dicendum studio omni enitendum putavit; ac primo quidem totius rationis ignari, qui neque exercitationis ullam vim neque aliquod praeceptum artis esse arbitrarentur, tantum, quantum ingenio et cogitatione poterant, consequebantur; post autem auditis oratoribus Graecis cognitisque eorum litteris adhibitisque doctoribus incredibili quodam nostri homines di s cendi studio flagraverunt. 1.15. Excitabat eos magnitudo, varietas multitudoque in omni genere causarum, ut ad eam doctrinam, quam suo quisque studio consecutus esset, adiungeretur usus frequens, qui omnium magistrorum praecepta superaret; erant autem huic studio maxima, quae nunc quoque sunt, exposita praemia vel ad gratiam vel ad opes vel ad dignitatem; ingenia vero, ut multis rebus possumus iudicare, nostrorum hominum multum ceteris hominibus omnium gentium praestiterunt. 1.34. Ac ne plura, quae sunt paene innumerabilia, consecter, comprehendam brevi: sic enim statuo, perfecti oratoris moderatione et sapientia non solum ipsius dignitatem, sed et privatorum plurimorum et universae rei publicae salutem maxime contineri. Quam ob rem pergite, ut facitis, adulescentes, atque in id studium, in quo estis, incumbite, ut et vobis honori et amicis utilitati et rei publicae emolumento esse possitis.'
21. Cicero, On Duties, 1.15, 2.5, 2.112 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 182, 186
1.15. Formam quidem ipsam, Marce fili, et tamquam faciem honesti vides, quae si oculis cerneretur, mirabiles amores, ut ait Plato, excitaret sapientiae. Sed omne, quod est honestum, id quattuor partium oritur ex aliqua: aut enim in perspicientia veri sollertiaque versatur aut in hominum societate tuenda tribuendoque suum cuique et rerum contractarum fide aut in animi excelsi atque invicti magnitudine ac robore aut in omnium, quae fiunt quaeque dicuntur, ordine et modo, in quo inest modestia et temperantia. Quae quattuor quamquam inter se colligata atque implicata sunt, tamen ex singulis certa officiorum genera nascuntur, velut ex ea parte, quae prima discripta est, in qua sapientiam et prudentiam ponimus, inest indagatio atque inventio veri, eiusque virtutis hoc munus est proprium. 2.5. Maximis igitur in malis hoc tamen boni assecuti videmur, ut ea litteris mandaremus, quae nec erant satis nota nostris et erant cognitione dignissima. Quid enim est, per deos, optabilius sapientia, quid praestantius, quid homini melius, quid homine dignius? Hanc igitur qui expetunt, philosophi nomitur, nec quicquam aliud est philosophia, si interpretari velis, praeter studium sapientiae. Sapientia autem est, ut a veteribus philosophis definitum est, rerum divinarum et humanarum causarumque, quibus eae res continentur, scientia; cuius studium qui vituperat, haud sane intellego, quidnam sit, quod laudandum putet. 2.5.  Therefore, amid all the present most awful calamities I yet flatter myself that I have won this good out of evil — that I may commit to written form matters not at all familiar to our countrymen but still very much worth their knowing. For what, in the name of heaven, is more to be desired than wisdom? What is more to be prized? What is better for a man, what more worthy of his nature? Those who seek after it are called philosophers; and philosophy is nothing else, if one will translate the word into our idiom, than "the love of wisdom." Wisdom, moreover, as the word has been defined by the philosophers of old, is "the knowledge of things human and divine and of the causes by which those things are controlled." And if the man lives who would belittle the study of philosophy, I quite fail to see what in the world he would see fit to praise.
22. Cicero, On The Ends of Good And Evil, 2.5, 2.112 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 182, 186
2.5. atqui haec patefactio quasi rerum opertarum, cum quid quidque sit aperitur, definitio est. qua tu etiam inprudens utebare non numquam. nam hunc ipsum sive finem sive extremum sive ultimum definiebas definiebas p. 13, 14 sqq. (cf. p. 5, 25 sqq.); 19, 3 sqq. id esse, quo omnia, quae recte fierent, referrentur neque id ipsum usquam referretur. praeclare hoc quidem. bonum ipsum etiam quid esset, fortasse, si opus fuisset, definisses aut quod esset natura adpetendum adp. AR app aut quod prodesset aut quod iuvaret aut quod liberet modo. nunc idem, nunc om. R (Modo aū = autem idem), N (Modo idem), V nisi molestum est, quoniam quoniam quō A q uo BE tibi non omnino displicet definire definire diffinire N 2 V finire et id facis, cum vis, velim definias definias definiri R quid sit voluptas, de quo omnis haec quaestio est. Quis, quaeso, inquit, est, qui quid sit voluptas quaeso Gz. quasi A 1 BE quam A 2 qua fit R; om. N (ubi de quo ... voluptas excid. et in mg. add.), V nesciat, aut qui, quo magis id intellegat, definitionem aliquam desideret? 2.112. ut, si Xerxes, cum tantis classibus tantisque equestribus et pedestribus copiis Hellesponto iuncto Athone perfosso mari ambulavisset terra mari ... terra Bai. in ed. min.; maria ... terram navigavisset, navigasset NV si, cum tanto impetu in Graeciam venisset, causam quis ex eo quaereret tantarum copiarum tantique belli, mel se auferre ex Hymetto voluisse diceret, certe sine causa videretur tanta conatus, sic nos sapientem plurimis et gravissimis artibus atque virtutibus instructum et ornatum non, ut illum, maria pedibus peragrantem, classibus montes, sed omne caelum totamque cum universo mari terram mente complexum voluptatem petere si dicemus, mellis causa dicemus tanta molitum. 2.5.  Now this process of disclosing latent meanings, of revealing what a particular thing is, is the process of definition; and you yourself now and then unconsciously employed it. For you repeatedly defined this very notion of End or final or ultimate aim as 'that to which all right actions are a means while it is not itself a means to anything else.' Excellent so far. Very likely had occasion arisen you would have defined the Good itself, either as 'the naturally desirable,' or 'the beneficial,' or 'the delightful,' or just 'that which we like.' Well then, if you don't mind, as you do not entirely disapprove of definition, and indeed practise it when it suits your purpose, I should be glad if you would now define pleasure, the thing which is the subject of the whole of our present inquiry." 2.112.  Suppose when Xerxes led forth his huge fleets and armies of horse and foot, bridged the Hellespont, cut through Athos, marched over sea and sailed over land — suppose on his reaching Greece with his great armada some one asked him the reason for all this enormous apparatus of warfare, and he were to reply that he had wanted to procure some honey from Hymettus! surely he would be thought to have had no adequate motive for so vast an undertaking. So with our Wise Man, equipped and adorned with all the noblest accomplishments and virtues, not like Xerxes traversing the seas on foot and the mountains on shipboard, but mentally embracing sky and earth and sea in their entirety — to say that this man's aim is pleasure is to say that all his high endeavour is for the sake of a little honey.
23. Cicero, Brutus, 42-43, 64, 68 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 170
68. sed cur nolunt Catones Catones vulg. : Catonis L ? Attico genere dicendi se gaudere dicunt. Sapienter id quidem; atque utinam imitarentur, nec ossa solum sed etiam sanguinem! Gratum est tamen quod volunt. gratum ... volunt secl. Eberhard —Cur igitur Lysias et Hyperides amatur, cum penitus ignoretur Cato? Antiquior est huius sermo et quaedam horridiora verba. Ita enim tum loquebantur. Id muta, quod tum ille non potuit, et adde numeros et ut ut add. vulg. aptior sit oratio, ipsa verba compone et quasi coagmenta, quod ne Graeci quidem veteres factitaverunt: iam neminem antepones Catoni.
24. Cicero, On Invention, 1.1.1-1.1.3, 1.34-1.36, 2.177-2.178 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 144, 171, 172, 173
1.34. Confirmatio est, per quam argumentando nostrae causae fidem et auctoritatem et firmamentum adiungit oratio. huius partis certa sunt praecepta, quae in singula causarum genera dividentur. verumtamen non incommodum videtur quandam silvam atque materiam universam ante permixtim et confuse exponere omnium argumentationum, post autem tradere, quemadmodum unum quodque causae genus hinc omnibus argumen- tandi rationibus tractis confirmari oporteat. Omnes res argumentando confirmantur aut ex eo, quod personis, aut ex eo, quod negotiis est adtributum. Ac personis has res adtributas putamus: nomen, na- turam, victum, fortunam, habitum, affectionem, studia, consilia, facta, casus, orationes. nomen est, quod uni cuique personae datur, quo suo quaeque proprio et certo vocabulo appellatur. naturam ipsam definire difficile est; 1.35. partes autem eius enumerare eas, quarum indigemus ad hanc praeceptionem, facilius est. eae autem partim divino, partim mortali in genere ver- santur. mortalium autem pars in hominum, pars in bestiarum genere numerantur. atque hominum genus et in sexu consideratur, virile an muliebre sit, et in natione, patria, cognatione, aetate. natione, Graius an barbarus; patria, Atheniensis an Lacedaemonius; co- gnatione, quibus maioribus, quibus consanguineis; aetate, puer an adulescens, natu grandior an senex. praeterea commoda et incommoda considerantur ab natura data animo aut corpori, hoc modo: valens an inbecillus, longus an brevis, formonsus an deformis, velox an tardus sit, acutus an hebetior, memor an obli- viosus, comis officiosus an infacetus, pudens, patiens an contra; et omnino quae a natura dantur animo et corpori considerabuntur et haec in natura conside- randa . nam quae industria comparantur, ad habitum pertinent, de quo posterius est dicendum. in victu con- siderare oportet, apud quem et quo more et cuius arbitratu sit educatus, quos habuerit artium liberalium magistros, quos vivendi praeceptores, quibus amicis utatur, quo in negotio, quaestu, artificio sit occupatus, quo modo rem familiarem administret, qua consuetu- dine domestica sit. in fortuna quaeritur, servus sit an liber, pecuniosus an tenuis, privatus an cum potestate: si cum potestate, iure an iniuria; felix, clarus an con- tra; quales liberos habeat. ac si de non vivo quaeretur, etiam quali morte sit affectus, erit considerandum. 1.36. habitum autem hunc appellamus animi aut corporis constantem et absolutam aliqua in re perfectionem, ut virtutis aut artis alicuius perceptionem aut quamvis scientiam et item corporis aliquam commoditatem non natura datam, sed studio et industria partam. affectio est animi aut corporis ex tempore aliqua de causa commutatio, ut laetitia, cupiditas, metus, molestia, morbus, debilitas et alia, quae in eodem genere re- periuntur. studium est autem animi assidua et vehe- menter ad aliquam rem adplicata magna cum voluptate occupatio, ut philosophiae, poe+ticae, geometricae, lit- terarum. consilium est aliquid faciendi aut non fa- ciendi excogitata ratio. facta autem et casus et ora- tiones tribus ex temporibus considerabuntur: quid fecerit aut quid ipsi acciderit aut quid dixerit; aut quid faciat, quid ipsi accidat, quid dicat; aut quid fac- turus sit, quid ipsi casurum sit, qua sit usurus oratione. Ac personis quidem haec videntur esse adtributa: 2.177. Laudes autem et vituperationes ex iis locis sumentur, qui loci personis sunt adtributi, de quibus ante dic- tum est. sin distributius tractare qui volet, partiatur in animum et corpus et extraneas res licebit. animi est virtus, cuius de partibus paulo ante dictum est; corporis valetudo, dignitas, vires, velocitas; extraneae honos, pecunia, adfinitas, genus, amici, patria, poten- tia, cetera, quae simili esse in genere intellegentur. 2.178. atque in his id, quod in omnia, valere oportebit; con- traria quoque, quae et qualia sint, intellegentur. vi- dere autem in laudando et in vituperando oportebit non tam, quae in corpore aut in extraneis rebus ha- buerit is, de quo agetur, quam quo pacto his rebus usus sit. nam fortunam quidem et laudare stultitia et vituperare superbia est, animi autem et laus ho- nesta et vituperatio vehemens est. Nunc quoniam omne in causae genus argumentan- di ratio tradita est, de inventione, prima ac maxima parte rhetoricae, satis dictum videtur. quare, quoniam et una pars ad exitum hoc ac superiore libro per- ducta est et hic liber non parum continet litterarum, quae restant, in reliquis dicemus.
25. Horace, Letters, 1.1, 1.4-1.6, 1.9.55-1.9.56, 1.10, 1.19.23-1.19.25, 2.1.1-2.1.4, 2.1.243-2.1.244 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 154, 155, 170, 173, 174, 179
26. Sallust, Catiline, 13.1-13.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 175
27. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.75 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 179, 180
1.75. unde refert nobis victor quid possit oriri,
28. Sallust, Historiae, None (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 166
29. Sallust, Iugurtha, 3.3, 5.1-5.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 147, 175
30. Anon., Rhetorica Ad Herennium, 3.10-3.11, 3.13-3.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 173, 174, 175, 183
3.10.  Let us now turn to the Epideictic kind of cause. Since epideictic includes Praise and Censure, the topics on which praise is founded will, by their contraries, serve us as the bases for censure. The following, then, can be subject to praise: External Circumstances, Physical Attributes, and Qualities of Character. To External Circumstances belong such as can happen by chance, or by fortune, favourable or adverse: descent, education, wealth, kinds of power, titles to fame, citizenship, friendships, and the like, and their contraries. Physical Attributes are merits or defect bestowed upon the body by nature: agility, strength, beauty, health, and their contraries. Qualities of Character rest upon our judgement and thought: wisdom, justice, courage, temperance, and their contraries. 3.11.  Such, then, in a cause of this kind, will be our Proof and Refutation. The Introduction is drawn from our own person, or the person we are discussing, or the person of our hearers, or from the subject-matter itself. From our own person: if we speak in praise, we shall say that we are doing so from a sense of duty, because ties of friendship exist; or from goodwill, because such is the virtue of the person under discussion that every one should wish to call it to mind; or because it is appropriate to show, from the praise accorded him by others, what his character is. If we speak in censure, we shall say that we are justified in doing so, because of the treatment we have suffered; or that we are doing so from goodwill, because we think it useful that all men should be apprised of a wickedness and a worthlessness without parallel; or because it is pleasing to show by our censure of others what conduct is pleasing to ourselves. When we draw our Introduction from the person being discussed: if we speak in praise, we shall say that we fear our inability to match his deeds with words; all men ought to proclaim his virtues; his very deeds transcend the eloquence of all eulogists. If we speak in censure, we shall, as obviously we can by the change of a few words, and as I have demonstrated just above, express sentiments to the contrary effect. 3.13.  If the Introduction has been developed in accordance with any of the methods just mentioned, there will be no need for a Statement of Facts to follow it; but if there is occasion for one, when we must recount with either praise or censure some deed of the person discussed, the instructions for Stating the Facts will be found in Book I. The Division we shall make is the following: we shall set forth the things we intend to praise or censure; then recount the events, observing their precise sequence and chronology, so that one may understand what the person under discussion did and with what prudence and caution. But it will first be necessary to set forth his virtues or faults of character, and then to explain how, such being his character, he has used the advantages or disadvantages, physical or external circumstances. The following is the order we must keep when portraying a life: (1) External Circumstances: Descent — in praise: the ancestors of whom he is sprung; if he is of illustrious descent, he has been their peer or superior; if of humble descent, he had had his support, not in the virtues of his ancestors, but in his own. In censure: if he is of illustrious descent, he has been a disgrace to his forebears; if of low descent, he is none the less a dishonour even to these. Education — in praise: that he was well and honourably trained in worthy studies throughout his boyhood. In censure: . . . 3.14.  (2) Next we must pass to the Physical Advantages: if by nature he has impressiveness and beauty, these have served him to his credit, and not, as in the case of others, to his detriment and shame; if he has exceptional strength and agility, we shall point out that these were acquired by worthy and diligent exercise; if he has continual good health, that was acquired by care and by control over his passions. In censure, if the subject has this physical advantages, we shall declare that he has abused what, like the meanest gladiator, he has had by chance and nature. If he lacks them, we shall say that to his own fault and want of self-control is his lack of every physical advantage, beauty apart, attributable. (3) Then we shall return to External Circumstances and consider his virtues and defects of Character evinced with respect to these: Has he been rich or poor? What kinds of power has he wielded? What have been his titles to fame? What his friendships? Or what his private feuds, and what act of bravery has he performed in conducting these feuds? With what motive has he entered into feuds? With what loyalty, goodwill, and sense of duty has he conducted his friendships? What character of man has he been in wealth, or in poverty? What has been his attitude in the exercise of his prerogatives? If he is dead, what sort of death did he die, and what sort of consequences followed upon it?  
31. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, None (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 173, 174
32. Appian, Civil Wars, 3.2.16 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 166
33. Statius, Siluae, 4.6.59 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 166
34. Plutarch, Mark Antony, 4.1-4.3, 36.7, 60.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 167, 168
4.1. προσῆν δὲ καὶ μορφῆς ἐλευθέριον ἀξίωμα, καὶ πώγων τις οὐκ ἀγεννὴς καὶ πλάτος μετώπου καὶ γρυπότης μυκτῆρος ἐδόκει τοῖς γραφομένοις καὶ πλαττομένοις Ἡρακλέους προσώποις ἐμφερὲς ἔχειν τὸ ἀρρενωπόν. ἦν δὲ καὶ λόγος παλαιὸς Ἡρακλείδας εἶναι τοὺς Ἀντωνίους, ἀπʼ Ἄντωνος, παιδὸς Ἡρακλέους, γεγονότας. 4.2. καὶ τοῦτον ᾤετο τὸν λόγον τῇ τε μορφῇ τοῦ σώματος, ὥσπερ εἴρηται, καὶ τῇ στολῇ βεβαιοῦν. ἀεὶ γάρ, ὅτε μέλλοι πλείοσιν ὁρᾶσθαι, χιτῶνα εἰς μηρὸν ἔζωστο, καὶ μάχαιρα μεγάλη παρήρτητο, καὶ σάγος περιέκειτο τῶν στερεῶν. οὐ μὴν ἀλλὰ καὶ τὰ τοῖς ἄλλοις φορτικὰ δοκοῦντα, μεγαλαυχία καὶ σκῶμμα καὶ κώθων ἐμφανὴς καὶ καθίσαι παρὰ τὸν ἐσθίοντα καὶ φαγεῖν ἐπιστάντα τραπέζῃ στρατιωτικῇ, θαυμαστὸν ὅσον εὐνοίας καὶ πόθου πρὸς αὐτὸν ἐνεποίει τοῖς στρατιώταις. 4.3. ἦν δέ που καὶ τὸ ἐρωτικὸν οὐκ ἀναφρόδιτον, ἀλλὰ καὶ τούτῳ πολλοὺς ἐδημαγώγει, συμπράττων τε τοῖς ἐρῶσι καὶ σκωπτόμενος οὐκ ἀηδῶς εἰς τοὺς ἰδίους ἔρωτας. ἡ δʼ ἐλευθεριότης καὶ τὸ μηδὲν ὀλίγῃ χειρὶ μηδὲ φειδομένῃ χαρίζεσθαι στρατιώταις καὶ φίλοις ἀρχήν τε λαμπρὰν ἐπὶ τὸ ἰσχύειν αὐτῷ παρέσχε, καὶ μεγάλου γενομένου τὴν δύναμιν ἐπὶ πλεῖον ἐπῆρεν, ἐκ μυρίων ἄλλων ἁμαρτημάτων ἀνατρεπομένην. ἓν δέ τι τοῦ μεγαλοδώρου παράδειγμα διηγήσομαι. 4.1. 4.2. 4.3.
35. Plutarch, Alexander The Great, 26 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 149, 150
36. Onasander, Strategicus, 19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 184
37. Martial, Epigrams, 9.43 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 166
38. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 5.62 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 149, 150
39. Juvenal, Satires, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 157, 158, 159
40. Plutarch, Pompey, 2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 166
41. Plutarch, On The Fortune Or Virtue of Alexander The Great, 3354-3357, 3353 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 149, 150, 186
42. Lucian, Essays In Portraiture Defended, 9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 186
43. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.55 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 175, 176
1.55. So far Pisistratus. To return to Solon: one of his sayings is that 70 years are the term of man's life.He seems to have enacted some admirable laws; for instance, if any man neglects to provide for his parents, he shall be disfranchised; moreover there is a similar penalty for the spendthrift who runs through his patrimony. Again, not to have a settled occupation is made a crime for which any one may, if he pleases, impeach the offender. Lysias, however, in his speech against Nicias ascribes this law to Draco, and to Solon another depriving open profligates of the right to speak in the Assembly. He curtailed the honours of athletes who took part in the games, fixing the allowance for an Olympic victor at 500 drachmae, for an Isthmian victor at 100 drachmae, and proportionately in all other cases. It was in bad taste, he urged, to increase the rewards of these victors, and to ignore the exclusive claims of those who had fallen in battle, whose sons ought, moreover, to be maintained and educated by the State.
44. Ammianus Marcellinus, History, 22.16.7 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 149, 150
22.16.7. But the crown of all cities is Alexandria, which is made famous by many splendid things, through the wisdom of its mighty founder and by the cleverness of the architect Dinocrates. The latter, when laying out its extensive and beautiful walls, for lack of lime, of which too little could at the time be found, sprinkled the whole line of its circuit with flour, Cf. Strabo, xvii. 1, 6 (at end); Plutarch, Alex. 26, 5 f. which chanced to be a sign that later the city would abound with a plentiful store of food.
45. Theodorus of Hierapolis, Peri Agonon, None  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 168
47. Varro, Ap. Censor., 14  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 184
48. App., Caes. Gal., 1.2.1  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 160
53. Epigraphy, Cil, 6.1285  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 29, 30, 171, 172
54. Vergil, Georgics, 2.66, 3.8-3.11  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 175, 176, 179, 180
2.66. fraxinus Herculeaeque arbos umbrosa coronae 3.8. acer equis? Temptanda via est, qua me quoque possim 3.9. tollere humo victorque virum volitare per ora. 3.10. Primus ego in patriam mecum, modo vita supersit, 3.11. Aonio rediens deducam vertice Musas;
55. Vergil, Eclogues, 7.61  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 175, 176
56. Vergil, Aeneis, 5.134-5.135, 6.408-6.410, 8.276-8.277  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 162, 175, 176
5.134. the wonted way, two swine, and, sable-hued, 5.135. the yoke of bulls; from shallow bowl he poured 6.408. But the grim boatman takes now these, now those, 6.409. Or thrusts unpitying from the stream away. 6.410. Aeneas, moved to wonder and deep awe, 8.276. the herd of monster bulls, which pastured free 8.277. along our river-valley. Cacus gazed
57. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, None  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 149, 150
58. Strabo, Geography, 14.1.23  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 149, 150
14.1.23. After the completion of the temple of Artemis, which, he says, was the work of Cheirocrates (the same man who built Alexandreia and the same man who proposed to Alexander to fashion Mt. Athos into his likeness, representing him as pouring a libation from a kind of ewer into a broad bowl, and to make two cities, one on the right of the mountain and the other on the left, and a river flowing from one to the other) — after the completion of the temple, he says, the great number of dedications in general were secured by means of the high honor they paid their artists, but the whole of the altar was filled, one might say, with the works of Praxiteles. They showed me also some of the works of Thrason, who made the chapel of Hecate, the waxen image of Penelope, and the old woman Eurycleia. They had eunuchs as priests, whom they called Megabyzi. And they were always in quest of persons from other places who were worthy of this preferment, and they held them in great honor. And it was obligatory for maidens to serve as colleagues with them in their priestly office. But though at the present some of their usages are being preserved, yet others are not; but the sanctuary remains a place of refuge, the same as in earlier times, although the limits of the refuge have often been changed; for example, when Alexander extended them for a stadium, and when Mithridates shot an arrow from the corner of the roof and thought it went a little farther than a stadium, and when Antony doubled this distance and included within the refuge a part of the city. But this extension of the refuge proved harmful, and put the city in the power of criminals; and it was therefore nullified by Augustus Caesar.
59. Hipp., Peri Technes, 1.3  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 144
60. Priscus, Fragments, 6.13.70  Tagged with subjects: •dinocrates macedonian architect Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 186