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72 results for "creation"
1. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 51.1-51.5, 51.10-51.12, 104.14, 104.17-104.18, 104.20-104.21, 104.25-104.26 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 26, 29
51.1. "לַמְנַצֵּחַ מִזְמוֹר לְדָוִד׃", 51.1. "תַּשְׁמִיעֵנִי שָׂשׂוֹן וְשִׂמְחָה תָּגֵלְנָה עֲצָמוֹת דִּכִּיתָ׃", 51.2. "הֵיטִיבָה בִרְצוֹנְךָ אֶת־צִיּוֹן תִּבְנֶה חוֹמוֹת יְרוּשָׁלִָם׃", 51.2. "בְּבוֹא־אֵלָיו נָתָן הַנָּבִיא כַּאֲשֶׁר־בָּא אֶל־בַּת־שָׁבַע׃", 51.3. "חָנֵּנִי אֱלֹהִים כְּחַסְדֶּךָ כְּרֹב רַחֲמֶיךָ מְחֵה פְשָׁעָי׃", 51.4. "הרבה [הֶרֶב] כַּבְּסֵנִי מֵעֲוֺנִי וּמֵחַטָּאתִי טַהֲרֵנִי׃", 51.5. "כִּי־פְשָׁעַי אֲנִי אֵדָע וְחַטָּאתִי נֶגְדִּי תָמִיד׃", 51.11. "הַסְתֵּר פָּנֶיךָ מֵחֲטָאָי וְכָל־עֲוֺנֹתַי מְחֵה׃", 51.12. "לֵב טָהוֹר בְּרָא־לִי אֱלֹהִים וְרוּחַ נָכוֹן חַדֵּשׁ בְּקִרְבִּי׃", 104.14. "מַצְמִיחַ חָצִיר לַבְּהֵמָה וְעֵשֶׂב לַעֲבֹדַת הָאָדָם לְהוֹצִיא לֶחֶם מִן־הָאָרֶץ׃", 104.17. "אֲשֶׁר־שָׁם צִפֳּרִים יְקַנֵּנוּ חֲסִידָה בְּרוֹשִׁים בֵּיתָהּ׃", 104.18. "הָרִים הַגְּבֹהִים לַיְּעֵלִים סְלָעִים מַחְסֶה לַשְׁפַנִּים׃", 104.21. "הַכְּפִירִים שֹׁאֲגִים לַטָּרֶף וּלְבַקֵּשׁ מֵאֵל אָכְלָם׃", 104.25. "זֶה הַיָּם גָּדוֹל וּרְחַב יָדָיִם שָׁם־רֶמֶשׂ וְאֵין מִסְפָּר חַיּוֹת קְטַנּוֹת עִם־גְּדֹלוֹת׃", 104.26. "שָׁם אֳנִיּוֹת יְהַלֵּכוּן לִוְיָתָן זֶה־יָצַרְתָּ לְשַׂחֶק־בּוֹ׃", 51.1. "For the Leader. A Psalm of David;", 51.2. "when Nathan the prophet came unto him, after he had gone in to Bath-sheba.", 51.3. "Be gracious unto me, O God, according to Thy mercy; According to the multitude of Thy compassions blot out my transgressions.", 51.4. "Wash me thoroughly from mine iniquity, And cleanse me from my sin.", 51.5. "For I know my transgressions; And my sin is ever before me.", 51.10. "Make me to hear joy and gladness; that the bones which Thou hast crushed may rejoice.", 51.11. "Hide Thy face from my sins, and blot out all mine iniquities.", 51.12. "Create me a clean heart, O God; and renew a stedfast spirit within me.", 104.14. "Who causeth the grass to spring up for the cattle, And herb for the service of man; To bring forth bread out of the earth,", 104.17. "Wherein the birds make their nests; As for the stork, the fir-trees are her house.", 104.18. "The high mountains are for the wild goats; The rocks are a refuge for the conies.", 104.20. "Thou makest darkness, and it is night, Wherein all the beasts of the forest do creep forth.", 104.21. "The young lions roar after their prey, And seek their food from God.", 104.25. "Yonder sea, great and wide, Therein are creeping things innumerable, Living creatures, both small and great.", 104.26. "There go the ships; There is leviathan, whom Thou hast formed to sport therein.",
2. Hebrew Bible, Proverbs, 8.22-8.23, 8.31, 9.5-9.6 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world •creation, of the world Found in books: Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 399; Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 73
8.22. "יְהוָה קָנָנִי רֵאשִׁית דַּרְכּוֹ קֶדֶם מִפְעָלָיו מֵאָז׃", 8.23. "מֵעוֹלָם נִסַּכְתִּי מֵרֹאשׁ מִקַּדְמֵי־אָרֶץ׃", 8.31. "מְשַׂחֶקֶת בְּתֵבֵל אַרְצוֹ וְשַׁעֲשֻׁעַי אֶת־בְּנֵי אָדָם׃", 9.5. "לְכוּ לַחֲמוּ בְלַחֲמִי וּשְׁתוּ בְּיַיִן מָסָכְתִּי׃", 9.6. "עִזְבוּ פְתָאיִם וִחְיוּ וְאִשְׁרוּ בְּדֶרֶךְ בִּינָה׃", 8.22. "The LORD made me as the beginning of His way, The first of His works of old.", 8.23. "I was set up from everlasting, from the beginning, Or ever the earth was.", 8.31. "Playing in His habitable earth, And my delights are with the sons of men.", 9.5. "'Come, eat of my bread, and drink of the wine which I have mingled.", 9.6. "Forsake all thoughtlessness, and live; and walk in the way of understanding.",
3. Hebrew Bible, Numbers, 13.22 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 111
13.22. "וַיַּעֲלוּ בַנֶּגֶב וַיָּבֹא עַד־חֶבְרוֹן וְשָׁם אֲחִימַן שֵׁשַׁי וְתַלְמַי יְלִידֵי הָעֲנָק וְחֶבְרוֹן שֶׁבַע שָׁנִים נִבְנְתָה לִפְנֵי צֹעַן מִצְרָיִם׃", 13.22. "And they went up into the South, and came unto Hebron; and Ahiman, Sheshai, and Talmai, the children of Anak, were there.—Now Hebron was built seven years before Zoan in Egypt.—",
4. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, None (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 179
2.8. "וַיִּטַּע יְהוָה אֱלֹהִים גַּן־בְעֵדֶן מִקֶּדֶם וַיָּשֶׂם שָׁם אֶת־הָאָדָם אֲשֶׁר יָצָר׃", 2.8. "And the LORD God planted a garden eastward, in Eden; and there He put the man whom He had formed.",
5. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 30.9-30.10 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 97
30.9. "וְהוֹתִירְךָ יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ בְּכֹל מַעֲשֵׂה יָדֶךָ בִּפְרִי בִטְנְךָ וּבִפְרִי בְהֶמְתְּךָ וּבִפְרִי אַדְמָתְךָ לְטוֹבָה כִּי יָשׁוּב יְהוָה לָשׂוּשׂ עָלֶיךָ לְטוֹב כַּאֲשֶׁר־שָׂשׂ עַל־אֲבֹתֶיךָ׃", 30.9. "And the LORD thy God will make thee over-abundant in all the work of thy hand, in the fruit of thy body, and in the fruit of thy cattle, and in the fruit of thy land, for good; for the LORD will again rejoice over thee for good, as He rejoiced over thy fathers;", 30.10. "if thou shalt hearken to the voice of the LORD thy God, to keep His commandments and His statutes which are written in this book of the law; if thou turn unto the LORD thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul.",
6. Hesiod, Theogony, 868 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 159
868. From all the other gods for nine years, fated
7. Hebrew Bible, Ezekiel, 37 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation, of the world Found in books: Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 29
8. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Celykte (2020), The Stoic Theory of Beauty. 106
9. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 6.22, 9.10, 9.16-9.17 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation, of the world Found in books: Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 399
6.22. I will tell you what wisdom is and how she came to be,and I will hide no secrets from you,but I will trace her course from the beginning of creation,and make knowledge of her clear,and I will not pass by the truth; 9.10. Send her forth from the holy heavens,and from the throne of thy glory send her,that she may be with me and toil,and that I may learn what is pleasing to thee. 9.16. We can hardly guess at what is on earth,and what is at hand we find with labor;but who has traced out what is in the heavens? 9.17. Who has learned thy counsel, unless thou hast given wisdom and sent thy holy Spirit from on high?
10. Septuagint, Ecclesiasticus (Siracides), 24.8, 39.1, 39.8 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 399
24.8. "Then the Creator of all things gave me a commandment,and the one who created me assigned a place for my tent. And he said, `Make your dwelling in Jacob,and in Israel receive your inheritance. 39.1. On the other hand he who devotes himself to the study of the law of the Most High will seek out the wisdom of all the ancients,and will be concerned with prophecies; 39.1. Nations will declare his wisdom,and the congregation will proclaim his praise; 39.8. He will reveal instruction in his teaching,and will glory in the law of the Lords covet.
11. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.43, 2.93, 3.26 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •rationality, of the creation of the world) Found in books: Celykte (2020), The Stoic Theory of Beauty. 104, 105, 121
2.43. moreover the substance employed as food is also believed to have some influence on mental acuteness; it is therefore likely that the stars possess surpassing intelligence, since they inhabit the ethereal region of the world and also are nourished by the moist vapours of sea and earth, rarefied in their passage through the wide intervening space. Again, the consciousness and intelligence of the stars is most clearly evinced by their order and regularity; for regular and rhythmical motion is impossible without design, which contains no trace of casual or accidental variation; now the order and eternal regularity of the constellations indicates neither a process of nature, for it is highly rational, nor chance, for chance loves variation and abhors regularity; it follows therefore that the stars move of their own free-will and because of their intelligence and divinity. 2.93. "At this point must I not marvel that there should be anyone who can persuade himself that there are certain solid and indivisible particles of matter borne along by the force of gravity, and that the fortuitous collision of those particles produces this elaborate and beautiful world? I cannot understand why he who considers it possible for this to have occurred should not all think that, if a counts number of copies of the one-and‑twenty letters of alphabet, made of gold or what you will, were thrown together into some receptacle and then shaken out on the ground, it would be possible that they should produce the Annals of Ennius, all ready for the reader. I doubt whether chance could possibly succeed in producing even a single verse! 3.26. no definition is given of the meaning of 'superior' and 'more excellent,' or of the distinction between nature and reason. Chrysippus furthermore declares that, if there be no gods, the natural universe contains nothing superior to man; but for any man to think that there is nothing superior to man he deems to be the height of arrogance. Let us grant that it is a mark of arrogance to value oneself more highly than the world; but not merely is it not a mark of arrogance, rather is it a mark of wisdom, to realize that one is a conscious and rational being, and that Orion and Canicula are not. Again, he says 'If we saw a handsome mansion, we should infer that it was built for its masters and not for mice; so therefore we must deem the world to be the mansion of the gods.' Assuredly I should so deem it if I thought it had been built like a house, and not constructed by nature, as I shall show that it was.
12. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 1, 243, 2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 171
2. But since of these things some are portions of the world, and some are accidents, and since the world is the most perfect and complete of all things, he has normally assigned the whole book to that subject. We have then examined with all the accuracy that was in our power, in what manner the creation of the world was arranged in our previous treatises;
13. Philo of Alexandria, On Husbandry, 96-97 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 159; Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 178
97. But, in the allegorical explanations of these statements, all that bears a fabulous appearance is got rid of in a moment, and the truth is discovered in a most evident manner. The serpent, then, which appeared to the woman, that is to life depending on the outward senses and on the flesh, we pronounce to have been pleasure, crawling forward with an indirect motion, full of innumerable wiles, unable to raise itself up, ever cast down on the ground, creeping only upon the good things of the earth, seeking lurking places in the body, burying itself in each of the outward senses as in pits or caverns, a plotter against man, designing destruction to a being better than itself, eager to kill with its poisonous but painless bite. But the brazen serpent, made by Moses, we explain as being the disposition opposite to pleasure, namely, patient endurance, on which account it is that he is represented as having made it of brass, which is a very strong material.
14. Philo of Alexandria, On The Confusion of Tongues, 14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 159
14. Those, then, who put these things together, and cavil at them, and raise malicious objections, will be easily refuted separately by those who can produce ready solutions of all such questions as arise from the plain words of the law, arguing in a spirit far from contentious, and not encountering them by sophisms drawn from any other source, but following the connection of natural consequences, which does not permit them to stumble, but which easily puts aside any impediments that arise, so that the course of their arguments proceeds without any interruption or mishap.
15. Philo of Alexandria, That The Worse Attacks The Better, 125 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 156
16. Philo of Alexandria, On The Decalogue, 156 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 156
17. Philo of Alexandria, On The Preliminary Studies, 62, 61 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 156
18. Philo of Alexandria, On Giants, 58 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 156
58. "And there were giants on the earth in those Days." Perhaps some one may here think, that the lawgiver is speaking enigmatically and alluding to the fables handed down by the poets about giants, though he is a man as far removed as possible from any invention of fables, and one who thinks fit only to walk in the paths of truth itself;
19. Philo of Alexandria, Who Is The Heir, 216 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 61
216. And a thing very similar to this appears to me to be very clearly shown in the matter of the sacred candlestick; for that also was made having six branches, three on each side, and the main candlestick itself in the middle made the seventh, dividing and separating the two triads; for it is made of carved work, a divine work of exquisite skill and highly admired, being made of one solid piece of pure gold. For the unit, being one and single and pure, begot the number seven, which had no mother but is born of itself alone, without taking any additional material whatever to aid him.
20. Strabo, Geography, 1.1.19, 1.2.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 159; Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 174
1.1.19. But even the theoretical portion of geography is by no means contemptible. On the one hand, it embraces the arts, mathematics, and natural science; on the other, history and fable. Not that this latter can have any distinct advantage: for instance, if any one should relate to us the wanderings of Ulysses, Menelaus, and Jason, he would not seem to have added directly to our fund of practical knowledge thereby, (which is the only thing men of the world are interested in,) unless he should convey useful examples of what those wanderers were compelled to suffer, and at the same time afford matter of rational amusement to those who interest themselves in the places which gave birth to such fables. Practical men interest themselves in these pursuits, since they are at once commendable, and afford them pleasure; but yet not to any great extent. In this class, too, will be found those whose main object in life is pleasure and respectability: but these by no means constitute the majority of mankind, who naturally prefer that which holds out some direct advantage. The geographer should therefore chiefly devote himself to what is practically important. He should follow the same rule in regard to history and the mathematics, selecting always that which is most useful, most intelligible, and most authentic. 1.2.14. Eratosthenes thinks it probable that Hesiod, having heard of the wanderings of Ulysses, and of their having taken place near to Sicily and Italy, embraced this view of the case, and not only describes the places spoken of by Homer, but also Aetna, the Isle of Ortygia, near to Syracuse, and Tyrrhenia. As for Homer, he was altogether unacquainted with these places, and further, had no wish to lay the scene of the wanderings in any well-known locality. What! are then Aetna and Tyrrhenia such well-known places, and Scyllaion, Charybdis, Circaion, and the Sirenussae, so obscure? Or is Hesiod so correct as never to write nonsense, but always follow in the wake of received opinions, while Homer blurts out whatever comes uppermost? Without taking into consideration our remarks on the character and aptitude of Homer's myths, a large array of writers who bear evidence to his statements, and the additional testimony of local tradition, are sufficient proof that his are not the inventions of poets or contemporary scribblers, but the record of real actors and real scenes.
21. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 1.8 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 159
22. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 1.43-1.45, 2.19, 2.24 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •on the creation of the world •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 159; Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 179
23. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 121 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 156
121. Those, then, who have no desire for either discovery or investigation have shamefully debased their reason by ignorance and indifference, and though they had it in their power to see acutely, they have become blind. Thus he says that "Lot's wife turning backwards became a pillar of Salt;" not here inventing a fable, but pointing out the proper nature of the event.
24. Philo of Alexandria, Against Flaccus, 46 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 72
46. on which account they frequent all the most prosperous and fertile countries of Europe and Asia, whether islands or continents, looking indeed upon the holy city as their metropolis in which is erected the sacred temple of the most high God, but accounting those regions which have been occupied by their fathers, and grandfathers, and great grandfathers, and still more remote ancestors, in which they have been born and brought up, as their country; and there are even some regions to which they came the very moment that they were originally settled, sending a colony of their people to do a pleasure to the founders of the colony.
25. Philo of Alexandria, On The Embassy To Gaius, 150 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 72
150. And we have evidence of this in the temples, and porticoes, and sacred precincts, and groves, and colonnades which have been erected, so that all the cities put together, ancient and modern, which exhibit magnificent works, are surpassed, by the beauty and magnitude of the buildings erected in honour of Caesar, and especially by those raised in our city of Alexandria.
26. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 1.51 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 156
1.51. And he receives all persons of a similar character and disposition, whether they were originally born so, or whether they have become so through any change of conduct, having become better people, and as such entitled to be ranked in a superior class; approving of the one body because they have not defaced their nobility of birth, and of the other because they have thought fit to alter their lives so as to come over to nobleness of conduct. And these last he calls proselytes (proseµlytou
27. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 2.174-2.175 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 97
2.174. thus thinking well (to eu phronein) is the derivation of the word joy (euphrosyneµ), being a great and brilliant thing so that, says Moses, even God himself does not disdain to exhibit it; and most especially at that time when the human race is departing from its sins, and inclining and bending its steps towards justice, following of its own accord the laws and institutions of nature. 2.175. "For," says Moses, "the Lord thy God will return, that he may rejoice in thee for thy good as he rejoiced in thy fathers, if thou wilt hear his voice to keep all his commandments and his ordices and his judgments which are written in the book of this Law."
28. Philo of Alexandria, On The Sacrifices of Cain And Abel, 13 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 156
13. For they who have come into the billows and heavy waves of life must be borne on by swimming, not being able to take hold of any firm point of the matters which lie within the province of knowledge, but depending on what is only likely and probable. But it becomes a servant of God to lay hold of the truth, disregarding and rejecting all the uncertain and fabulous statements which rest on the conjectures of plausible men.
29. Philo of Alexandria, On The Posterity of Cain, 60 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •on the creation of the world Found in books: Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 179
60. for Moses says that the spies came to Chebron, and these three are Acheman, and Jesein, and Thalamein, of the sons of Enoch: and this he adds, "and Chebron was built seven years before Janis, in Egypt," and these synonymous appellations are distinguished according to their species in a most natural manner. Chebron, being interpreted, means compunction, and this is of two kinds; one with reference to the soul being joined to the body, the other with reference to its being adapted to virtue.
30. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 118, 153-157, 170, 172-177, 3-7, 72, 77, 79-88, 171 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 177
171. In the second place he teaches us that God is one; having reference here to the assertors of the polytheistic doctrine; men who do not blush to transfer that worst of evil constitutions, ochlocracy, from earth to heaven. Thirdly, he teaches, as has been already related, that the world was created; by this lesson refuting those who think that it is uncreated and eternal, and who thus attribute no glory to God. In the fourth place we learn that the world also which was thus created is one, since also the Creator is one, and he, making his creation to resemble himself in its singleness, employed all existing essence in the creation of the universe. For it would not have been complete if it had not been made and composed of all parts which were likewise whole and complete. For there are some persons who believe that there are many worlds, and some who even fancy that they are boundless in extent, being themselves inexperienced and ignorant of the truth of those things of which it is desirable to have a correct knowledge. The fifth lesson that Moses teaches us is, that God exerts his providence for the benefit of the world.
31. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 1.24, 1.150-1.154, 1.157, 2.25, 2.31, 2.48, 2.103, 2.129, 2.209-2.210 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 61, 72, 159; Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 171, 172
1.24. And this knowledge he derived also from the Egyptians, who study mathematics above all things, and he learnt with great accuracy the state of that art among both the Chaldaeans and Egyptians, making himself acquainted with the points in which they agree with and differ from each other--making himself master of all their disputes without encouraging any disputatious disposition in himself--but seeking the plain truth, since his mind was unable to admit any falsehood, as those are accustomed to do who contend violently for one particular side of a question; and who advocate any doctrine which is set before them, whatever it may be, not inquiring whether it deserves to be supported, but acting in the same manner as those lawyers who defend a cause for pay, and are wholly indifferent to the justice of their cause. 1.150. And when he had received this authority, he did not show anxiety, as some persons do, to increase the power of his own family, and promote his sons (for he had two 1.151. for he kept one most invariable object always steadily before him, namely, that of benefiting those who were subjected to his authority, and of doing everything both in word and deed, with a view to their advantage, never omitting any opportunity of doing anything that might tend to their prosperity. 1.152. Therefore he alone of all the persons who have ever enjoyed supreme authority, neither accumulated treasures of silver and gold, nor levied taxes, nor acquired possession of houses, or property, or cattle, or servants of his household, or revenues, or anything else which has reference to magnificence and superfluity, although he might have acquired an unlimited abundance of them all. 1.153. But as he thought it a token of poverty of soul to be anxious about material wealth, he despised it as a blind thing, but he honoured the far-sighted wealth of nature, and was as great an admirer as any one in the world of that kind of riches, as he showed himself to be in his clothes, and in his food, and in his whole system and manner of life, not indulging in any theatrical affectation of pomp and magnificence, but cultivating the simplicity and unpretending affable plainness of a private individual, but a sumptuousness which was truly royal, in those things which it is becoming for a ruler to desire and to abound in; 1.154. and these things are, temperance, and fortitude, and continence, and presence of mind, and acuteness, and knowledge, and industry, and patience under evil, and contempt of pleasure, and justice, and exhortations to virtue and blame, and lawful punishment of offenders, and, on the contrary, praise and honour to those who did well in accordance with law. 1.157. for God possesses everything and is in need of nothing; but the good man has nothing which is properly his own, no, not even himself, but he has a share granted to him of the treasures of God as far as he is able to partake of them. And this is natural enough; for he is a citizen of the world; on which account he is not spoken of as to be enrolled as a citizen of any particular city in the habitable world, since he very appropriately has for his inheritance not a portion of a district, but the whole world. 2.25. And that beauty and dignity of the legislation of Moses is honoured not among the Jews only, but also by all other nations, is plain, both from what has been already said and from what I am about to state. 2.31. He, then, being a sovereign of this character, and having conceived a great admiration for and love of the legislation of Moses, conceived the idea of having our laws translated into the Greek language; and immediately he sent out ambassadors to the high-priest and king of Judea, for they were the same person. 2.48. for he was not like any ordinary compiler of history, studying to leave behind him records of ancient transactions as memorials to future ages for the mere sake of affording pleasure without any advantage; but he traced back the most ancient events from the beginning of the world, commencing with the creation of the universe, in order to make known two most necessary principles. First, that the same being was the father and creator of the world, and likewise the lawgiver of truth; secondly, that the man who adhered to these laws, and clung closely to a connection with and obedience to nature, would live in a manner corresponding to the arrangement of the universe with a perfect harmony and union, between his words and his actions and between his actions and his words. 2.103. and in all the seven there were seven candles and seven lights, being symbols of those seven stars which are called planets by those men who are versed in natural philosophy; for the sun, like the candlestick, being placed in the middle of the other six, in the fourth rank, gives light to the three planets which are above him, and to those of equal number which are below him, adapting to circumstances the musical and truly divine instrument. 2.129. not but what he has also assigned their two appropriate virtues to those two kinds of reason which exist in each of us, namely, that which is uttered and that which is kept concealed, attributing clearness of manifestation to the uttered one, and truth to that which is concealed in the mind; for it is suitable to the mind that it should admit of no error or falsehood, and to explanation that it should not hinder anything that can conduce to the most accurate manifestation. 2.209. Moreover, in accordance with the honour due to the Creator of the universe, the prophet hallowed the sacred seventh day, beholding with eyes of more acute sight than those of mortals its pre-eminent beauty, which had already been deeply impressed on the heaven and the whole universal world, and had been borne about as an image by nature itself in her own bosom; 2.210. for first of all Moses found that day destitute of any mother, and devoid of all participation in the female generation, being born of the Father alone without any propagation by means of seed, and being born without any conception on the part of any mother. And then he beheld not only this, that it was very beautiful and destitute of any mother, neither being born of corruption nor liable to corruption; and then, in the third place, he by further inquiry discovered that it was the birthday of the world, which the heaven keeps as a festival, and the earth and all the things in and on the earth keep as a festival, rejoicing and delighting in the all-harmonious number of seven, and in the sabbath day.
32. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 1.15-1.23, 1.186 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 111, 156
1.15. And now I exhort all those that peruse these books, to apply their minds to God; and to examine the mind of our legislator, whether he hath not understood his nature in a manner worthy of him; and hath not ever ascribed to him such operations as become his power, and hath not preserved his writings from those indecent fables which others have framed, 1.16. although, by the great distance of time when he lived, he might have securely forged such lies; for he lived two thousand years ago; at which vast distance of ages the poets themselves have not been so hardy as to fix even the generations of their gods, much less the actions of their men, or their own laws. 1.17. As I proceed, therefore, I shall accurately describe what is contained in our records, in the order of time that belongs to them; for I have already promised so to do throughout this undertaking; and this without adding any thing to what is therein contained, or taking away any thing therefrom. 1.18. 4. But because almost all our constitution depends on the wisdom of Moses, our legislator, I cannot avoid saying somewhat concerning him beforehand, though I shall do it briefly; I mean, because otherwise those that read my book may wonder how it comes to pass, that my discourse, which promises an account of laws and historical facts, contains so much of philosophy. 1.19. The reader is therefore to know, that Moses deemed it exceeding necessary, that he who would conduct his own life well, and give laws to others, in the first place should consider the divine nature; and, upon the contemplation of God’s operations, should thereby imitate the best of all patterns, so far as it is possible for human nature to do, and to endeavor to follow after it: 1.20. neither could the legislator himself have a right mind without such a contemplation; nor would any thing he should write tend to the promotion of virtue in his readers; I mean, unless they be taught first of all, that God is the Father and Lord of all things, and sees all things, and that thence he bestows a happy life upon those that follow him; but plunges such as do not walk in the paths of virtue into inevitable miseries. 1.21. Now when Moses was desirous to teach this lesson to his countrymen, he did not begin the establishment of his laws after the same manner that other legislators did; I mean, upon contracts and other rights between one man and another, but by raising their minds upwards to regard God, and his creation of the world; and by persuading them, that we men are the most excellent of the creatures of God upon earth. Now when once he had brought them to submit to religion, he easily persuaded them to submit in all other things: 1.22. for as to other legislators, they followed fables, and by their discourses transferred the most reproachful of human vices unto the gods, and so afforded wicked men the most plausible excuses for their crimes; 1.23. but as for our legislator, when he had once demonstrated that God was possessed of perfect virtue, he supposed that men also ought to strive after the participation of it; and on those who did not so think, and so believe, he inflicted the severest punishments. 1.186. 4. Now Abram dwelt near the oak called Ogyges,—the place belongs to Canaan, not far from the city of Hebron. But being uneasy at his wife’s barrenness, he entreated God to grant that he might have male issue;
33. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 4.530-4.533 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 111
4.530. Now the people of the country say that it is an ancienter city, not only than any in that country, but than Memphis in Egypt, and accordingly its age is reckoned at two thousand and three hundred years. 4.531. They also relate that it had been the habitation of Abram, the progenitor of the Jews, after he had removed out of Mesopotamia; and they say that his posterity descended from thence into Egypt, 4.532. whose monuments are to this very time showed in that small city; the fabric of which monuments are of the most excellent marble, and wrought after the most elegant manner. 4.533. There is also there showed, at the distance of six furlongs from the city, a very large turpentine tree and the report goes, that this tree has continued ever since the creation of the world.
34. Josephus Flavius, Against Apion, 2.257 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 61
2.257. Nay, Plato principally imitated our legislator in this point, that he enjoined his citizens to have the main regard to this precept, “That every one of them should learn their laws accurately.” He also ordained, that they should not admit of foreigners intermixing with their own people at random; and provided that the commonwealth should keep itself pure, and consist of such only as persevered in their own laws.
35. New Testament, John, 1.1, 1.14, 3.13, 3.31, 6.38, 7.37, 12.44, 16.28, 17.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation, of the world Found in books: Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 399
1.1. ΕΝ ΑΡΧΗ ἦν ὁ λόγος, καὶ ὁ λόγος ἦν πρὸς τὸν θεόν, καὶ θεὸς ἦν ὁ λόγος. 1.14. Καὶ ὁ λόγος σὰρξ ἐγένετο καὶ ἐσκήνωσεν ἐν ἡμῖν, καὶ ἐθεασάμεθα τὴν δόξαν αὐτοῦ, δόξαν ὡς μονογενοῦς παρὰ πατρός, πλήρης χάριτος καὶ ἀληθείας·?̔ 3.13. καὶ οὐδεὶς ἀναβέβηκεν εἰς τὸν οὐρανὸν εἰ μὴ ὁ ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ καταβάς, ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου. 3.31. Ὁ ἄνωθεν ἐρχόμενος ἐπάνω πάντων ἐστίν. ὁ ὢν ἐκ τῆς γῆς ἐκ τῆς γῆς ἐστὶν καὶ ἐκ τῆς γῆς λαλεῖ· ὁ ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ ἐρχόμενος ἐπάνω πάντων ἐστίν· 6.38. ὅτι καταβέβηκα ἀπὸ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ οὐχ ἵνα ποιῶ τὸ θέλημα τὸ ἐμὸν ἀλλὰ τὸ θέλημα τοῦ πέμψαντός με· 7.37. Ἐν δὲ τῇ ἐσχάτῃ ἡμέρᾳ τῇ μεγάλῃ τῆς ἑορτῆς ἱστήκει ὁ Ἰησοῦς, καὶ ἔκραξεν λέγων Ἐάν τις διψᾷ ἐρχέσθω πρός με καὶ πινέτω. 12.44. Ἰησοῦς δὲ ἔκραξεν καὶ εἶπεν Ὁ πιστεύων εἰς ἐμὲ οὐ πιστεύει εἰς ἐμὲ ἀλλὰ εἰς τὸν πέμψαντά με, 16.28. ἐξῆλθον ἐκ τοῦ πατρὸς καὶ ἐλήλυθα εἰς τὸν κόσμον· πάλιν ἀφίημι τὸν κόσμον καὶ πορεύομαι πρὸς τὸν πατέρα. 17.5. καὶ νῦν δόξασόν με σύ, πάτερ, παρὰ σεαυτῷ τῇ δόξῃ ᾗ εἶχον πρὸ τοῦ τὸν κόσμον εἶναι παρὰ σοί. 1.1. In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. 1.14. The Word became flesh, and lived among us. We saw his glory, such glory as of the one and only Son of the Father, full of grace and truth. 3.13. No one has ascended into heaven, but he who descended out of heaven, the Son of Man, who is in heaven. 3.31. He who comes from above is above all. He who is from the Earth belongs to the Earth, and speaks of the Earth. He who comes from heaven is above all. 6.38. For I have come down from heaven, not to do my own will, but the will of him who sent me. 7.37. Now on the last and greatest day of the feast, Jesus stood and cried out, "If anyone is thirsty, let him come to me and drink! 12.44. Jesus cried out and said, "Whoever believes in me, believes not in me, but in him who sent me. 16.28. I came out from the Father, and have come into the world. Again, I leave the world, and go to the Father." 17.5. Now, Father, glorify me with your own self with the glory which I had with you before the world existed.
36. Sextus, Against The Mathematicians, 9.75-9.76 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •rationality, of the creation of the world) Found in books: Celykte (2020), The Stoic Theory of Beauty. 107
37. Galen, On Fullness, 7.525 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •rationality, of the creation of the world) Found in books: Celykte (2020), The Stoic Theory of Beauty. 111
38. Sextus, Outlines of Pyrrhonism, 2.104-2.107, 2.141-2.143 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •rationality, of the creation of the world) Found in books: Celykte (2020), The Stoic Theory of Beauty. 130, 131
39. Alexander of Aphrodisias, On Mixture, 2.17.32-218.6, 216.14-217.1, 217.7, 217.8, 217.9, 217.13, 217.14, 217.15, 217.16, 217.17, 217.18, 217.19, 226.24, 226.25, 226.26, 226.27, 226.28, 226.29 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Celykte (2020), The Stoic Theory of Beauty. 112
40. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.156 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •rationality, of the creation of the world) Found in books: Celykte (2020), The Stoic Theory of Beauty. 113
7.156. And there are five terrestrial zones: first, the northern zone which is beyond the arctic circle, uninhabitable because of the cold; second, a temperate zone; a third, uninhabitable because of great heats, called the torrid zone; fourth, a counter-temperate zone; fifth, the southern zone, uninhabitable because of its cold.Nature in their view is an artistically working fire, going on its way to create; which is equivalent to a fiery, creative, or fashioning breath. And the soul is a nature capable of perception. And they regard it as the breath of life, congenital with us; from which they infer first that it is a body and secondly that it survives death. Yet it is perishable, though the soul of the universe, of which the individual souls of animals are parts, is indestructible.
41. Eusebius of Caesarea, Preparation For The Gospel, 9.27.4 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 61
42. Origen, Against Celsus, 1.20, 4.36, 4.41 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 156
1.20. And yet, against his will, Celsus is entangled into testifying that the world is comparatively modern, and not yet ten thousand years old, when he says that the Greeks consider those things as ancient, because, owing to the deluges and conflagrations, they have not beheld or received any memorials of older events. But let Celsus have, as his authorities for the myth regarding the conflagrations and inundations, those persons who, in his opinion, are the most learned of the Egyptians, traces of whose wisdom are to be found in the worship of irrational animals, and in arguments which prove that such a worship of God is in conformity with reason, and of a secret and mysterious character. The Egyptians, then, when they boastfully give their own account of the divinity of animals, are to be considered wise; but if any Jew, who has signified his adherence to the law and the lawgiver, refer everything to the Creator of the universe, and the only God, he is, in the opinion of Celsus and those like him, deemed inferior to him who degrades the Divinity not only to the level of rational and mortal animals, but even to that of irrational also!- a view which goes far beyond the mythical doctrine of transmigration, according to which the soul falls down from the summit of heaven, and enters into the body of brute beasts, both tame and savage! And if the Egyptians related fables of this kind, they are believed to convey a philosophical meaning by their enigmas and mysteries; but if Moses compose and leave behind him histories and laws for an entire nation, they are to be considered as empty fables, the language of which admits of no allegorical meaning! 4.36. Celsus in the next place, producing from history other than that of the divine record, those passages which bear upon the claims to great antiquity put forth by many nations, as the Athenians, and Egyptians, and Arcadians, and Phrygians, who assert that certain individuals have existed among them who sprang from the earth, and who each adduce proofs of these assertions, says: The Jews, then, leading a grovelling life in some corner of Palestine, and being a wholly uneducated people, who had not heard that these matters had been committed to verse long ago by Hesiod and innumerable other inspired men, wove together some most incredible and insipid stories, viz., that a certain man was formed by the hands of God, and had breathed into him the breath of life, and that a woman was taken from his side, and that God issued certain commands, and that a serpent opposed these, and gained a victory over the commandments of God; thus relating certain old wives' fables, and most impiously representing God as weak at the very beginning (of things), and unable to convince even a single human being whom He Himself had formed. By these instances, indeed, this deeply read and learned Celsus, who accuses Jews and Christians of ignorance and want of instruction, clearly evinces the accuracy of his knowledge of the chronology of the respective historians, whether Greek or Barbarian, since he imagines that Hesiod and the innumerable others, whom he styles inspired men, are older than Moses and his writings - that very Moses who is shown to be much older than the time of the Trojan War! It is not the Jews, then, who have composed incredible and insipid stories regarding the birth of man from the earth, but these inspired men of Celsus, Hesiod and his other innumerable companions, who, having neither learned nor heard of the far older and most venerable accounts existing in Palestine, have written such histories as their Theogonies, attributing, so far as in their power, generation to their deities, and innumerable other absurdities. And these are the writers whom Plato expels from his State as being corrupters of the youth, - Homer, viz., and those who have composed poems of a similar description! Now it is evident that Plato did not regard as inspired those men who had left behind them such works. But perhaps it was from a desire to cast reproach upon us, that this Epicurean Celsus, who is better able to judge than Plato (if it be the same Celsus who composed two other books against the Christians), called those individuals inspired whom he did not in reality regard as such. 4.41. After this he continues as follows: They speak, in the next place, of a deluge, and of a monstrous ark, having within it all things, and of a dove and a crow as messengers, falsifying and recklessly altering the story of Deucalion; not expecting, I suppose, that these things would come to light, but imagining that they were inventing stories merely for young children. Now in these remarks observe the hostility - so unbecoming a philosopher- displayed by this man towards this very ancient Jewish narrative. For, not being able to say anything against the history of the deluge, and not perceiving what he might have urged against the ark and its dimensions - viz., that, according to the general opinion, which accepted the statements that it was three hundred cubits in length, and fifty in breadth, and thirty in height, it was impossible to maintain that it contained (all) the animals that were upon the earth, fourteen specimens of every clean and four of every unclean beast - he merely termed it monstrous, containing all things within it. Now wherein was its monstrous character, seeing it is related to have been a hundred years in building, and to have had the three hundred cubits of its length and the fifty of its breadth contracted, until the thirty cubits of its height terminated in a top one cubit long and one cubit broad? Why should we not rather admire a structure which resembled an extensive city, if its measurements be taken to mean what they are capable of meaning, so that it was nine myriads of cubits long in the base, and two thousand five hundred in breadth? And why should we not admire the design evinced in having it so compactly built, and rendered capable of sustaining a tempest which caused a deluge? For it was not daubed with pitch, or any material of that kind, but was securely coated with bitumen. And is it not a subject of admiration, that by the providential arrangement of God, the elements of all the races were brought into it, that the earth might receive again the seeds of all living things, while God made use of a most righteous man to be the progenitor of those who were to be born after the deluge?
43. Papyri, Papyri Graecae Magicae, 1, 10-19, 2-3, 5-9, 4 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 170
44. Augustine, Confessions, 12.29.40 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation and the created world, augustine, on creation of world from formless matter Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 413
45. Augustine, On Christian Doctrine, 4.9 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation and the created world, new works and genres, late antique and early medieval production of Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 716
4.9. 23. For there are some passages which are not understood in their proper force, or are understood with great difficulty, at whatever length, however clearly, or with whatever eloquence the speaker may expound them; and these should never be brought before the people at all, or only on rare occasions when there is some urgent reason. In books, however, which are written in such a style that, if understood, they, so to speak, draw their own readers, and if not understood, give no trouble to those who do not care to read them and in private conversations, we must not shrink from the duty of bringing the truth which we ourselves have reached within the comprehension of others, however difficult it may be to understand it, and whatever labor in the way of argument it may cost us. Only two conditions are to be insisted upon, that our hearer or companion should have an earnest desire to learn the truth, and should have capacity of mind to receive it in whatever form it may be communicated, the teacher not being so anxious about the eloquence as about the clearness of his teaching.
46. Augustine, Commentary On Genesis, 1.38-1.41 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation and the created world, new works and genres, late antique and early medieval production of Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 714
47. Augustine, Retractiones, 1.18 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •creation and the created world, new works and genres, late antique and early medieval production of Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 714
48. Augustine, Sermons, None (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 412
49. Olympiodorus The Younger of Alexandria, In Platonis Gorgiam Commentaria, 21.1 (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •rationality, of the creation of the world) Found in books: Celykte (2020), The Stoic Theory of Beauty. 114
50. Isidore of Seville, De Natura Rerum, None (6th cent. CE - 7th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 724
51. Epistula Ad Herodotum, Epistula Ad Herodotum, 45  Tagged with subjects: •rationality, of the creation of the world) Found in books: Celykte (2020), The Stoic Theory of Beauty. 104
52. Aristobulus, Ap. Euseb. Praep. Evang., 7.13.10, 13.12.9, 13.12.11-13.12.12  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 72, 73
53. Stobaeus, Eclogues, 1.155  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Celykte (2020), The Stoic Theory of Beauty. 110
54. Manuscripts, Cod. Paris, Bnf, None  Tagged with subjects: •creation and the created world, authority in late antique scholarship and knowledge of Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 727
55. Basil of Caesarea, In Regum Librum Xxx Questiones, None  Tagged with subjects: •creation and the created world, new works and genres, late antique and early medieval production of Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 716
56. David, De Mirabilibus Sacrae Scripturae, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 726
57. Tim., Plato, None  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 181
58. Basil of Caesarea, De Natura Rerum, 18, 8  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 717
59. Eratosthenes, Ap. Strabo, None  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 174
60. Aristeas, 2 Baruch, 3.37  Tagged with subjects: •creation, of the world Found in books: Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 399
61. Julianus Pomerius, De Vita Contemplativa Libri Tres, 1.2  Tagged with subjects: •creation and the created world, new works and genres, late antique and early medieval production of Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 716
62. Manuscripts, St Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, None  Tagged with subjects: •creation and the created world, innovation and derivativeness, issues of •creation and the created world, new works and genres, late antique and early medieval production of •creation and the created world, observation of •creation and the created world, rain before the flood, interest in question of Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 723, 726
63. Manuscripts, Verona, Biblioteca Capitolare, 27  Tagged with subjects: •creation and the created world, authority in late antique scholarship and knowledge of Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 727
64. Manuscripts, Munich, Clm, 6302  Tagged with subjects: •creation and the created world, authority in late antique scholarship and knowledge of •creation and the created world, innovation and derivativeness, issues of •creation and the created world, new works and genres, late antique and early medieval production of •creation and the created world, reasoning through problems of Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 705, 721, 722, 727
65. Augustine, Leg., 1.8.11-9.12  Tagged with subjects: •creation and the created world, augustine, on creation of world from formless matter Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 413
66. Basil of Caesarea, In Cantica Canticorum Allegorica Expositio, None  Tagged with subjects: •creation and the created world, new works and genres, late antique and early medieval production of Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 712
67. Cassiodorus, Expositio In Psalmos, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 714
68. Basil of Caesarea, De Temporum Ratione, 28, 32  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 725
69. Basil of Caesarea, Libri Quattuor In Principium Genesis, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 719
70. Anon., Pauca Problesmata, 151.7-151.10  Tagged with subjects: •creation and the created world, new works and genres, late antique and early medieval production of Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 717
71. David, De Ordine Creaturarum, 5.11  Tagged with subjects: •creation and the created world, new works and genres, late antique and early medieval production of Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 716
72. De An. Procr.,, Plutarch, None  Tagged with subjects: •creation of the world Found in books: Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 72