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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
derveni, krater Graf and Johnston (2007) 160
derveni, papyri Johnston and Struck (2005) 17, 153, 154, 156, 157, 158, 159, 164, 222
derveni, papyrus Carter (2019) 197, 199
Eidinow (2007) 252
Graf and Johnston (2007) 143, 149, 150, 152, 169, 174
Hitch (2017) 70
Ker and Wessels (2020) 3, 54, 55, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66
Seaford (2018) 203, 205, 218, 372
Tor (2017) 17, 140, 236, 284
Ward (2022) 34, 35, 36
Wolfsdorf (2020) 557, 558, 559
de Jáuregui (2010) 22, 24, 25, 30, 35, 76, 91, 101, 170, 175, 178, 187, 192, 230, 231, 238, 254, 268, 281, 292, 298, 299, 302, 305, 307, 311, 318, 319, 324, 327, 328, 335, 353, 362, 369
de Jáuregui et al. (2011) 2, 3, 14, 31, 33, 36, 50, 55, 66, 85, 99, 221, 222, 223, 295, 361, 371, 377, 379, 380, 381, 382, 383, 394, 405
derveni, papyrus, as riddle Ward (2022) 35, 36
derveni, papyrus, heraclitus, and Seaford (2018) 205
derveni, papyrus, orphic tradition Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 30, 93, 135, 136, 212
derveni, papyrus, papyri/papyrology Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 30, 93, 135, 136, 212, 213, 300, 418
derveny, papyrus Niehoff (2011) 63

List of validated texts:
19 validated results for "derveni"
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 116-118, 121-122, 886-894, 899 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Derveni Papyrus • Derveni author • Derveni papyrus • Derveni poem • Derveni poet

 Found in books: Ker and Wessels (2020) 63; de Jáuregui (2010) 318; Álvarez (2019) 49, 51, 52, 53, 54, 56, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 92


116. ἦ τοι μὲν πρώτιστα Χάος γένετʼ, αὐτὰρ ἔπειτα'117. Γαῖʼ εὐρύστερνος, πάντων ἕδος ἀσφαλὲς αἰεὶ 118. ἀθανάτων, οἳ ἔχουσι κάρη νιφόεντος Ὀλύμπου,
121. λυσιμελής, πάντων δὲ θεῶν πάντων τʼ ἀνθρώπων 122. δάμναται ἐν στήθεσσι νόον καὶ ἐπίφρονα βουλήν.
886. Ζεὺς δὲ θεῶν βασιλεὺς πρώτην ἄλοχον θέτο Μῆτιν 887. πλεῖστα τε ἰδυῖαν ἰδὲ θνητῶν ἀνθρώπων. 888. ἀλλʼ ὅτε δὴ ἄρʼ ἔμελλε θεὰν γλαυκῶπιν Ἀθήνην 889. τέξεσθαι, τότʼ ἔπειτα δόλῳ φρένας ἐξαπατήσας 890. αἱμυλίοισι λόγοισιν ἑὴν ἐσκάτθετο νηδὺν 891. Γαίης φραδμοσύνῃσι καὶ Οὐρανοῦ ἀστερόεντος. 892. τὼς γάρ οἱ φρασάτην, ἵνα μὴ βασιληίδα τιμὴν 893. ἄλλος ἔχοι Διὸς ἀντὶ θεῶν αἰειγενετάων. 894. ἐκ γὰρ τῆς εἵμαρτο περίφρονα τέκνα γενέσθαι·
899. ἀλλʼ ἄρα μιν Ζεὺς πρόσθεν ἑὴν ἐσκάτθετο νηδύν, '. None
116. A pleasing song and laud the company'117. of the immortal gods, and those created 118. In earthly regions and those generated
121. The streams, the swelling sea and up on high 122. The gleaming stars, broad Heaven in the sky,
886. Gave him in marriage to his progeny 887. Cymopolea. When Zeus, in the war, 888. Drove the Titans out of Heaven, huge Earth bore 889. Her youngest child Typhoeus with the aid 890. of golden Aphrodite, who had bade 891. Her lie with Tartarus. In everything 892. He did the lad was strong, untiring 893. When running, and upon his shoulders spread 894. A hundred-headed dragon, full of dread,
899. Sometimes a god could understand the sound '. None
2. None, None, nan (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Derveni author • Orphic tradition, Derveni Papyrus • papyri/papyrology, Derveni Papyrus

 Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 93; Álvarez (2019) 101


3. Euripides, Bacchae, 272-297 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Derveni Papyrus • Derveni Papyrus, first columns • Derveni author • Derveni poem • Heraclitus, and Derveni Papyrus • Orphic tradition, Derveni Papyrus • allegoresis (allegorical interpretation), in the Derveni Papyrus • experts, expertise, Derveni author as expert • papyri/papyrology, Derveni Papyrus

 Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 30; Seaford (2018) 205; Álvarez (2019) 85, 86, 134


272. '273. οὐκ ἂν δυναίμην μέγεθος ἐξειπεῖν ὅσος 274. καθʼ Ἑλλάδʼ ἔσται. δύο γάρ, ὦ νεανία, 275. τὰ πρῶτʼ ἐν ἀνθρώποισι· Δημήτηρ θεά— 276. γῆ δʼ ἐστίν, ὄνομα δʼ ὁπότερον βούλῃ κάλει· 277. αὕτη μὲν ἐν ξηροῖσιν ἐκτρέφει βροτούς· 278. ὃς δʼ ἦλθʼ ἔπειτʼ, ἀντίπαλον ὁ Σεμέλης γόνος 279. βότρυος ὑγρὸν πῶμʼ ηὗρε κεἰσηνέγκατο 280. θνητοῖς, ὃ παύει τοὺς ταλαιπώρους βροτοὺς 281. λύπης, ὅταν πλησθῶσιν ἀμπέλου ῥοῆς, 282. ὕπνον τε λήθην τῶν καθʼ ἡμέραν κακῶν 283. δίδωσιν, οὐδʼ ἔστʼ ἄλλο φάρμακον πόνων. 284. οὗτος θεοῖσι σπένδεται θεὸς γεγώς, 285. ὥστε διὰ τοῦτον τἀγάθʼ ἀνθρώπους ἔχειν. 286. 287. μηρῷ; διδάξω σʼ ὡς καλῶς ἔχει τόδε. 288. ἐπεί νιν ἥρπασʼ ἐκ πυρὸς κεραυνίου 289. Ζεύς, ἐς δʼ Ὄλυμπον βρέφος ἀνήγαγεν θεόν, 290. Ἥρα νιν ἤθελʼ ἐκβαλεῖν ἀπʼ οὐρανοῦ· 291. Ζεὺς δʼ ἀντεμηχανήσαθʼ οἷα δὴ θεός. 292. ῥήξας μέρος τι τοῦ χθόνʼ ἐγκυκλουμένου 293. αἰθέρος, ἔθηκε τόνδʼ ὅμηρον ἐκδιδούς, 294. Διόνυσον Ἥρας νεικέων· χρόνῳ δέ νιν 295. βροτοὶ ῥαφῆναί φασιν ἐν μηρῷ Διός, 296. ὄνομα μεταστήσαντες, ὅτι θεᾷ θεὸς 297. Ἥρᾳ ποθʼ ὡμήρευσε, συνθέντες λόγον. '. None
272. A man powerful in his boldness, one capable of speaking well, becomes a bad citizen in his lack of sense. This new god, whom you ridicule, I am unable to express how great he will be throughout Hellas . For two things, young man,'273. A man powerful in his boldness, one capable of speaking well, becomes a bad citizen in his lack of sense. This new god, whom you ridicule, I am unable to express how great he will be throughout Hellas . For two things, young man, 275. are first among men: the goddess Demeter—she is the earth, but call her whatever name you wish; she nourishes mortals with dry food; but he who came afterwards, the offspring of Semele, discovered a match to it, the liquid drink of the grape, and introduced it 280. to mortals. It releases wretched mortals from grief, whenever they are filled with the stream of the vine, and gives them sleep, a means of forgetting their daily troubles, nor is there another cure for hardships. He who is a god is poured out in offerings to the gods, 285. o that by his means men may have good things. And do you laugh at him, because he was sewn up in Zeus’ thigh? I will teach you that this is well: when Zeus snatched him out of the lighting-flame, and led the child as a god to Olympus , 290. Hera wished to banish him from the sky, but Zeus, as a god, had a counter-contrivance. Having broken a part of the air which surrounds the earth, he gave this to Hera as a pledge protecting the real A line of text has apparently been lost here. Dionysus from her hostility. But in time, 295. mortals say that he was nourished in the thigh of Zeus, changing the word, because a god he had served as a hostage for the goddess Hera, and composing the story. The account given in lines 292f. of the development of this legend is based on the similarity between the Greek words for hostage ( ὅμηρος ) and thigh ( μηρός ). But this god is a prophet—for Bacchic revelry and madness have in them much prophetic skill. '. None
4. Euripides, Hippolytus, 952-954 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Derveni Papyri • Derveni Papyrus • Derveni author

 Found in books: Graf and Johnston (2007) 174; Johnston and Struck (2005) 222; Álvarez (2019) 133


952. ἤδη νυν αὔχει καὶ δι' ἀψύχου βορᾶς"953. σίτοις καπήλευ' ̓Ορφέα τ' ἄνακτ' ἔχων" '954. βάκχευε πολλῶν γραμμάτων τιμῶν καπνούς:' "". None
952. Thy boasts will never persuade me to be guilty of attributing ignorance to gods. Go then, vaunt thyself, and drive1 Hippolytus is here taunted with being an exponent of the Orphic mysteries. Apparently Orpheus, like Pythagoras, taught the necessity of total abstinence from animal food. thy petty trade in viands formed of lifeless food; take Orpheus for thy chief and go a-revelling, with all honour for the vapourings of many a written scroll,'953. Thy boasts will never persuade me to be guilty of attributing ignorance to gods. Go then, vaunt thyself, and drive1 Hippolytus is here taunted with being an exponent of the Orphic mysteries. Apparently Orpheus, like Pythagoras, taught the necessity of total abstinence from animal food. thy petty trade in viands formed of lifeless food; take Orpheus for thy chief and go a-revelling, with all honour for the vapourings of many a written scroll, '. None
5. Herodotus, Histories, 1.132, 2.53, 4.78 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Derveni Papyrus • Derveni Papyrus, first columns • Derveni author • Derveni papyrus • Derveni poem • Derveni poet

 Found in books: Graf and Johnston (2007) 169; de Jáuregui (2010) 24, 30; Álvarez (2019) 35, 47, 135


1.132. θυσίη δὲ τοῖσι Πέρσῃσι περὶ τοὺς εἰρημένους θεοὺς ἥδε κατέστηκε· οὔτε βωμοὺς ποιεῦνται οὔτε πῦρ ἀνακαίουσι μέλλοντες θύειν, οὐ σπονδῇ χρέωνται, οὐκὶ αὐλῷ, οὐ στέμμασι, οὐκὶ οὐλῇσι· τῶν δὲ ὡς ἑκάστῳ θύειν θέλῃ, ἐς χῶρον καθαρὸν ἀγαγὼν τὸ κτῆνος καλέει τὸν θεόν, ἐστεφανωμένος τὸν τιάραν μυρσίνῃ μάλιστα. ἑωυτῷ μὲν δὴ τῷ θύοντι ἰδίῃ μούνῳ οὔ οἱ ἐγγίνεται ἀρᾶσθαι ἀγαθά, ὁ δὲ τοῖσι πᾶσι Πέρσῃσι κατεύχεται εὖ γίνεσθαι καὶ τῷ βασιλέι· ἐν γὰρ δὴ τοῖσι ἅπασι Πέρσῃσι καὶ αὐτὸς γίνεται. ἐπεὰν δὲ διαμιστύλας κατὰ μέλεα τὸ ἱρήιον ἑψήσῃ τὰ κρέα ὑποπάσας ποίην ὡς ἁπαλωτάτην, μάλιστα δὲ τὸ τρίφυλλον, ἐπὶ ταύτης ἔθηκε ὦν πάντα τὰ κρέα. διαθέντος δὲ αὐτοῦ Μάγος ἀνὴρ παρεστεὼς ἐπαείδει θεογονίην, οἵην δὴ ἐκεῖνοι λέγουσι εἶναι τὴν ἐπαοιδήν· ἄνευ γὰρ δὴ Μάγου οὔ σφι νόμος ἐστὶ θυσίας ποιέεσθαι. ἐπισχὼν δὲ ὀλίγον χρόνον ἀποφέρεται ὁ θύσας τὰ κρέα καὶ χρᾶται ὅ τι μιν λόγος αἱρέει.
2.53. ἔνθεν δὲ ἐγένοντο ἕκαστος τῶν θεῶν, εἴτε αἰεὶ ἦσαν πάντες, ὁκοῖοί τε τινὲς τὰ εἴδεα, οὐκ ἠπιστέατο μέχρι οὗ πρώην τε καὶ χθὲς ὡς εἰπεῖν λόγῳ. Ἡσίοδον γὰρ καὶ Ὅμηρον ἡλικίην τετρακοσίοισι ἔτεσι δοκέω μευ πρεσβυτέρους γενέσθαι καὶ οὐ πλέοσι· οὗτοι δὲ εἰσὶ οἱ ποιήσαντες θεογονίην Ἕλλησι καὶ τοῖσι θεοῖσι τὰς ἐπωνυμίας δόντες καὶ τιμάς τε καὶ τέχνας διελόντες καὶ εἴδεα αὐτῶν σημήναντες. οἱ δὲ πρότερον ποιηταὶ λεγόμενοι τούτων τῶν ἀνδρῶν γενέσθαι ὕστερον, ἔμοιγε δοκέειν, ἐγένοντο. τούτων τὰ μὲν πρῶτα αἱ Δωδωνίδες ἱρεῖαι λέγουσι, τὰ δὲ ὕστερα τὰ ἐς Ἡσίοδόν τε καὶ Ὅμηρον ἔχοντα ἐγὼ λέγω.
4.78. οὗτος μέν νυν οὕτω δὴ ἔπρηξε διὰ ξεινικά τε νόμαια καὶ Ἑλληνικὰς ὁμιλίας. πολλοῖσι δὲ κάρτα ἔτεσι ὕστερον Σκύλης ὁ Ἀριαπείθεος ἔπαθε παραπλήσια τούτῳ. Ἀριαπείθεϊ γὰρ τῷ Σκυθέων βασιλέι γίνεται μετʼ ἄλλων παίδων Σκύλης· ἐξ Ἰστριηνῆς δὲ γυναικὸς οὗτος γίνεται καὶ οὐδαμῶς ἐγχωρίης· τὸν ἡ μήτηρ αὕτη γλῶσσάν τε Ἑλλάδα καὶ γράμματα ἐδίδαξε. μετὰ δὲ χρόνῳ ὕστερον Ἀριαπείθης μὲν τελευτᾷ δόλῳ ὑπὸ Σπαργαπείθεος τοῦ Ἀγαθύρσων βασιλέος, Σκύλης δὲ τήν τε βασιληίην παρέλαβε καὶ τὴν γυναῖκα τοῦ πατρός, τῇ οὔνομα ἦν Ὀποίη· ἦν δὲ αὕτη ἡ Ὀποίη ἀστή, ἐξ ἧς ἦν Ὄρικος Ἀριαπείθεϊ παῖς. βασιλεύων δὲ Σκυθέων ὁ Σκύλης διαίτῃ οὐδαμῶς ἠρέσκετο Σκυψικῇ, ἀλλὰ πολλὸν πρὸς τὰ Ἑλληνικὰ μᾶλλον τετραμμένος ἦν ἀπὸ παιδεύσιος τῆς ἐπεπαίδευτο, ἐποίεέ τε τοιοῦτο· εὖτε ἀγάγοι τὴν στρατιὴν τὴν Σκυθέων ἐς τὸ Βορυσθενειτέων ἄστυ ʽοἱ δὲ Βορυσθενεῗται οὗτοι λέγουσι σφέας αὐτοὺς εἶναι Μιλησίουσ̓, ἐς τούτους ὅκως ἔλθοι ὁ Σκύλης, τὴν μὲν στρατιὴν καταλίπεσκε ἐν τῷ προαστείῳ, αὐτὸς δὲ ὅκως ἔλθοι ἐς τὸ τεῖχος καὶ τὰς πύλας ἐγκλῄσειε, τὴν στολὴν ἀποθέμενος τὴν Σκυθικὴν λάβεσκε ἂν Ἑλληνίδα ἐσθῆτα, ἔχων δʼ ἂν ταύτην ἠγόραζε οὔτε δορυφόρων ἑπομένων οὔτε ἄλλου οὐδενός· τὰς δὲ πύλας ἐφύλασσον, μή τίς μιν Σκυθέων ἴδοι ἔχοντα ταύτην τὴν στολήν· καὶ τά τε ἄλλα ἐχρᾶτο διαίτη Ἑλληνικῇ καὶ θεοῖσι ἱρὰ ἐποίεε κατὰ νόμους τοὺς Ἑλλήνων. ὅτε δὲ διατρίψειε μῆνα ἡ πλέον τούτου, ἀπαλλάσσετο ἐνδὺς τὴν Σκυθικὴν στολήν. ταῦτα ποιέεσκε πολλάκις καὶ οἰκία τε ἐδείματο ἐν Βορυσθένεϊ καὶ γυναῖκα ἔγημε ἐς αὐτὰ ἐπιχωρίην.''. None
1.132. And this is their method of sacrifice to the aforesaid gods: when about to sacrifice, they do not build altars or kindle fire, employ libations, or music, or fillets, or barley meal: when a man wishes to sacrifice to one of the gods, he leads a beast to an open space and then, wearing a wreath on his tiara, of myrtle usually, calls on the god. ,To pray for blessings for himself alone is not lawful for the sacrificer; rather, he prays that the king and all the Persians be well; for he reckons himself among them. He then cuts the victim limb from limb into portions, and, after boiling the flesh, spreads the softest grass, trefoil usually, and places all of it on this. ,When he has so arranged it, a Magus comes near and chants over it the song of the birth of the gods, as the Persian tradition relates it; for no sacrifice can be offered without a Magus. Then after a little while the sacrificer carries away the flesh and uses it as he pleases.
2.53. But whence each of the gods came to be, or whether all had always been, and how they appeared in form, they did not know until yesterday or the day before, so to speak; ,for I suppose Hesiod and Homer flourished not more than four hundred years earlier than I; and these are the ones who taught the Greeks the descent of the gods, and gave the gods their names, and determined their spheres and functions, and described their outward forms. ,But the poets who are said to have been earlier than these men were, in my opinion, later. The earlier part of all this is what the priestesses of Dodona tell; the later, that which concerns Hesiod and Homer, is what I myself say. ' "
4.78. This, then, was how Anacharsis fared, owing to his foreign ways and consorting with Greeks; and a great many years afterward, Scyles, son of Ariapithes, suffered a like fate. Scyles was one of the sons born to Ariapithes, king of Scythia; but his mother was of Istria, and not native-born; and she taught him to speak and read Greek. ,As time passed, Ariapithes was treacherously killed by Spargapithes, king of the Agathyrsi, and Scyles inherited the kingship and his father's wife, a Scythian woman whose name was Opoea, and she bore Scyles a son, Oricus. ,So Scyles was king of Scythia; but he was in no way content with the Scythian way of life, and was much more inclined to Greek ways, from the upbringing that he had received. So this is what he would do: he would lead the Scythian army to the city of the Borysthenites (who say that they are Milesians), and when he arrived there would leave his army in the suburb of the city, ,while he himself, entering within the walls and shutting the gates, would take off his Scythian apparel and put on Greek dress; and in it he would go among the townsfolk unattended by spearmen or any others (who would guard the gates, lest any Scythian see him wearing this apparel), and in every way follow the Greek manner of life, and worship the gods according to Greek usage. ,When he had spent a month or more like this, he would put on Scythian dress and leave the city. He did this often; and he built a house in Borysthenes, and married a wife of the people of the country and brought her there. "'. None
6. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Derveni Papyrus • Derveni papyrus

 Found in books: Graf and Johnston (2007) 174; Wolfsdorf (2020) 557


493a. καὶ ἡμεῖς τῷ ὄντι ἴσως τέθναμεν· ἤδη γάρ του ἔγωγε καὶ ἤκουσα τῶν σοφῶν ὡς νῦν ἡμεῖς τέθναμεν καὶ τὸ μὲν σῶμά ἐστιν ἡμῖν σῆμα, τῆς δὲ ψυχῆς τοῦτο ἐν ᾧ ἐπιθυμίαι εἰσὶ τυγχάνει ὂν οἷον ἀναπείθεσθαι καὶ μεταπίπτειν ἄνω κάτω, καὶ τοῦτο ἄρα τις μυθολογῶν κομψὸς ἀνήρ, ἴσως Σικελός τις ἢ Ἰταλικός, παράγων τῷ ὀνόματι διὰ τὸ πιθανόν τε καὶ πειστικὸν ὠνόμασε πίθον, τοὺς δὲ ἀνοήτους ἀμυήτους,''. None
493a. and we really, it may be, are dead; in fact I once heard sages say that we are now dead, and the body is our tomb, and the part of the soul in which we have desires is liable to be over-persuaded and to vacillate to and fro, and so some smart fellow, a Sicilian, I daresay, or Italian, made a fable in which—by a play of words—he named this part, as being so impressionable and persuadable, a jar, and the thoughtless he called uninitiate:''. None
7. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Derveni papyrus • Derveni poem

 Found in books: Tor (2017) 140; Álvarez (2019) 67


715e. αὐτὸς αὑτοῦ ὁρᾷ, γέρων δὲ ὀξύτατα. ΚΛ. ἀληθέστατα. ΑΘ. τί δὴ τὸ μετὰ ταῦτα; ἆρʼ οὐχ ἥκοντας μὲν καὶ παρόντας θῶμεν τοὺς ἐποίκους, τὸν δʼ ἑξῆς αὐτοῖς διαπεραντέον ἂν εἴη λόγον; ΚΛ. πῶς γὰρ οὔ; ΑΘ. ἄνδρες τοίνυν φῶμεν πρὸς αὐτούς, ὁ μὲν δὴ θεός, ὥσπερ καὶ ὁ παλαιὸς λόγος, ἀρχήν τε καὶ τελευτὴν καὶ''. None
715e. when he is young, but at its keenest when he is old. Clin. Very true. Ath. What, then, is to be our next step? May we not assume that our immigrants have arrived and are in the country, and should we not proceed with our address to them? Clin. of course. Ath. Let us, then, speak to them thus:— O men, that God who, as old tradition tells, holdeth the beginning, the end, and the center of all things that exist,''. None
8. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Derveni Papyrus • Derveni papyrus • Derveni poet • Orphic tradition, Derveni Papyrus • papyri/papyrology, Derveni Papyrus

 Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 135, 136; Graf and Johnston (2007) 174; Wolfsdorf (2020) 559; de Jáuregui (2010) 254; de Jáuregui et al. (2011) 14; Álvarez (2019) 47


364b. καὶ πένητες ὦσιν, ὁμολογοῦντες αὐτοὺς ἀμείνους εἶναι τῶν ἑτέρων. τούτων δὲ πάντων οἱ περὶ θεῶν τε λόγοι καὶ ἀρετῆς θαυμασιώτατοι λέγονται, ὡς ἄρα καὶ θεοὶ πολλοῖς μὲν ἀγαθοῖς δυστυχίας τε καὶ βίον κακὸν ἔνειμαν, τοῖς δʼ ἐναντίοις ἐναντίαν μοῖραν. ἀγύρται δὲ καὶ μάντεις ἐπὶ πλουσίων θύρας ἰόντες πείθουσιν ὡς ἔστι παρὰ σφίσι δύναμις ἐκ θεῶν ποριζομένη θυσίαις τε καὶ ἐπῳδαῖς, εἴτε τι'364e. λοιβῇ τε κνίσῃ τε παρατρωπῶσʼ ἄνθρωποι λισσόμενοι, ὅτε κέν τις ὑπερβήῃ καὶ ἁμάρτῃ. Hom. Il. 9.497 βίβλων δὲ ὅμαδον παρέχονται Μουσαίου καὶ Ὀρφέως, Σελήνης τε καὶ Μουσῶν ἐκγόνων, ὥς φασι, καθʼ ἃς θυηπολοῦσιν, πείθοντες οὐ μόνον ἰδιώτας ἀλλὰ καὶ πόλεις, ὡς ἄρα λύσεις τε καὶ καθαρμοὶ ἀδικημάτων διὰ θυσιῶν καὶ '. None
364b. and disregard those who are in any way weak or poor, even while admitting that they are better men than the others. But the strangest of all these speeches are the things they say about the gods and virtue, how so it is that the gods themselves assign to many good men misfortunes and an evil life but to their opposites a contrary lot; and begging priests and soothsayers go to rich men’s doors and make them believe that they by means of sacrifices and incantations have accumulated a treasure of power from the gods that can expiate and cure with pleasurable festival'364e. And incense and libation turn their wills Praying, whenever they have sinned and made transgression. Hom. Il. 9.497 And they produce a bushel of books of Musaeus and Orpheus, the offspring of the Moon and of the Muses, as they affirm, and these books they use in their ritual, and make not only ordinary men but states believe that there really are remissions of sins and purifications for deeds of injustice, by means of sacrifice and pleasant sport for the living, '. None
9. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Derveni author • Derveni poem • Orphic tradition, Derveni Papyrus • allegoresis (allegorical interpretation), in the Derveni Papyrus • experts, expertise, Derveni author as expert • papyri/papyrology, Derveni Papyrus

 Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 212; Álvarez (2019) 81, 134


10. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Derveni Papyri • Derveni Papyrus

 Found in books: Graf and Johnston (2007) 174; Johnston and Struck (2005) 222


11. None, None, nan (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Derveni Papyrus • Derveni author • allegoresis (allegorical interpretation), in the Derveni Papyrus

 Found in books: de Jáuregui et al. (2011) 380; Álvarez (2019) 88


12. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Derveni papyrus

 Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020) 559; de Jáuregui (2010) 76


13. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Derveni Papyri • Derveni Papyrus, first columns • Derveni author • Derveni poem

 Found in books: Johnston and Struck (2005) 153; Álvarez (2019) 100


14. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Derveni Papyrus, first columns • Derveni author • Derveni papyrus

 Found in books: de Jáuregui (2010) 170; Álvarez (2019) 137


15. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 8.32-8.33 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Derveni Papyrus, first columns • Derveni author • Derveni poem • allegoresis (allegorical interpretation), in the Derveni Papyrus • experts, expertise, Derveni author as expert • papyri/papyrology, Derveni Papyrus

 Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 418; Álvarez (2019) 25, 135, 138


8.32. The whole air is full of souls which are called genii or heroes; these are they who send men dreams and signs of future disease and health, and not to men alone, but to sheep also and cattle as well; and it is to them that purifications and lustrations, all divination, omens and the like, have reference. The most momentous thing in human life is the art of winning the soul to good or to evil. Blest are the men who acquire a good soul; they can never be at rest, nor ever keep the same course two days together. 8.33. Right has the force of an oath, and that is why Zeus is called the God of Oaths. Virtue is harmony, and so are health and all good and God himself; this is why they say that all things are constructed according to the laws of harmony. The love of friends is just concord and equality. We should not pay equal worship to gods and heroes, but to the gods always, with reverent silence, in white robes, and after purification, to the heroes only from midday onwards. Purification is by cleansing, baptism and lustration, and by keeping clean from all deaths and births and all pollution, and abstaining from meat and flesh of animals that have died, mullets, gurnards, eggs and egg-sprung animals, beans, and the other abstinences prescribed by those who perform rites in the sanctuaries.''. None
16. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Derveni author • Derveni papyrus

 Found in books: de Jáuregui (2010) 254; Álvarez (2019) 132


17. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Derveni Papyri • Derveni Papyrus • Derveni Papyrus, as riddle • Derveni Papyrus, first columns • Derveni author • Derveni papyrus • Derveni poem • Derveni poet • allegoresis (allegorical interpretation), in the Derveni Papyrus • experts, expertise, Derveni author as expert • papyri, Derveni Papyrus

 Found in books: Johnston and Struck (2005) 153; Ker and Wessels (2020) 3, 54, 55, 60, 62; Waldner et al (2016) 34, 40, 44; Ward (2022) 35, 36; Wolfsdorf (2020) 557, 558; de Jáuregui (2010) 35, 254, 319, 327; de Jáuregui et al. (2011) 3, 31, 50, 223, 361, 371, 377, 379, 380, 381, 382, 383, 394; Álvarez (2019) 24, 25, 30, 39, 48, 49, 51, 52, 53, 57, 66, 67, 71, 77, 82, 83, 84, 85, 102, 104, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 119, 120, 121, 122, 132, 135, 137, 138, 139, 143, 144, 145, 146


18. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Derveni author • Derveni papyrus • allegoresis (allegorical interpretation), in the Derveni Papyrus

 Found in books: de Jáuregui (2010) 238, 268; Álvarez (2019) 131


19. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Derveni Papyrus • Derveni Papyrus, first columns • Derveni author • Derveni papyrus • Derveni poem • Derveni poet • allegoresis (allegorical interpretation), in the Derveni Papyrus • experts, expertise, Derveni author as expert

 Found in books: de Jáuregui (2010) 22, 30, 170, 175, 187, 192, 230, 231, 298, 299, 302, 305, 307, 318, 319, 324, 327, 353, 369; de Jáuregui et al. (2011) 3, 31, 33, 36, 66, 85, 221, 222, 377, 382; Álvarez (2019) 2, 36, 49, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 65, 66, 67, 71, 111, 116, 118, 119, 120, 121, 137, 143, 146





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