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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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45 results for "democracy"
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 194 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy, oaths in democratic athens Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 124
194. No love of brothers as there was erstwhile,
2. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 213, 215-218, 287-291, 667-673, 214 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 55
214. Ἥρας τελείας καὶ Διὸς πιστώματα.
3. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 432 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy, oaths in democratic athens Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 55
432. ἄνευ δὲ πενθημάτων
4. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy, democratic Found in books: Papadodima (2022), Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II, 123
5. Aeschylus, Persians, 184-185, 188, 191, 181 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Papadodima (2022), Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II, 143
181. ἐδοξάτην μοι δύο γυναῖκʼ εὐείμονε,
6. Sophocles, Antigone, 1152, 1151 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 115
7. Isaeus, Orations, 10.10 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 153, 222, 226
8. Lysias, Orations, 9.15, 30.10, 31.1-31.2, 32.6 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy, oaths in democratic athens •democracy/democratic, Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 104; Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 226
9. Aristophanes, Frogs, 549-575, 577-578, 576 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 19
576. δρέπανον λαβοῦς', ᾧ τὰς χόλικας κατέσπασας.
10. Isocrates, Orations, 12.121-12.124 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy, oaths in democratic athens Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 104
11. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 10, 100-109, 11, 110-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-139, 14, 140-149, 15, 150-159, 16, 160-169, 17, 170-179, 18, 180-189, 19, 190-199, 2, 20, 200-209, 21, 210-219, 22, 220-229, 23, 230-239, 24, 240-249, 25, 250-253, 26-29, 3, 30-39, 4, 40-49, 5, 50-59, 6, 60-69, 7, 70-79, 8, 80-89, 9, 90-99, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 115; Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 19
1. ἀλλ' εἴ τις ἐς Βακχεῖον αὐτὰς ἐκάλεσεν,
12. Aristophanes, Fragments, 317-340, 342-344, 341 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 19
13. Lysias, Fragments, 25-27, 29, 28 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 28
14. Xenophon, On Household Management, 7.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy/democratic, Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 7, 8, 19
15. Xenophon, Hellenica, 2.3.6-2.3.7 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy, democratic Found in books: Papadodima (2022), Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II, 57
16. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Laks (2022), Plato's Second Republic: An Essay on the Laws. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2022 81
17. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 3.83, 8.81.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 124
18. Theopompus of Chios, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy/democratic, Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 28
19. Lysias, Fragments, 25-27, 29, 28 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 28
20. Herodotus, Histories, 1.131, 3.80, 7.148 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy, democratic •democracy, oaths in democratic athens Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 104; Papadodima (2022), Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II, 123
1.131. As to the customs of the Persians, I know them to be these. It is not their custom to make and set up statues and temples and altars, but those who do such things they think foolish, because, I suppose, they have never believed the gods to be like men, as the Greeks do; ,but they call the whole circuit of heaven Zeus, and to him they sacrifice on the highest peaks of the mountains; they sacrifice also to the sun and moon and earth and fire and water and winds. ,From the beginning, these are the only gods to whom they have ever sacrificed; they learned later to sacrifice to the “heavenly” Aphrodite from the Assyrians and Arabians. She is called by the Assyrians Mylitta, by the Arabians Alilat, by the Persians Mitra. 3.80. After the tumult quieted down, and five days passed, the rebels against the Magi held a council on the whole state of affairs, at which sentiments were uttered which to some Greeks seem incredible, but there is no doubt that they were spoken. ,Otanes was for turning the government over to the Persian people: “It seems to me,” he said, “that there can no longer be a single sovereign over us, for that is not pleasant or good. You saw the insolence of Cambyses, how far it went, and you had your share of the insolence of the Magus. ,How can monarchy be a fit thing, when the ruler can do what he wants with impunity? Give this power to the best man on earth, and it would stir him to unaccustomed thoughts. Insolence is created in him by the good things to hand, while from birth envy is rooted in man. ,Acquiring the two he possesses complete evil; for being satiated he does many reckless things, some from insolence, some from envy. And yet an absolute ruler ought to be free of envy, having all good things; but he becomes the opposite of this towards his citizens; he envies the best who thrive and live, and is pleased by the worst of his fellows; and he is the best confidant of slander. ,of all men he is the most inconsistent; for if you admire him modestly he is angry that you do not give him excessive attention, but if one gives him excessive attention he is angry because one is a flatter. But I have yet worse to say of him than that; he upsets the ancestral ways and rapes women and kills indiscriminately. ,But the rule of the multitude has in the first place the loveliest name of all, equality, and does in the second place none of the things that a monarch does. It determines offices by lot, and holds power accountable, and conducts all deliberating publicly. Therefore I give my opinion that we make an end of monarchy and exalt the multitude, for all things are possible for the majority.” 7.148. So the spies were sent back after they had seen all and returned to Europe. After sending the spies, those of the Greeks who had sworn alliance against the Persian next sent messengers to Argos. ,Now this is what the Argives say of their own part in the matter. They were informed from the first that the foreigner was stirring up war against Hellas. When they learned that the Greeks would attempt to gain their aid against the Persian, they sent messengers to Delphi to inquire of the god how it would be best for them to act, for six thousand of them had been lately slain by a Lacedaemonian army and Cleomenes son of Anaxandrides its general. For this reason, they said, the messengers were sent. ,The priestess gave this answer to their question: quote type="oracle" l met="dact" Hated by your neighbors, dear to the immortals, /l l Crouch with a lance in rest, like a warrior fenced in his armor, /l l Guarding your head from the blow, and the head will shelter the body. /l /quote This answer had already been uttered by the priestess when the envoys arrived in Argos and entered the council chamber to speak as they were charged. ,Then the Argives answered to what had been said that they would do as was asked of them if they might first make a thirty years peace with Lacedaemonia and if the command of half the allied power were theirs. It was their right to have the full command, but they would nevertheless be content with half.
21. Lycurgus, Against Leocrates, 79 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy, oaths in democratic athens Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 100
22. Eubulus, Fragments, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy/democratic, Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 19
23. Demosthenes, Orations, 23.53, 27.5, 29.26-29.33, 44.68 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 19, 188, 212, 226, 241
24. Timocles Comicus, Fragments, 23 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy/democratic, Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 153
25. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 3.5, 7.1.4 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy, democratic •democracy, oaths in democratic athens Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 115; Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 103
26. Eubulus, Fragments, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy/democratic, Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 19
27. Plautus, Asinaria, 751-776, 778-809, 777 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 212
28. Plutarch, Solon, 20, 22, 21 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 226
29. Plutarch, Pericles, 37 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy/democratic, Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 241
30. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy/democratic, Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 28
31. Plutarch, Lysander, 18.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy, democratic Found in books: Papadodima (2022), Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II, 57
18.4. σάμιοι δὲ τὰ παρʼ αὐτοῖς Ἡραῖα Λυσάνδρεια καλεῖν ἐψηφίσαντο. τῶν δὲ ποιητῶν Χοιρίλον μὲν ἀεὶ περὶ αὑτὸν εἶχεν ὡς κοσμήσοντα τὰς πράξεις διὰ ποιητικῆς, Ἀντιλόχῳ δὲ ποιήσαντι μετρίους τινὰς εἰς αὐτὸν στίχους ἡσθεὶς ἔδωκε πλήσας ἀργυρίου τὸν πῖλον. Ἀντιμάχου δὲ τοῦ Κολοφωνίου καὶ Νικηράτου τινὸς Ἡρακλεώτου ποιήμασι Λυσάνδρεια διαγωνισαμένων ἐπʼ αὐτοῦ τὸν Νικήρατον ἐστεφάνωσεν, ὁ δὲ Ἀντίμαχος ἀχθεσθεὶς ἠφάνισε τὸ ποίημα. 18.4.
32. Pollux, Onomasticon, 8.108 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy, democratic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 115
33. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 3.20.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy, democratic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 104
3.20.3. διαβᾶσι δὲ αὐτόθεν ποταμὸν Φελλίαν, παρὰ Ἀμύκλας ἰοῦσιν εὐθεῖαν ὡς ἐπὶ θάλασσαν Φᾶρις πόλις ἐν τῇ Λακωνικῇ ποτε ᾠκεῖτο· ἀποτρεπομένῳ δὲ ἀπὸ τῆς Φελλίας ἐς δεξιὰν ἡ πρὸς τὸ ὄρος τὸ Ταΰγετόν ἐστιν ὁδός. ἔστι δὲ ἐν τῷ πεδίῳ Διὸς Μεσσαπέως τέμενος· γενέσθαι δέ οἱ τὴν ἐπίκλησιν ἀπὸ ἀνδρὸς λέγουσιν ἱερασαμένου τῷ θεῷ. ἐντεῦθέν ἐστιν ἀπιοῦσιν ἐκ τοῦ Ταϋγέτου χωρίον ἔνθα πόλις ποτὲ ᾠκεῖτο Βρυσίαι· καὶ Διονύσου ναὸς ἐνταῦθα ἔτι λείπεται καὶ ἄγαλμα ἐν ὑπαίθρῳ. τὸ δὲ ἐν τῷ ναῷ μόναις γυναιξὶν ἔστιν ὁρᾶν· γυναῖκες γὰρ δὴ μόναι καὶ τὰ ἐς τὰς θυσίας δρῶσιν ἐν ἀπορρήτῳ. 3.20.3. Crossing from here a river Phellia, and going past Amyclae along a road leading straight towards the sea, you come to the site of Pharis, which was once a city of Laconia . Turning away from the Phellia to the right is the road that leads to Mount Taygetus. On the plain is a precinct of Zeus Messapeus, who is surnamed, they say, after a man who served the god as his priest. Leaving Taygetus from here you come to the site of the city Bryseae . There still remains here a temple of Dionysus with an image in the open. But the image in the temple women only may see, for women by themselves perform in secret the sacrificial rites.
34. Polyaenus, Stratagems, 1.23 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy, democratic Found in books: Papadodima (2022), Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II, 57
35. Athenaeus, The Learned Banquet, 13.22, 13.60 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy/democratic, Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 153
36. Hesychius of Miletus, Fragments, None (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •democracy, democratic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 115
37. Andocides, Orations, 1.97-1.98, 4.13-4.14  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 100; Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 226
38. Anon., Totenbuch, 130  Tagged with subjects: •democracy, democratic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 256
39. Anon., Vat. Gr., None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 28
40. Papyri, P. Vindob. Gr., None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 28
41. Aeschines, Or., 3.18  Tagged with subjects: •democracy/democratic, Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 241
42. Etymologicum Magnum, Catasterismi, None  Tagged with subjects: •democracy, democratic Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 115
44. Menodotus, Fgrh 541, None  Tagged with subjects: •democracy, democratic Found in books: Papadodima (2022), Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II, 57
45. Aristophanes Boeotus, Fragments, 317-340, 342-344, 341  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 19