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subject book bibliographic info
contrast Gwynne (2004), Logic, Rhetoric and Legal Reasoning in the Qur'an: God's Arguments, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 199
contrast, aesthetic of Stavrianopoulou (2013), Shifting Social Imaginaries in the Hellenistic Period: Narrations, Practices and Images, 224, 225
contrast, anger based on empty beliefs, anger, philodemus, natural anger almost = freedom from anger Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 202
contrast, between, elders and youth Ashbrook Harvey et al. (2015), A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer, 138, 139
contrast, chrysippus, stoic, already in antiquity, views seen as orthodox for stoics tended to be ascribed to chrysippus, intellectualist account of emotions as identical with judgements zeno Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 29, 30
contrast, imitation Greensmith (2021), The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation, 14
contrast, imitation, ‘control agents’ Greensmith (2021), The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation, 309, 310
contrast, skin color, and character, linked with north-south Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 151
contrast, theme McClay (2023), The Bacchic Gold Tablets and Poetic Tradition: Memory and Performance. 101, 102, 103, 104, 105
contrast, to anger, sophrosyne Mermelstein (2021), Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation, 86, 88
contrast, to demiurge, young gods O'Brien (2015), The Demiurge in Ancient Thought, 132
contrast, to digest, mishnah, in Fonrobert and Jaffee (2007), The Cambridge Companion to the Talmud and Rabbinic Literature Cambridge Companions to Religion, 186
contrast, to exaltation, ambiguity, in Eisenfeld (2022), Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes, 163, 168
contrast, to lexis, logos, λόγος James (2021), Learning the Language of Scripture: Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation, 77, 78, 79, 80
contrast, to prefiguration, typology, figuration, in Kaplan (2015), My Perfect One: Typology and Early Rabbinic Interpretation of Song of Songs, 66, 67
contrast, with anger, philanthropia Mermelstein (2021), Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation, 68, 69, 78, 92, 93, 94, 95, 107, 108
contrast, with barbarians, greeks/hellenes Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 22, 26, 28, 29, 31, 33, 35, 37, 39, 40, 41, 151, 205, 209
contrast, with good and benefit, indifferents, preferred and dispreferred Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 170, 171, 172
contrast, with immortality and relation to ritual practices, mortality Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 85, 86, 98, 126, 127, 171, 220, 233, 234, 235, 238, 239, 242, 262, 331, 332, 333, 334
contrast, with interpretation, invention, εὕρεσις, inventio James (2021), Learning the Language of Scripture: Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation, 224, 225
contrast, with jews, gentiles, as Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 40, 85, 86, 122, 133, 140, 148, 177, 185, 191, 194, 195, 196
contrast, with kata lexin rationality James (2021), Learning the Language of Scripture: Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation, 84, 273
contrast, with logical critic, grammarian James (2021), Learning the Language of Scripture: Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation, 34, 35
contrast, with mortality and relation to ritual practices, immortality Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 85, 86, 98, 126, 127, 171, 206, 220, 222, 233, 234, 235, 238, 239, 242, 262, 331, 332, 333, 334
contrast, with parrhesia, figurative language James (2021), Learning the Language of Scripture: Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation, 228, 230
contrast, with philanthropia, arrogance Mermelstein (2021), Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation, 94
contrast, with semantics, pragmatics James (2021), Learning the Language of Scripture: Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation, 79, 80
contrast, with seneca, the younger, stoic, emotion, which is a voluntary judgement Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 69, 70
contrast, with techne James (2021), Learning the Language of Scripture: Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation, 159
contrasted, north-south Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 67, 73, 83, 84, 93, 94
contrasted, or combined with the liberal arts or disciplines, bible, biblical culture Pollmann and Vessey (2007), Augustine and the Disciplines: From Cassiciacum to Confessions, 110, 143, 162
contrasted, song of songs piyyutim, shabbat piyyutim and Lieber (2014), A Vocabulary of Desire: The Song of Songs in the Early Synagogue, 42, 43
contrasted, to alteration, generation, γενέσις Trott (2019), Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 102, 103, 104, 109, 115
contrasted, to fire and heat vital heat Trott (2019), Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation, 53, 175, 179, 180, 220, 228, 230
contrasted, to historia, tragedy Hawes (2014), Rationalizing Myth in Antiquity, 87, 88, 89, 150, 171
contrasted, to prayer of esther, stoicism Brakke, Satlow, Weitzman (2005), Religion and the Self in Antiquity. 77
contrasted, with action, rhetoric, al Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48
contrasted, with agrippa i, josephus, on herod Udoh (2006), To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E, 202
contrasted, with asia, europe Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 61, 62, 63, 64, 70, 71, 72, 283, 284, 285, 286, 287
contrasted, with august rites, pleasures, low, personal pleasure Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 28
contrasted, with author-figure, titus albucius Yona (2018), Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire, 18, 192, 193, 194, 197, 198, 199
contrasted, with cataclysm, nile, flood Williams (2012), The Cosmic Viewpoint: A Study of Seneca's 'Natural Questions', 125, 126, 127
contrasted, with christian incubation, hammat gader, lepers ritual Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 814
contrasted, with democritus, heraclitus Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 212
contrasted, with divinatory incubation, mandoulis, theological revelations Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 554
contrasted, with ethics, rhetoric, al Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 46, 47, 48, 50
contrasted, with europe, asia Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 61, 62, 63, 64, 70, 71, 72, 298
contrasted, with gifts, money Seaford (2018), Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays, 351
contrasted, with gods, human beings Dürr (2022), Paul on the Human Vocation: Reason Language in Romans and Ancient Philosophical Tradition, 93
contrasted, with greek, incubation, egyptian incubation Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 17, 18
contrasted, with greeks, barbarians Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 17, 18, 73, 120
contrasted, with harsh criticism, frankness Yona (2018), Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire, 74, 75
contrasted, with herod, josephus, on agrippa i Udoh (2006), To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E, 202, 203
contrasted, with honor, utility Gilbert, Graver and McConnell (2023), Power and Persuasion in Cicero's Philosophy. 130, 180, 187
contrasted, with human saints linked to incubation, michael, archangel Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 749
contrasted, with idealism practicality Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 70, 115, 116, 149, 150, 151, 152, 154
contrasted, with isis, cyrus and john, saints Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 373, 619, 620
contrasted, with john in confl ict with mary, peter Ernst (2009), Martha from the Margins: The Authority of Martha in Early Christian Tradition, 56, 276
contrasted, with john in lists of apostles, peter Ernst (2009), Martha from the Margins: The Authority of Martha in Early Christian Tradition, 71, 91, 246, 287
contrasted, with john, peter Ernst (2009), Martha from the Margins: The Authority of Martha in Early Christian Tradition, 251
contrasted, with justice, sophia, wisdom truth Pucci (2016), Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay, 30, 31, 32
contrasted, with law in society, law, and society Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 59
contrasted, with logocentrism, polysemy Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 142
contrasted, with lust as supposedly free of bodily insubordination, augustine, anger Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 380, 381
contrasted, with martha mary, diakonia of Ernst (2009), Martha from the Margins: The Authority of Martha in Early Christian Tradition, 2, 3, 4, 57, 58, 177, 183, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 205, 221, 260, 262, 263, 265, 268, 269, 278, 300
contrasted, with mary, martha Ernst (2009), Martha from the Margins: The Authority of Martha in Early Christian Tradition, 193, 195, 196, 197, 200, 201, 206, 211, 216
contrasted, with midrash, targum Lieber (2014), A Vocabulary of Desire: The Song of Songs in the Early Synagogue, 37, 38, 40, 41
contrasted, with money, gifts Seaford (2018), Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays, 351
contrasted, with musonius rufus on gender, philo Ashbrook Harvey et al. (2015), A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer, 281
contrasted, with negotium, otium Conybeare (2006), The Irrational Augustine, 110, 111, 136
contrasted, with nile flood Williams (2012), The Cosmic Viewpoint: A Study of Seneca's 'Natural Questions', 125, 126, 127
contrasted, with nile flood, distinguished from cosmic conflagration Williams (2012), The Cosmic Viewpoint: A Study of Seneca's 'Natural Questions', 125
contrasted, with nile flood, moralizing interpretation of Williams (2012), The Cosmic Viewpoint: A Study of Seneca's 'Natural Questions', 112, 127, 128
contrasted, with nile flood, part of nature's beneficent plan Williams (2012), The Cosmic Viewpoint: A Study of Seneca's 'Natural Questions', 125, 126
contrasted, with peter, john, denials of Ernst (2009), Martha from the Margins: The Authority of Martha in Early Christian Tradition, 78, 80
contrasted, with peter, john, gospel of Ernst (2009), Martha from the Margins: The Authority of Martha in Early Christian Tradition, 76, 88, 128
contrasted, with philosophy, oratory Gilbert, Graver and McConnell (2023), Power and Persuasion in Cicero's Philosophy. 18, 22
contrasted, with protagonists of the satires, persona of horace Yona (2018), Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire, 192, 193, 194, 197, 198, 208, 211, 212, 233, 248, 287, 288
contrasted, with ratio, auctoritas Wardy and Warren (2018), Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy, 266, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 287, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294
contrasted, with religion, superstition O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 115, 129, 130
contrasted, with souls, see soul, four capacities Singer and van Eijk (2018), Galen: Works on Human Nature: Volume 1, Mixtures (De Temperamentis), 160, 161
contrasted, with souls, see soul, natural, of nature Singer and van Eijk (2018), Galen: Works on Human Nature: Volume 1, Mixtures (De Temperamentis), 6, 23, 60, 147
contrasted, with souls, see soul, of whole substance of a body Singer and van Eijk (2018), Galen: Works on Human Nature: Volume 1, Mixtures (De Temperamentis), 162
contrasted, with souls, see soul, shaping, of nature, diaplastik? dunamis Singer and van Eijk (2018), Galen: Works on Human Nature: Volume 1, Mixtures (De Temperamentis), 12, 13, 89, 93, 94, 95, 126
contrasted, with souls, see soul, vital Singer and van Eijk (2018), Galen: Works on Human Nature: Volume 1, Mixtures (De Temperamentis), 6
contrasted, with spirit, flesh Sider (2001), Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian, 112, 146
Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 668, 669
contrasted, with targum, midrash Lieber (2014), A Vocabulary of Desire: The Song of Songs in the Early Synagogue, 37, 38, 40, 41
contrasted, with telesphoros, hypnos/somnus Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 684, 685
contrasted, with the fallen angels, noah Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 96
contrasted, with the giants, noah Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 94, 96, 633, 634, 635, 662, 666, 702
contrasted, with the word of god, rhetoric Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 136, 137
contrasted, with those of theoderic, justinian Kraemer (2020), The Mediterranean Diaspora in Late Antiquity: What Christianity Cost the Jews, 317
contrasted, with virtue, fortune Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 38, 42, 55, 159, 170
contrasted, with vital heat female Trott (2019), Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation, 153, 165, 166, 179, 180, 181
contrasted, with words as merely calming the irrational part, plato, scales and rhythms Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 128
contrasted, with, abraham, lot Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 276, 277, 288, 399, 406
contrasted, with, abraham, pharaoh Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 232, 237, 251
contrasted, with, apostles, pharisees Azar (2016), Exegeting the Jews: the early reception of the Johannine "Jews", 194
contrasted, with, avitus, chilperic Kraemer (2020), The Mediterranean Diaspora in Late Antiquity: What Christianity Cost the Jews, 330, 331
contrasted, with, chaldeans, abraham Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 75, 106, 216, 217, 220, 221, 224, 225
contrasted, with, chaldeans, abraham charioteer, god as Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 217, 218, 288
contrasted, with, faith, external goods Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 64, 135, 394, 395, 399, 400, 402, 403
contrasted, with, lot, abraham Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 276, 277, 288, 399, 406
contrasted, with, pharaoh, abraham Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 232, 251
contrasted, with, pharisees, apostles Azar (2016), Exegeting the Jews: the early reception of the Johannine "Jews", 194
contrasted, with, prayer, sacrifice Lieber (2014), A Vocabulary of Desire: The Song of Songs in the Early Synagogue, 147
contrasted, with, qedushta shir ha-shirim, yannai, yotzerot Lieber (2014), A Vocabulary of Desire: The Song of Songs in the Early Synagogue, 391
contrasted, with, yotzer, yotzerot, qerovot Lieber (2014), A Vocabulary of Desire: The Song of Songs in the Early Synagogue, 391
contrasting, bishops court and real court of law, libanius Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 168
contrasting, humans and animals, hesiod Dürr (2022), Paul on the Human Vocation: Reason Language in Romans and Ancient Philosophical Tradition, 95
contrasting, modes of immortality Eisenfeld (2022), Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes, 22, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 109, 110, 142, 157, 225
contrasting, modes, revelation and guidance Moxon (2017), Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective. 326, 327, 329, 337
contrasting, order of events, 1 maccabees Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 29, 30, 373, 374, 380, 394, 395, 533
contrasting, presentation of events, 1 maccabees Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 323, 324, 325, 396, 397, 419, 467, 469, 475, 481, 482, 496, 535
contrasting, qualities of men, aristotle, on Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 308
contrasting, revelations, double dreams and visions, peter and cornelius Moxon (2017), Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective. 326, 327, 329
contrastive, linguistics, courtier literature Burton (2009), Dionysus and Rome: Religion and Literature, 92
contrasts Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 10, 17, 21, 23, 39, 42, 55, 77, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 96, 97, 99, 100, 101, 102, 107, 108, 115, 118, 119, 120, 134, 136, 138, 140, 143, 144, 147, 149, 150, 155, 157, 164, 169
Rubin (2008) Time and the Life Cycle in Talmud and Midrash: Socio-Anthropological Perspectives. 96, 97
contrasts, as narrative technique Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 2, 13, 21, 23, 63, 100, 101, 102, 134, 136, 140, 143, 149, 150, 164, 169
contrasts, as theme in plutarch’s narrative Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 17, 39, 55, 84, 96, 97, 108, 118, 119, 120, 157
contrasts, between plutarch and other authors Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 29, 30, 43, 45, 95, 160, 165, 166, 167
contrasts, in narrative Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 23, 26, 27, 32, 34, 35, 37, 38, 40, 42, 43, 48, 53, 54, 55, 56, 62, 74, 75, 76, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 85, 86, 87, 90, 94, 100, 102, 103, 105, 113, 117, 122, 123, 125, 127, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 148, 152, 153, 164, 166, 168, 174, 175, 180, 181, 186, 195, 198, 204, 205, 220, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 238, 239, 246, 259, 260, 261, 266, 269, 272, 274, 302, 308, 316, 319

List of validated texts:
19 validated results for "contrast"
1. Hebrew Bible, Esther, 6.1 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Noah, Contrasted with the Giants • contrastive linguistics, Courtier Literature

 Found in books: Burton (2009), Dionysus and Rome: Religion and Literature, 92; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 702

sup>
6.1 בַּלַּיְלָה הַהוּא נָדְדָה שְׁנַת הַמֶּלֶךְ וַיֹּאמֶר לְהָבִיא אֶת־סֵפֶר הַזִּכְרֹנוֹת דִּבְרֵי הַיָּמִים וַיִּהְיוּ נִקְרָאִים לִפְנֵי הַמֶּלֶךְ׃
6.1
וַיֹּאמֶר הַמֶּלֶךְ לְהָמָן מַהֵר קַח אֶת־הַלְּבוּשׁ וְאֶת־הַסּוּס כַּאֲשֶׁר דִּבַּרְתָּ וַעֲשֵׂה־כֵן לְמָרְדֳּכַי הַיְּהוּדִי הַיּוֹשֵׁב בְּשַׁעַר הַמֶּלֶךְ אַל־תַּפֵּל דָּבָר מִכֹּל אֲשֶׁר דִּבַּרְתָּ׃'' None
sup>
6.1 On that night could not the king sleep; and he commanded to bring the book of records of the chronicles, and they were read before the king.'' None
2. None, None, nan (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Mortality, contrast with immortality and relation to ritual practices • immortality, contrasting modes of • immortality,, contrast with mortality and relation to ritual practices

 Found in books: Eisenfeld (2022), Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes, 53; Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 86

3. None, None, nan (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Mortality, contrast with immortality and relation to ritual practices • immortality, contrasting modes of • immortality,, contrast with mortality and relation to ritual practices

 Found in books: Eisenfeld (2022), Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes, 22; Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 171

4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 198 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Greeks/Hellenes, contrast with barbarians • Noah, Contrasted with the Giants

 Found in books: Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 37; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 666

sup>
198 But this man, like a priest of sacrifice himself, did himself begin to perform the sacred rite, although he was a most affectionate father of a son who was in all respects most excellent. And, perhaps, according to the usual law and custom of burnt offerings he was intending to solemnise the rite by dividing his son limb by limb. And so he did not divide his feelings and allot one part of his regard to his son and another part to piety to God: but he devoted the whole soul, entire and undivided, to holiness; thinking but little of the kindred blood which flowed in the victim. '' None
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 2.165-2.166 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Abraham, Pharaoh contrasted with • Greeks/Hellenes, contrast with barbarians

 Found in books: Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 237; Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 37, 151

sup>
2.165 But if he is, whom all Greeks together with all barbarians acknowledge with one judgment, the highest Father of both gods and humans and the Maker of the entire cosmos, whose nature--although it is invisible and unfathomable not only to sight but also to perception--all who spend their time with mathematics and other philosophy long to discover, leaving aside none of the things which contribute to the discovery and service of him, then it was necessary for all people to cling to him and not as if through some mechanical device to introduce other gods into participation of equal honors. 2.166 Since they slipped in the most essential matter, the nation of the Jews--to speak most accurately--set aright the false step of others by having looked beyond everything which has come into existence through creation since it is generate and corruptible in nature, and chose only the service of the ungenerate and eternal. The first reason for this is because it is excellent; the second is because it is profitable to be dedicated and associated with the Older rather than those who are younger and with the Ruler rather than those who are ruled and with the Maker rather those things which come into existence. '' None
6. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Abraham, Lot contrasted with • Greeks/Hellenes, contrast with barbarians • Lot, Abraham contrasted with • faith, external goods contrasted with

 Found in books: Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 399, 400; Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 151

7. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Abraham, Lot contrasted with • Greeks/Hellenes, contrast with barbarians • Lot, Abraham contrasted with • faith, external goods contrasted with

 Found in books: Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 400, 406; Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 151

8. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 19.328 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Josephus, on Agrippa I, contrasted with Herod • Josephus, on Herod, contrasted with Agrippa I • gentiles, as contrast with Jews

 Found in books: Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 177; Udoh (2006), To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E, 202

sup>
19.328 ̓Επεφύκει δ' ὁ βασιλεὺς οὗτος εὐεργετικὸς εἶναι ἐν δωρεαῖς καὶ μεγαλοφρονῆσαι ἔθνη φιλότιμος καὶ πολλοῖς ἀθρόως δαπανήμασιν ἀνιστὰς αὑτὸν εἰς ἐπιφάνειαν ἡδόμενος τῷ χαρίζεσθαι καὶ τῷ βιοῦν ἐν εὐφημίᾳ χαίρων, κατ' οὐδὲν ̔Ηρώδῃ τῷ πρὸ ἑαυτοῦ βασιλεῖ τὸν τρόπον συμφερόμενος:"" None
sup>
19.328 3. Now this king was by nature very beneficent and liberal in his gifts, and very ambitious to oblige people with such large donations; and he made himself very illustrious by the many chargeable presents he made them. He took delight in giving, and rejoiced in living with good reputation. He was not at all like that Herod who reigned before him;'' None
9. Josephus Flavius, Against Apion, 2.148 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Greeks/Hellenes, contrast with barbarians • philanthropia, contrast with anger

 Found in books: Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 41; Mermelstein (2021), Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation, 68

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2.148 ἀπὸ τῶν νόμων, καθ' οὓς ζῶντες διατελοῦμεν. ἄλλως τε καὶ τὴν κατηγορίαν ὁ ̓Απολλώνιος οὐκ ἀθρόαν ὥσπερ ὁ ̓Απίων ἔταξεν, ἀλλὰ σποράδην, καὶ δὴ εἴπας ποτὲ μὲν ὡς ἀθέους καὶ μισανθρώπους λοιδορεῖ, ποτὲ δ' αὖ δειλίαν ἡμῖν ὀνειδίζει καὶ τοὔμπαλιν ἔστιν ὅπου τόλμαν κατηγορεῖ καὶ ἀπόνοιαν. λέγει δὲ καὶ ἀφυεστάτους εἶναι τῶν βαρβάρων καὶ διὰ τοῦτο μηδὲν εἰς τὸν βίον εὕρημα συμβεβλῆσθαι μόνους."" None
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2.148 Moreover, since this Apollonius does not do like Apion, and lay a continued accusation against us, but does it only by starts, and up and down his discourse, while he sometimes reproaches us as atheists, and man-haters, and sometimes hits us in the teeth with our want of courage, and yet sometimes, on the contrary, accuses us of too great boldness, and madness in our conduct; nay, he says that we are the weakest of all the barbarians, and that this is the reason why we are the only people who have made no improvements in human life; '' None
10. New Testament, Acts, 16.21 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Double dreams and visions, Peter and Cornelius, contrasting revelations • Noah, Contrasted with the Giants • Revelation and guidance, contrasting modes

 Found in books: Moxon (2017), Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective. 329; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 666

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16.21 καὶ καταγγέλλουσιν ἔθη ἃ οὐκ ἔξεστιν ἡμῖν παραδέχεσθαι οὐδὲ ποιεῖν Ῥωμαίοις οὖσιν.'' None
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16.21 and set forth customs which it is not lawful for us to accept or to observe, being Romans."'' None
11. New Testament, Romans, 4.1, 4.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Abraham, Lot contrasted with • Lot, Abraham contrasted with • faith, external goods contrasted with • gentiles, as contrast with Jews

 Found in books: Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 399; Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 191, 195

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4.1 Τί οὖν ἐροῦμεν Ἀβραὰμ τὸν προπάτορα ἡμῶν κατὰ σάρκα;
4.9
ὁ μακαρισμὸς οὖν οὗτος ἐπὶ τὴν περιτομὴν ἢ καὶ ἐπὶ τὴν ἀκροβυστίαν; λέγομεν γάρἘλογίσθη τῷ Ἀβραὰμ ἡ πίστις εἰς δικαιοσύνην.'' None
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4.1 What then will we say that Abraham, our forefather, has found according to the flesh?
4.9
Is this blessing then pronounced on the circumcised, or on the uncircumcised also? For we say that faith was accounted to Abraham for righteousness. '' None
12. Plutarch, Nicias, 1.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • contrasts • contrasts (in narrative) • contrasts, as theme in Plutarch’s narrative • contrasts, between Plutarch and other authors

 Found in books: Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 30, 119; Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 23

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1.1 ἐπεὶ δοκοῦμεν οὐκ ἀτόπως τῷ Νικίᾳ τὸν Κράσσον παραβάλλειν, καὶ τὰ Παρθικὰ παθήματα τοῖς Σικελικοῖς, ὥρα παραιτεῖσθαι καὶ παρακαλεῖν ὑπὲρ ἐμοῦ τοὺς ἐντυγχάνοντας τοῖς συγγράμμασι τούτοις, ὅπως ἐπὶ ταῖς διηγήσεσιν αἷς Θουκυδίδης, αὐτὸς αὑτοῦ περὶ ταῦτα παθητικώτατος, ἐναργέστατος, ποικιλώτατος γενόμενος, ἀμιμήτως ἐξενήνοχε, μηδὲν ἡμᾶς ὑπολάβωσι πεπονθέναι Τιμαίῳ πάθος ὅμοιον,'' None
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1.1 '' None
13. Tacitus, Histories, 5.12 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Josephus, on Agrippa I, contrasted with Herod • Josephus, on Herod, contrasted with Agrippa I • gentiles, as contrast with Jews

 Found in books: Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 86; Udoh (2006), To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E, 202

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5.12 \xa0The temple was built like a citadel, with walls of its own, which were constructed with more care and effort than any of the rest; the very colonnades about the temple made a splendid defence. Within the enclosure is an ever-flowing spring; in the hills are subterraneous excavations, with pools and cisterns for holding rain-water. The founders of the city had foreseen that there would be many wars because the ways of their people differed so from those of\xa0the neighbours: therefore they had built at every point as if they expected a long siege; and after the city had been stormed by Pompey, their fears and experience taught them much. Moreover, profiting by the greed displayed during the reign of Claudius, they had bought the privilege of fortifying the city, and in time of peace had built walls as if for war. The population at this time had been increased by streams of rabble that flowed in from the other captured cities, for the most desperate rebels had taken refuge here, and consequently sedition was the more rife. There were three generals, three armies: the outermost and largest circuit of the walls was held by Simon, the middle of the city by John, and the temple was guarded by Eleazar. John and Simon were strong in numbers and equipment, Eleazar had the advantage of position: between these three there was constant fighting, treachery, and arson, and a great store of grain was consumed. Then John got possession of the temple by sending a party, under pretence of offering sacrifice, to slay Eleazar and his troops. So the citizens were divided into two factions until, at the approach of the Romans, foreign war produced concord.'' None
14. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • contrasts (in narrative) • rhetoric(al), contrasted with action • rhetoric(al), contrasted with ethics

 Found in books: Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 47; Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 139

15. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • contrasts (in narrative) • contrasts, as narrative technique

 Found in books: Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 63; Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 227

16. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • contrasts • contrasts (in narrative) • contrasts, as theme in Plutarch’s narrative • fortune, contrasted with virtue

 Found in books: Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 39, 55; Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 102

17. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • contrasts (in narrative) • fortune, contrasted with virtue

 Found in books: Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 159; Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 227

18. None, None, nan (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Chaldeans, Abraham contrasted with • Chaldeans, Abraham contrasted with, Charioteer, God as • Noah, Contrasted with the Giants

 Found in books: Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 217; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 634

19. Strabo, Geography, 1.2.3
 Tagged with subjects: • Greeks/Hellenes, contrast with barbarians • grammarian, contrast with logical critic

 Found in books: Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 29; James (2021), Learning the Language of Scripture: Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation, 35

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1.2.3 Eratosthenes says that the poet directs his whole attention to the amusement of the mind, and not at all to its instruction. In opposition to his idea, the ancients define poesy as a primitive philosophy, guiding our life from infancy, and pleasantly regulating our morals, our tastes, and our actions. The Stoics of our day affirm that the only wise man is the poet. On this account the earliest lessons which the citizens of Greece convey to their children are from the poets; certainly not alone for the purpose of amusing their minds, but for their instruction. Nay, even the professors of music, who give lessons on the harp, lyre, and pipe, lay claim to our consideration on the same account, since they say that the accomplishments which they teach are calculated to form and improve the character. It is not only among the Pythagoreans that one hears this claim supported, for Aristoxenus is of that opinion, and Homer too regarded the bards as amongst the wisest of mankind. of this number was the guardian of Clytemnestra, to whom the son of Atreus, when he set out for Troy, gave earnest charge to preserve his wife, whom Aegisthus was unable to seduce, until leading the bard to a desert island, he left him, and then The queen he led, not willing less than he, To his own mansion. Ib. iii. 272. But apart from all such considerations, Eratosthenes contradicts himself; for a little previously to the sentence which we have quoted, at the commencement of his Essay on Geography, he says, that all the ancient poets took delight in showing their knowledge of such matters. Homer inserted into his poetry all that he knew about the Ethiopians, Egypt, and Libya. of all that related to Greece and the neighbouring places he entered even too minutely into the details, describing Thisbe as abounding in doves, Haliartus, grassy, Anthedon, the far distant, Lilaea, situated on the sources of the Cephissus, and none of his epithets are without their meaning. But in pursuing this method, what object has he in view, to amuse merely, or to instruct? The latter, doubtless. Well, perhaps he has told the truth in these instances, but in what was beyond his observation both he and the other writers have indulged in all the marvels of fable. If such be the case the statement should have been, that the poets relate some things for mere amusement, others for instruction; but he affirms that they do it altogether for amusement, without any view to information; and by way of climax, inquires, What can it add to Homer's worth to be familiar with many lands, and skilled in strategy, agriculture, rhetoric, and similar information, which some persons seem desirous to make him possessed of. To seek to invest him with all this knowledge is most likely the effect of too great a zeal for his honour. Hipparchus observes, that to assert he was acquainted with every art and science, is like saying that an Attic eiresione bears pears and apples. As far as this goes, Eratosthenes, you are right enough; not so, however, when you not only deny that Homer was possessed of these vast acquirements, but represent poetry in general as a tissue of old wives' fables, where, to use your own expression, every thing thought likely to amuse is cooked up. I ask, is it of no value to the auditors of the poets to be made acquainted with the history of different countries, with strategy, agriculture, and rhetoric, and suchlike things, which the lecture generally contains."" None



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