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16 results for "descent"
1. Herodotus, Histories, 4.197 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •rome, ideally placed for universal rule, ideas about descent and lineage of its people Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 135
4.197. These are all the Libyans whom we can name, and the majority of their kings cared nothing for the king of the Medes at the time of which I write, nor do they care for him now. ,I have this much further to say of this country: four nations and no more, as far as we know, inhabit it, two of which are aboriginal and two not; the Libyans in the north and the Ethiopians in the south of Libya are aboriginal; the Phoenicians and Greeks are later settlers.
2. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 130
693a. ἤμυνεν τὴν ἐπιοῦσαν δουλείαν, σχεδὸν ἂν ἤδη πάντʼ ἦν μεμειγμένα τὰ τῶν Ἑλλήνων γένη ἐν ἀλλήλοις, καὶ βάρβαρα ἐν Ἕλλησι καὶ Ἑλληνικὰ ἐν βαρβάροις, καθάπερ ὧν Πέρσαι τυραννοῦσι τὰ νῦν διαπεφορημένα καὶ συμπεφορημένα κακῶς ἐσπαρμένα κατοικεῖται. ταῦτʼ, ὦ Κλεινία καὶ Μέγιλλε, ἔχομεν ἐπιτιμᾶν τοῖς τε πάλαι πολιτικοῖς λεγομένοις καὶ νομοθέταις καὶ τοῖς νῦν, ἵνα τὰς αἰτίας αὐτῶν ἀναζητοῦντες, 693a. and Lacedaemonians, practically all the Greek races would have been confused together by now, and barbarians confused with Greeks and Greeks with barbarians,—just as the races under the Persian empire today are either scattered abroad or jumbled together and live in a miserable plight. Such, O Megillus and Clinias, are the charges we have to make against the so-called statesmen and lawgivers, both of the past and of the present, in order that, by investigating their causes, we may discover
3. Aristotle, Politics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 130
4. Sallust, Iugurtha, 17-18 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 147
5. Seneca The Younger, Quaestiones Naturales, 5.18.4 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •rome, ideally placed for universal rule, ideas about descent and lineage of its people Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 136
6. Julius Caesar, De Bello Gallico, 5.12.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •rome, ideally placed for universal rule, ideas about descent and lineage of its people Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 135
7. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.9.3, 2.38.1, 3.2.1, 5.21.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •rome, ideally placed for universal rule, ideas about descent and lineage of its people Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 135, 136
1.9.3.  Again, with respect to the antiquity of the human race, not only do Greeks put forth their claims but many of the barbarians as well, all holding that it is they who were autochthonous and the first of all men to discover the things which are of use in life, and that it was the events in their own history which were the earliest to have been held worthy of record. 2.38.1.  Now India as a whole, being of a vast extent, is inhabited, as we are told, by many other peoples of every description, and not one of them had its first origin in a foreign land, but all of them are thought to be autochthonous; it never receives any colony from abroad nor has it ever sent one to any other people. 3.2.1.  Now the Ethiopians, as historians relate, were the first of all men and the proofs of this statement, they say, are manifest. For that they did not come into their land as immigrants from abroad but were natives of it and so justly bear the name of "autochthones" is, they maintain, conceded by practically all men; furthermore, that those who dwell beneath the noon-day sun were, in all likelihood, the first to be generated by the earth, is clear to all; since, inasmuch as it was the warmth of the sun which, at the generation of the universe, dried up the earth when it was still wet and impregnated it with life, it is reasonable to suppose that the region which was nearest the sun was the first to bring forth living creatures. 5.21.5.  And Britain, we are told, is inhabited by tribes which are autochthonous and preserve in their ways of living the ancient manner of life. They use chariots, for instance, in their wars, even as tradition tells us the old Greek heroes did in the Trojan War, and their dwellings are humble, being built for the most part out of reeds or logs. The method they employ of harvesting their grain crops is to cut off no more than the heads and store them away in roofed granges, and then each day they pick out the ripened heads and grind them, getting in this way their food.
8. Seneca The Younger, Natural Questions, 5.18.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •rome, ideally placed for universal rule, ideas about descent and lineage of its people Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 136
9. Tacitus, Germania (De Origine Et Situ Germanorum), 2.1, 33.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 137, 140
10. Tacitus, Histories, 4.64.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •rome, ideally placed for universal rule, ideas about descent and lineage of its people •descent and lineage, of the germans Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 141
11. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 39.1 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •rome, ideally placed for universal rule, ideas about descent and lineage of its people Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 144
39.1. I am delighted at being honoured by you, as indeed it is to be expected that a man of sound judgement would be when honoured by a city which is noble and worthy of renown, as is the case with your city in regard to both power and grandeur, for it is inferior to no city of distinction anywhere, whether in nobility of lineage or in composition of population, comprising, as it does, the most illustrious families, not small groups of sorry specimens who came together from this place and from that, but the leaders among both Greeks and Macedonians, and, what is most significant, having had as founders both heroes and gods.
12. Cassius Dio, Roman History, None (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •rome, ideally placed for universal rule, ideas about descent and lineage of its people Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 146
13. Lucian, Parliament of The Gods, 7, 4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 145
14. Servius, Commentary On The Aeneid, 8.314 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •rome, ideally placed for universal rule, ideas about descent and lineage of its people Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 134
15. Strabo, Geography, 7.1.3, 7.2.3  Tagged with subjects: •rome, ideally placed for universal rule, ideas about descent and lineage of its people •descent and lineage, of the germans •descent and lineage, of the teutones and cimbri Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 139, 142
7.1.3. The first parts of this country are those that are next to the Rhenus, beginning at its source and extending a far as its outlet; and this stretch of river-land taken as a whole is approximately the breadth of the country on its western side. Some of the tribes of this river-land were transferred by the Romans to Celtica, whereas the others anticipated the Romans by migrating deep into the country, for instance, the Marsi; and only a few people, including a part of the Sugambri, are left. After the people who live along the river come the other tribes that live between the Rhenus and the River Albis, and traverses no less territory than the former. Between the two are other navigable rivers also (among them the Amasias, on which Drusus won a naval victory over the Bructeri), which likewise flow from the south towards the north and the ocean; for the country is elevated towards the south and forms a mountain chain that connects with the Alps and extends towards the east as though it were a part of the Alps; and in truth some declare that they actually are a part of the Alps, both because of their aforesaid position and of the fact that they produce the same timber; however, the country in this region does not rise to a sufficient height for that. Here, too, is the Hercynian Forest, and also the tribes of the Suevi, some of which dwell inside the forest, as, for instance, the tribes of the Coldui, in whose territory is Boihaemum, the domain of Marabodus, the place whither he caused to migrate, not only several other peoples, but in particular the Marcomanni, his fellow-tribesmen; for after his return from Rome this man, who before had been only a private citizen, was placed in charge of the affairs of state, for, as a youth he had been at Rome and had enjoyed the favor of Augustus, and on his return he took the rulership and acquired, in addition to the peoples aforementioned, the Lugii (a large tribe), the Zumi, the Butones, the Mugilones, the Sibini, and also the Semnones, a large tribe of the Suevi themselves. However, while some of the tribes of the Suevi dwell inside the forest, as I was saying, others dwell outside of it, and have a common boundary with the Getae. Now as for the tribe of the Suevi, it is the largest, for it extends from the Rhenus to the Albis; and a part of them even dwell on the far side of the Albis, as, for instance, the Hermondori and the Langobardi; and at the present time these latter, at least, have, to the last man, been driven in flight out of their country into the land on the far side of the river. It is a common characteristic of all the peoples in this part of the world that they migrate with ease, because of the meagerness of their livelihood and because they do not till the soil or even store up food, but live in small huts that are merely temporary structures; and they live for the most part off their flocks, as the Nomads do, so that, in imitation of the Nomads, they load their household belongings on their wagons and with their beasts turn whithersoever they think best. But other German tribes are still more indigent. I mean the Cherusci, the Chatti, the Gamabrivii and the Chattuarii, and also, near the ocean, the Sugambri, the Chaubi, the Bructeri, and the Cimbri, and also the Cauci, the Caulci, the Campsiani, and several others. Both the Visurgis and the Lupias Rivers run in the same direction as the Amasias, the Lupias being about six hundred stadia distant from the Rhenus and flowing through the country of the Lesser Bructeri. Germany has also the Salas River; and it was between the Salas and the Rhenus that Drusus Germanicus, while he was successfully carrying on the war, came to his end. He had subjugated, not only most of the tribes, but also the islands along the coast, among which is Burchanis, which he took by siege. 7.2.3. Writers report a custom of the Cimbri to this effect: Their wives, who would accompany them on their expeditions, were attended by priestesses who were seers; these were grey-haired, clad in white, with flaxen cloaks fastened on with clasps, girt with girdles of bronze, and bare-footed; now sword in hand these priestesses would meet with the prisoners of war throughout the camp, and having first crowned them with wreaths would lead them to a brazen vessel of about twenty amphorae; and they had a raised platform which the priestess would mount, and then, bending over the kettle, would cut the throat of each prisoner after he had been lifted up; and from the blood that poured forth into the vessel some of the priestesses would draw a prophecy, while still others would split open the body and from an inspection of the entrails would utter a prophecy of victory for their own people; and during the battles they would beat on the hides that were stretched over the wicker-bodies of the wagons and in this way produce an unearthly noise.
16. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.338, 4.40  Tagged with subjects: •rome, ideally placed for universal rule, ideas about descent and lineage of its people Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 148
1.338. But we of thine own seed, to whom thou dost 4.40. He who first mingled his dear life with mine