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44 results for "contract"
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 230-231 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 64
231. He labelled Titans for they used huge strain
2. Hesiod, Works And Days, 282-286, 803-804 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 64
804. The gods will visit you with pece due
3. Alcaeus, Fragments, None (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, erinyes as agents of curses Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 64
4. Alcaeus, Fragments, None (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, erinyes as agents of curses Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 64
5. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 417, 621, 754, 921-949, 951-987, 950 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 65
950. οἷʼ ἐπικραίνει; μέγα γὰρ δύναται 950. the things she will accomplish? For the lady Erinys is very powerful, both with the deathless gods and with those below the earth; and in their dealings with mankind, they accomplish matters visibly, perfectly; to some giving songs,
6. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 899, 901, 900 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 12
900. ποῦ δὴ τὰ λοιπὰ Λοξίου μαντεύματα 900. What then will become in the future of Loxias’ oracles declared at Orestes
7. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1438-1446, 1496-1504, 1570, 1600-1602, 218, 60-68, 1580 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 63
1580. ἰδὼν ὑφαντοῖς ἐν πέπλοις, Ἐρινύων 1580. Seeing, as I have, i’ the spun robes of the Erinues,
8. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 720-725 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 63
725. κατάρας Οἰδιπόδα βλαψίφρονος· 725. curses that Oedipus spoke in madness. This strife that will destroy his sons drives the Erinys to fulfillment. Chorus
9. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 7.65 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, conditional self-curse of oath Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 9
10. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 58 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, conditional self-curse of oath Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 8
11. Euripides, Medea, 1053-1055, 112-114, 259-268, 395-399, 744-755, 813-814, 439 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 183
12. Euripides, Electra, 1355 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, curse •contract, inherited curse Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 156
1355. μηδ' ἐπιόρκων μέτα συμπλείτω:
13. Euripides, Cyclops, 2, 261-269, 271-272, 320-334, 586-587, 669, 696-701, 270 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 150, 151, 153
270. αὐτὸς ἔχ'. ἔγωγε τοῖς ξένοις τὰ χρήματα
14. Euripides, Archelaus (Fragmenta Papyracea), None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, conditional self-curse of oath Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 126
15. Alcaeus Comicus, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, erinyes as agents of curses Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 64
16. Alcaeus Comicus, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, erinyes as agents of curses Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 64
17. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1006-1012, 427-431, 476, 481, 624, 626, 641, 657-669, 67, 670-675, 72, 630 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 12
18. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 1189-1199, 1201-1209, 1200 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 125
19. Herodotus, Histories, 4.70, 4.154, 6.62-6.69, 6.68.1-6.68.2, 7.148, 9.109 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, conditional self-curse of oath Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 9, 31, 230
4.70. As for giving sworn pledges to those who are to receive them, this is the Scythian way: they take blood from the parties to the agreement by making a little cut in the body with an awl or a knife, and pour it mixed with wine into a big earthenware bowl, into which they then dip a scimitar and arrows and an axe and a javelin; and when this is done those swearing the agreement, and the most honorable of their followers, drink the blood after solemn curses. 4.154. This is what the Theraeans say; and now begins the part in which the Theraean and Cyrenaean stories agree, but not until now, for the Cyrenaeans tell a wholly different story about Battus, which is this. There is a town in Crete called Oaxus, of which one Etearchus became ruler. He was a widower with a daughter whose name was Phronime, and he married a second wife. ,When the second wife came into his house, she thought fit to be the proverbial stepmother to Phronime, ill-treating her and devising all sorts of evil against her; at last she accused the girl of lewdness, and persuaded her husband that the charge was true. So Etearchus was persuaded by his wife and contrived a great sin against his daughter. ,There was at Oaxus a Theraean trader, one Themison; Etearchus made this man his guest and friend, and got him to swear that he would do him whatever service he desired; then he gave the man his own daughter, telling him to take her away and throw her into the sea. ,But Themison was very angry at being thus tricked on his oath and renounced his friendship with Etearchus; presently, he took the girl and sailed away, and so as to fulfill the oath that he had sworn to Etearchus, when he was on the high seas he bound her with ropes and let her down into the sea and drew her up again, and presently arrived at Thera. 6.62. So love for this woman pricked Ariston, and he contrived as follows: He promised to give to his comrade any one thing out of all he owned, whatever Agetus might choose, and he bade his comrade make him the same promise. Agetus had no fear about his wife, seeing that Ariston was already married, so he agreed and they took oaths on these terms. ,Ariston gave Agetus whatever it was that he chose out of all his treasures, and then, seeking equal recompense from him, tried to take the wife of his comrade. Agetus said that he had agreed to anything but that, but he was forced by his oath and by the deceitful trick to let his wife be taken. 6.63. In this way Ariston married his third wife, after divorcing the second one. But his new wife gave birth to Demaratus too soon, before ten lunar months had passed. ,When one of his servants announced to him as he sat in council with the ephors that he had a son, Ariston, knowing the time of the marriage, counted up the months on his fingers and swore on oath, “It's not mine.” The ephors heard this but did not make anything of it. When the boy grew up, Ariston regretted having said that, for he firmly believed Demaratus to be his own son. ,He named him Demaratus because before his birth all the Spartan populace had prayed that Ariston, the man most highly esteemed out of all the kings of Sparta, might have a son. Thus he was named Demaratus, which means “answer to the people's prayer.” 6.64. Time passed and Ariston died, so Demaratus held the kingship. But it seems that these matters had to become known and cause Demaratus to lose his kingship. He had already fallen out with Cleomenes when he had brought the army back from Eleusis, and now they were even more at odds when Cleomenes crossed over after the Aeginetans who were Medizing. 6.65. Cleomenes wanted revenge, so he made a deal with Leotychides son of Menares son of Agis, of the same family as Demaratus. The deal was that Leotychides would go with Cleomenes against the Aeginetans if he became king. ,Leotychides had already become strongly hostile to Demaratus for the following reason: Leotychides was betrothed to Percalus, daughter of Demarmenus, but Demaratus plotted and robbed him of his marriage, stealing Percalus and marrying her first. ,From this affair Leotychides was hostile toward Demaratus, so at Cleomenes' instigation he took an oath against him, saying that he was not king of the Spartans by right, since he was not Ariston's son. After making this oath, he prosecuted him, recalling that utterance which Ariston had made when the servant told him he had a son, and he counted up the months and swore that it was not his. ,Taking his stand on this remark, Leotychides declared that Demaratus was not Ariston's son and that he was not rightly king of Sparta, bringing as witnesses the ephors who had been sitting beside Ariston and heard him say this. 6.66. Disputes arose over it, so the Spartans resolved to ask the oracle at Delphi if Demaratus was the son of Ariston. ,At Cleomenes' instigation this was revealed to the Pythia. He had won over a man of great influence among the Delphians, Cobon son of Aristophantus, and Cobon persuaded the priestess, Periallus, to say what Cleomenes wanted her to. ,When the ambassadors asked if Demaratus was the son of Ariston, the Pythia gave judgment that he was not. All this came to light later; Cobon was exiled from Delphi, and Periallus was deposed from her position. 6.67. So it was concerning Demaratus' loss of the kingship, and from Sparta he went into exile among the Medes because of the following reproach: after he was deposed from the kingship, he was elected to office. ,When it was the time of the date Gymnopaidia /date , Leotychides, now king in his place, saw him in the audience and, as a joke and an insult, sent a messenger to him to ask what it was like to hold office after being king. ,He was grieved by the question and said that he had experience of both, while Leotychides did not, and that this question would be the beginning for Sparta of either immense evil or immense good fortune. He said this, covered his head, left the theater, and went home, where he immediately made preparations and sacrificed an ox to Zeus. Then he summoned his mother. 6.68. When she came in, he put some of the entrails in her hands and entreated her, saying, “Mother, appealing to Zeus of the household and to all the other gods, I beseech you to tell me the truth. Who is my father? Tell me truly. ,Leotychides said in the disputes that you were already pregt by your former husband when you came to Ariston. Others say more foolishly that you approached to one of the servants, the ass-keeper, and that I am his son. ,I adjure you by the gods to speak what is true. If you have done anything of what they say, you are not the only one; you are in company with many women. There is much talk at Sparta that Ariston did not have child-bearing seed in him, or his former wives would have given him children.” 6.68.1. When she came in, he put some of the entrails in her hands and entreated her, saying, “Mother, appealing to Zeus of the household and to all the other gods, I beseech you to tell me the truth. Who is my father? Tell me truly. 6.68.2. Leotychides said in the disputes that you were already pregt by your former husband when you came to Ariston. Others say more foolishly that you approached to one of the servants, the ass-keeper, and that I am his son. 6.69. Thus he spoke. His mother answered, “My son, since you adjure me by entreaties to speak the truth, I will speak out to you all that is true. On the third night after Ariston brought me to his house, a phantom resembling him came to me. It came and lay with me and then put on me the garlands which it had. ,It went away, and when Ariston came in later and saw me with the garlands, he asked who gave them to me. I said he did, but he denied it. I swore an oath that just a little while before he had come in and lain with me and given me the garlands, and I said it was not good of him to deny it. ,When he saw me swearing, he perceived that this was some divine affair. For the garlands had clearly come from the hero's precinct which is established at the courtyard doors, which they call the precinct of Astrabacus, and the seers responded that this was the same hero who had come to me. Thus, my son, you have all you want to know. ,Either you are from this hero and Astrabacus the hero is your father, or Ariston is, for I conceived you that night. As for how your enemies chiefly attack you, saying that Ariston himself, when your birth was announced, denied in front of a large audience that you were his because the ten months had not yet been completed, he spoke an idle word, out of ignorance of such things. ,Some women give birth after nine months or seven months; not all complete the ten months. I gave birth to you, my son, after seven months. A little later Ariston himself recognized that he had blurted out that speech because of foolishness. Do not believe other stories about your manner of birth. You have heard the whole truth. May the wife of Leotychides himself, and the wives of the others who say these things, give birth to children fathered by ass-keepers.” 7.148. So the spies were sent back after they had seen all and returned to Europe. After sending the spies, those of the Greeks who had sworn alliance against the Persian next sent messengers to Argos. ,Now this is what the Argives say of their own part in the matter. They were informed from the first that the foreigner was stirring up war against Hellas. When they learned that the Greeks would attempt to gain their aid against the Persian, they sent messengers to Delphi to inquire of the god how it would be best for them to act, for six thousand of them had been lately slain by a Lacedaemonian army and Cleomenes son of Anaxandrides its general. For this reason, they said, the messengers were sent. ,The priestess gave this answer to their question: quote type="oracle" l met="dact" Hated by your neighbors, dear to the immortals, /l l Crouch with a lance in rest, like a warrior fenced in his armor, /l l Guarding your head from the blow, and the head will shelter the body. /l /quote This answer had already been uttered by the priestess when the envoys arrived in Argos and entered the council chamber to speak as they were charged. ,Then the Argives answered to what had been said that they would do as was asked of them if they might first make a thirty years peace with Lacedaemonia and if the command of half the allied power were theirs. It was their right to have the full command, but they would nevertheless be content with half. 9.109. As time went on, however, the truth came to light, and in such manner as I will show. Xerxes' wife, Amestris, wove and gave to him a great gaily-colored mantle, marvellous to see. Xerxes was pleased with it, and went to Artaynte wearing it. ,Being pleased with her too, he asked her what she wanted in return for her favors, for he would deny nothing at her asking. Thereupon—for she and all her house were doomed to evil—she said to Xerxes, “Will you give me whatever I ask of you?” He promised this, supposing that she would ask anything but that; when he had sworn, she asked boldly for his mantle. ,Xerxes tried to refuse her, for no reason except that he feared that Amestris might have clear proof of his doing what she already guessed. He accordingly offered her cities instead and gold in abundance and an army for none but herself to command. Armies are the most suitable of gifts in Persia. But as he could not move her, he gave her the mantle; and she, rejoicing greatly in the gift, went flaunting her finery.
20. Isaeus, Orations, 10.10 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, inherited curse Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 50
21. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 751 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, conditional self-curse of oath Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 8
22. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1025-1030, 13, 1390, 1425-1430, 509-510, 612, 713, 877-880, 1031 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 7, 193, 194
23. Sophocles, Ajax, 293 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, curse Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 154
24. Aristophanes, Knights, 185, 297, 296 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 12
296. ὁμολογῶ κλέπτειν: σὺ δ' οὐχί.
25. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 1143-1145, 1370-1392, 1760-1767, 650-651, 868-870, 1351 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 119
26. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 223-249, 251, 276-279, 644-647, 653, 250 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 8, 113, 115
27. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 1171-1173, 1175-1180, 1182-1188, 1217, 1222-1248, 383-384, 734-735, 781-782, 808-809, 1181 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 8, 86
28. Xenophon, On Household Management, 6.16-7.10 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, curse Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 149
29. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 59-60 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 7
60. ἢν μὴ περὶ εἰρήνης γε πρυτανεύσητέ μοι.
30. Aristophanes, Birds, 1608-1612, 194-195, 332, 444-447, 705-706, 263 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 7
263. ὁρᾷς τιν' ὄρνιν; μὰ τὸν ̓Απόλλω 'γὼ μὲν οὔ:
31. Antiphon, Orations, 11-12, 16 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 61
32. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, conditional self-curse of oath Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 151
33. Aristophanes, Clouds, 1229-1239, 1227 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 167
1227. μὰ τὸν Δί' οὐ γάρ πω τότ' ἐξηπίστατο
34. Aristophanes, Frogs, 177 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, conditional self-curse of oath Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 8
177. λάβ' ἐννέ' ὀβολούς. ἀναβιοίην νυν πάλιν.
35. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 200-209 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 230
209. λάζυσθε πᾶσαι τῆς κύλικος ὦ Λαμπιτοῖ:
36. Aeschines, Letters, 2.87, 3.110-3.111 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, conditional self-curse of oath Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 7, 61
37. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 55.5.5 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, conditional self-curse of oath Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 9
38. Aristotle, Rhetoric, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, curse Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 190
39. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 3.85-3.302, 4.70-4.72, 4.155-4.159, 4.268-4.271, 6.234, 7.351-7.352, 9.454, 18.490-18.508, 19.258-19.260 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, conditional self-curse of oath •contract, curse •contract, erinyes as agents of curses •contract, inherited curse Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 7, 9, 24, 25, 63, 64, 76, 84, 151, 183, 186, 231
3.85. It is with reluctance that I enlarge upon this topic, since you may think that my discourse lends authority to sin; and you would be justified in so thinking, were not an innocent or guilty conscience so powerful a force in itself, without the assumption of any divine design. Destroy this, and everything collapses; for just as a household or a state appears to lack all rational system and order if in it there are no rewards for right conduct and no punishments for transgression, so there is no such thing at all as the divine goverce of the world if that goverce makes no distinction between the good and the wicked. 3.86. " 'But,' it may be objected, 'the gods disregard smaller matters, and do not pay attention to the petty farms and paltry vines of individuals, and any trifling damage done by blight or hail cannot have been a matter for the notice of Jupiter; even kings do not attend to all the petty affairs in their kingdoms': this is how you argue. As if forsooth it was Publius Rutilius's estate at Formiae about which I complained a little time ago, and not his loss of all security! But this is the way with all mortals: their external goods, their vineyards, cornº-fields and olive-yards, with their abundant harvests and fruits, and in short all the comfort and prosperity of their lives, they think of as coming to them from the gods; but virtue no one ever imputed to a god's bounty. 3.87. And doubtless with good reason; for our virtue is a just ground for others' praise and a right reason for our own pride, and this would not be so if the gift of virtue came to us from a god and not from ourselves. On the other hand when we achieve some honour or some accession to our estate, or obtain any other of the goods or avoid any of the evils of fortune, it is then that we render thanks to the gods, and do not think that our credit has been enhanced. Did anyone ever render thanks to the gods because he was a good man? No, but because he was rich, honoured, secure. The reason why men give to Jupiter the titles of Best and Greatest is not that they the hand that he makes us just, temperate or wise, but safe, secure, wealthy and opulent. 3.88. Nor did anyone ever vow to pay a tithe to Hercules if he became a wise man! It is true there is a story that Pythagoras used to sacrifice an ox to the Muses when he had made a new discovery in geometry! but I don't believe it, since Pythagoras refused even to sacrifice a victim to Apollo of Delos, for fear of sprinkling the altar with blood. However, to return to my point, it is the considered belief of all mankind that they must pray to god for fortune but obtain wisdom for themselves. Let us dedicate temples as we will to Intellect, Virtue and Faith, yet we perceive that these things are within ourselves; hope, safety, wealth, victory are blessings which we must seek from the gods. Accordingly the prosperity and good fortune of the wicked, as Diogenes used to say, disprove the might and power of the gods entirely. 3.89. 'But sometimes good men come to good ends.' Yes, and we seize upon these cases and impute them with no reason to the immortal gods. Diagoras, named the Atheist, once came to Samothrace, and a certain friend said to him, 'You who think that the gods disregard men's affairs, do you not remark all the votive pictures that prove how many persons have escaped the violence of the storm, and come safe to port, by dint of vows to the gods?' 'That is so,' replied Diagoras; 'it is because there are nowhere any pictures of those who have been shipwrecked and drowned at sea.' On another voyage he encountered a storm which threw the crew of the vessel into a panic, and in their terror they told him that they had brought it on themselves by having taken him on board their ship. He pointed out to them a never of other vessels making heavy weather on the same course, and inquired whether they supposed that those ships also had a Diagoras on board. The fact really is that your character and past life make no difference whatever as regards your fortune good or bad. 3.90. " 'The gods do not take notice of everything, any more than do human rulers,' says our friend. Where is the parallel? If human rulers knowingly overlook a fault they are greatly to blame; but as for god, he cannot even offer the excuse of ignorance. And how remarkably you champion his cause, when you declare that the divine power is such that even if a person has escaped punishment by dying, the punishment is visited on his children and grandchildren and their descendants! What a remarkable instance of the divine justice! Would any state tolerate a lawgiver who should enact that a son or grandson was to be sentenced for the transgression of a father or grandfather? Where shall the Tantalids' vendetta end? What penalty for Myrtilus' murder Shall ever glut the appetite of vengeance? 3.91. Whether the Stoic philosophers were led astray by the poets, or the poets relied on the authority of the Stoics, I should find it hard to say; for both tell some monstrous and outrageous tales. For the victim lashed by the lampoons of Hipponax or the verses of Archilochus nursed a wound not inflicted by a god but received from himself; and we do not look for any heaven-sent cause when we view the licentiousness of aegisthus or of Paris, since their guilt almost cries aloud in our ears; and the bestowal of health upon many sick persons I ascribe to Hippocrates rather than to Aesculapius; and I will never allow that Sparta received the Lacedaemonian rule of life from Apollo rather than from Lycurgus. It was Critolaus, I aver, who overthrew Corinth, and Hasdrubal Carthage: those two glories of the sea‑coast were extinguished by these mortals, not by some angry god — who according to your school is entirely incapable of anger. 3.92. But at all events a god could have come to the aid of those great and splendid cities and have preserved them — for you yourselves are fond of saying that there is nothing that a god cannot accomplish, and that without any toil; as man's limbs are effortlessly moved merely by his mind and will, so, as you say, the god's power can mould and move and alter all things. Nor do you say this as some superstitious fable or old wives' tale, but you give a scientific and systematic account of it: you allege that matter, which constitutes and contains all things, is in its entirety flexible and subject to change, so that there is nothing that cannot be moulded and transmuted out of it however suddenly, but the moulder and manipulator of this universal substance is divine providence, and therefore providence, whithersoever it moves, is able to perform whatever it will. Accordingly either providence does not know its own powers, or it does not regard human affairs, or it lacks power of judgement to discern what is the best. 3.93. 'It does not care for individuals.' This is no wonder; no more does it care for cities. Not for temple? Not for tribes or nations either. And if it shall appear that it despises even nations, what wonder is it that it has scorned the entire human race? But how can you both maintain that the gods do not pay attention to everything and also believe that dreams are distributed and doled out to men by the immortal gods? I argue this with you because the belief in the truth of dreams is a tenet of your school. And do you also say that it is proper for men to take vows upon themselves? Well, but vows are made by individuals; therefore the divine mind gives a hearing even to the concerns of individuals; do you see therefore that it is not so engrossed in business as you thought? Grant that it is distracted between moving the heavens and watching the earth and controlling the seas: why does it suffer so many gods to be idle and keep holiday? why does it not appoint some of leisured gods whose countless numbers you expounded, Balbus, to superintend human affairs? "This more or less is what I have to say about the nature of the gods; it is not my design to disprove it, but to bring you to understand how obscure it is and how difficult to explain." 3.94. So saying, Cotta ended. But Lucilius said: "You have indeed made a slashing attack upon the most reverently and wisely constructed Stoic doctrine of the divine providence. But as evening is now approaching, you will assign us a day on which to make our answer to your views. For I have to fight against you on behalf of our altars and hearths, of the temples and shrines of the gods, and of the city-walls, which you as pontifes declare to be sacred and are more careful to hedge the city round with religious ceremonies than even with fortifications; and my conscience forbids me to abandon their cause so long as I yet can breathe." 3.95. "I on my side," replied Cotta, "only desire to be refuted. My purpose was rather to discuss the doctrines I have expounded than to pronounce judgement upon them, and I am confident that you can easily defeat me." "Oh, no doubt," interposed Velleius; "why, he thinks that even our dreams are sent to us by Jupiter — though dreams themselves are not so unsubstantial as a Stoic disquisition on the nature of the gods." Here the conversation ended, and we parted, Velleius thinking Cotta's discourse to be the truer, while I felt that that of Balbus approximated more nearly to a semblance of the truth.
40. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 5.10.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •contract, erinyes as agents of curses Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 137
5.10.6. τὰ δὲ ἐν τοῖς ἀετοῖς, ἔστιν ἔμπροσθεν Πέλοπος ἡ πρὸς Οἰνόμαον τῶν ἵππων ἅμιλλα ἔτι μέλλουσα καὶ τὸ ἔργον τοῦ δρόμου παρὰ ἀμφοτέρων ἐν παρασκευῇ. Διὸς δὲ ἀγάλματος κατὰ μέσον πεποιημένου μάλιστα τὸν ἀετόν, ἔστιν Οἰνόμαος ἐν δεξιᾷ τοῦ Διὸς ἐπικείμενος κράνος τῇ κεφαλῇ, παρὰ δὲ αὐτὸν γυνὴ Στερόπη, θυγατέρων καὶ αὕτη τῶν Ἄτλαντος· Μυρτίλος δέ, ὃς ἤλαυνε τῷ Οἰνομάῳ τὸ ἅρμα, κάθηται πρὸ τῶν ἵππων, οἱ δέ εἰσιν ἀριθμὸν οἱ ἵπποι τέσσαρες. μετὰ δὲ αὐτόν εἰσιν ἄνδρες δύο· ὀνόματα μέν σφισιν οὐκ ἔστι, θεραπεύειν δὲ ἄρα τοὺς ἵππους καὶ τούτοις προσετέτακτο ὑπὸ τοῦ Οἰνομάου. 5.10.6. To come to the pediments: in the front pediment there is, not yet begun, the chariot-race between Pelops and Oenomaus, and preparation for the actual race is being made by both. An image of Zeus has been carved in about the middle of the pediment; on the right of Zeus is Oenomaus with a helmet on his head, and by him Sterope his wife, who was one of the daughters of Atlas. Myrtilus too, the charioteer of Oenomaus, sits in front of the horses, which are four in number. After him are two men. They have no names, but they too must be under orders from Oenomaus to attend to the horses.
41. Andocides, Orations, 1.126  Tagged with subjects: •contract, conditional self-curse of oath Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 9
42. Epigraphy, Ig, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 8
43. Epigraphy, Syll. , 3.145.13-3.145.15, 3.921.14-3.921.15  Tagged with subjects: •contract, conditional self-curse of oath •contract, erinyes as agents of curses Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 8, 65
44. Epigraphy, Seg, 33.147  Tagged with subjects: •contract, conditional self-curse of oath Found in books: Fletcher (2012), Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama, 9