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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.


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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
connected, to canonization of cicero, decline of eloquence, as Keeline (2018), The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy, 92
connected, to census, temple Udoh (2006), To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E, 89
connected, to deity, dice oracles, combination and/or sum as Johnston and Struck (2005), Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination, 59, 63, 65, 73
connected, to reincarnation, animals Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 43, 45, 263
connected, to supernatural world, sounds Janowitz (2002b), Icons of Power: Ritual Practices in Late Antiquity, 41
connected, to the body, sin not Rosen-Zvi (2011), Demonic Desires: Yetzer Hara and the Problem of Evil in Late Antiquity. 61
connected, to, sophistry, heresy Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 31, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148, 154, 155, 172, 282, 283, 286, 287, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 295, 296, 349, 409, 410, 411, 412, 460, 461, 586, 587
connected, with disease, religious prohibition Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 58, 59
connected, with divinity, night/nighttime Ker and Wessels (2020), The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn, 31
connected, with fire, water, baptism of Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 288
connected, with lower classes, asses Fletcher (2023), The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature, 68, 69, 175
connected, with present, past Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 35, 41, 44, 57, 109, 110
connected, with refraining from leaven, matzah Alexander (2013), Gender and Timebound Commandments in Judaism. 126, 127
connected, with water, fire Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 119
connected, with, zelophehad, daughters of problems Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 397, 398
connecting, hand on chin Boeghold (2022), When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature. 18, 19
connecting, in modern greece Boeghold (2022), When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature. 19
connecting, mark to, rome Peppard (2011), The Son of God in the Roman World: Divine Sonship in its Social and Political Context, 87, 88, 89, 90
connecting, to jericho, en gedi, fortresses Taylor (2012), The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea, 220, 221, 240, 342
connection Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 70, 75, 84, 85, 86, 89, 92, 93, 94, 102, 103, 104, 111, 113, 114, 120, 122, 126, 134, 141, 143, 156, 177, 178, 184, 188, 190, 198, 200, 202, 211, 218, 229, 230, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 243, 245, 246, 248, 250, 267, 277, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 289, 292, 294, 299, 300, 302, 303, 304, 305, 312, 313, 323, 327, 334
connection, between deeds and consequences Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 126, 131
connection, between episodes, martyrologies Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 318
connection, between self and senses, romanos the melodist, on Brakke, Satlow, Weitzman (2005), Religion and the Self in Antiquity. 167
connection, between, pastoralism, sea and pasture Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 51
connection, between, sea and seafarers, pasture and sea Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 51
connection, gamaliel of yavneh as evidence of pharisaic-rabbinic Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 54
connection, idumea, of with arabia Udoh (2006), To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E, 173, 174
connection, importance of succession, imperial, blood Hug (2023), Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome, 232, 237
connection, in early christian literature, pharisaic-rabbinic Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 68, 69, 70
connection, john hyrcanus story as evidence of pharisaic-rabbinic Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 54
connection, new testament evidence supporting, pharisaic-rabbinic Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 54
connection, of distant times and places by greek writers, ethnographies/ethnographers Bosak-Schroeder (2020), Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography, 194
connection, of testament of levi and jubilees to, qumran Udoh (2006), To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E, 254
connection, of with dew, roses, possible Fletcher (2023), The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature, 78, 79, 81, 90, 143, 147, 154, 155
connection, of with gold, roses Fletcher (2023), The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature, 63
connection, of with isis, roses Fletcher (2023), The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature, 98
connection, of with rome, amalek Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 793, 794
connection, pharisaic-rabbinic Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 54, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60
connection, to 2 macc., letter, first, 2 macc. Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 525, 526, 527, 528, 529
connection, to cholos, time Braund and Most (2004), Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen, 27
connection, to grief, pity Mermelstein (2021), Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation, 140, 141, 142
connection, to human realm, divine/god Fishbane (2003), Biblical Myth and Rabbinic Mythmaking, 14, 15, 48, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 132, 133, 134, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 297, 298, 299
connection, to humility, sevara Hirshman (2009), The Stabilization of Rabbinic Culture, 100 C, 119
connection, to morality, resurrection Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 15, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 53, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 136, 146, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 208, 209, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218
connection, to opening letters, hanukkah narrative Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 8, 143, 372, 526, 528
connection, to pharisees, tannaim, view of Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 56
connection, to pythagoreanism, aristoxenus Huffman (2019), A History of Pythagoreanism, 10
connection, to reason and god, law of nature Martens (2003), One God, One Law: Philo of Alexandria on the Mosaic and Greco-Roman Law, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 84
connection, to sin body Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 121, 214, 215, 216, 217, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 237, 238, 239
connection, to the ptolemaic rulers, sarapis Stavrianopoulou (2013), Shifting Social Imaginaries in the Hellenistic Period: Narrations, Practices and Images, 11, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126
connection, to yosef, rav, persians, in the babylonian talmud Mokhtarian (2021), Rabbis, Sorcerers, Kings, and Priests: The Culture of the Talmud in Ancient Iran. 43, 44, 51, 52, 79
connection, to, apollo, flowing water Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 179
connection, to, artemis, flowing water Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 179
connection, to, artemis, theater and tragedy Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 185, 186, 187
connection, to, authority, auctoritas/axiōma, transcendent Masterson (2016), Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood. 38, 50, 86, 87, 88, 90, 108, 109, 111, 127, 139, 141, 143, 144, 147, 149, 154, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167
connection, to, donatists, tyconius’s literary Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 303, 304, 305, 306
connection, to, transcendent, the, manhood having Masterson (2016), Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood. 38, 41, 42, 43, 90, 108, 109
connection, w. the great persecution, porphyry, life and background Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 32, 241
connection, with a meal, meals, sacrifices in Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 39, 179
connection, with agriculture, saturn Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 185
connection, with anger, honor Braund and Most (2004), Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen, 27, 35, 41
connection, with chaldaean theology, antioch Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 235
connection, with demotion of gamaliel vi of stephen, st. Kraemer (2020), The Mediterranean Diaspora in Late Antiquity: What Christianity Cost the Jews, 237
connection, with heresy, eristic Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 136, 137, 142, 143, 145, 146, 287, 288, 293, 294, 403, 404, 405, 407, 408, 411, 412, 434, 435, 436, 437
connection, with idolatry, usurpation Lunn-Rockliffe (2007), The Letter of Mara bar Sarapion in Context, 165
connection, with palace fire, lactantius Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 44
connection, with prophecy and preaching, spirit Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 308
connection, with sacrifices, meals, in Stavrianopoulou (2006), Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World, 80, 83, 109, 159, 187
connection, with sacrifices, meals, ritual meals in Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 35, 36, 47, 123, 137, 140, 148, 149, 180, 185, 197, 295, 298, 313, 316, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324
connection, with the earth, descent and lineage, its Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133
connection, with the gods, hipponion tablet, of 474 McClay (2023), The Bacchic Gold Tablets and Poetic Tradition: Memory and Performance. 139
connection, with the great persecution, apollonius of tyana Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 25, 44
connection, with the pharisees, perushim, having no Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 56
connection, with theodoret de Ste. Croix et al. (2006), Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy, 291
connection, σύστασις Schibli (2002), Hierocles of Alexandria, 285, 287
connection, ἀκολουθία James (2021), Learning the Language of Scripture: Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation, 64, 147
connections, among, tamid psalms Trudinger (2004), The Psalms of the Tamid Service: A Liturgical Text from the Second Temple, 166, 167, 168
connections, between eusebius and clement, fragments of hellenistic jewish authors Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 287, 288, 289
connections, between god and cosmos McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 6, 48, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133
connections, between the novel, drama Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013), Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel, 240
connections, between, dead sea scrolls Taylor (2012), The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea, 273, 280, 284, 342
connections, between, epigraphic agents Wilding (2022), Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos, 114, 115, 116, 117, 167, 168
connections, cicero, m. tullius cicero, on marriage Hug (2023), Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome, 91
connections, dead sea scrolls, dead sea scrolls and essene Taylor (2012), The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea, 273, 301, 302
connections, greek-persian, genealogical Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 19, 37, 38
connections, in l material, aesopic Strong (2021), The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke: A New Foundation for the Study of Parables 248, 249, 250, 251, 252
connections, in tales of founding of rome, genealogical Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249
connections, of vedius antoninus iii, p., vedius iii, m. cl. p. vedius phaedrus sabinianus, ‘bauherr’, senatorial Kalinowski (2021), Memory, Family, and Community in Roman Ephesos, 71, 72
connections, of with revolt of the maccabees, revolts, of jews against rome Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 319
connections, to ahasuerus/artaxerxes, persian gaius, roman emperor, literary king Edwards (2023), In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus, 139, 140, 141, 142, 146, 150, 151
connections, to esther, jewish agrippa i, jewish king, literary queen Edwards (2023), In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157
connections, to haman, apion, literary Edwards (2023), In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus, 145, 147, 148
connections, to joseph, genesis agrippa i, jewish king, literary patriarch Edwards (2023), In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129
connections, to joseph, genesis hyrcanus, tobiad, literary patriarch Edwards (2023), In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus, 88, 89, 90, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 103, 104, 105
connections, to joseph, genesis literary patriarch Edwards (2023), In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus, 67, 68, 69, 71, 72, 73, 74, 80, 81, 82, 94, 95
connections, to nebuchadnezzar, gaius, roman emperor, literary Edwards (2023), In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus, 141
connections, to, diaspora, rabbinic Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 47
connections, with ambrosiaster, jerome Lunn-Rockliffe (2007), The Letter of Mara bar Sarapion in Context, 14, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25
connections, with east, rabbis, babylonian Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 9, 28, 53, 75, 80, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 122, 126, 147, 164, 167, 169, 172, 176, 177, 185, 186, 187, 188, 192, 198, 199, 200, 205, 231
connections, with foreign wars Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 23
connections, with foreign wars, marcus aurelius’s view of Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 83, 89, 91, 102, 128
connections, with foreign wars, plebs, people and Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 84
connections, with foreign wars, polemos/oi emphylios/oi Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 23
connections, with foreign wars, stasis/eis Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 23, 54
connections, with foreign wars, thucydides and Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 64, 73, 74
connections, with mesopotamian christians, rabbis, babylonian Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 9, 52, 53, 80, 91, 92, 93, 94
connections, with, minim, social Schremer (2010), Brothers Estranged: Heresy, Christianity and Jewish Identity in Late Antiquity, 73, 204, 226
connections, with, pertinax, roman emperor, antonine dynasty Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 109
connections, within McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 86, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131
connections, within cosmos McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 86, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131
connections, within in greek thought McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 97, 98, 99, 100, 102, 103, 104, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 114, 115, 116, 117, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 174
connectives, language and style, book of judith, particles and Gera (2014), Judith, 80, 88, 89, 92, 121, 149, 157, 158, 197, 215, 218, 224, 239, 240, 243, 280, 282, 314, 354, 363, 380, 387, 388, 425, 431, 436, 453, 454, 462
connectivity Castelli and Sluiter 92023), Agents of Change in the Greco-Roman and Early Modern Periods: Ten Case Studies in Agency in Innovation. 78
Clackson et al. (2020), Migration, Mobility and Language Contact in and around the Ancient Mediterranean, 53, 81, 103
Hallmannsecker (2022), Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor, 206, 214
Maier and Waldner (2022), Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time, 160
Williamson (2021), Urban Rituals in Sacred Landscapes in Hellenistic Asia Minor, 69, 418
van 't Westeinde (2021), Roman Nobilitas in Jerome's Letters: Roman Values and Christian Asceticism for Socialites, 112
connectivity, aeschylus, operating as network Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 24
connectivity, inscriptions, social ties and Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 107
connectivity, memories, kept alive or evoked in ritual, of Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 98, 124, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 300, 308
connectivity, of in myth and cult, rhodes Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 253, 254
connectivity, of oropos, geographical Wilding (2022), Reinventing the Amphiareion at Oropos, 25, 26, 27, 152
connectivity, piedmont, and elite Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 130
connects, first movements with bad origen, church father, thoughts, thus blurring distinction from emotion Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 343, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351, 359, 382
connects, pre-passion with bad thoughts, jerome, st, church father Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 346, 348, 354
jericho, connection, to en gedi Taylor (2012), The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea, 220, 221, 240, 304, 342

List of validated texts:
28 validated results for "connects"
1. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 1.9, 17.16 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Amalek, connection of with Rome • connection • language and style, Book of Judith, particles and connectives

 Found in books: Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 793; Gera (2014), Judith, 240, 431; Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 248

sup>
1.9 וַיֹּאמֶר אֶל־עַמּוֹ הִנֵּה עַם בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל רַב וְעָצוּם מִמֶּנּוּ׃
17.16
וַיֹּאמֶר כִּי־יָד עַל־כֵּס יָהּ מִלְחָמָה לַיהוָה בַּעֲמָלֵק מִדֹּר דֹּר׃'' None
sup>
1.9 And he said unto his people: ‘Behold, the people of the children of Israel are too many and too mighty for us;
17.16
And he said: ‘The hand upon the throne of the LORD: the LORD will have war with Amalek from generation to generation.’'' None
2. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 33.16-33.18, 91.15, 110.1 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Connections within • Connections, Within cosmos • Divine/God,, Connection to Human Realm • Tamid Psalms, connections among • connection • language and style, Book of Judith, particles and connectives • psalmody, fourth-century connection with Eucharist

 Found in books: Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 788; Fishbane (2003), Biblical Myth and Rabbinic Mythmaking, 75, 76, 148, 150, 151, 152, 153, 165; Gera (2014), Judith, 314; Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 75, 94; McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 86; Trudinger (2004), The Psalms of the Tamid Service: A Liturgical Text from the Second Temple, 166, 167, 168

sup>
33.16 אֵין־הַמֶּלֶךְ נוֹשָׁע בְּרָב־חָיִל גִּבּוֹר לֹא־יִנָּצֵל בְּרָב־כֹּחַ׃ 33.17 שֶׁקֶר הַסּוּס לִתְשׁוּעָה וּבְרֹב חֵילוֹ לֹא יְמַלֵּט׃ 33.18 הִנֵּה עֵין יְהוָה אֶל־יְרֵאָיו לַמְיַחֲלִים לְחַסְדּוֹ׃
91.15
יִקְרָאֵנִי וְאֶעֱנֵהוּ עִמּוֹ־אָנֹכִי בְצָרָה אֲחַלְּצֵהוּ וַאֲכַבְּדֵהוּ׃
110.1
לְדָוִד מִזְמוֹר נְאֻם יְהוָה לַאדֹנִי שֵׁב לִימִינִי עַד־אָשִׁית אֹיְבֶיךָ הֲדֹם לְרַגְלֶיךָ׃' ' None
sup>
33.16 A king is not saved by the multitude of a host; A mighty man is not delivered by great strength. 33.17 A horse is a vain thing for safety; Neither doth it afford escape by its great strength. 33.18 Behold, the eye of the LORD is toward them that fear Him, Toward them that wait for His mercy;
91.15
He shall call upon Me, and I will answer him; I will be with him in trouble; I will rescue him, and bring him to honour.' "
110.1
A Psalm of David. The LORD saith unto my lord: ‘Sit thou at My right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool.'" ' None
3. None, None, nan (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Hyrcanus (Tobiad), literary connections to Joseph (Genesis patriarch) • language and style, Book of Judith, particles and connectives

 Found in books: Edwards (2023), In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus, 101; Gera (2014), Judith, 388

4. Hebrew Bible, 1 Kings, 5.9 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Yosef, Rav, connection to Persians, in the Babylonian Talmud • language and style, Book of Judith, particles and connectives

 Found in books: Gera (2014), Judith, 149; Mokhtarian (2021), Rabbis, Sorcerers, Kings, and Priests: The Culture of the Talmud in Ancient Iran. 51

sup>
5.9 וַיִּתֵּן אֱלֹהִים חָכְמָה לִשְׁלֹמֹה וּתְבוּנָה הַרְבֵּה מְאֹד וְרֹחַב לֵב כַּחוֹל אֲשֶׁר עַל־שְׂפַת הַיָּם׃'' None
sup>
5.9 And God gave Solomon wisdom and understanding exceeding much, and largeness of heart, even as the sand that is on the sea-shore.'' None
5. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 14.14, 14.20-14.21, 29.13 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Divine/God,, Connection to Human Realm • Sophistry, heresy connected to • connection

 Found in books: Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 461; Fishbane (2003), Biblical Myth and Rabbinic Mythmaking, 74, 75; Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 102, 156, 327

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14.14 אֶעֱלֶה עַל־בָּמֳתֵי עָב אֶדַּמֶּה לְעֶלְיוֹן׃' '14.21 הָכִינוּ לְבָנָיו מַטְבֵּחַ בַּעֲוֺן אֲבוֹתָם בַּל־יָקֻמוּ וְיָרְשׁוּ אָרֶץ וּמָלְאוּ פְנֵי־תֵבֵל עָרִים׃
29.13
וַיֹּאמֶר אֲדֹנָי יַעַן כִּי נִגַּשׁ הָעָם הַזֶּה בְּפִיו וּבִשְׂפָתָיו כִּבְּדוּנִי וְלִבּוֹ רִחַק מִמֶּנִּי וַתְּהִי יִרְאָתָם אֹתִי מִצְוַת אֲנָשִׁים מְלֻמָּדָה׃'' None
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14.14 I will ascend above the heights of the clouds; I will be like the Most High.’
14.20
Thou shalt not be joined with them in burial, because thou hast destroyed thy land, Thou hast slain thy people; the seed of evil-doers shall not be named for ever. 14.21 Prepare ye slaughter for his children For the iniquity of their fathers; That they rise not up, and possess the earth, And fill the face of the world with cities.
29.13
And the Lord said: Forasmuch as this people draw near, and with their mouth and with their lips do honour Me, But have removed their heart far from Me, And their fear of Me is a commandment of men learned by rote;'' None
6. Hesiod, Works And Days, 238, 240 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Connections within, In Greek thought • religious prohibition, connected with disease

 Found in books: Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 58, 59; McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 57

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238 οἷς δʼ ὕβρις τε μέμηλε κακὴ καὶ σχέτλια ἔργα,240 πολλάκι καὶ ξύμπασα πόλις κακοῦ ἀνδρὸς ἀπηύρα, ' None
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238 Woe to the wicked men who ousted her.240 However, when to both the foreigner ' None
7. Hesiod, Theogony, 503-506 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Connections within, In Greek thought • connection(s)

 Found in books: Beck (2021), Repetition, Communication, and Meaning in the Ancient World, 207; McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 57

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503 οἳ οἱ ἀπεμνήσαντο χάριν ἐυεργεσιάων,'504 δῶκαν δὲ βροντὴν ἠδʼ αἰθαλόεντα κεραυνὸν 505 καὶ στεροπήν· τὸ πρὶν δὲ πελώρη Γαῖα κεκεύθει· 506 τοῖς πίσυνος θνητοῖσι καὶ ἀθανάτοισιν ἀνάσσει. ' None
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503 With Hermes, too, she helps increase men’s stocks –'504 Their droves of cows and goats and fleecy flocks. 505 of few she’ll cause increase; of many, though 506 She’ll cause a dearth if she should will it so. ' None
8. Homer, Iliad, 3.103-3.104 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Meals, in connection with sacrifices • language and style, Book of Judith, particles and connectives

 Found in books: Gera (2014), Judith, 431; Stavrianopoulou (2006), Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World, 187

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3.103 οἴσετε ἄρνʼ, ἕτερον λευκόν, ἑτέρην δὲ μέλαιναν, 3.104 Γῇ τε καὶ Ἠελίῳ· Διὶ δʼ ἡμεῖς οἴσομεν ἄλλον·'' None
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3.103 because of my quarrel and Alexander's beginning thereof. And for whichsoever of us twain death and fate are appointed, let him lie dead; but be ye others parted with all speed. Bring ye two lambs, a white ram and a black ewe, for Earth and Sun, and for Zeus we will bring another; " "3.104 because of my quarrel and Alexander's beginning thereof. And for whichsoever of us twain death and fate are appointed, let him lie dead; but be ye others parted with all speed. Bring ye two lambs, a white ram and a black ewe, for Earth and Sun, and for Zeus we will bring another; "" None
9. Herodotus, Histories, 3.131, 5.67 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Agrippa I (Jewish king), literary connections to Joseph (Genesis patriarch) • Meals, ritual meals in connection with sacrifices • memories, kept alive or evoked in ritual, of connectivity

 Found in books: Edwards (2023), In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus, 124; Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 197; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 152, 153

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3.131 ὁ δὲ Δημοκήδης οὗτος ὧδε ἐκ Κρότωνος ἀπιγμένος Πολυκράτεϊ ὡμίλησε· πατρὶ συνείχετο ἐν τῇ Κρότωνι ὀργὴν χαλεπῷ· τοῦτον ἐπείτε οὐκ ἐδύνατο φέρειν, ἀπολιπὼν οἴχετο ἐς Αἴγιναν. καταστὰς δὲ ἐς ταύτην πρώτῳ ἔτεϊ ὑπερεβάλετο τοὺς ἄλλους ἰητρούς, ἀσκευής περ ἐὼν καὶ ἔχων οὐδὲν τῶν ὅσα περὶ τὴν τέχνην ἐστὶ ἐργαλήια. καί μιν δευτέρῳ ἔτεϊ ταλάντου Αἰγινῆται δημοσίῃ μισθοῦνται, τρίτῳ δὲ ἔτεϊ Ἀθηναῖοι ἑκατὸν μνέων, τετάρτῳ δὲ ἔτεϊ Πολυκράτης δυῶν ταλάντων. οὕτω μὲν ἀπίκετο ἐς τὴν Σάμον, καὶ ἀπὸ τούτου τοῦ ἀνδρὸς οὐκ ἥκιστα Κροτωνιῆται ἰητροὶ εὐδοκίμησαν. ἐγένετο γὰρ ὦν τοῦτο ὅτε πρῶτοι μὲν Κροτωνιῆται ἰητροὶ ἐλέγοντο ἀνὰ τὴν Ἑλλάδα εἶναι, δεύτεροι δὲ Κυρηναῖοι. κατὰ τὸν αὐτὸν δὲ τοῦτον χρόνον καὶ Ἀργεῖοι ἤκουον μουσικὴν εἶναι Ἑλλήνων πρῶτοι. 1
5.67
ταῦτα δέ, δοκέειν ἐμοί, ἐμιμέετο ὁ Κλεισθένης οὗτος τὸν ἑωυτοῦ μητροπάτορα Κλεισθένεα τὸν Σικυῶνος τύραννον. Κλεισθένης γὰρ Ἀργείοισι πολεμήσας τοῦτο μὲν ῥαψῳδοὺς ἔπαυσε ἐν Σικυῶνι ἀγωνίζεσθαι τῶν Ὁμηρείων ἐπέων εἵνεκα, ὅτι Ἀργεῖοί τε καὶ Ἄργος τὰ πολλὰ πάντα ὑμνέαται· τοῦτο δέ, ἡρώιον γὰρ ἦν καὶ ἔστι ἐν αὐτῇ τῇ ἀγορῇ τῶν Σικυωνίων Ἀδρήστου τοῦ Ταλαοῦ, τοῦτον ἐπεθύμησε ὁ Κλεισθένης ἐόντα Ἀργεῖον ἐκβαλεῖν ἐκ τῆς χώρης. ἐλθὼν δὲ ἐς Δελφοὺς ἐχρηστηριάζετο εἰ ἐκβάλοι τὸν Ἄδρηστον· ἡ δὲ Πυθίη οἱ χρᾷ φᾶσα Ἄδρηστον μὲν εἶναι Σικυωνίων βασιλέα, κεῖνον δὲ λευστῆρα. ἐπεὶ δὲ ὁ θεὸς τοῦτό γε οὐ παρεδίδου, ἀπελθὼν ὀπίσω ἐφρόντιζε μηχανὴν τῇ αὐτὸς ὁ Ἄδρηστος ἀπαλλάξεται. ὡς δέ οἱ ἐξευρῆσθαι ἐδόκεε, πέμψας ἐς Θήβας τὰς Βοιωτίας ἔφη θέλειν ἐπαγαγέσθαι Μελάνιππον τὸν Ἀστακοῦ· οἱ δὲ Θηβαῖοι ἔδοσαν. ἐπαγαγόμενος δὲ ὁ Κλεισθένης τὸν Μελάνιππον τέμενός οἱ ἀπέδεξε ἐν αὐτῷ τῷ πρυτανηίῳ καί μιν ἵδρυσε ἐνθαῦτα ἐν τῷ ἰσχυροτάτῳ. ἐπηγάγετο δὲ τὸν Μελάνιππον ὁ Κλεισθένης ʽ καὶ γὰρ τοῦτο δεῖ ἀπηγήσασθαἰ ὡς ἔχθιστον ἐόντα Ἀδρήστῳ, ὃς τόν τε ἀδελφεόν οἱ Μηκιστέα ἀπεκτόνεε καὶ τὸν γαμβρὸν Τυδέα. ἐπείτε δέ οἱ τὸ τέμενος ἀπέδεξε, θυσίας τε καὶ ὁρτὰς Ἀδρήστου ἀπελόμενος ἔδωκε τῷ Μελανίππῳ. οἱ δὲ Σικυώνιοι ἐώθεσαν μεγαλωστὶ κάρτα τιμᾶν τὸν Ἄδρηστον· ἡ γὰρ χώρη ἦν αὕτη Πολύβου, ὁ δὲ Ἄδρηστος ἦν Πολύβου θυγατριδέος, ἄπαις δὲ Πόλυβος τελευτῶν διδοῖ Ἀδρήστῳ τὴν ἀρχήν. τά τε δὴ ἄλλα οἱ Σικυώνιοι ἐτίμων τὸν Ἄδρηστον καὶ δὴ πρὸς τὰ πάθεα αὐτοῦ τραγικοῖσι χοροῖσι ἐγέραιρον, τὸν μὲν Διόνυσον οὐ τιμῶντες, τὸν δὲ Ἄδρηστον. Κλεισθένης δὲ χοροὺς μὲν τῷ Διονύσῳ ἀπέδωκε, τὴν δὲ ἄλλην θυσίην Μελανίππῳ.'' None
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3.131 Now this is how Democedes had come from Croton to live with Polycrates: he was oppressed by a harsh-tempered father at Croton ; since he could not stand him, he left him and went to Aegina . Within the first year after settling there, he excelled the rest of the physicians, although he had no equipment nor any medical implements. ,In his second year the Aeginetans paid him a talent to be their public physician; in the third year the Athenians hired him for a hundred minae, and Polycrates in the fourth year for two talents. Thus he came to Samos, and not least because of this man the physicians of Croton were well-respected ,for at this time the best physicians in Greek countries were those of Croton, and next to them those of Cyrene . About the same time the Argives had the name of being the best musicians. ' "
5.67
In doing this, to my thinking, this Cleisthenes was imitating his own mother's father, Cleisthenes the tyrant of Sicyon, for Cleisthenes, after going to war with the Argives, made an end of minstrels' contests at Sicyon by reason of the Homeric poems, in which it is the Argives and Argos which are primarily the theme of the songs. Furthermore, he conceived the desire to cast out from the land Adrastus son of Talaus, the hero whose shrine stood then as now in the very marketplace of Sicyon because he was an Argive. ,He went then to Delphi, and asked the oracle if he should cast Adrastus out, but the priestess said in response: “Adrastus is king of Sicyon, and you but a stone thrower.” When the god would not permit him to do as he wished in this matter, he returned home and attempted to devise some plan which might rid him of Adrastus. When he thought he had found one, he sent to Boeotian Thebes saying that he would gladly bring Melanippus son of Astacus into his country, and the Thebans handed him over. ,When Cleisthenes had brought him in, he consecrated a sanctuary for him in the government house itself, where he was established in the greatest possible security. Now the reason why Cleisthenes brought in Melanippus, a thing which I must relate, was that Melanippus was Adrastus' deadliest enemy, for Adrastus had slain his brother Mecisteus and his son-in-law Tydeus. ,Having then designated the precinct for him, Cleisthenes took away all Adrastus' sacrifices and festivals and gave them to Melanippus. The Sicyonians had been accustomed to pay very great honor to Adrastus because the country had once belonged to Polybus, his maternal grandfather, who died without an heir and bequeathed the kingship to him. ,Besides other honors paid to Adrastus by the Sicyonians, they celebrated his lamentable fate with tragic choruses in honor not of Dionysus but of Adrastus. Cleisthenes, however, gave the choruses back to Dionysus and the rest of the worship to Melanippus. "' None
10. Hebrew Bible, Daniel, 11.36 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Divine/God,, Connection to Human Realm • Hyrcanus (Tobiad), literary connections to Joseph (Genesis patriarch) • connection

 Found in books: Edwards (2023), In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus, 92; Fishbane (2003), Biblical Myth and Rabbinic Mythmaking, 76; Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 75, 237

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11.36 וְעָשָׂה כִרְצוֹנוֹ הַמֶּלֶךְ וְיִתְרוֹמֵם וְיִתְגַּדֵּל עַל־כָּל־אֵל וְעַל אֵל אֵלִים יְדַבֵּר נִפְלָאוֹת וְהִצְלִיחַ עַד־כָּלָה זַעַם כִּי נֶחֱרָצָה נֶעֱשָׂתָה׃' ' None
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11.36 And the king shall do according to his will; and he shall exalt himself, and magnify himself above every god, and shall speak strange things against the God of gods; and he shall prosper till the indignation be accomplished; for that which is determined shall be done.' ' None
11. Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 5.20 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Hanukkah Narrative, Connection to Opening Letters • Letter, First, 2 macc., Connection to 2 macc. • language and style, Book of Judith, particles and connectives

 Found in books: Gera (2014), Judith, 80; Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 526

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5.20 Therefore the place itself shared in the misfortunes that befell the nation and afterward participated in its benefits; and what was forsaken in the wrath of the Almighty was restored again in all its glory when the great Lord became reconciled."'' None
12. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 3 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • human soul’s conjunction with • law of nature, connection to reason and God

 Found in books: Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 16; Martens (2003), One God, One Law: Philo of Alexandria on the Mosaic and Greco-Roman Law, 84

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3 And his exordium, as I have already said, is most admirable; embracing the creation of the world, under the idea that the law corresponds to the world and the world to the law, and that a man who is obedient to the law, being, by so doing, a citizen of the world, arranges his actions with reference to the intention of nature, in harmony with which the whole universal world is regulated. '' None
13. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 13.288, 13.293 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Pharisaic-rabbinic connection • Pharisaic-rabbinic connection, Gamaliel of Yavneh as evidence of • Pharisaic-rabbinic connection, John Hyrcanus story as evidence of • Pharisaic-rabbinic connection, New Testament evidence supporting • Sophistry, heresy connected to

 Found in books: Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 31; Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 54

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13.288 ̔Υρκανῷ δὲ φθόνον ἐκίνησεν παρὰ τῶν ̓Ιουδαίων ἡ εὐπραγία, μάλιστα δ' οἱ Φαρισαῖοι κακῶς πρὸς αὐτὸν εἶχον, αἵρεσις ὄντες μία τῶν ̓Ιουδαίων, ὡς καὶ ἐν τοῖς ἐπάνω δεδηλώκαμεν. τοσαύτην δὲ ἔχουσι τὴν ἰσχὺν παρὰ τῷ πλήθει, ὡς καὶ κατὰ βασιλέως τι λέγοντες καὶ κατ' ἀρχιερέως εὐθὺς πιστεύεσθαι." "
13.293
Τῶν δ' ἐκ τῶν Σαδδουκαίων τῆς αἱρέσεως, οἳ τὴν ἐναντίαν τοῖς Φαρισαίοις προαίρεσιν ἔχουσιν, ̓Ιωνάθης τις ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα φίλος ὢν ̔Υρκανῷ τῇ κοινῇ πάντων Φαρισαίων γνώμῃ ποιήσασθαι τὰς βλασφημίας τὸν ̓Ελεάζαρον ἔλεγεν: καὶ τοῦτ' ἔσεσθαι φανερὸν αὐτῷ πυθομένῳ παρ' ἐκείνων, τίνος ἄξιός ἐστιν ἐπὶ τοῖς εἰρημένοις κολάσεως."" None
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13.288 5. However, this prosperous state of affairs moved the Jews to envy Hyrcanus; but they that were the worst disposed to him were the Pharisees, who were one of the sects of the Jews, as we have informed you already. These have so great a power over the multitude, that when they say any thing against the king, or against the high priest, they are presently believed.
13.293
6. Now there was one Jonathan, a very great friend of Hyrcanus’s, but of the sect of the Sadducees, whose notions are quite contrary to those of the Pharisees. He told Hyrcanus that Eleazar had cast such a reproach upon him, according to the common sentiments of all the Pharisees, and that this would be made manifest if he would but ask them the question, What punishment they thought this man deserved?'' None
14. Mishnah, Berachot, 9.5 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Pharisaic-rabbinic connection • Sin, not connected to the body

 Found in books: Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 59; Rosen-Zvi (2011), Demonic Desires: Yetzer Hara and the Problem of Evil in Late Antiquity. 61

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9.5 חַיָּב אָדָם לְבָרֵךְ עַל הָרָעָה כְּשֵׁם שֶׁהוּא מְבָרֵךְ עַל הַטּוֹבָה, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (דברים ו) וְאָהַבְתָּ אֵת יְיָ אֱלֹהֶיךָ בְּכָל לְבָבְךָ וּבְכָל נַפְשְׁךָ וּבְכָל מְאֹדֶךָ. בְּכָל לְבָבְךָ, בִּשְׁנֵי יְצָרֶיךָ, בְּיֵצֶר טוֹב וּבְיֵצֶר רָע. וּבְכָל נַפְשְׁךָ, אֲפִלּוּ הוּא נוֹטֵל אֶת נַפְשֶׁךָ. וּבְכָל מְאֹדֶךָ, בְּכָל מָמוֹנֶךָ. דָּבָר אַחֵר בְּכָל מְאֹדֶךָ, בְּכָל מִדָּה וּמִדָּה שֶׁהוּא מוֹדֵד לְךָ הֱוֵי מוֹדֶה לוֹ בִּמְאֹד מְאֹד. לֹא יָקֵל אָדָם אֶת רֹאשׁוֹ כְּנֶגֶד שַׁעַר הַמִּזְרָח, שֶׁהוּא מְכֻוָּן כְּנֶגֶד בֵּית קָדְשֵׁי הַקָּדָשִׁים. לֹא יִכָּנֵס לְהַר הַבַּיִת בְּמַקְלוֹ, וּבְמִנְעָלוֹ, וּבְפֻנְדָּתוֹ, וּבְאָבָק שֶׁעַל רַגְלָיו, וְלֹא יַעֲשֶׂנּוּ קַפַּנְדַּרְיָא, וּרְקִיקָה מִקַּל וָחֹמֶר. כָּל חוֹתְמֵי בְרָכוֹת שֶׁהָיוּ בַמִּקְדָּשׁ, הָיוּ אוֹמְרִים מִן הָעוֹלָם. מִשֶּׁקִּלְקְלוּ הַמִּינִין, וְאָמְרוּ, אֵין עוֹלָם אֶלָּא אֶחָד, הִתְקִינוּ שֶׁיְּהוּ אוֹמְרִים, מִן הָעוֹלָם וְעַד הָעוֹלָם. וְהִתְקִינוּ, שֶׁיְּהֵא אָדָם שׁוֹאֵל אֶת שְׁלוֹם חֲבֵרוֹ בַּשֵּׁם, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (רות ב) וְהִנֵּה בֹעַז בָּא מִבֵּית לֶחֶם, וַיֹּאמֶר לַקּוֹצְרִים יְיָ עִמָּכֶם, וַיֹּאמְרוּ לוֹ, יְבָרֶכְךָ יְיָ. וְאוֹמֵר (שופטים ו) יְיָ עִמְּךָ גִּבּוֹר הֶחָיִל. וְאוֹמֵר (משלי כג) אַל תָּבוּז כִּי זָקְנָה אִמֶּךָ. וְאוֹמֵר (תהלים קיט) עֵת לַעֲשׂוֹת לַייָ הֵפֵרוּ תוֹרָתֶךָ. רַבִּי נָתָן אוֹמֵר, הֵפֵרוּ תוֹרָתֶךָ עֵת לַעֲשׂוֹת לַייָ:'' None
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9.5 One must bless God for the evil in the same way as one blesses for the good, as it says, “And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul and with all your might” (Deuteronomy 6:5). “With all your heart,” with your two impulses, the evil impulse as well as the good impulse. “With all your soul” even though he takes your soul life away from you. “With all your might” with all your money. Another explanation, “With all your might” whatever treatment he metes out to you. One should not show disrespect to the Eastern Gate, because it is in a direct line with the Holy of Holies. One should not enter the Temple Mount with a staff, or with shoes on, or with a wallet, or with dusty feet; nor should one make it a short cut, all the more spitting is forbidden. All the conclusions of blessings that were in the Temple they would say, “forever lit. as long as the world is.” When the sectarians perverted their ways and said that there was only one world, they decreed that they should say, “for ever and ever lit. from the end of the world to the end of the world. They also decreed that a person should greet his fellow in God’s name, as it says, “And behold Boaz came from Bethlehem and said to the reapers, ‘May the Lord be with you.’ And they answered him, “May the Lord bless you’” (Ruth 2:. And it also says, “The Lord is with your, you valiant warrior” (Judges 6:12). And it also says, “And do not despise your mother when she grows old” (Proverbs 23:22). And it also says, “It is time to act on behalf of the Lord, for they have violated Your teaching” (Psalms 119:126). Rabbi Natan says: this means “They have violated your teaching It is time to act on behalf of the Lord.”'' None
15. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 1.26-1.29 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Eristic, connection with heresy • Sophistry, heresy connected to • wealth, connection with social ranking

 Found in books: Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 144, 145, 154, 155; Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 377

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1.26 Βλέπετε γὰρ τὴν κλῆσιν ὑμῶν, ἀδελφοί, ὅτι οὐ πολλοὶ σοφοὶ κατὰ σάρκα, οὐ πολλοὶ δυνατοί, οὐ πολλοὶ εὐγενεῖς· 1.27 ἀλλὰ τὰ μωρὰ τοῦ κόσμου ἐξελέξατο ὁ θεός, ἵνα καταισχύνῃ τοὺς σοφούς, καὶ τὰ ἀσθενῆ τοῦ κόσμου ἐξελέξατο ὁ θεός, ἵνα καταισχύνῃ τὰ ἰσχυρά, 1.28 καὶ τὰ ἀγενῆ τοῦ κόσμου καὶ τὰ ἐξουθενημένα ἐξελέξατο ὁ θεός, καὶ τὰ μὴ ὄντα, ἵνα τὰ ὄντα καταργήσῃ, 1.29 ὅπως μὴ καυχήσηται πᾶσα σὰρξ ἐνώπιον τοῦ θεοῦ.'' None
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1.26 For you seeyour calling, brothers, that not many are wise according to the flesh,not many mighty, and not many noble; 1.27 but God chose the foolishthings of the world that he might put to shame those who are wise. Godchose the weak things of the world, that he might put to shame thethings that are strong; 1.28 and God chose the lowly things of theworld, and the things that are despised, and the things that are not,that he might bring to nothing the things that are: 1.29 that noflesh should boast before God.'' None
16. New Testament, 1 Thessalonians, 4.14 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Connections, Between God and cosmos • resurrection, connection to morality

 Found in books: McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 48; Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 34

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4.14 εἰ γὰρ πιστεύομεν ὅτι Ἰησοῦς ἀπέθανεν καὶ ἀνέστη, οὕτως καὶ ὁ θεὸς τοὺς κοιμηθέντας διὰ τοῦ Ἰησοῦ ἄξει σὺν αὐτῷ.'' None
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4.14 For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so those who have fallen asleep in Jesus will God bring with him. '' None
17. New Testament, Acts, 8.19 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Sophistry, heresy connected to • spirit, connection with prophecy and preaching

 Found in books: Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 148; Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 308

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8.19 ρας λαμβάνῃ πνεῦμα ἅγιον.'' None
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8.19 saying, "Give me also this power, that whoever I lay my hands on may receive the Holy Spirit."'' None
18. New Testament, Colossians, 1.18 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Connections within, In Greek thought • connection

 Found in books: Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 70; McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 174

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1.18 καὶ αὐτός ἐστιν ἡ κεφαλὴ τοῦ σώματος, τῆς ἐκκλησίας· ὅς ἐστιν ἡ ἀρχή, πρωτότοκος ἐκ τῶν νεκρῶν, ἵνα γένηται ἐν πᾶσιν αὐτὸς πρωτεύων,'' None
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1.18 He is the head of the body, the assembly, who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all things he might have the preeminence. '' None
19. New Testament, Romans, 1.4, 6.10, 9.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Jesus, Priestly (Aaronic) connection • Origen, Church Father, Connects first movements with bad thoughts, thus blurring distinction from emotion • body, connection to sin • connection • resurrection, connection to morality

 Found in books: Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 230; Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 34, 35, 216; Ruzer (2020), Early Jewish Messianism in the New Testament: Reflections in the Dim Mirror, 76; Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 350

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1.4 τοῦ ὁρισθέντος υἱοῦ θεοῦ ἐν δυνάμει κατὰ πνεῦμα ἁγιωσύνης ἐξ ἀναστάσεως νεκρῶν, Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν,
6.10
ὃ γὰρ ἀπέθανεν, τῇ ἁμαρτίᾳ ἀπέθανεν ἐφάπαξ·
9.21
ἢ οὐκ ἔχει ἐξουσίανὁ κεραμεὺς τοῦ πηλοῦἐκ τοῦ αὐτοῦ φυράματος ποιῆσαι ὃ μὲν εἰς τιμὴν σκεῦος, ὃ δὲ εἰς ἀτιμίαν;'' None
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1.4 who was declared to be the Son of God with power, according to the Spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead, Jesus Christ our Lord,
6.10
For the death that he died, he died to sin one time; but the life that he lives, he lives to God. ' "
9.21
Or hasn't the potter a right over the clay, from the same lump to make one part a vessel for honor, and another for dishonor? "' None
20. New Testament, Luke, 1.6, 1.8-1.12, 1.19, 4.1, 4.16-4.29, 18.10-18.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Idumea, connection of, with Arabia • Jesus, Priestly (Aaronic) connection • L material, Aesopic connections in • Pharisaic-rabbinic connection • Pharisaic-rabbinic connection, Gamaliel of Yavneh as evidence of • Pharisaic-rabbinic connection, John Hyrcanus story as evidence of • Pharisaic-rabbinic connection, New Testament evidence supporting • Sophistry, heresy connected to • rabbis, Babylonian, connections with East • spirit, connection with prophecy and preaching

 Found in books: Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 154, 155; Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 54; Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 172; Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 308; Ruzer (2020), Early Jewish Messianism in the New Testament: Reflections in the Dim Mirror, 25, 76, 96, 107; Strong (2021), The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke: A New Foundation for the Study of Parables 249, 250, 251; Udoh (2006), To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E, 173

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1.6 ἦσαν δὲ δίκαιοι ἀμφότεροι ἐναντίον τοῦ θεοῦ, πορευόμενοι ἐν πάσαις ταῖς ἐντολαῖς καὶ δικαιώμασιν τοῦ κυρίου ἄμεμπτοι.
1.8
Ἐγένετο δὲ ἐν τῷ ἱερατεύειν αὐτὸν ἐν τῇ τάξει τῆς ἐφημερίας αὐτοῦ ἔναντι τοῦ θεοῦ 1.9 κατὰ τὸ ἔθος τῆς ἱερατίας ἔλαχε τοῦ θυμιᾶσαι εἰσελθὼν εἰς τὸν ναὸν τοῦ κυρίου, 1.10 καὶ πᾶν τὸ πλῆθος ἦν τοῦ λαοῦ προσευχόμενον ἔξω τῇ ὥρᾳ τοῦ θυμιάματος· 1.11 ὤφθη δὲ αὐτῷ ἄγγελος Κυρίου ἑστὼς ἐκ δεξιῶν τοῦ θυσιαστηρίου τοῦ θυμιάματος. 1.12 καὶ ἐταράχθη Ζαχαρίας ἰδών, καὶ φόβος ἐπέπεσεν ἐπʼ αὐτόν.
1.19
καὶ ἀποκριθεὶς ὁ ἄγγελος εἶπεν αὐτῷ Ἐγώ εἰμι Γαβριὴλ ὁ παρεστηκὼς ἐνώπιον τοῦ θεοῦ, καὶ ἀπεστάλην λαλῆσαι πρὸς σὲ καὶ εὐαγγελίσασθαί σοι ταῦτα·
4.1
Ἰησοῦς δὲ πλήρης πνεύματος ἁγίου ὑπέστρεψεν ἀπὸ τοῦ Ἰορδάνου, καὶ ἤγετο ἐν τῷ πνεύματι ἐν τῇ ἐρήμῳ

4.16
Καὶ ἦλθεν εἰς Ναζαρά, οὗ ἦν τεθραμμένος, καὶ εἰσῆλθεν κατὰ τὸ εἰωθὸς αὐτῷ ἐν τῇ ἡμέρᾳ τῶν σαββάτων εἰς τὴν συναγωγήν, καὶ ἀνέστη ἀναγνῶναι.
4.17
καὶ ἐπεδόθη αὐτῷ βιβλίον τοῦ προφήτου Ἠσαίου, καὶ ἀνοίξας τὸ βιβλίον εὗρεν τὸν τόπον οὗ ἦν γεγραμμένον
4.18
Πνεῦμα Κυρίου ἐπʼ ἐμέ, οὗ εἵνεκεν ἔχρισέν με εὐαγγελίσασθαι πτωχοῖς, ἀπέσταλκέν με κηρύξαι αἰχμαλώτοις ἄφεσιν καὶ τυφλοῖς ἀνάβλεψιν, ἀποστεῖλαι τεθραυσμένους ἐν ἀφέσει,
4.19
κηρύξαι ἐνιαυτὸν Κυρίου δεκτόν. 4.20 καὶ πτύξας τὸ βιβλίον ἀποδοὺς τῷ ὑπηρέτῃ ἐκάθισεν· καὶ πάντων οἱ ὀφθαλμοὶ ἐν τῇ συναγωγῇ ἦσαν ἀτενίζοντες αὐτῷ. 4.21 ἤρξατο δὲ λέγειν πρὸς αὐτοὺς ὅτι Σήμερον πεπλήρωται ἡ γραφὴ αὕτη ἐν τοῖς ὠσὶν ὑμῶν. 4.22 καὶ πάντες ἐμαρτύρουν αὐτῷ καὶ ἐθαύμαζον ἐπὶ τοῖς λόγοις τῆς χάριτος τοῖς ἐκπορευομένοις ἐκ τοῦ στόματος αὐτοῦ, καὶ ἔλεγον Οὐχὶ υἱός ἐστιν Ἰωσὴφ οὗτος; 4.23 καὶ εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτούς Πάντως ἐρεῖτέ μοι τὴν παραβολὴν ταύτην Ἰατρέ, θεράπευσον σεαυτόν· ὅσα ἠκούσαμεν γενόμενα εἰς τὴν — Καφαρναοὺμ ποίησον καὶ ὧδε ἐν τῇ πατρίδι σου. 4.24 εἶπεν δέ Ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν ὅτι οὐδεὶς προφήτης δεκτός ἐστιν ἐν τῇ πατρίδι αὐτοῦ. 4.25 ἐπʼ ἀληθείας δὲ λέγω ὑμῖν, πολλαὶ χῆραι ἦσαν ἐν ταῖς ἡμέραις Ἠλείου ἐν τῷ Ἰσραήλ, ὅτε ἐκλείσθη ὁ οὐρανὸς ἔτη τρία καὶ μῆνας ἕξ, ὡς ἐγένετο λιμὸς μέγας ἐπὶ πᾶσαν τὴν γῆν, 4.26 καὶ πρὸς οὐδεμίαν αὐτῶν ἐπέμφθη Ἠλείας εἰ μὴ εἰς Σάρεπτα τῆς Σιδωνίας πρὸς γυναῖκα χήραν. 4.27 καὶ πολλοὶ λεπροὶ ἦσαν ἐν τῷ Ἰσραὴλ ἐπὶ Ἐλισαίου τοῦ προφήτου, καὶ οὐδεὶς αὐτῶν ἐκαθαρίσθη εἰ μὴ Ναιμὰν ὁ Σύρος. 4.28 καὶ ἐπλήσθησαν πάντες θυμοῦ ἐν τῇ συναγωγῇ ἀκούοντες ταῦτα, 4.29 καὶ ἀναστάντες ἐξέβαλον αὐτὸν ἔξω τῆς πόλεως, καὶ ἤγαγον αὐτὸν ἕως ὀφρύος τοῦ ὄρους ἐφʼ οὗ ἡ πόλις ᾠκοδόμητο αὐτῶν, ὥστε κατακρημνίσαι αὐτόν·
18.10
Ἄνθρωποι δύο ἀνέβησαν εἰς τὸ ἱερὸν προσεύξασθαι, εἷς Φαρισαῖος καὶ ὁ ἕτερος τελώνης. 18.11 ὁ Φαρισαῖος σταθεὶς ταῦτα πρὸς ἑαυτὸν προσηύχετο Ὁ θεός, εὐχαριστῶ σοι ὅτι οὐκ εἰμὶ ὥσπερ οἱ λοιποὶ τῶν ἀνθρώπων, ἅρπαγες, ἄδικοι, μοιχοί, ἢ καὶ ὡς οὗτος ὁ τελώνης·'' None
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1.6 They were both righteous before God, walking blamelessly in all the commandments and ordices of the Lord. ' "
1.8
Now it happened, while he executed the priest's office before God in the order of his division, " "1.9 according to the custom of the priest's office, his lot was to enter into the temple of the Lord and burn incense. " '1.10 The whole multitude of the people were praying outside at the hour of incense. 1.11 An angel of the Lord appeared to him, standing on the right side of the altar of incense. 1.12 Zacharias was troubled when he saw him, and fear fell upon him.
1.19
The angel answered him, "I am Gabriel, who stands in the presence of God. I was sent to speak to you, and to bring you this good news.
4.1
Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan, and was led by the Spirit into the wilderness

4.16
He came to Nazareth, where he had been brought up. He entered, as was his custom, into the synagogue on the Sabbath day, and stood up to read.
4.17
The book of the prophet Isaiah was handed to him. He opened the book, and found the place where it was written,
4.18
"The Spirit of the Lord is on me, Because he has anointed me to preach good news to the poor. He has sent me to heal the brokenhearted, To proclaim release to the captives, Recovering of sight to the blind, To deliver those who are crushed,
4.19
And to proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord." 4.20 He closed the book, gave it back to the attendant, and sat down. The eyes of all in the synagogue were fastened on him. 4.21 He began to tell them, "Today, this Scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing." 4.22 All testified about him, and wondered at the gracious words which proceeded out of his mouth, and they said, "Isn\'t this Joseph\'s son?" 4.23 He said to them, "Doubtless you will tell me this parable, \'Physician, heal yourself! Whatever we have heard done at Capernaum, do also here in your hometown.\'" 4.24 He said, "Most assuredly I tell you, no prophet is acceptable in his hometown. 4.25 But truly I tell you, there were many widows in Israel in the days of Elijah, when the the sky was shut up three years and six months, when a great famine came over all the land. 4.26 Elijah was sent to none of them, except to Zarephath, in the land of Sidon, to a woman who was a widow. 4.27 There were many lepers in Israel in the time of Elisha the prophet, yet not one of them was cleansed, except Naaman, the Syrian." 4.28 They were all filled with wrath in the synagogue, as they heard these things. 4.29 They rose up, threw him out of the city, and led him to the brow of the hill that their city was built on, that they might throw him off the cliff.
18.10
"Two men went up into the temple to pray; one was a Pharisee, and the other was a tax collector. ' "18.11 The Pharisee stood and prayed to himself like this: 'God, I thank you, that I am not like the rest of men, extortioners, unrighteous, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. "' None
21. New Testament, Mark, 1.9, 1.12 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Jesus, Priestly (Aaronic) connection • Lukan Fable Collection, conjunctions in • asyndeton, conjunctions • spirit, connection with prophecy and preaching

 Found in books: Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 308; Ruzer (2020), Early Jewish Messianism in the New Testament: Reflections in the Dim Mirror, 96, 107; Strong (2021), The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke: A New Foundation for the Study of Parables 495

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1.9 ΚΑΙ ΕΓΕΝΕΤΟ ἐν ἐκείναις ταῖς ἡμέραις ἦλθεν Ἰησοῦς ἀπὸ Ναζαρὲτ τῆς Γαλιλαίας καὶ ἐβαπτίσθη εἰς τὸν Ἰορδάνην ὑπὸ Ἰωάνου.
1.12
Καὶ εὐθὺς τὸ πνεῦμα αὐτὸν ἐκβάλλει εἰς τὴν ἔρημον.'' None
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1.9 It happened in those days, that Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee, and was baptized by John in the Jordan.
1.12
Immediately the Spirit drove him out into the wilderness. '' None
22. New Testament, Matthew, 4.1, 4.4, 4.6, 5.23-5.24, 6.24, 6.33, 7.25, 10.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Connection between deeds and consequences • Eristic, connection with heresy • Jesus, Priestly (Aaronic) connection • Sophistry, heresy connected to • connection • rabbis, Babylonian, connections with East • spirit, connection with prophecy and preaching

 Found in books: Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 134, 135, 136, 146, 155, 282, 283, 407; Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 75; Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 131; Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 243; Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 308; Ruzer (2020), Early Jewish Messianism in the New Testament: Reflections in the Dim Mirror, 96, 107

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4.1 Τότε ὁ Ἰησοῦς ἀνήχθη εἰς τὴν ἔρημον ὑπὸ τοῦ πνεύματος, πειρασθῆναι ὑπὸ τοῦ διαβόλου.
4.4
ὁ δὲ ἀποκριθεὶς εἶπεν Γέγραπται Οὐκ ἐπʼ ἄρτῳ μόνῳ ζήσεται ὁ ἄνθρωπος, ἀλλʼ ἐπὶ παντὶ ῥήματι ἐκπορευομένῳ διὰ στόματος θεοῦ.
4.6
καὶ λέγει αὐτῷ Εἰ υἱὸς εἶ τοῦ θεοῦ, βάλε σεαυτὸν κάτω· γέγραπται γὰρ ὅτι Τοῖς ἀγγέλοις αὐτοῦ ἐντελεῖται περὶ σοῦ καὶ ἐπὶ χειρῶν ἀροῦσίν σε, μή ποτε προσκόψῃς πρὸς λίθον τὸν πόδα σου.
5.23
ἐὰν οὖν προσφέρῃς τὸ δῶρόν σου ἐπὶ τὸ θυσιαστήριον κἀκεῖ μνησθῇς ὅτι ὁ ἀδελφός σου ἔχει τι κατὰ σοῦ, 5.24 ἄφες ἐκεῖ τὸ δῶρόν σου ἔμπροσθεν τοῦ θυσιαστηρίου, καὶ ὕπαγε πρῶτον διαλλάγηθι τῷ ἀδελφῷ σου, καὶ τότε ἐλθὼν πρόσφερε τὸ δῶρόν σου.
6.24
Οὐδεὶς δύναται δυσὶ κυρίοις δουλεύειν· ἢ γὰρ τὸν ἕνα μισήσει καὶ τὸν ἕτερον ἀγαπήσει, ἢ ἑνὸς ἀνθέξεται καὶ τοῦ ἑτέρου καταφρονήσει· οὐ δύνασθε θεῷ δουλεύειν καὶ μαμωνᾷ.
6.33
ζητεῖτε δὲ πρῶτον τὴν βασιλείαν καὶ τὴν δικαιοσύνην αὐτοῦ, καὶ ταῦτα πάντα προστεθήσεται ὑμῖν.
7.25
καὶ κατέβη ἡ βροχὴ καὶ ἦλθαν οἱ ποταμοὶ καὶ ἔπνευσαν οἱ ἄνεμοι καὶ προσέπεσαν τῇ οἰκίᾳ ἐκείνῃ, καὶ οὐκ ἔπεσεν, τεθεμελίωτο γὰρ ἐπὶ τὴν πέτραν.
10.8
ἀσθενοῦντας θεραπεύετε, νεκροὺς ἐγείρετε, λεπροὺς καθαρίζετε, δαιμόνια ἐκβάλλετε· δωρεὰν ἐλάβετε, δωρεὰν δότε.'' None
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4.1 Then Jesus was led up by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil.
4.4
But he answered, "It is written, \'Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceeds out of the mouth of God.\'"
4.6
and said to him, "If you are the Son of God, throw yourself down, for it is written, \'He will give his angels charge concerning you.\' and, \'On their hands they will bear you up, So that you don\'t dash your foot against a stone.\'"
5.23
"If therefore you are offering your gift at the altar, and there remember that your brother has anything against you, 5.24 leave your gift there before the altar, and go your way. First be reconciled to your brother, and then come and offer your gift.
6.24
"No one can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other; or else he will be devoted to one and despise the other. You can\'t serve both God and Mammon. ' "
6.33
But seek first God's Kingdom, and his righteousness; and all these things will be given to you as well. " "
7.25
The rain came down, the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat on that house; and it didn't fall, for it was founded on the rock. " 10.8 Heal the sick, cleanse the lepers, and cast out demons. Freely you received, so freely give. '' None
23. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Pharisaic-rabbinic connection • Pharisaic-rabbinic connection, Gamaliel of Yavneh as evidence of • Pharisaic-rabbinic connection, John Hyrcanus story as evidence of • Pharisaic-rabbinic connection, New Testament evidence supporting • Sophistry, heresy connected to

 Found in books: Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 31; Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 54

24. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 1.6.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Sophistry, heresy connected to • resurrection, connection to morality

 Found in books: Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 154, 155; Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 53

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1.6.3 Wherefore also it comes to pass, that the "most perfect" among them addict themselves without fear to all those kinds of forbidden deeds of which the Scriptures assure us that "they who do such things shall not inherit the kingdom of God." For instance, they make no scruple about eating meats offered in sacrifice to idols, imagining that they can in this way contract no defilement. Then, again, at every heathen festival celebrated in honour of the idols, these men are the first to assemble; and to such a pitch do they go, that some of them do not even keep away from that bloody spectacle hateful both to God and men, in which gladiators either fight with wild beasts, or singly encounter one another. Others of them yield themselves up to the lusts of the flesh with the utmost greediness, maintaining that carnal things should be allowed to the carnal nature, while spiritual things are provided for the spiritual. Some of them, moreover, are in the habit of defiling those women to whom they have taught the above doctrine, as has frequently been confessed by those women who have been led astray by certain of them, on their returning to the Church of God, and acknowledging this along with the rest of their errors. Others of them, too, openly and without a blush, having become passionately attached to certain women, seduce them away from their husbands, and contract marriages of their own with them. Others of them, again, who pretend at first. to live in all modesty with them as with sisters, have in course of time been revealed in their true colours, when the sister has been found with child by her pretended brother.'' None
25. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9.35.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Apollo, flowing water, connection to • Artemis, flowing water, connection to • memories, kept alive or evoked in ritual, of connectivity

 Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 98; Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 179

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9.35.3 παρὰ δὲ Ἐτεοκλέους τοῦ Ὀρχομενίου μαθόντες τρισὶν ἤδη νομίζομεν Χάρισιν εὔχεσθαι· καὶ Ἀγγελίων τε καὶ Τεκταῖος †ὅσοι γε Διονύσου †τὸν Ἀπόλλωνα ἐργασάμενοι Δηλίοις τρεῖς ἐποίησαν ἐπὶ τῇ χειρὶ αὐτοῦ Χάριτας· καὶ Ἀθήνῃσι πρὸ τῆς ἐς τὴν ἀκρόπολιν ἐσόδου Χάριτές εἰσι καὶ αὗται τρεῖς, παρὰ δὲ αὐταῖς τελετὴν ἄγουσιν ἐς τοὺς πολλοὺς ἀπόρρητον.'' None
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9.35.3 It was from Eteocles of Orchomenus that we learned the custom of praying to three Graces. And Angelion and Tectaus, sons of Dionysus, The text here is corrupt. The two emendations mentioned in the critical notes would give either (a) “the pair who made . . ."or (b) “who made the statue of Dionysodotus for the Delians. . .” who made the image of Apollo for the Delians, set three Graces in his hand. Again, at Athens, before the entrance to the Acropolis, the Graces are three in number; by their side are celebrated mysteries which must not be divulged to the many.'' None
26. Babylonian Talmud, Sotah, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Pharisaic-rabbinic connection • rabbis, Babylonian, connections with East

 Found in books: Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 57; Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 164, 167, 169

22b ועד כמה עד ארבעין שנין איני והא רבה אורי בשוין,ומכות פרושין וכו\' ת"ר שבעה פרושין הן פרוש שיכמי פרוש נקפי פרוש קיזאי פרוש מדוכיא פרוש מה חובתי ואעשנה פרוש מאהבה פרוש מיראה,פרוש שיכמי זה העושה מעשה שכם פרוש נקפי זה המנקיף את רגליו פרוש קיזאי א"ר נחמן בר יצחק זה המקיז דם לכתלים פרוש מדוכיא אמר רבה בר שילא דמשפע כי מדוכיא,פרוש מה חובתי ואעשנה הא מעליותא היא אלא דאמר מה חובתי תו ואעשנה,פרוש מאהבה פרוש מיראה אמרו ליה אביי ורבא לתנא לא תיתני פרוש מאהבה פרוש מיראה דאמר רב יהודה אמר רב לעולם יעסוק אדם בתורה ובמצות אפי\' שלא לשמה שמתוך שלא לשמה בא לשמה,אמר רב נחמן בר יצחק דמטמרא מטמרא ודמגליא מגליא בי דינא רבה ליתפרע מהני דחפו גונדי אמר לה ינאי מלכא לדביתיה אל תתיראי מן הפרושין ולא ממי שאינן פרושין אלא מן הצבועין שדומין לפרושין שמעשיהן כמעשה זמרי ומבקשין שכר כפנחס,22b And until when is it considered too premature for a scholar to issue halakhic rulings? It is until forty years. The Gemara asks: Is that so? But didn’t Rabba issue rulings, even though he lived for only forty years? The Gemara answers: It is permitted for a scholar who has not studied for so long to issue rulings when his knowledge reaches the level of the foremost scholar in his city and they are equals.,§ It states in the mishna: And those who injure themselves out of false abstinence perushin are people who erode the world. The Sages taught: There are seven pseudo-righteous people who erode the world: The righteous of Shechem, the self-flagellating righteous, the bloodletting righteous, the pestle-like righteous, the righteous who say: Tell me what my obligation is and I will perform it, those who are righteous due to love, and those who are righteous due to fear.,The Gemara explains: The righteous of Shechem shikhmi; this is one who performs actions comparable to the action of the people of Shechem, who agreed to circumcise themselves for personal gain (see Genesis, chapter 34); so too, he behaves righteously only in order to be honored. The self-flagellating righteous; this is one who injures his feet, as he walks slowly, dragging his feet on the ground in an attempt to appear humble, and injures his feet in the process. The bloodletting righteous; Rav Naḥman bar Yitzḥak says that this is one who lets blood by banging his head against the walls because he walks with his eyes shut, ostensibly out of modesty. The pestle-like righteous; Rabba bar Sheila says that this is one who walks bent over like the pestle of a mortar.,With regard to the righteous one who says: Tell me what my obligation is and I will perform it, the Gemara asks: Isn’t this virtuous behavior, as he desires to be aware of his obligations? Rather, this is referring to one who says: Tell me what further obligations are incumbent upon me and I will perform them, indicating that he fulfills all of his mitzvot perfectly and therefore seeks additional obligations.,The baraita also includes in the list of pseudo-righteous people those who are righteous due to love and those who are righteous due to fear, i.e., one who performs mitzvot due to love of their reward or due to fear of punishment. Abaye and Rava said to the tanna who transmitted this baraita: Do not teach in the baraita: Those who are righteous due to love and those who are righteous due to fear, as Rav Yehuda says that Rav says: A person should always engage in Torah study and in performance of the mitzvot even if he does not do so for their own sake, as through performing them not for their own sake, one comes to perform them for their own sake.,Rav Naḥman bar Yitzḥak said: That which is hidden is hidden, and that which is revealed is revealed, but in Heaven everything is known, and the great court in Heaven will exact payment from those who wear the cloak of the righteous but are in fact unworthy. The Gemara relates: King Yannai said to his wife before he died: Do not be afraid of the Pharisees perushin, and neither should you fear from those who are not Pharisees, i.e., the Sadducees; rather, beware of the hypocrites who appear like Pharisees, as their actions are like the act of the wicked Zimri and they request a reward like that of the righteous Pinehas (see Numbers, chapter 25).,Rabbi Shimon says: Merit does not delay the punishment of the bitter water of a sota, and if you say that merit does delay the punishment of the water that causes the curse, as stated earlier by the Rabbis (20a), you weaken madhe the power of the bitter water before all the women who drink the water, who will no longer be afraid of it, as they will rely on their merit to save them. And you defame the untainted women who drank the water and survived, as people say: They are defiled but it is their merit that delayed the punishment for them. Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi says: Merit delays the punishment of the water that causes the curse, but a woman whose punishment is delayed does not give birth and does not flourish; rather, she progressively deteriorates. Ultimately she dies by the same death as a sota who dies immediately.,§ If the meal-offering of the sota is rendered impure before it has been sanctified in the service vessel, its status is like that of all the other meal-offerings that are rendered impure before being sanctified in a service vessel, and it is redeemed. But if it is rendered impure after it has been sanctified in the service vessel, its status is like that of all the other meal-offerings that are rendered impure after being sanctified in a service vessel, and it is burned. And these are the sota women whose meal-offerings are burned if they have already been sanctified in a service vessel:'' None
27. Strabo, Geography, 14.1.6
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis, theater and tragedy, connection to • memories, kept alive or evoked in ritual, of connectivity

 Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 124; Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 187

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14.1.6 Ephorus says: Miletus was first founded and fortified above the sea by the Cretans, where the Milatos of olden times is now situated, being settled by Sarpedon, who brought colonists from the Cretan Milatos and named the city after that Miletus, the place formerly being in the possession of the Leleges; but later Neleus and his followers fortified the present city. The present city has four harbors, one of which is large enough for a fleet. Many are the achievements of this city, but the greatest is the number of its colonizations; for the Euxine Pontus has been colonized everywhere by these people, as also the Propontis and several other regions. At any rate, Anaximenes of Lampsacus says that the Milesians colonized the islands Icaros and Leros; and, near the Hellespont, Limnae in the Chersonesus, as also Abydus and Arisba and Paesus in Asia; and Artace and Cyzicus in the island of the Cyziceni; and Scepsis in the interior of the Troad. I, however, in my detailed description speak of the other cities, which have been omitted by him. Both Milesians and Delians invoke an Apollo Ulius, that is, as god of health and healing, for the verb ulein means to be healthy; whence the noun ule and the salutation, Both health and great joy to thee; for Apollo is the god of healing. And Artemis has her name from the fact that she makes people Artemeas. And both Helius and Selene are closely associated with these, since they are the causes of the temperature of the air. And both pestilential diseases and sudden deaths are imputed to these gods.'' None
28. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Donatists, Tyconius’s literary connection to • connection

 Found in books: Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 70, 229, 236, 240, 277; Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 303, 306




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