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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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13 results for "courage"
1. Plutarch, On Having Many Friends, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •courage (andreia), in pythagorean acusmata Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 13
2. Plutarch, Fragments, 93 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •courage (andreia), in pythagorean acusmata Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 13
3. Plutarch, Table Talk, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 13
4. Athenaeus, The Learned Banquet, None (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •courage (andreia), in pythagorean acusmata Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 13
5. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •courage (andreia), in pythagorean acusmata Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 13
6. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 8.1, 8.17, 8.33, 8.35 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •courage (andreia), in pythagorean acusmata Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 13
8.1. BOOK 8: 1. PYTHAGORASPythagoras Having now completed our account of the philosophy of Ionia starting with Thales, as well as of its chief representatives, let us proceed to examine the philosophy of Italy, which was started by Pythagoras, son of the gem-engraver Mnesarchus, and according to Hermippus, a Samian, or, according to Aristoxenus, a Tyrrhenian from one of those islands which the Athenians held after clearing them of their Tyrrhenian inhabitants. Some indeed say that he was descended through Euthyphro, Hippasus and Marmacus from Cleonymus, who was exiled from Phlius, and that, as Marmacus lived in Samos, so Pythagoras was called a Samian. 8.17. The following were his watchwords or precepts: don't stir the fire with a knife, don't step over the beam of a balance, don't sit down on your bushel, don't eat your heart, don't help a man off with a load but help him on, always roll your bed-clothes up, don't put God's image on the circle of a ring, don't leave the pan's imprint on the ashes, don't wipe up a mess with a torch, don't commit a nuisance towards the sun, don't walk the highway, don't shake hands too eagerly, don't have swallows under your own roof, don't keep birds with hooked claws, don't make water on nor stand upon your nail-and hair-trimmings, turn the sharp blade away, when you go abroad don't turn round at the frontier. 8.33. Right has the force of an oath, and that is why Zeus is called the God of Oaths. Virtue is harmony, and so are health and all good and God himself; this is why they say that all things are constructed according to the laws of harmony. The love of friends is just concord and equality. We should not pay equal worship to gods and heroes, but to the gods always, with reverent silence, in white robes, and after purification, to the heroes only from midday onwards. Purification is by cleansing, baptism and lustration, and by keeping clean from all deaths and births and all pollution, and abstaining from meat and flesh of animals that have died, mullets, gurnards, eggs and egg-sprung animals, beans, and the other abstinences prescribed by those who perform rites in the sanctuaries. 8.35. Not to break bread; for once friends used to meet over one loaf, as the barbarians do even to this day; and you should not divide bread which brings them together; some give as the explanation of this that it has reference to the judgement of the dead in Hades, others that bread makes cowards in war, others again that it is from it that the whole world begins.He held that the most beautiful figure is the sphere among solids, and the circle among plane figures. Old age may be compared to everything that is decreasing, while youth is one with increase. Health means retention of the form, disease its destruction. of salt he said it should be brought to table to remind us of what is right; for salt preserves whatever it finds, and it arises from the purest sources, sun and sea.
7. Iamblichus, Protrepticus, None (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 13
8. Porphyry, Life of Pythagoras, 154, 196, 231, 42, 85-86, 84 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 13
9. Demetrius of Byzantium, Apud Ath., None  Tagged with subjects: •courage (andreia), in pythagorean acusmata Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 13
12. Aristotle, Protrepticus, None  Tagged with subjects: •courage (andreia), in pythagorean acusmata Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 13