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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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4 results for "curse"
1. Homer, Iliad, 3.297-3.301, 19.264-19.268 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse, performance Found in books: Stavrianopoulou (2006), Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World, 197, 198
3.297. / Then they drew wine from the bowl into the cups, and poured it forth, and made prayer to the gods that are for ever. And thus would one of the Achaeans and Trojans say:Zeus, most glorious, most great, and ye other immortal gods, which host soever of the twain shall be first to work harm in defiance of the oaths, 3.298. / Then they drew wine from the bowl into the cups, and poured it forth, and made prayer to the gods that are for ever. And thus would one of the Achaeans and Trojans say:Zeus, most glorious, most great, and ye other immortal gods, which host soever of the twain shall be first to work harm in defiance of the oaths, 3.299. / Then they drew wine from the bowl into the cups, and poured it forth, and made prayer to the gods that are for ever. And thus would one of the Achaeans and Trojans say:Zeus, most glorious, most great, and ye other immortal gods, which host soever of the twain shall be first to work harm in defiance of the oaths, 3.300. / may their brains be thus poured forth upon the ground even as this wine, theirs and their children's; and may their wives be made slaves to others. 3.301. / may their brains be thus poured forth upon the ground even as this wine, theirs and their children's; and may their wives be made slaves to others. 19.264. / take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.265. / full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives: 19.266. / full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives: 19.267. / full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives: 19.268. / full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives:
2. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 237 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse, performance Found in books: Stavrianopoulou (2006), Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World, 198
237. συνεπόμνυθ' ὑμεῖς ταῦτα πᾶσαι; νὴ Δία.
3. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 9.10.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse, performance Found in books: Stavrianopoulou (2006), Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World, 197
9.10.3.  Likewise, the maxim "Nothing overmuch" exhorts us to observe due measure in all things and not to make an irrevocable decision about any human affairs, as the Epidamnians once did. This people, who dwelt on the shores of the Adriatic, once quarrelled among themselves, and casting red-hot masses of iron right into the sea they swore an oath that they would never make up their mutual enmity until the masses of iron should be brought up hot out of the sea. And although they had sworn so severe an oath and had taken no thought of the admonition "Nothing overmuch," later under the compulsion of circumstances they put an end to their enmity, leaving the masses of iron to lie cold in the depths of the sea.
4. Epigraphy, Seg, 9.3  Tagged with subjects: •curse, performance Found in books: Stavrianopoulou (2006), Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World, 197