Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

   Search:  
validated results only / all results

and or

Filtering options: (leave empty for all results)
By author:     
By work:        
By subject:
By additional keyword:       



Results for
Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.





16 results for "citations"
1. Sophocles, Antigone, 450 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •citations of tragedy by Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 165
2. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 410 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •citations of tragedy by Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 165
3. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 344-514, 516-558, 515 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 170
4. Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •aelius aristides (sophist)\n, citations of tragedy by •dio of prusa (chrysostom)\n, citations of tragedy by •philostratus (the younger), citations of tragedy by •citations of tragedy by Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 170, 171
5. Cicero, On Duties, 3.82 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dio of prusa (chrysostom)\n, citations of tragedy by Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 171
3.82. Est ergo ulla res tanti aut commodum ullum tam expetendum, ut viri boni et splendorem et nomen amittas? Quid est, quod afferre tantum utilitas ista, quae dicitur, possit, quantum auferre, si boni viri nomen eripuerit, fidem iustitiamque detraxerit? Quid enim interest, utrum ex homine se convertat quis in beluam an hominis figura immanitatem gerat beluae? Quid? qui omnia recta et honesta neglegunt, dum modo potentiam consequantur, nonne idem faciunt, quod is, qui etiam socerum habere voluit eum, cuius ipse audacia potens esset? Utile ei videbatur plurimum posse alterius invidia; id quam iniustum in patriam et quam turpe esset, non videbat. Ipse autem socer in ore semper Graecos versus de Phoenissis habebat, quos dicam, ut potero, incondite fortasse, sed tamen, ut res possit intellegi: Nam sí violandum est Iús, regdi grátia Violándum est; aliis rébus pietatém colas. Capitalis Eteocles vel potius Euripides, qui id unum, quod omnum sceleratissimum fuerit, exceperit! 3.82.  Is there, then, any object of such value or any advantage so worth the winning that, to gain it, one should sacrifice the name of a "good man" and the lustre of his reputation? What is there that your so‑called expediency can bring to you that will compensate for what it can take away, if it steals from you the name of a "good man" and causes you to lose your sense of honour and justice? For what difference does it make whether a man is actually transformed into a beast or whether, keeping the outward appearance of a man, he has the savage nature of a beast within? Again, when people disregard everything that is morally right and true, if only they may secure power thereby, are they not pursuing the same course as he who wished to have as a father-in‑law the man by whose effrontery he might gain power for himself? He thought it advantageous to secure supreme power while the odium of it fell upon another; and he failed to see how unjust to his country this was, and how wrong morally. But the father-in‑law himself used to have continually upon his lips the Greek verses from the Phoenissae, which I will reproduce as well as I can — awkwardly, it may be, but still so that the meaning can be understood: "If wrong may e'er be right, for a throne's sake Were wrong most right:— be God in all else feared!" Our tyrant deserved his death for having made an exception of the one thing that was the blackest crime of all.
6. Suetonius, Augustus, 85, 45 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 165, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180
7. Suetonius, Nero, 21.3, 46.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •citations of tragedy by Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 165
8. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 17.6-17.7, 32.41-32.43, 66.6 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dio of prusa (chrysostom)\n, citations of tragedy by •citations of tragedy by Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 165, 171
17.6.  We know, for instance, that inflamed parts of the body do not yield at once to the first fomentation, but that if the treatment is continued, the swelling is softened and relief is given. So in a like manner we must be well content if we are able to assuage the inflammation in the souls of the many by the unceasing use of the word of reason. So I maintain in regard to covetousness too, that all men do know it is neither expedient nor honourable, but the cause of the greatest evils; and that in spite of all this, not one man refrains from it or is willing to have equality of possessions with his neighbour. 17.7.  And yet you will find that, although idleness, intemperance and, to express it in general terms, all the other vices without exception are injurious to the very men who practice them; and although those who are addicted to any of them do deservedly, in my opinion, meet with admonishment and condemnation, still you certainly will find that they are not hated or regarded as the common enemies of all mankind. But greed is not only the greatest evil to a man himself, but it injures his neighbours as well. And so no one pities, forsooth, the covetous man or cares to instruct him, but all shun him and regard him as their enemy. 32.41.  What, then, do you suppose those people say when they have returned to their homes at the ends of the earth? Do they not say: "We have seen a city that in most respects is admirable and a spectacle that surpasses all human spectacles, with regard both to beauty and sanctuaries and multitude of inhabitants and abundance of all that man requires," going on to describe to their fellow citizens as accurately as possible all the things that I myself named a short while ago — all about the Nile, the land, and the sea, and in particular the epiphany of the god; "and yet," they will add, "it is a city that is mad over music and horse-races and in these matters behaves in a manner entirely unworthy of itself. For the Alexandrians are moderate enough when they offer sacrifice or stroll by themselves or engage in their other pursuits; but when they enter the theatre or the stadium, just as if drugs that would madden them lay buried there, they lose all consciousness of their former state and are not ashamed to say or do anything that occurs to them. 32.42.  And what is most distressing of all is that, despite their interest in the show, they do not really see, and, though they wish to hear, they do not hear, being evidently out of their senses and deranged â€” not only men, but even women and children. And when the dreadful exhibition is over and they are dismissed, although the more violent aspect of their disorder has been extinguished, still at street-corners and in alley-ways the malady continues throughout the entire city for several days; just as when a mighty conflagration has died down, you can see for a long time, not only the smoke, but also some portions of the buildings still aflame." 32.43.  Moreover, some Persian or Bactrian is likely to say: "We ourselves know how to ride horses and are held to be just about the best in horsemanship" — for they cultivate that art for the defence of their empire and independence — "but for all that we have never behaved that way or anything like it"; whereas you, who have never handled a horse or mounted one yourselves, are unable to restrain yourselves, but are like lame men squabbling over a foot-race. That may explain why, cowards and slackers though you are, you have won so many cavalry battles in the past! 66.6.  Why, because of a golden lamb it came to pass that a mighty house like that of Pelops was overturned, as we learn from the tragic poets. And not only were the children of Thyestes cut in pieces, but Pelopia's father lay with her and begot Aegistheus; and Aegistheus with Clytemnestra's aid slew Agamemnon, "the shepherd of the Achaeans"; and then Clytemnestra's son Orestes slew her, and, having done so, he straightway went mad. One should not disbelieve these things, for they have been recorded by no ordinary men — Euripides and Sophocles — and also are recited in the midst of the theatres. Furthermore, one may behold another house, more affluent than that of Pelops, which has been ruined because of a tongue, and, in sooth, another house which is now in jeopardy.
9. Juvenal, Satires, 8.229 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •citations of tragedy by Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 165
10. Plutarch, On Exilio, 605 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dio of prusa (chrysostom)\n, citations of tragedy by Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 171
11. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 58.24.3-58.24.5, 59.5, 63.9.4, 63.10.2, 63.22.6 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dio of prusa (chrysostom)\n, citations of tragedy by •aelius aristides (sophist)\n, citations of tragedy by •philostratus (the younger), citations of tragedy by •citations of tragedy by Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 165, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180
58.24.3.  Among the various persons who perished either at the hands of the executioners or by their own act was Pomponius Labeo. This man, who had once governed Moesia for eight years after his praetorship, was indicted, together with his wife, for taking bribes, and voluntarily perished along with her. Mamercus Aemilius Scaurus, on the other hand, who had never governed a province or accepted bribes, was convicted because of a tragedy he had composed, and fell a victim to a worse fate than that which he had described. 58.24.4.  "Atreus" was the name of his drama, and in the manner of Euripides it advised one of the subjects of that monarch to endure the folly of the reigning prince. Tiberius, upon hearing of it, declared that this had been written with reference to him, claiming that he himself was "Atreus" because of his bloodthirstiness; and remarking, "I will make him Ajax," he compelled him to commit suicide. 58.24.5.  The above, however, was not the accusation that was actually brought against him, but instead, he was charged with having committed adultery with Livilla; indeed, many others also were punished on her account, some with good reason and some as the result of false accusations. 59.5. 1.  This was the kind of emperor into whose hands the Romans were then delivered. Hence the deeds of Tiberius, though they were felt to have been very harsh, were nevertheless as far superior to those of Gaius as the deeds of Augustus were to those of his successor.,2.  For Tiberius always kept the power in his own hands and used others as agents for carrying out his wishes; whereas Gaius was ruled by the charioteers and gladiators, and was the slave of the actors and others connected with the stage. Indeed, he always kept Apelles, the most famous of the tragedians of that day, with him even in public.,3.  Thus he by himself and they by themselves did without let or hindrance all that such persons would naturally dare to do when given power. Everything that pertained to their art he arranged and settled on the slightest pretext in the most lavish manner, and he compelled the praetors and the consuls to do the same, so that almost every day some performance of the kind was sure to be given.,4.  At first he was but a spectator and listener at these and would take sides for or against various performers like one of the crowd; and one time, when he was vexed with those of opposing tastes, he did not go to the spectacle. But as time went on, he came to imitate, and to contend in many events,,5.  driving chariots, fighting as a gladiator, giving exhibitions of pantomimic dancing, and acting in tragedy. So much for his regular behaviour. And once he sent an urgent summons at night to the leading men of the senate, as if for some important deliberation, and then danced before them.   63.22.6.  They were held by Augustus and by Claudius, whereas this fellow might most properly be termed Thyestes, Oedipus, Alcmeon, or Orestes; for these are the characters that he represents on the stage and it is these titles that he has assumed in place of the others. Therefore rise now at length against him; succour yourselves and succour the Romans; liberate the entire world!"
12. Philostratus The Athenian, Lives of The Sophists, 4.38.5, 4.39.2, 7.4.2 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •citations of tragedy by Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 165
13. Epigraphy, Roesch, Ithesp, 358  Tagged with subjects: •aelius aristides (sophist)\n, citations of tragedy by •dio of prusa (chrysostom)\n, citations of tragedy by •philostratus (the younger), citations of tragedy by •citations of tragedy by Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 165, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180
14. Favorinus, De Exil., 7.2-7.3  Tagged with subjects: •aelius aristides (sophist)\n, citations of tragedy by •philostratus (the younger), citations of tragedy by •citations of tragedy by Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 170
15. Sophocles, Trgf F589.1-3 227 See Also Page, 589.1-589.3  Tagged with subjects: •aelius aristides (sophist)\n, citations of tragedy by •dio of prusa (chrysostom)\n, citations of tragedy by •philostratus (the younger), citations of tragedy by •citations of tragedy by Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 180
16. Papyri, P.Oxy., 5203  Tagged with subjects: •aelius aristides (sophist)\n, citations of tragedy by •philostratus (the younger), citations of tragedy by •citations of tragedy by Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 170