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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.


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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
corcyra Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 106, 114, 213
Balbo and Santangelo (2022), A Community in Transition: Rome between Hannibal and the Gracchi 40
Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 210, 212
Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 185, 186, 368, 369
Buszard (2023), Greek Translations of Roman Gods. 212, 216
Ebrey and Kraut (2022), The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed, 52
Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 568, 582
Faulkner and Hodkinson (2015), Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns, 88, 97
Gaifman (2012), Aniconism in Greek Antiquity, 276, 288, 289
Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 60, 108
Gygax and Zuiderhoek (2021), Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity, 128
Konig and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 76
König and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 76
Vlassopoulos (2021), Historicising Ancient Slavery, 133, 136, 192
corcyra, and, corcyraeans, Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 163, 175, 176
corcyra, demos, in Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 60
corcyra, dracon of Buszard (2023), Greek Translations of Roman Gods. 212, 213, 214, 216
corcyra, fear, and stasis at Joho (2022), Style and Necessity in Thucydides, 42, 43, 44, 106
corcyra, modern corfu Bianchetti et al. (2015), Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition, 29, 369
corcyra, philicus of Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 101
corcyra, temple of artemis on, corfu Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 29, 193
corcyra, tragic philiscus of poet Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 38, 78, 163

List of validated texts:
5 validated results for "corcyra"
1. Herodotus, Histories, 3.49 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Corcyra • Corcyra and Corcyraeans

 Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 582; Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 163

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3.49 εἰ μέν νυν Περιάνδρου τελευτήσαντος τοῖσι Κορινθίοισι φίλα ἦν πρὸς τοὺς Κερκυραίους, οἳ δὲ οὐκ ἂν συνελάβοντο τοῦ στρατεύματος τοῦ ἐπὶ Σάμον ταύτης εἵνεκεν τῆς αἰτίης. νῦν δὲ αἰεὶ ἐπείτε ἔκτισαν τὴν νῆσον εἰσὶ ἀλλήλοισι διάφοροι, ἐόντες ἑωυτοῖσι 1 τούτων ὦν εἵνεκεν ἀπεμνησικάκεον τοῖσι Σαμίοισι οἱ Κορίνθιοι. ἀπέπεμπε δὲ ἐς Σάρδις ἐπʼ ἐκτομῇ Περίανδρος τῶν πρώτων Κερκυραίων ἐπιλέξας τοὺς παῖδας τιμωρεύμενος· πρότεροι γὰρ οἱ Κερκυραῖοι ἦρξαν ἐς αὐτὸν πρῆγμα ἀτάσθαλον ποιήσαντες.'' None
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3.49 If after the death of Periander, the Corinthians had been friendly towards the Corcyraeans, they would not have taken part in the expedition against Samos for this reason. But as it was, ever since the island was colonized, they have been at odds with each other, despite their kinship. ,For these reasons then the Corinthians bore a grudge against the Samians. Periander chose the sons of the notable Corcyraeans and sent them to Sardis to be made eunuchs as an act of vengeance; for the Corcyraeans had first begun the quarrel by committing a terrible crime against him.
3.49
If after the death of Periander, the Corinthians had been friendly towards the Corcyraeans, they would not have taken part in the expedition against Samos for this reason. But as it was, ever since the island was colonized, they have been at odds with each other, despite their kinship. ,For these reasons then the Corinthians bore a grudge against the Samians. Periander chose the sons of the notable Corcyraeans and sent them to Sardis to be made eunuchs as an act of vengeance; for the Corcyraeans had first begun the quarrel by committing a terrible crime against him. '' None
2. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 3.82.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Corcyra • Fear, and stasis at Corcyra

 Found in books: Ebrey and Kraut (2022), The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed, 52; Joho (2022), Style and Necessity in Thucydides, 106

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3.82.2 καὶ ἐπέπεσε πολλὰ καὶ χαλεπὰ κατὰ στάσιν ταῖς πόλεσι, γιγνόμενα μὲν καὶ αἰεὶ ἐσόμενα, ἕως ἂν ἡ αὐτὴ φύσις ἀνθρώπων ᾖ, μᾶλλον δὲ καὶ ἡσυχαίτερα καὶ τοῖς εἴδεσι διηλλαγμένα, ὡς ἂν ἕκασται αἱ μεταβολαὶ τῶν ξυντυχιῶν ἐφιστῶνται. ἐν μὲν γὰρ εἰρήνῃ καὶ ἀγαθοῖς πράγμασιν αἵ τε πόλεις καὶ οἱ ἰδιῶται ἀμείνους τὰς γνώμας ἔχουσι διὰ τὸ μὴ ἐς ἀκουσίους ἀνάγκας πίπτειν: ὁ δὲ πόλεμος ὑφελὼν τὴν εὐπορίαν τοῦ καθ’ ἡμέραν βίαιος διδάσκαλος καὶ πρὸς τὰ παρόντα τὰς ὀργὰς τῶν πολλῶν ὁμοιοῖ.'' None
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3.82.2 The sufferings which revolution entailed upon the cities were many and terrible, such as have occurred and always will occur, as long as the nature of mankind remains the same; though in a severer or milder form, and varying in their symptoms, according to the variety of the particular cases. In peace and prosperity states and individuals have better sentiments, because they do not find themselves suddenly confronted with imperious necessities; but war takes away the easy supply of daily wants, and so proves a rough master, that brings most men's characters to a level with their fortunes. "" None
3. None, None, nan (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Corcyra • Heraion, Corcyra

 Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 210; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 209

4. Strabo, Geography, 6.4.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Corcyra

 Found in books: Konig and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 76; König and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 76

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6.4.1 Such, indeed, is the size and such the character of Italy. And while I have already mentioned many things which have caused the Romans at the present time to be exalted to so great a height, I shall now indicate the most important things. One is, that, like an island, Italy is securely guarded by the seas on all sides, except in a few regions, and even these are fortified by mountains that are hardly passable. A second is that along most of its coast it is harborless and that the harbors it does have are large and admirable. The former is useful in meeting attacks from the outside, while the latter is helpful in making counter-attacks and in promoting an abundant commerce. A third is that it is characterized by many differences of air and temperature, on which depend the greater variation, whether for better or for worse, in animals, plants, and, in short, everything that is useful for the support of life. Its length extends from north to south, generally speaking, and Sicily counts as an addition to its length, already so great. Now mild temperature and harsh temperature of the air are judged by heat, cold, and their intermediates; and so from this it necessarily follows that what is now Italy, situated as it is between the two extremes and extending to such a length, shares very largely in the temperate zone and in a very large number of ways. And the following is still another advantage which has fallen to the lot of Italy; since the Apennine Mountains extend through the whole of its length and leave on both sides plains and hills which bear fine fruits, there is no part of it which does not enjoy the blessings of both mountain and plain. And add also to this the size and number of its rivers and its lakes, and, besides these, the fountains of water, both hot and cold, which in many places nature has provided as an aid to health, and then again its good supply of mines of all sorts. Neither can one worthily describe Italy's abundant supply of fuel, and of food both for men and beast, and the excellence of its fruits. Further, since it lies intermediate between the largest races on the one hand, and Greece and the best parts of Libya on the other, it not only is naturally well-suited to hegemony, because it surpasses the countries that surround it both in the valor of its people and in size, but also can easily avail itself of their services, because it is close to them."" None
5. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Corcyra

 Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 368, 369; König and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 76




Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.