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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.


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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
change/continuity, over time, cult Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 310
continual, proper respect for gods Mikalson (2010) 63, 64, 76, 78, 79
continually, pneuma, spirit, in paul, given Engberg-Pedersen (2010) 69, 70
continuation Gazis and Hooper (2021) 14, 18
Lynskey (2021) 84, 85, 86, 89, 112, 169, 295, 332
van , t Westeinde (2021) 202
continuation, consolation writings, hope of Sorabji (2000) 237, 238, 242, 243, 248, 249, 394
continuation, model, afterlife Wolfsdorf (2020) 548, 549, 550, 551, 552, 562, 563
continuation, of biblical history luke-acts, dahl Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 123
continuation, of creation, kingdom of god, as McDonough (2009) 224, 225
continuations, conventions or themes Crabb (2020) 39, 64, 130
continued, incarnation Lynskey (2021) 71, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 92, 97, 111, 112, 118, 138, 139, 169, 244, 286, 304, 306
continued, song-culture, tragedy, as Kowalzig (2007) 392, 393, 395
continues, eusebius’ canons, jerome, translates and O, Daly (2020) 212, 213, 295, 296
continuing, conversion Lynskey (2021) 169
continuing, to live in judaea, netinim, as Cohen (2010) 96, 97
continuing, to live when divided, body, as Carter (2019) 213, 217
continuities, in the evolution of elite, changes and Gygax (2016) 143, 144
continuities, with, soteria, in greek antiquity, christian uses Jim (2022) 221, 222, 227, 231, 233, 238
continuity Despotis and Lohr (2022) 135, 187, 260, 287, 354
Lynskey (2021) 71, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 106, 107, 187, 191, 256, 279, 299, 301, 302, 308, 312, 313, 316
Motta and Petrucci (2022) 25, 26, 117, 202
continuity, and change Walter (2020) 25, 26, 27, 28, 33, 101, 102, 138, 142
continuity, and change, ab urbe condita, livy Walter (2020) 138, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146
continuity, between late hellenistic and imperial texts Konig and Wiater (2022) 23, 263, 316
König and Wiater (2022) 23, 263, 316
continuity, between thucydides’ style and subject matter, dionysius of halicarnassus, on Joho (2022) 12, 13, 14, 15
continuity, body, principle of Mcglothlin (2018) 126, 127, 128, 174, 175, 209, 255, 256
continuity, change, of theodicy Versnel (2011) 156, 198, 207
continuity, cult Rupke (2016) 97
continuity, elite Tacoma (2020) 89, 254
continuity, from pharisees, qumran texts Hayes (2022) 65, 68, 85
continuity, in language, language, change and Walter (2020) 101, 102
continuity, incubation, christian, origins and development, and question of Renberg (2017) 753, 754, 755, 756, 793
continuity, myth/mythology, change and Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 31, 200, 206
continuity, of action Jouanna (2018) 253, 254
continuity, of behaviour Bexley (2022) 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 61, 62, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 163, 164, 165
continuity, of being-life-intellect d, Hoine and Martijn (2017) 128
continuity, of causation/cause d, Hoine and Martijn (2017) 51, 52, 54, 57, 66, 68, 84, 100
continuity, of education Keeline (2018) 164
continuity, of narrative, landscape alteration Konig and Wiater (2022) 141
König and Wiater (2022) 141
continuity, of ritual Stavrianopoulou (2006) 269, 287
continuity, perfect, jewish-christian Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022) 497
continuity, resurrection, principle of Mcglothlin (2018) 4, 5, 15, 21, 22, 100, 101, 126, 127, 128, 158, 174, 175, 209, 255, 256
continuity, ritual, exploiting its perceived Kowalzig (2007) 82, 110, 117, 118
continuity, song-culture, of esp. at athens Kowalzig (2007) 5, 395
continuity, thematic Fishbane (2003) 14, 20, 21, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 95, 96, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 203, 204, 214, 219, 273, 305, 310, 311, 312, 347, 352, 393
continuity, to a broken giving history, travelling Kowalzig (2007) 24, 269, 270, 271
continuity, to a broken giving history, unifying localities Kowalzig (2007) 149, 150, 151, 152, 153
continuity, to a broken giving history, working in overarching frameworks Kowalzig (2007) 399
continuity, to a broken history, giving Kowalzig (2007) 26, 132, 260, 261, 262, 267, 268, 296, 297, 305, 316
continuity, with day, night Balberg (2017) 216, 217, 218
continuous, procession, prohodos, πρόοδος‎ d, Hoine and Martijn (2017) 73, 94
continuous, prose style Martin and Whitlark (2018) 201, 202, 206, 207, 209, 210
continuous, providence, creation, in genesis, “one off, ” vs. Hoenig (2018) 133, 134
continuous, quantity, posotês, discrete vs. ποσότης‎ d, Hoine and Martijn (2017) 174, 311
continuous, reading Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022) 65, 440, 442, 450
continuous, with moral order, nature, φύσις Joho (2022) 116, 117, 119, 120

List of validated texts:
9 validated results for "continued"
1. Hebrew Bible, Habakkuk, 3.15 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Esther Rabbah I, continuity of past and present in • Lamentations Rabbah, continuity of past and present in • Rabbinic literature, continuity of past and present in • Ruth Rabbah, continuity of past and present in • Song of Songs Rabbah, continuity of past and present in • Thematic Continuity • past and present, continuity of, in Rabbinic Literature • time, continuity of past and presentin Rabbinic Literature

 Found in books: Fishbane (2003) 91; Neusner (2004) 109


3.15. דָּרַכְתָּ בַיָּם סוּסֶיךָ חֹמֶר מַיִם רַבִּים׃''. None
3.15. Thou hast trodden the sea with Thy horses, the foaming of mighty waters.''. None
2. Homeric Hymns, To Demeter, 480-482 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Ritual, continuity of • afterlife, continuation model

 Found in books: Stavrianopoulou (2006) 269; Wolfsdorf (2020) 549


480. Also there were gathering blooms with me'481. Rhodope, Plouto, Calypso the Fair, 482. Styx, also, and Urania were there, '. None
3. None, None, nan (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • continued incarnation • reading, continuous

 Found in books: Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022) 450; Lynskey (2021) 111


4. Hebrew Bible, Ezekiel, 28.12-28.13 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Thematic Continuity • continued incarnation

 Found in books: Fishbane (2003) 87; Lynskey (2021) 306


28.12. בֶּן־אָדָם שָׂא קִינָה עַל־מֶלֶךְ צוֹר וְאָמַרְתָּ לּוֹ כֹּה אָמַר אֲדֹנָי יְהוִה אַתָּה חוֹתֵם תָּכְנִית מָלֵא חָכְמָה וּכְלִיל יֹפִי׃ 28.13. בְּעֵדֶן גַּן־אֱלֹהִים הָיִיתָ כָּל־אֶבֶן יְקָרָה מְסֻכָתֶךָ אֹדֶם פִּטְדָה וְיָהֲלֹם תַּרְשִׁישׁ שֹׁהַם וְיָשְׁפֵה סַפִּיר נֹפֶךְ וּבָרְקַת וְזָהָב מְלֶאכֶת תֻּפֶּיךָ וּנְקָבֶיךָ בָּךְ בְּיוֹם הִבָּרַאֲךָ כּוֹנָנוּ׃''. None
28.12. ’Son of man, take up a lamentation for the king of Tyre, and say unto him: Thus saith the Lord GOD: Thou seal most accurate, full of wisdom, and perfect in beauty, 28.13. thou wast in Eden the garden of God; every precious stone was thy covering, the carnelian, the topaz, and the emerald, the beryl, the onyx, and the jasper, the sapphire, the carbuncle, and the smaragd, and gold; the workmanship of thy settings and of thy sockets was in thee, in the day that thou wast created they were prepared.''. None
5. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Thematic Continuity • conventions or themes, continuations

 Found in books: Crabb (2020) 39; Fishbane (2003) 85, 86


6. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 11.2.4, 11.3.6, 11.5.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • landscape alteration, continuity of narrative

 Found in books: Konig and Wiater (2022) 141; König and Wiater (2022) 141


11.2.4. \xa0Then, dividing his army, he sent in advance a sufficient number of men both to bridge the Hellespont and to dig a canal through Athos at the neck of the Cherronesus, in this way not only making the passage safe and short for his forces but also hoping by the magnitude of his exploits to strike the Greeks with terror before his arrival. Now the men who had been sent to make ready these works completed them with dispatch, because so many labourers coâ\x80\x91operated in the task.
11.3.6. 1. \xa0And now it will be useful to distinguish those Greeks who chose the side of the barbarians, in order that, incurring our censure here, their example may, by the obloquy visited upon them, deter for the future any who may become traitors to the common freedom.,2. \xa0The Aenianians, Dolopians, Melians, Perrhaebians, and Magnetans took the side of the barbarians even while the defending force was still at Tempê, and after its departure the Achaeans of Phthia, Locrians, Thessalians, and the majority of the Boeotians went over to the barbarians.,3. \xa0But the Greeks who were meeting in congress at the Isthmus voted to make the Greeks who voluntarily chose the cause of the Persians pay a tithe to the gods, when they should be successful in the war, and to send ambassadors to those Greeks who were neutral to urge them to join in the struggle for the common freedom.,4. \xa0of the latter, some joined the alliance without reservation, while others postponed any decision for a considerable time, clinging to their own safety alone and anxiously waiting for the outcome of the war; the Argives, however, sending ambassadors to the common congress, promised to join the alliance if the congress would give them a share in the command.,5. \xa0To them the representatives declared plainly that, if they thought it a more terrible thing to have a Greek as general than a barbarian as master, they would do well to remain neutral, but if they were ambitious to secure the leadership of the Greeks, they should, it was stated, first have accomplished deeds deserving of this leadership and then strive for such an honour. After these events, when the ambassadors sent by Xerxes came to Greece and demanded both earth and water, all the states manifested in their replies the zeal they felt for the command freedom. \xa0When Xerxes learned that the Hellespont had been bridged and the canal had been dug through Athos, he left Sardis and made his way toward the Hellespont; and when he had arrived at Abydus, he led his army over the bridge into Europe. And as he advanced through Thrace, he added to his forces many soldiers from both the Thracians and neighbouring Greeks.,7. \xa0When he arrived at the city called Doriscus, he ordered his fleet to come there, and so both arms of his forces were gathered into one place. And he held there also the enumeration of the entire army, and the number of his land forces was over eight hundred thousand men, while the sum total of his ships of war excelled twelve hundred, of which three hundred and twenty were Greek, the Greeks providing the complement of men and the king supplying the vessels. All the remaining ships were listed as barbarian; and of these the Egyptians supplied two hundred, the Phoenicians three hundred, the Cilicians eighty, the Pamphylians forty, the Lycians the same number, also the Carians eighty, and the Cyprians one\xa0hundred and fifty.,8. \xa0of the Greeks the Dorians who dwelt off Caria, together with the Rhodians and Coans, sent forty ships, the Ionians, together with the Chians and Samians, one\xa0hundred, the Aeolians, together with the Lesbians and Tenedans, forty, the peoples of the region of the Hellespont, together with those who dwelt along the shores of the Pontus, eighty, and the inhabitants of the islands fifty; for the king had won over to his side the islands lying within the Cyanean Rocks and Triopium and Sunium.,9. \xa0Triremes made up the multitude we have listed, and the transports for the cavalry numbered eight hundred and fifty, and the triaconters three thousand. Xerxes, then, was busied with the enumeration of the armaments at Doriscus.
11.5.1. \xa0Xerxes, after having enumerated his armaments, pushed on with the entire army, and the whole fleet accompanied the land forces in their advance as far as the city of Acanthus, and from there the ships passed through the place where the canal had been cut into the other sea expeditiously and without loss.''. None
7. New Testament, Romans, 5.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • pneuma (spirit) in Paul, given continually • soteria (in Greek antiquity), Christian uses, continuities with

 Found in books: Engberg-Pedersen (2010) 70; Jim (2022) 222


5.9. πολλῷ οὖν μᾶλλον δικαιωθέντες νῦν ἐν τῷ αἵματι αὐτοῦ σωθησόμεθα διʼ αὐτοῦ ἀπὸ τῆς ὀργῆς.''. None
5.9. Much more then, being now justified by his blood, we will be saved from God's wrath through him. "". None
8. Plutarch, Fabius, 2.4-2.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • continuity between late Hellenistic and imperial texts

 Found in books: Konig and Wiater (2022) 263; König and Wiater (2022) 263


2.4. τὸν μὲν ὕπατον Γάιον Φλαμίνιον οὐδὲν ἤμβλυνε τούτων, ἄνδρα πρὸς τῷ φύσει θυμοειδεῖ καὶ φιλοτίμῳ μεγάλαις ἐπαιρόμενον εὐτυχίαις, ἃς πρόσθεν εὐτύχησε παραλόγως, τῆς τε βουλῆς ἀπᾳδούσης ἀπᾳδούσης with CS: ἀποκαλούσης . καὶ τοῦ συνάρχοντος ἐνισταμένου βίᾳ συμβαλὼν τοῖς Γαλάταις καὶ κρατήσας, Φάβιον δὲ τὰ μὲν σημεῖα, καίπερ ἁπτόμενα πολλῶν, ἧττον ὑπέθραττε διὰ τὴν ἀλογίαν· 2.5. τὴν δʼ ὀλιγότητα τῶν πολεμίων καὶ τὴν ἀχρηματίαν πυνθανόμενος καρτερεῖν παρεκάλει τοὺς Ῥωμαίους καὶ μὴ μάχεσθαι πρὸς ἄνθρωπον ἐπʼ αὐτῷ τούτῳ διὰ πολλῶν ἀγώνων ἠσκημένῃ στρατιᾷ χρώμενον, ἀλλὰ τοῖς συμμάχοις ἐπιπέμποντας βοηθείας καὶ τὰς πόλεις διὰ χειρὸς ἔχοντας αὐτὴν ἐᾶν περὶ αὑτῇ μαραίνεσθαι τὴν ἀκμὴν τοῦ Ἀννίβου, καθάπερ φλόγα λάμψασαν ἀπὸ μικρᾶς καὶ κούφης δυνάμεως.' '. None
2.4. The consul, Gaius Flaminius, was daunted by none of these things, for he was a man of a fiery and ambitious nature, and besides, he was elated by great successes which he had won before this, in a manner contrary to all expectation. He had, namely, although the senate dissented from his plan, and his colleague violently opposed it, joined battle with the Gauls and defeated them. Fabius also was less disturbed by the signs and portents, because he thought it would be absurd, although they had great effect upon many.
2.4. The consul, Gaius Flaminius, was daunted by none of these things, for he was a man of a fiery and ambitious nature, and besides, he was elated by great successes which he had won before this, in a manner contrary to all expectation. He had, namely, although the senate dissented from his plan, and his colleague violently opposed it, joined battle with the Gauls and defeated them. Fabius also was less disturbed by the signs and portents, because he thought it would be absurd, although they had great effect upon many. 2.5. But when he learned how few in number the enemy were, and how great was their lack of resources, he exhorted the Romans to bide their time, and not to give battle to a man who wielded an army trained by many contests for this very issue, but to send aid to their allies, to keep their subject cities well in hand, and to suffer the culminating vigour of Hannibal to sink and expire of itself, like a flame that flares up from scant and slight material.' '. None
9. Plutarch, Pericles, 18.1, 22.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • continuity between late Hellenistic and imperial texts

 Found in books: Konig and Wiater (2022) 263; König and Wiater (2022) 263


18.1. ἐν δὲ ταῖς στρατηγίαις εὐδοκίμει μάλιστα διὰ τὴν ἀσφάλειαν, οὔτε μάχης ἐχούσης πολλὴν ἀδηλότητα καὶ κίνδυνον ἑκουσίως ἁπτόμενος, οὔτε τοὺς ἐκ τοῦ παραβάλλεσθαι χρησαμένους τύχῃ λαμπρᾷ καὶ θαυμασθέντας ὡς μεγάλους ζηλῶν καὶ μιμούμενος στρατηγούς, ἀεί τε λέγων πρὸς τοὺς πολίτας ὡς ὅσον ἐπʼ αὐτῷ μενοῦσιν ἀθάνατοι πάντα τὸν χρόνον.
22.1. ὅτι δʼ ὀρθῶς ἐν τῇ Ἑλλάδι τὴν δύναμιν τῶν Ἀθηναίων συνεῖχεν, ἐμαρτύρησεν αὐτῷ τὰ γενόμενα. πρῶτον μὲν γὰρ Εὐβοεῖς ἀπέστησαν, ἐφʼ οὓς διέβη μετὰ δυνάμεως. εἶτʼ εὐθὺς ἀπηγγέλλοντο Μεγαρεῖς ἐκπεπολεμωμένοι καὶ στρατιὰ πολεμίων ἐπὶ τοῖς ὅροις τῆς Ἀττικῆς οὖσα, Πλειστώνακτος ἡγουμένου, βασιλέως Λακεδαιμονίων.''. None
18.1. In his capacity as general, he was famous above all things for his saving caution; he neither undertook of his own accord a battle involving much uncertainty and peril, nor did he envy and imitate those who took great risks, enjoyed brilliant good-fortune, and so were admired as great generals; and he was for ever saying to his fellow-citizens that, so far as lay in his power, they would remain alive forever and be immortals.
22.1. That he was right in seeking to confine the power of the Athenians within lesser Greece, was amply proved by what came to pass. To begin with, the Euboeans revolted, 446. B.C. and he crossed over to the island with a hostile force. Then straightway word was brought to him that the Megarians had gone over to the enemy, and that an army of the enemy was on the confines of Attica under the leadership of Pleistoanax, the king of the Lacedaemonians.''. None



Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.