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23 results for "cosmopolitanism"
1. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.5.77 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 191
2. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 5.118 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 191
5.118. Theodorus sq. Val. Max. 6,2 ext. 3 Lysimacho mortem minitanti magnum vero inquit effecisti, si cantharidis cantaridi sumi c. V cant aridis F vim consecutus es, Paulus Persi Persi XF Persae s deprecanti, ne in triumpho duceretur, in tua id quidem potestate est. multa primo die, primo die FV rec et b s primordie X cum de ipsa morte quaereremus, non pauca etiam postero, cum ageretur de dolore, sunt dicta de morte, quae qui recordetur, haud haud aut F sane periculum est ne non mortem aut optandam aut certe certa K 1 non timendam putet. mihi quidem in vita servanda videtur illa lex, quae in Graecorum conviviis optinetur: obtin. F aut bibat inquit aut abeat. habeat G 1 V et recte. aut enim fruatur aliquis pariter cum aliis voluptate potandi aut, ne sobrius in violentiam violentiam R ( R 2 ) vinolentorum incidat, ante discedat. discedat F s R 2 V b decedat KH dicebat GR 1 V sic iniurias fortunae, quas ferre nequeas, defugiendo relinquas. Haec eadem, quae Epicurus, totidem verbis dicit Hieronymus.
3. Horace, Odes, 1.37 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 187, 192
4. Strabo, Geography, 17.1.10-17.1.13 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 187
17.1.10. Next after the Heptastadium is the harbour of Eunostus, and above this the artificial harbour, called Cibotus (or the Ark), which also has docks. At the bottom of this harbour is a navigable canal, extending to the lake Mareotis. Beyond the canal there still remains a small part of the city. Then follows the suburb Necropolis, in which are numerous gardens, burial-places, and buildings for carrying on the process of embalming the dead.On this side the canal is the Sarapium and other ancient sacred places, which are now abandoned on account of the erection of the temples at Nicopolis; for [there are situated] an amphitheatre and a stadium, and there are celebrated quinquennial games; but the ancient rites and customs are neglected.In short, the city of Alexandreia abounds with public and sacred buildings. The most beautiful of the former is the Gymnasium, with porticos exceeding a stadium in extent. In the middle of it are the court of justice and groves. Here also is a Paneium, an artificial mound of the shape of a fir-cone, resembling a pile of rock, to the top of which there is an ascent by a spiral path. From the summit may be seen the whole city lying all around and beneath it.The wide street extends in length along the Gymnasium from the Necropolis to the Canobic gate. Next is the Hippodromos (or race-course), as it is called, and other buildings near it, and reaching to the Canobic canal. After passing through the Hippodromos is the Nicopolis, which contains buildings fronting the sea not less numerous than a city. It is 30 stadia distant from Alexandreia. Augustus Caesar distinguished this place, because it was here that he defeated Antony and his party of adherents. He took the city at the first onset, and compelled Antony to put himself to death, but Cleopatra to surrender herself alive. A short time afterwards, however, she also put an end to her life secretly, in prison, by the bite of an asp, or (for there are two accounts) by the application of a poisonous ointment. Thus the empire of the Lagidae, which had subsisted many years, was dissolved. 17.1.11. Alexander was succeeded by Ptolemy the son of Lagus, the son of Lagus by Philadelphus, Philadelphus by Euergetes; next succeeded Philopator the lover of Agathocleia, then Epiphanes, afterwards Philometor, the son (thus far) always succeeding the father. But Philometor was succeeded by his brother, the second Euergetes, who was also called Physcon. He was succeeded by Ptolemy surnamed Lathurus, Lathurus by Auletes of our time, who was the father of Cleopatra. All these kings, after the third Ptolemy, were corrupted by luxury and effeminacy, and the affairs of government were very badly administered by them; but worst of all by the fourth, the seventh, and the last, Auletes (or the Piper), who, besides other deeds of shamelessness, acted the piper; indeed he gloried so much in the practice, that he scrupled not to appoint trials of skill in his palace; on which occasions he presented himself as a competitor with other rivals. He was deposed by the Alexandrines; and of his three daughters, one, the eldest, who was legitimate, they proclaimed queen; but his two sons, who were infants, were absolutely excluded from the succession.As a husband for the daughter established on the throne, the Alexandrines invited one Cybiosactes from Syria, who pretended to be descended from the Syrian kings. The queen after a few days, unable to endure his coarseness and vulgarity, rid herself of him by causing him to be strangled. She afterwards married Archelaus, who also pretended to be the son of Mithridates Eupator, but he was really the son of that Archelaus who carried on war against Sulla, and was afterwards honourably treated by the Romans. He was grandfather of the last king of Cappadocia in our time, and priest of Comana in Pontus. He was then (at the time we are speaking of) the guest of Gabinius, and intended to accompany him in an expedition against the Parthians, but unknown to Gabinius, he was conducted away by some (friends) to the queen, and declared king.At this time Pompey the Great entertained Auletes as his guest on his arrival at Rome, and recommended him to the senate, negotiated his return, and contrived the execution of most of the deputies, in number a hundred, who had undertaken to appear against him: at their head was Dion the academic philosopher.Ptolemy (Auletes) on being restored by Gabinius, put to death both Archelaus and his daughter; but not long after he was reinstated in his kingdom, he died a natural death, leaving two sons and two daughters, the eldest of whom was Cleopatra.The Alexandrines declared as sovereigns the eldest son and Cleopatra. But the adherents of the son excited a sedition, and banished Cleopatra, who retired with her sister into Syria.It was about this time that Pompey the Great, in his flight from Palaepharsalus, came to Pelusium and Mount Casium. He was treacherously slain by the king's party. When Caesar arrived, he put the young prince to death, and sending for Cleopatra from her place of exile, appointed her queen of Egypt, declaring also her surviving brother, who was very young, and herself joint sovereigns.After the death of Caesar and the battle at Pharsalia, Antony passed over into Asia; he raised Cleopatra to the highest dignity, made her his wife, and had children by her. He was present with her at the battle of Actium, and accompanied her in her flight. Augustus Caesar pursued them, put an end to their power, and rescued Egypt from misgovernment and revelry. 17.1.12. At present Egypt is a (Roman) province, pays considerable tribute, and is well governed by prudent persons, who are sent there in succession. The governor thus sent out has the rank of king. Subordinate to him is the administrator of justice, who is the supreme judge in many causes. There is another officer, who is called Idiologus, whose business it is to inquire into property for which there is no claimant, and which of right falls to Caesar. These are accompanied by Caesar's freedmen and stewards, who are entrusted with affairs of more or less importance.Three legions are stationed in Egypt, one in the city, the rest in the country. Besides these there are also nine Roman cohorts, three quartered in the city, three on the borders of Ethiopia in Syene, as a guard to that tract, and three in other parts of the country. There are also three bodies of cavalry distributed in convenient posts.of the native magistrates in the cities, the first is the expounder of the law, who is dressed in scarlet; he receives the customary honours of the country, and has the care of providing what is necessary for the city. The second is the writer of records, the third is the chief judge. The fourth is the commander of the night guard. These magistrates existed in the time of the kings, but in consequence of the bad administration of affairs by the latter, the prosperity of the city was ruined by licentiousness. Polybius expresses his indignation at the state of things when lie was there: he describes the inhabitants of the city to be composed of three classes; the (first) Egyptians and natives, acute but indifferent citizens, and meddling with civil affairs. Tile second, the mercenaries, a numerous and undisciplined body ; for it was an ancient custom to maintain foreign soldiers, who, from the worthlessness of their sovereigns, knew better how to govern than to obey. The third were the Alexandrines, who, for the same reason, were not orderly citizens; but still they were better than the mercenaries, for although they were a mixed race, yet being of Greek origin, they retained the customs common to the Greeks. But this class was extinct nearly about the time of Euergetes Physcon, in whose reign Polybius came to Alexandreia. For Physcon, being distressed by factions, frequently exposed the multitude to the attacks of the soldiery, and thus destroyed them. By such a state of things in the city the words of the poet (says Polybius) were verified: The way to Egypt is long and vexatious. 17.1.13. Such then, if not worse, was the condition of the city under the last kings. The Romans, as far as they were able, corrected, as I have said, many abuses, and established an orderly government, by appointing vice-governors, nomarchs, and ethnarchs, whose business it was to superintend affairs of minor importance.The greatest advantage which the city possesses arises from its being the only place in all Egypt well situated by nature for communication with the sea by its excellent harbour, and with the land by the river, by means of which everything is easily transported and collected together into this city, which is the greatest mart in the habitable world.These may be said to be the superior excellencies of the city. Cicero, in one of his orations, in speaking of the revenues of Egypt, states that an annual tribute of 12,000 talents was paid to Auletes, the father of Cleopatra. If then a king, who administered his government in the worst possible manner, and with the greatest negligence, obtained so large a revenue, what must we suppose it to be at present, when affairs are administered with great care, and when the commerce with India and with Troglodytica has been so greatly increased ? For formerly not even twenty vessels ventured to navigate the Arabian Gulf, or advance to the smallest distance beyond the straits at its mouth; but now large fleets are despatched as far as India and the extremities of Ethiopia, from which places the most valuable freights are brought to Egypt, and are thence exported to other parts, so that a double amount of custom is collected, arising from imports on the one hand, and from exports on the other. The most expensive description of goods is charged with the heaviest impost; for in fact Alexandreia has a monopoly of trade, and is almost the only receptacle for this kind of merchandise and place of supply for foreigners. The natural convenience of the situation is still more apparent to persons travelling through the country, and particularly along the coast which commences at the Catabathmus; for to this place Egypt extends.Next to it is Cyrenaea, and the neighboring barbarians, the Marmaridae.
5. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.144, 1.722-1.747 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 193, 199
1.144. Vivitur ex rapto: non hospes ab hospite tutus, 1.722. Excipit hos volucrisque suae Saturnia pennis 1.723. collocat et gemmis caudam stellantibus inplet. 1.724. Protinus exarsit nec tempora distulit irae 1.725. horriferamque oculis animoque obiecit Erinyn 1.726. paelicis Argolicae stimulosque in pectore caecos 1.727. condidit et profugam per totum terruit orbem. 1.728. Ultimus inmenso restabas, Nile, labori. 1.729. Quem simul ac tetigit, positis in margine ripae 1.730. procubuit genibus resupinoque ardua collo, 1.731. quos potuit solos, tollens ad sidera vultus 1.732. et gemitu et lacrimis et luctisono mugitu 1.733. cum Iove visa queri finemque orare malorum. 1.734. Coniugis ille suae conplexus colla lacertis, 1.735. finiat ut poenas tandem, rogat “in” que “futurum 1.736. pone metus” inquit; “numquam tibi causa doloris 1.737. haec erit:” et Stygias iubet hoc audire paludes. 1.738. Ut lenita dea est, vultus capit illa priores 1.739. fitque quod ante fuit: fugiunt e corpore saetae, 1.740. cornua decrescunt, fit luminis artior orbis, 1.741. contrahitur rictus, redeunt umerique manusque, 1.742. ungulaque in quinos dilapsa absumitur ungues: 1.743. de bove nil superest formae nisi candor in illa. 1.744. officioque pedum nymphe contenta duorum 1.745. erigitur metuitque loqui, ne more iuvencae 1.746. mugiat, et timide verba intermissa retemptat. 1.747. Nunc dea linigera colitur celeberrima turba,
6. Ovid, Epistulae (Heroides), 14.86 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 199
7. Vergil, Aeneis, 8.688-8.713 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 192
8.688. pallas, my son, and bid him find in thee 8.689. a master and example, while he learns 8.690. the soldier's arduous toil. With thy brave deeds 8.691. let him familiar grow, and reverence thee 8.692. with youthful love and honor. In his train 8.693. two hundred horsemen of Arcadia , 8.694. our choicest men-at-arms, shall ride; and he 8.695. in his own name an equal band shall bring 8.696. to follow only thee.” Such the discourse. 8.697. With meditative brows and downcast eyes 8.698. Aeneas and Achates, sad at heart, 8.699. mused on unnumbered perils yet to come. 8.700. But out of cloudless sky Cythera's Queen 8.701. gave sudden signal: from th' ethereal dome 8.702. a thunder-peal and flash of quivering fire 8.703. tumultuous broke, as if the world would fall, 8.704. and bellowing Tuscan trumpets shook the air. 8.705. All eyes look up. Again and yet again 8.706. crashed the terrible din, and where the sky 8.707. looked clearest hung a visionary cloud, 8.708. whence through the brightness blazed resounding arms. 8.709. All hearts stood still. But Troy 's heroic son 8.710. knew that his mother in the skies redeemed 8.711. her pledge in sound of thunder: so he cried, 8.712. “Seek not, my friend, seek not thyself to read 8.713. the meaning of the omen. 'T is to me
8. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 1.1.5, 6.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 13, 191
9. Propertius, Elegies, 2.28.17-2.28.18, 3.11.30-3.11.58 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 187, 199
10. Horace, Epodes, 8.12 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 191
11. Livy, History, 30.45.5, 38.60.6, 45.42.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 191
45.42.5. Bithys, filius Cotyis, regis Thracum, cum obsidibus in custodiam Carseolos est missus. ceteros captivos, qui in triumpho ducti erant, in carcerem condi placuit.
12. Plutarch, Mark Antony, 59.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 187
59.4. ὧν καὶ Μάρκος ἦν Σιλανὸς καὶ Δέλλιος ὁ ἱστορικός. οὗτος δὲ καὶ δεῖσαί φησιν ἐπιβουλὴν ἐκ Κλεοπάτρας, Γλαύκου τοῦ ἰατροῦ φράσαντος αὐτῷ. προσέκρουσε δὲ Κλεοπάτρᾳ παρὰ δεῖπνον εἰπὼν αὐτοῖς μὲν ὀξίνην ἐγχεῖσθαι, Σάρμεντον δὲ πίνειν ἐν Ῥώμῃ Φαλερῖνον. ὁ δὲ Σάρμεντος ἦν τῶν Καίσαρος παιγνίων παιδάριον, ἃ δηλίκια Ῥωμαῖοι καλοῦσιν. 59.4.
13. Martial, Epigrams, 4.11, 6.80 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 126, 187
14. Martial, Epigrams, 4.11, 6.80 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 126, 187
15. Lucan, Pharsalia, 7.770-7.776, 7.785-7.786, 7.852, 8.713-8.793, 8.820-8.846, 9.1-9.18, 9.64, 9.150-9.163, 9.1010-9.1104, 10.6-10.8, 10.63-10.73, 10.160-10.171, 10.329-10.338 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 187, 191, 192, 215
16. Statius, Siluae, 1.6.38, 2.2.2, 3.2.6, 3.2.21-3.2.34, 3.2.101-3.2.126, 3.2.142-3.2.143, 4.1.22, 4.5.23-4.5.24 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 186, 187, 191, 192, 193, 199, 215, 218, 219
17. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 2.8.6-2.8.7, 5.5.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 191
18. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.1-1.21, 1.642-1.646, 4.344-4.422, 7.227-7.230 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 135, 136, 199
19. Tacitus, Histories, 1.2.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 126
20. Suetonius, Iulius, 80 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 191
21. Juvenal, Satires, 3.62-3.65 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 126
22. Pseudo-Acro, Commentum In Horati Carmina, 1.37.30 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 192
23. Athenaeus, The Learned Banquet, None (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cosmopolitanism, flavian Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 126