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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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subject book bibliographic info
cumaean Dijkstra and Raschle (2020) 243
cumaean, artwork of daedalus, apollo, and Pillinger (2019) 175
cumaean, sibyl Bortolani et al (2019) 164
Santangelo (2013) 122, 154, 229, 230, 231
cumaean, sibyl, and daedalus Pillinger (2019) 176, 177
cumaean, sibyl, and song Pillinger (2019) 231
cumaean, sibyl, and the sibylline books Pillinger (2019) 167, 168, 178, 238
cumaean, sibyl, and written texts Pillinger (2019) 24
cumaean, sibyl, apollo, and Pillinger (2019) 149, 190
cumaean, sibyl, as composite figure Pillinger (2019) 149, 166, 173, 174
cumaean, sibyl, as state institution Pillinger (2019) 170, 171, 172
cumaean, sibyl, association with cassandra Pillinger (2019) 138, 139, 140, 141, 148, 149, 178
cumaean, sibyl, described by helenus Pillinger (2019) 161, 162, 163, 164
cumaean, sibyl, in metamorphoses Pillinger (2019) 188, 189, 190, 191
cumaean, sibyl, inspiration Pillinger (2019) 179, 180, 181, 182
cumaean, sibyl, longevity Pillinger (2019) 188, 189, 190, 191
cumaean, sibyl, origins of Pillinger (2019) 167
cumaean, sibyl, prophecies of cassandra, on the Pillinger (2019) 140, 141, 148
cumaean, sibyl, prophecies to aeneas Pillinger (2019) 182, 183, 184, 185, 190, 191
cumaean, sibyl, reflected in senecan cassandra Pillinger (2019) 205, 206
cumaean, sibyl, relationship to audience Pillinger (2019) 238

List of validated texts:
4 validated results for "cumaean"
1. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 4.62 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Cumaean Sibyl, as state institution • Sibyl, Cumaean

 Found in books: Pillinger (2019) 171; Santangelo (2013) 230


4.62. 1. \xa0It is said that during the reign of Tarquinius another very wonderful piece of good luck also came to the Roman state, conferred upon it by the favour of some god or other divinity; and this good fortune was not of short duration, but throughout the whole existence of the country it has often saved it from great calamities.,2. \xa0A\xa0certain woman who was not a native of the country came to the tyrant wishing to sell him nine books filled with Sibylline oracles; but when Tarquinius refused to purchase the books at the price she asked, she went away and burned three of them. And not long afterwards, bringing the remaining six books, she offered to sell them for the same price. But when they thought her a fool and mocked at her for asking the same price for the smaller number of books that she had been unable to get for even the larger number, she again went away and burned half of those that were left; then, bringing the remaining books, she asked the same amount of money for these.,3. \xa0Tarquinius, wondering at the woman's purpose, sent for the augurs and acquainting them with the matter, asked them what he should do. These, knowing by certain signs that he had rejected a god-sent blessing, and declaring it to be a great misfortune that he had not purchased all the books, directed him to pay the woman all the money she asked and to get the oracles that were left.,4. \xa0The woman, after delivering the books and bidding him take great care of them, disappeared from among men. Tarquinius chose two men of distinction from among the citizens and appointing two public slaves to assist them, entrusted to them the guarding of the books; and when one of these men, named Marcus Atilius, seemed to have been faithless to his trust and was informed upon by one of the public slaves, he ordered him to be sewed up in a leather bag and thrown into the sea as a parricide.,5. \xa0Since the expulsion of the kings, the commonwealth, taking upon itself the guarding of these oracles, entrusts the care of them to persons of the greatest distinction, who hold this office for life, being exempt from military service and from all civil employments, and it assigns public slaves to assist them, in whose absence the others are not permitted to inspect the oracles. In short, there is no possession of the Romans, sacred or profane, which they guard so carefully as they do the Sibylline oracles. They consult them, by order of the senate, when the state is in the grip of party strife or some great misfortune has happened to them in war, or some important prodigies and apparitions have been seen which are difficult of interpretation, as has often happened. These oracles till the time of the Marsian War, as it was called, were kept underground in the temple of Jupiter Capitolinus in a stone chest under the guard of ten men.,6. \xa0But when the temple was burned after the close of the one\xa0hundred and seventy-third Olympiad, either purposely, as some think, or by accident, these oracles together with all the offerings consecrated to the god were destroyed by the fire. Those which are now extant have been scraped together from many places, some from the cities of Italy, others from Erythrae in Asia (whither three envoys were sent by vote of the senate to copy them), and others were brought from other cities, transcribed by private persons. Some of these are found to be interpolations among the genuine Sibylline oracles, being recognized as such by means of the soâ\x80\x91called acrostics. In all this I\xa0am following the account given by Terentius Varro in his work on religion. "". None
2. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Cumaean Sibyl, as state institution • Sibyl, Cumaean

 Found in books: Pillinger (2019) 172; Santangelo (2013) 230


3. Lactantius, Divine Institutes, 1.6.10-1.6.11 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Cumaean Sibyl, and the Sibylline Books • Sibyl, Cumaean

 Found in books: Pillinger (2019) 168; Santangelo (2013) 230


1.6.10. Now let us pass to divine testimonies; but I will previously bring forward one which resembles a divine testimony, both on account of its very great antiquity, and because he whom I shall name was taken from men and placed among the gods. According to Cicero, Caius Cotta the pontiff, while disputing against the Stoics concerning superstitions, and the variety of opinions which prevail respecting the gods, in order that he might, after the custom of the Academics, make everything uncertain, says that there were five Mercuries; and having enumerated four in order, says that the fifth was he by whom Argus was slain, and that on this account he fled into Egypt, and gave laws and letters to the Egyptians. The Egyptians call him Thoth; and from him the first month of their year, that is, September, received its name among them. He also built a town, which is even now called in Greek Hermopolis (the town of Mercury), and the inhabitants of Phen honour him with religious worship. And although he was a man, yet he was of great antiquity, and most fully imbued with every kind of learning, so that the knowledge of many subjects and arts acquired for him the name of Trismegistus. He wrote books, and those in great numbers, relating to the knowledge of divine things, in which be asserts the majesty of the supreme and only God, and makes mention of Him by the same names which we use - God and Father. And that no one might inquire His name, he said that He was without name, and that on account of His very unity He does not require the peculiarity of a name. These are his own words: God is one, but He who is one only does not need a name; for He who is self-existent is without a name. God, therefore, has no name, because He is alone; nor is there any need of a proper name, except in cases where a multitude of persons requires a distinguishing mark, so that you may designate each person by his own mark and appellation. But God, because He is always one, has no peculiar name. It remains for me to bring forward testimonies respecting the sacred responses and predictions, which are much more to be relied upon. For perhaps they against whom we are arguing may think that no credence is to be given to poets, as though they invented fictions, nor to philosophers, inasmuch as they were liable to err, being themselves but men. Marcus Varro, than whom no man of greater learning ever lived, even among the Greeks, much less among the Latins, in those books respecting divine subjects which he addressed to Caius C sar the chief pontiff, when he was speaking of the Quindecemviri, says that the Sibylline books were not the production of one Sibyl only, but that they were called by one name Sibylline, because all prophetesses were called by the ancients Sibyls, either from the name of one, the Delphian priestess, or from their proclaiming the counsels of the gods. For in the Æolic dialect they used to call the gods by the word Sioi, not Theoi; and for counsel they used the word bule, not boule;- and so the Sibyl received her name as though Siobule. But he says that the Sibyls were ten in number, and he enumerated them all under the writers, who wrote an account of each: that the first was from the Persians, and of her Nicanor made mention, who wrote the exploits of Alexander of Macedon;- the second of Libya, and of her Euripides makes mention in the prologue of the Lamia;- the third of Delphi, concerning whom Chrysippus speaks in that book which he composed concerning divination - the fourth a Cimmerian in Italy, whom N vius mentions in his books of the Punic war, and Piso in his annals - the fifth of Erythr a, whom Apollodorus of Erythr a affirms to have been his own countrywoman, and that she foretold to the Greeks when they were setting out for Ilium, both that Troy was doomed to destruction, and that Homer would write falsehoods;- the sixth of Samos, respecting whom Eratosthenes writes that he had found a written notice in the ancient annals of the Samians. The seventh was of Cum, by name Amalth a, who is termed by some Herophile, or Demophile, and they say that she brought nine books to the king Tarquinius Priscus, and asked for them three hundred philippics, and that the king refused so great a price, and derided the madness of the woman; that she, in the sight of the king, burnt three of the books, and demanded the same price for those which were left; that Tarquinias much more considered the woman to be mad; and that when she again, having burnt three other books, persisted in asking the same price, the king was moved, and bought the remaining books for the three hundred pieces of gold: and the number of these books was afterwards increased, after the rebuilding of the Capitol; because they were collected from all cities of Italy and Greece, and especially from those of Erythr a, and were brought to Rome, under the name of whatever Sibyl they were. Further, that the eighth was from the Hellespont, born in the Trojan territory, in the village of Marpessus, about the town of Gergithus; and Heraclides of Pontus writes that she lived in the times of Solon and Cyrus - the ninth of Phrygia, who gave oracles at Ancyra;- the tenth of Tibur, by name Albunea, who is worshipped at Tibur as a goddess, near the banks of the river Anio, in the depths of which her statue is said to have been found, holding in her hand a book. The senate transferred her oracles into the Capitol. The predictions of all these Sibyls are both brought forward and esteemed as such, except those of the Cum an Sibyl, whose books are concealed by the Romans; nor do they consider it lawful for them to be inspected by any one but the Quindecemviri. And there are separate books the production of each, but because these are inscribed with the name of the Sibyl they are believed to be the work of one; and they are confused, nor can the productions of each be distinguished and assigned to their own authors, except in the case of the Erythr an Sibyl, for she both inserted her own true name in her verse, and predicted that she would be called Erythr an, though she was born at Babylon. But we also shall speak of the Sibyl without any distinction, wherever we shall have occasion to use their testimonies. All these Sibyls, then, proclaim one God, and especially the Erythr an, who is regarded among the others as more celebrated and noble; since Fenestella, a most diligent writer, speaking of the Quindecemviri, says that, after the rebuilding of the Capitol, Caius Curio the consul proposed to the senate that ambassadors should be sent to Erythr to search out and bring to Rome the writings of the Sibyl; and that, accordingly, Publius Gabinius, Marcus Otacilius, and Lucius Valerius were sent, who conveyed to Rome about a thousand verses written out by private persons. We have shown before that Varro made the same statement. Now in these verses which the ambassadors brought to Rome, are these testimonies respecting the one God:- 1. One God, who is alone, most mighty, uncreated. This is the only supreme God, who made the heaven, and decked it with lights. 2. But there is one only God of pre-eminent power, who made the heaven, and sun, and stars, and moon, and fruitful earth, and waves of the water of the sea. And since He alone is the framer of the universe, and the artificer of all things of which it consists or which are contained in it, it testifies that He alone ought to be worshipped: - 3. Worship Him who is alone the ruler of the world, who alone was and is from age to age. Also another Sibyl, whoever she is, when she said that she conveyed the voice of God to men, thus spoke:- 4. I am the one only God, and there is no other God. I would now follow up the testimonies of the others, were it not that these are sufficient, and that I reserve others for more befitting opportunities. But since we are defending the cause of truth before those who err from the truth and serve false religions, what kind of proof ought we to bring forward against them, rather than to refute them by the testimonies of their own gods? 1.6.11. Now let us pass to divine testimonies; but I will previously bring forward one which resembles a divine testimony, both on account of its very great antiquity, and because he whom I shall name was taken from men and placed among the gods. According to Cicero, Caius Cotta the pontiff, while disputing against the Stoics concerning superstitions, and the variety of opinions which prevail respecting the gods, in order that he might, after the custom of the Academics, make everything uncertain, says that there were five Mercuries; and having enumerated four in order, says that the fifth was he by whom Argus was slain, and that on this account he fled into Egypt, and gave laws and letters to the Egyptians. The Egyptians call him Thoth; and from him the first month of their year, that is, September, received its name among them. He also built a town, which is even now called in Greek Hermopolis (the town of Mercury), and the inhabitants of Phen honour him with religious worship. And although he was a man, yet he was of great antiquity, and most fully imbued with every kind of learning, so that the knowledge of many subjects and arts acquired for him the name of Trismegistus. He wrote books, and those in great numbers, relating to the knowledge of divine things, in which be asserts the majesty of the supreme and only God, and makes mention of Him by the same names which we use - God and Father. And that no one might inquire His name, he said that He was without name, and that on account of His very unity He does not require the peculiarity of a name. These are his own words: God is one, but He who is one only does not need a name; for He who is self-existent is without a name. God, therefore, has no name, because He is alone; nor is there any need of a proper name, except in cases where a multitude of persons requires a distinguishing mark, so that you may designate each person by his own mark and appellation. But God, because He is always one, has no peculiar name. It remains for me to bring forward testimonies respecting the sacred responses and predictions, which are much more to be relied upon. For perhaps they against whom we are arguing may think that no credence is to be given to poets, as though they invented fictions, nor to philosophers, inasmuch as they were liable to err, being themselves but men. Marcus Varro, than whom no man of greater learning ever lived, even among the Greeks, much less among the Latins, in those books respecting divine subjects which he addressed to Caius C sar the chief pontiff, when he was speaking of the Quindecemviri, says that the Sibylline books were not the production of one Sibyl only, but that they were called by one name Sibylline, because all prophetesses were called by the ancients Sibyls, either from the name of one, the Delphian priestess, or from their proclaiming the counsels of the gods. For in the Æolic dialect they used to call the gods by the word Sioi, not Theoi; and for counsel they used the word bule, not boule;- and so the Sibyl received her name as though Siobule. But he says that the Sibyls were ten in number, and he enumerated them all under the writers, who wrote an account of each: that the first was from the Persians, and of her Nicanor made mention, who wrote the exploits of Alexander of Macedon;- the second of Libya, and of her Euripides makes mention in the prologue of the Lamia;- the third of Delphi, concerning whom Chrysippus speaks in that book which he composed concerning divination - the fourth a Cimmerian in Italy, whom N vius mentions in his books of the Punic war, and Piso in his annals - the fifth of Erythr a, whom Apollodorus of Erythr a affirms to have been his own countrywoman, and that she foretold to the Greeks when they were setting out for Ilium, both that Troy was doomed to destruction, and that Homer would write falsehoods;- the sixth of Samos, respecting whom Eratosthenes writes that he had found a written notice in the ancient annals of the Samians. The seventh was of Cum, by name Amalth a, who is termed by some Herophile, or Demophile, and they say that she brought nine books to the king Tarquinius Priscus, and asked for them three hundred philippics, and that the king refused so great a price, and derided the madness of the woman; that she, in the sight of the king, burnt three of the books, and demanded the same price for those which were left; that Tarquinias much more considered the woman to be mad; and that when she again, having burnt three other books, persisted in asking the same price, the king was moved, and bought the remaining books for the three hundred pieces of gold: and the number of these books was afterwards increased, after the rebuilding of the Capitol; because they were collected from all cities of Italy and Greece, and especially from those of Erythr a, and were brought to Rome, under the name of whatever Sibyl they were. Further, that the eighth was from the Hellespont, born in the Trojan territory, in the village of Marpessus, about the town of Gergithus; and Heraclides of Pontus writes that she lived in the times of Solon and Cyrus - the ninth of Phrygia, who gave oracles at Ancyra;- the tenth of Tibur, by name Albunea, who is worshipped at Tibur as a goddess, near the banks of the river Anio, in the depths of which her statue is said to have been found, holding in her hand a book. The senate transferred her oracles into the Capitol. The predictions of all these Sibyls are both brought forward and esteemed as such, except those of the Cum an Sibyl, whose books are concealed by the Romans; nor do they consider it lawful for them to be inspected by any one but the Quindecemviri. And there are separate books the production of each, but because these are inscribed with the name of the Sibyl they are believed to be the work of one; and they are confused, nor can the productions of each be distinguished and assigned to their own authors, except in the case of the Erythr an Sibyl, for she both inserted her own true name in her verse, and predicted that she would be called Erythr an, though she was born at Babylon. But we also shall speak of the Sibyl without any distinction, wherever we shall have occasion to use their testimonies. All these Sibyls, then, proclaim one God, and especially the Erythr an, who is regarded among the others as more celebrated and noble; since Fenestella, a most diligent writer, speaking of the Quindecemviri, says that, after the rebuilding of the Capitol, Caius Curio the consul proposed to the senate that ambassadors should be sent to Erythr to search out and bring to Rome the writings of the Sibyl; and that, accordingly, Publius Gabinius, Marcus Otacilius, and Lucius Valerius were sent, who conveyed to Rome about a thousand verses written out by private persons. We have shown before that Varro made the same statement. Now in these verses which the ambassadors brought to Rome, are these testimonies respecting the one God:- 1. One God, who is alone, most mighty, uncreated. This is the only supreme God, who made the heaven, and decked it with lights. 2. But there is one only God of pre-eminent power, who made the heaven, and sun, and stars, and moon, and fruitful earth, and waves of the water of the sea. And since He alone is the framer of the universe, and the artificer of all things of which it consists or which are contained in it, it testifies that He alone ought to be worshipped: - 3. Worship Him who is alone the ruler of the world, who alone was and is from age to age. Also another Sibyl, whoever she is, when she said that she conveyed the voice of God to men, thus spoke:- 4. I am the one only God, and there is no other God. I would now follow up the testimonies of the others, were it not that these are sufficient, and that I reserve others for more befitting opportunities. But since we are defending the cause of truth before those who err from the truth and serve false religions, what kind of proof ought we to bring forward against them, rather than to refute them by the testimonies of their own gods? ''. None
4. Vergil, Aeneis, 3.443-3.452, 6.9-6.12, 6.25, 6.29-6.30, 6.42-6.54, 6.69-6.84, 6.86, 6.89, 6.97-6.101, 6.103-6.105
 Tagged with subjects: • Cumaean Sibyl • Cumaean Sibyl, and Daedalus • Cumaean Sibyl, and song • Cumaean Sibyl, and the Sibylline Books • Cumaean Sibyl, as composite figure • Cumaean Sibyl, association with Cassandra • Cumaean Sibyl, described by Helenus • Cumaean Sibyl, inspiration • Cumaean Sibyl, prophecies to Aeneas • Cumaean Sibyl, reflected in Senecan Cassandra • Cumaean Sibyl, relationship to audience • Sibyl, Cumaean

 Found in books: Bortolani et al (2019) 164; Pillinger (2019) 161, 162, 163, 164, 174, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 205, 231, 238; Santangelo (2013) 229, 230, 231


3.443. insanam vatem aspicies, quae rupe sub ima 3.444. fata canit, foliisque notas et nomina mandat. 3.445. Quaecumque in foliis descripsit carmina virgo, 3.446. digerit in numerum, atque antro seclusa relinquit. 3.447. Illa manent immota locis, neque ab ordine cedunt; 3.448. verum eadem, verso tenuis cum cardine ventus 3.450. numquam deinde cavo volitantia prendere saxo, 3.451. nec revocare situs aut iungere carmina curat: 3.452. inconsulti abeunt, sedemque odere Sibyllae.
6.9. At pius Aeneas arces, quibus altus Apollo 6.10. praesidet, horrendaeque procul secreta Sibyllae 6.11. antrum immane petit, magnum cui mentem animumque 6.12. Delius inspirat vates, aperitque futura.
6.25. Pasiphaë, mixtumque genus prolesque biformis
6.29. Daedalus ipse dolos tecti ambagesque resolvit, 6.30. caeca regens filo vestigia. Tu quoque magnam
6.42. Excisum Euboicae latus ingens rupis in antrum, 6.43. quo lati ducunt aditus centum, ostia centum; 6.44. unde ruunt totidem voces, responsa Sibyllae. 6.45. Ventum erat ad limen, cum virgo. Poscere fata 6.46. tempus ait; deus, ecce, deus! Cui talia fanti 6.47. ante fores subito non voltus, non color unus, 6.48. non comptae mansere comae; sed pectus anhelum, 6.49. et rabie fera corda tument; maiorque videri, 6.50. nec mortale sos, adflata est numine quando 6.51. iam propiore dei. Cessas in vota precesque, 6.52. Tros ait Aenea? Cessas? Neque enim ante dehiscent 6.53. attonitae magna ora domus. Et talia fata 6.54. conticuit. Gelidus Teucris per dura cucurrit
6.69. Tum Phoebo et Triviae solido de marmore templum 6.70. instituam, festosque dies de nomine Phoebi. 6.71. Te quoque magna manent regnis penetralia nostris: 6.72. hic ego namque tuas sortes arcanaque fata, 6.73. dicta meae genti, ponam, lectosque sacrabo, 6.74. alma, viros. Foliis tantum ne carmina manda, 6.75. ne turbata volent rapidis ludibria ventis; 6.76. ipsa canas oro. Finem dedit ore loquendi. 6.77. At, Phoebi nondum patiens, immanis in antro 6.78. bacchatur vates, magnum si pectore possit 6.79. excussisse deum; tanto magis ille fatigat 6.80. os rabidum, fera corda domans, fingitque premendo. 6.81. Ostia iamque domus patuere ingentia centum 6.82. sponte sua, vatisque ferunt responsa per auras: 6.83. O tandem magnis pelagi defuncte periclis! 6.84. Sed terrae graviora manent. In regna Lavini
6.86. sed non et venisse volent. Bella, horrida bella,
6.89. defuerint; alius Latio iam partus Achilles,

6.97. quod minime reris, Graia pandetur ab urbe.
6.98. Talibus ex adyto dictis Cumaea Sibylla
6.99. horrendas canit ambages antroque remugit, 6.100. obscuris vera involvens: ea frena furenti 6.101. concutit, et stimulos sub pectore vertit Apollo.
6.103. incipit Aeneas heros: Non ulla laborum, 6.104. O virgo, nova mi facies inopinave surgit; 6.105. omnia praecepi atque animo mecum ante peregi.' '. None
3.443. “I live, 't is true. I lengthen out my days " '3.444. through many a desperate strait. But O, believe 3.445. that what thine eyes behold is vision true. 3.446. Alas! what lot is thine, that wert unthroned ' "3.447. from such a husband's side? What after-fate " '3.448. could give thee honor due? Andromache, 3.450. With drooping brows and lowly voice she cried : 3.451. “O, happy only was that virgin blest, 3.452. daughter of Priam, summoned forth to die
6.9. To find the seed-spark hidden in its veins; 6.10. One breaks the thick-branched trees, and steals away 6.11. The shelter where the woodland creatures bide; 6.12. One leads his mates where living waters flow.
6.25. Here first to earth come down, he gave to thee ' "
6.29. And Cecrops' children paid their debt of woe, " '6.30. Where, seven and seven,—0 pitiable sight!—
6.42. 0 Icarus, in such well-graven scene 6.43. How proud thy place should be! but grief forbade: ' "6.44. Twice in pure gold a father's fingers strove " '6.45. To shape thy fall, and twice they strove in vain. 6.46. Aeneas long the various work would scan; 6.47. But now Achates comes, and by his side ' "6.48. Deiphobe, the Sibyl, Glaucus' child. " '6.49. Thus to the prince she spoke : 6.50. “Is this thine hour 6.51. To stand and wonder? Rather go obtain 6.52. From young unbroken herd the bullocks seven, 6.53. And seven yearling ewes, our wonted way.” 6.54. Thus to Aeneas; his attendants haste
6.69. For only unto prayer this haunted cave 6.70. May its vast lips unclose.” She spake no more. 6.71. An icy shudder through the marrow ran 6.72. of the bold Trojans; while their sacred King 6.73. Poured from his inmost soul this plaint and prayer : 6.74. “Phoebus, who ever for the woes of Troy 6.75. Hadst pitying eyes! who gavest deadly aim 6.76. To Paris when his Dardan shaft he hurled 6.77. On great Achilles! Thou hast guided me 6.78. Through many an unknown water, where the seas 6.79. Break upon kingdoms vast, and to the tribes 6.80. of the remote Massyli, whose wild land 6.81. To Syrtes spreads. But now; because at last ' "6.82. I touch Hesperia's ever-fleeting bound, " "6.83. May Troy 's ill fate forsake me from this day! " '6.84. 0 gods and goddesses, beneath whose wrath
6.86. Spare, for ye may, the remt of my race!
6.89. (Which asks no kingdom save what Fate decrees)

6.97. Shall honor; thy dark books and holy songs ' "
6.98. I there will keep, to be my people's law; " '
6.99. And thee, benigt Sibyl for all time 6.100. A company of chosen priests shall serve. 6.101. O, not on leaves, light leaves, inscribe thy songs!
6.103. In swift confusion! Sing thyself, I pray.” 6.104. So ceased his voice; the virgin through the cave, ' "6.105. Scarce bridled yet by Phoebus' hand divine, " ". None



Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.