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348 results for "christian"
1. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 16.11, 24.10, 78.16, 105.41, 143.10 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •gymnastic events, in christian literature •christianity/christians, early writings/literature •christian, literature/authors Found in books: Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 229, 373; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 334; Spielman (2020), Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World. 216
16.11. "תּוֹדִיעֵנִי אֹרַח חַיִּים שֹׂבַע שְׂמָחוֹת אֶת־פָּנֶיךָ נְעִמוֹת בִּימִינְךָ נֶצַח׃", 78.16. "וַיּוֹצִא נוֹזְלִים מִסָּלַע וַיּוֹרֶד כַּנְּהָרוֹת מָיִם׃", 105.41. "פָּתַח צוּר וַיָּזוּבוּ מָיִם הָלְכוּ בַּצִּיּוֹת נָהָר׃", 16.11. "Thou makest me to know the path of life; In Thy presence is fulness of joy, In Thy right hand bliss for evermore.", 24.10. "'Who then is the King of glory?' 'The LORD of hosts; He is the King of glory.' Selah", 78.16. "He brought streams also out of the rock, And caused waters to run down like rivers.", 105.41. "He opened the rock, and waters gushed out; They ran, a river in the dry places.", 143.10. "Teach me to do Thy will, For Thou art my God; Let Thy good spirit Lead me in an even land.",
2. Hebrew Bible, Proverbs, 26.4 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •festivals, non-christian, in early christian literature Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 63
26.4. "אַל־תַּעַן כְּסִיל כְּאִוַּלְתּוֹ פֶּן־תִּשְׁוֶה־לּוֹ גַם־אָתָּה׃", 26.4. "Answer not a fool according to his folly, Lest thou also be like unto him.",
3. Hebrew Bible, Numbers, 12.8, 20.16, 22.25, 24.2-24.3 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature •christian, literature/authors •faith, in early christian literature Found in books: Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022), Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity, 6; Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 44; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 229, 230
12.8. "פֶּה אֶל־פֶּה אֲדַבֶּר־בּוֹ וּמַרְאֶה וְלֹא בְחִידֹת וּתְמֻנַת יְהוָה יַבִּיט וּמַדּוּעַ לֹא יְרֵאתֶם לְדַבֵּר בְּעַבְדִּי בְמֹשֶׁה׃", 20.16. "וַנִּצְעַק אֶל־יְהוָה וַיִּשְׁמַע קֹלֵנוּ וַיִּשְׁלַח מַלְאָךְ וַיֹּצִאֵנוּ מִמִּצְרָיִם וְהִנֵּה אֲנַחְנוּ בְקָדֵשׁ עִיר קְצֵה גְבוּלֶךָ׃", 22.25. "וַתֵּרֶא הָאָתוֹן אֶת־מַלְאַךְ יְהוָה וַתִּלָּחֵץ אֶל־הַקִּיר וַתִּלְחַץ אֶת־רֶגֶל בִּלְעָם אֶל־הַקִּיר וַיֹּסֶף לְהַכֹּתָהּ׃", 24.2. "וַיִּשָּׂא בִלְעָם אֶת־עֵינָיו וַיַּרְא אֶת־יִשְׂרָאֵל שֹׁכֵן לִשְׁבָטָיו וַתְּהִי עָלָיו רוּחַ אֱלֹהִים׃", 24.2. "וַיַּרְא אֶת־עֲמָלֵק וַיִּשָּׂא מְשָׁלוֹ וַיֹּאמַר רֵאשִׁית גּוֹיִם עֲמָלֵק וְאַחֲרִיתוֹ עֲדֵי אֹבֵד׃", 24.3. "וַיִּשָּׂא מְשָׁלוֹ וַיֹּאמַר נְאֻם בִּלְעָם בְּנוֹ בְעֹר וּנְאֻם הַגֶּבֶר שְׁתֻם הָעָיִן׃", 12.8. "with him do I speak mouth to mouth, even manifestly, and not in dark speeches; and the similitude of the LORD doth he behold; wherefore then were ye not afraid to speak against My servant, against Moses?’", 20.16. "and when we cried unto the LORD, He heard our voice, and sent an angel, and brought us forth out of Egypt; and, behold, we are in Kadesh, a city in the uttermost of thy border.", 22.25. "And the ass saw the angel of the LORD, and she thrust herself unto the wall, and crushed Balaam’s foot against the wall; and he smote her again.", 24.2. "And Balaam lifted up his eyes, and he saw Israel dwelling tribe by tribe; and the spirit of God came upon him.", 24.3. "And he took up his parable, and said: The saying of Balaam the son of Beor, And the saying of the man whose eye is opened;",
4. Hebrew Bible, Leviticus, 20.19, 24.17, 26.29 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pharisees, in christian literature •festivals, non-christian, in early christian literature •christianity, early, relationship between early christian and jewish feasting and feasting literature Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 44; Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 48; König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 294
20.19. "וְעֶרְוַת אֲחוֹת אִמְּךָ וַאֲחוֹת אָבִיךָ לֹא תְגַלֵּה כִּי אֶת־שְׁאֵרוֹ הֶעֱרָה עֲוֺנָם יִשָּׂאוּ׃", 24.17. "וְאִישׁ כִּי יַכֶּה כָּל־נֶפֶשׁ אָדָם מוֹת יוּמָת׃", 26.29. "וַאֲכַלְתֶּם בְּשַׂר בְּנֵיכֶם וּבְשַׂר בְּנֹתֵיכֶם תֹּאכֵלוּ׃" 20.19. "And thou shalt not uncover the nakedness of thy mother’s sister, nor of thy father’s sister; for he hath made naked his near kin; they shall bear their iniquity.", 24.17. "And he that smiteth any man mortally shall surely be put to death.", 26.29. "And ye shall eat the flesh of your sons, and the flesh of your daughters shall ye eat."
5. Hebrew Bible, Hosea, 5.6 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •sandals, in early christian literature •christian literature, acts of paul and thekla Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 173; Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 69
5.6. "בְּצֹאנָם וּבִבְקָרָם יֵלְכוּ לְבַקֵּשׁ אֶת־יְהוָה וְלֹא יִמְצָאוּ חָלַץ מֵהֶם׃", 5.6. "With their flocks and with their herds they shall go To seek the LORD, but they shall not find Him; He hath withdrawn Himself from them.",
6. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, None (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 48
24.40. "And he said unto me: The LORD, before whom I walk, will send His angel with thee, and prosper thy way; and thou shalt take a wife for my son of my kindred, and of my father’s house;",
7. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 8.19, 17.1-17.7, 20.12, 21.12, 21.16, 23.20-23.21, 33.20 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian, literature/authors •pharisees, in christian literature •festivals, non-christian, in early christian literature •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 44; Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 48; Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 31, 36; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 230, 373
8.19. "וְשַׂמְתִּי פְדֻת בֵּין עַמִּי וּבֵין עַמֶּךָ לְמָחָר יִהְיֶה הָאֹת הַזֶּה׃", 17.1. "וַיִּסְעוּ כָּל־עֲדַת בְּנֵי־יִשְׂרָאֵל מִמִּדְבַּר־סִין לְמַסְעֵיהֶם עַל־פִּי יְהוָה וַיַּחֲנוּ בִּרְפִידִים וְאֵין מַיִם לִשְׁתֹּת הָעָם׃", 17.1. "וַיַּעַשׂ יְהוֹשֻׁעַ כַּאֲשֶׁר אָמַר־לוֹ מֹשֶׁה לְהִלָּחֵם בַּעֲמָלֵק וּמֹשֶׁה אַהֲרֹן וְחוּר עָלוּ רֹאשׁ הַגִּבְעָה׃", 17.2. "וַיָּרֶב הָעָם עִם־מֹשֶׁה וַיֹּאמְרוּ תְּנוּ־לָנוּ מַיִם וְנִשְׁתֶּה וַיֹּאמֶר לָהֶם מֹשֶׁה מַה־תְּרִיבוּן עִמָּדִי מַה־תְּנַסּוּן אֶת־יְהוָה׃", 17.3. "וַיִּצְמָא שָׁם הָעָם לַמַּיִם וַיָּלֶן הָעָם עַל־מֹשֶׁה וַיֹּאמֶר לָמָּה זֶּה הֶעֱלִיתָנוּ מִמִּצְרַיִם לְהָמִית אֹתִי וְאֶת־בָּנַי וְאֶת־מִקְנַי בַּצָּמָא׃", 17.4. "וַיִּצְעַק מֹשֶׁה אֶל־יְהוָה לֵאמֹר מָה אֶעֱשֶׂה לָעָם הַזֶּה עוֹד מְעַט וּסְקָלֻנִי׃", 17.5. "וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה אֶל־מֹשֶׁה עֲבֹר לִפְנֵי הָעָם וְקַח אִתְּךָ מִזִּקְנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל וּמַטְּךָ אֲשֶׁר הִכִּיתָ בּוֹ אֶת־הַיְאֹר קַח בְּיָדְךָ וְהָלָכְתָּ׃", 17.6. "הִנְנִי עֹמֵד לְפָנֶיךָ שָּׁם עַל־הַצּוּר בְּחֹרֵב וְהִכִּיתָ בַצּוּר וְיָצְאוּ מִמֶּנּוּ מַיִם וְשָׁתָה הָעָם וַיַּעַשׂ כֵּן מֹשֶׁה לְעֵינֵי זִקְנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל׃", 17.7. "וַיִּקְרָא שֵׁם הַמָּקוֹם מַסָּה וּמְרִיבָה עַל־רִיב בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל וְעַל נַסֹּתָם אֶת־יְהוָה לֵאמֹר הֲיֵשׁ יְהוָה בְּקִרְבֵּנוּ אִם־אָיִן׃", 20.12. "כַּבֵּד אֶת־אָבִיךָ וְאֶת־אִמֶּךָ לְמַעַן יַאֲרִכוּן יָמֶיךָ עַל הָאֲדָמָה אֲשֶׁר־יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ נֹתֵן לָךְ׃", 21.12. "מַכֵּה אִישׁ וָמֵת מוֹת יוּמָת׃", 21.16. "וְגֹנֵב אִישׁ וּמְכָרוֹ וְנִמְצָא בְיָדוֹ מוֹת יוּמָת׃", 23.21. "הִשָּׁמֶר מִפָּנָיו וּשְׁמַע בְּקֹלוֹ אַל־תַּמֵּר בּוֹ כִּי לֹא יִשָּׂא לְפִשְׁעֲכֶם כִּי שְׁמִי בְּקִרְבּוֹ׃", 8.19. "And I will put a division between My people and thy people—by to-morrow shall this sign be.’", 17.1. "And all the congregation of the children of Israel journeyed from the wilderness of Sin, by their stages, according to the commandment of the LORD, and encamped in Rephidim; and there was no water for the people to drink.", 17.2. "Wherefore the people strove with Moses, and said: ‘Give us water that we may drink.’ And Moses said unto them: ‘Why strive ye with me? wherefore do ye try the LORD?’", 17.3. "And the people thirsted there for water; and the people murmured against Moses, and said: ‘Wherefore hast thou brought us up out of Egypt, to kill us and our children and our cattle with thirst?’", 17.4. "And Moses cried unto the LORD, saying: ‘What shall I do unto this people? they are almost ready to stone me.’", 17.5. "And the LORD said unto Moses: ‘Pass on before the people, and take with thee of the elders of Israel; and thy rod, wherewith thou smotest the river, take in thy hand, and go.", 17.6. "Behold, I will stand before thee there upon the rock in Horeb; and thou shalt smite the rock, and there shall come water out of it, that the people may drink.’ And Moses did so in the sight of the elders of Israel.", 17.7. "And the name of the place was called Massah, and Meribah, because of the striving of the children of Israel, and because they tried the LORD, saying: ‘Is the LORD among us, or not?’", 20.12. "Honour thy father and thy mother, that thy days may be long upon the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee.", 21.12. "He that smiteth a man, so that he dieth, shall surely be put to death.", 21.16. "And he that stealeth a man, and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death.", 23.20. "Behold, I send an angel before thee, to keep thee by the way, and to bring thee into the place which I have prepared.", 23.21. "Take heed of him, and hearken unto his voice; be not rebellious against him; for he will not pardon your transgression; for My name is in him.", 33.20. "And He said: ‘Thou canst not see My face, for man shall not see Me and live.’",
8. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 4.7, 5.16, 8.6, 25.7-25.10, 28.53-28.57 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature •pharisees, in christian literature •festivals, non-christian, in early christian literature •christianity/christians, early writings/literature •sandals, in early christian literature •christianity, early, relationship between early christian and jewish feasting and feasting literature Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 44, 170; Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 48; Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 35; König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 294; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 334
4.7. "כִּי מִי־גוֹי גָּדוֹל אֲשֶׁר־לוֹ אֱלֹהִים קְרֹבִים אֵלָיו כַּיהוָה אֱלֹהֵינוּ בְּכָּל־קָרְאֵנוּ אֵלָיו׃", 5.16. "כַּבֵּד אֶת־אָבִיךָ וְאֶת־אִמֶּךָ כַּאֲשֶׁר צִוְּךָ יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ לְמַעַן יַאֲרִיכֻן יָמֶיךָ וּלְמַעַן יִיטַב לָךְ עַל הָאֲדָמָה אֲשֶׁר־יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ נֹתֵן לָךְ׃", 8.6. "וְשָׁמַרְתָּ אֶת־מִצְוֺת יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ לָלֶכֶת בִּדְרָכָיו וּלְיִרְאָה אֹתוֹ׃", 25.7. "וְאִם־לֹא יַחְפֹּץ הָאִישׁ לָקַחַת אֶת־יְבִמְתּוֹ וְעָלְתָה יְבִמְתּוֹ הַשַּׁעְרָה אֶל־הַזְּקֵנִים וְאָמְרָה מֵאֵין יְבָמִי לְהָקִים לְאָחִיו שֵׁם בְּיִשְׂרָאֵל לֹא אָבָה יַבְּמִי׃", 25.8. "וְקָרְאוּ־לוֹ זִקְנֵי־עִירוֹ וְדִבְּרוּ אֵלָיו וְעָמַד וְאָמַר לֹא חָפַצְתִּי לְקַחְתָּהּ׃", 25.9. "וְנִגְּשָׁה יְבִמְתּוֹ אֵלָיו לְעֵינֵי הַזְּקֵנִים וְחָלְצָה נַעֲלוֹ מֵעַל רַגְלוֹ וְיָרְקָה בְּפָנָיו וְעָנְתָה וְאָמְרָה כָּכָה יֵעָשֶׂה לָאִישׁ אֲשֶׁר לֹא־יִבְנֶה אֶת־בֵּית אָחִיו", 28.53. "וְאָכַלְתָּ פְרִי־בִטְנְךָ בְּשַׂר בָּנֶיךָ וּבְנֹתֶיךָ אֲשֶׁר נָתַן־לְךָ יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ בְּמָצוֹר וּבְמָצוֹק אֲשֶׁר־יָצִיק לְךָ אֹיְבֶךָ׃", 28.54. "הָאִישׁ הָרַךְ בְּךָ וְהֶעָנֹג מְאֹד תֵּרַע עֵינוֹ בְאָחִיו וּבְאֵשֶׁת חֵיקוֹ וּבְיֶתֶר בָּנָיו אֲשֶׁר יוֹתִיר׃", 28.55. "מִתֵּת לְאַחַד מֵהֶם מִבְּשַׂר בָּנָיו אֲשֶׁר יֹאכֵל מִבְּלִי הִשְׁאִיר־לוֹ כֹּל בְּמָצוֹר וּבְמָצוֹק אֲשֶׁר יָצִיק לְךָ אֹיִבְךָ בְּכָל־שְׁעָרֶיךָ׃", 28.56. "הָרַכָּה בְךָ וְהָעֲנֻגָּה אֲשֶׁר לֹא־נִסְּתָה כַף־רַגְלָהּ הַצֵּג עַל־הָאָרֶץ מֵהִתְעַנֵּג וּמֵרֹךְ תֵּרַע עֵינָהּ בְּאִישׁ חֵיקָהּ וּבִבְנָהּ וּבְבִתָּהּ׃", 28.57. "וּבְשִׁלְיָתָהּ הַיּוֹצֵת מִבֵּין רַגְלֶיהָ וּבְבָנֶיהָ אֲשֶׁר תֵּלֵד כִּי־תֹאכְלֵם בְּחֹסֶר־כֹּל בַּסָּתֶר בְּמָצוֹר וּבְמָצוֹק אֲשֶׁר יָצִיק לְךָ אֹיִבְךָ בִּשְׁעָרֶיךָ׃", 4.7. "For what great nation is there, that hath God so nigh unto them, as the LORD our God is whensoever we call upon Him?", 5.16. "Honour thy father and thy mother, as the LORD thy God commanded thee; that thy days may be long, and that it may go well with thee, upon the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee.", 8.6. "And thou shalt keep the commandments of the LORD thy God, to walk in His ways, and to fear Him.", 25.7. "And if the man like not to take his brother’s wife, then his brother’s wife shall go up to the gate unto the elders, and say: ‘My husband’s brother refuseth to raise up unto his brother a name in Israel; he will not perform the duty of a husband’s brother unto me.’", 25.8. "Then the elders of his city shall call him, and speak unto him; and if he stand, and say: ‘I like not to take her’;", 25.9. "then shall his brother’s wife draw nigh unto him in the presence of the elders, and loose his shoe from off his foot, and spit in his face; and she shall answer and say: ‘So shall it be done unto the man that doth not build up his brother’s house.’", 25.10. "And his name shall be called in Israel The house of him that had his shoe loosed.", 28.53. "And thou shalt eat the fruit of thine own body, the flesh of thy sons and of thy daughters whom the LORD thy God hath given thee; in the siege and in the straitness, wherewith thine enemies shall straiten thee.", 28.54. "The man that is tender among you, and very delicate, his eye shall be evil against his brother, and against the wife of his bosom, and against the remt of his children whom he hath remaining;", 28.55. "so that he will not give to any of them of the flesh of his children whom he shall eat, because he hath nothing left him; in the siege and in the straitness, wherewith thine enemy shall straiten thee in all thy gates.", 28.56. "The tender and delicate woman among you, who would not adventure to set the sole of her foot upon the ground for delicateness and tenderness, her eye shall be evil against the husband of her bosom, and against her son, and against her daughter;", 28.57. "and against her afterbirth that cometh out from between her feet, and against her children whom she shall bear; for she shall eat them for want of all things secretly; in the siege and in the straitness, wherewith thine enemy shall straiten thee in thy gates.",
9. Hebrew Bible, Jeremiah, 6.16, 19.9, 39.10-39.11, 39.25, 39.44 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •christianity/christians, early writings/literature •christianity, early, relationship between early christian and jewish feasting and feasting literature •christian, literature/authors Found in books: König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 294; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 256; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 334
6.16. "כֹּה אָמַר יְהוָה עִמְדוּ עַל־דְּרָכִים וּרְאוּ וְשַׁאֲלוּ לִנְתִבוֹת עוֹלָם אֵי־זֶה דֶרֶךְ הַטּוֹב וּלְכוּ־בָהּ וּמִצְאוּ מַרְגּוֹעַ לְנַפְשְׁכֶם וַיֹּאמְרוּ לֹא נֵלֵךְ׃", 19.9. "וְהַאֲכַלְתִּים אֶת־בְּשַׂר בְּנֵיהֶם וְאֵת בְּשַׂר בְּנֹתֵיהֶם וְאִישׁ בְּשַׂר־רֵעֵהוּ יֹאכֵלוּ בְּמָצוֹר וּבְמָצוֹק אֲשֶׁר יָצִיקוּ לָהֶם אֹיְבֵיהֶם וּמְבַקְשֵׁי נַפְשָׁם׃", 39.11. "וַיְצַו נְבוּכַדְרֶאצַּר מֶלֶךְ־בָּבֶל עַל־יִרְמְיָהוּ בְּיַד נְבוּזַרְאֲדָן רַב־טַבָּחִים לֵאמֹר׃", 6.16. "Thus saith the LORD: Stand ye in the ways and see, And ask for the old paths, Where is the good way, and walk therein, And ye shall find rest for your souls. But they said: ‘We will not walk therein.’", 19.9. "and I will cause them to eat the flesh of their sons and the flesh of their daughters, and they shall eat every one the flesh of his friend, in the siege and in the straitness, wherewith their enemies, and they that seek their life, shall straiten them.", 39.10. "But Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard left of the poor of the people, that had nothing, in the land of Judah, and gave them vineyards and fields in that day.", 39.11. "Now Nebuchadrezzar king of Babylon gave charge concerning Jeremiah to Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard, saying:",
10. Homer, Iliad, 1.4, 22.71-22.74 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian literature, acts of paul and thekla Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 69
1.4. / The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment, 22.71. / which then having drunk my blood in the madness of their hearts, shall lie there in the gateway. A young man it beseemeth wholly, when he is slain in battle, that he lie mangled by the sharp bronze; dead though he be, all is honourable whatsoever be seen. But when dogs work shame upon the hoary head and hoary beard 22.72. / which then having drunk my blood in the madness of their hearts, shall lie there in the gateway. A young man it beseemeth wholly, when he is slain in battle, that he lie mangled by the sharp bronze; dead though he be, all is honourable whatsoever be seen. But when dogs work shame upon the hoary head and hoary beard 22.73. / which then having drunk my blood in the madness of their hearts, shall lie there in the gateway. A young man it beseemeth wholly, when he is slain in battle, that he lie mangled by the sharp bronze; dead though he be, all is honourable whatsoever be seen. But when dogs work shame upon the hoary head and hoary beard 22.74. / which then having drunk my blood in the madness of their hearts, shall lie there in the gateway. A young man it beseemeth wholly, when he is slain in battle, that he lie mangled by the sharp bronze; dead though he be, all is honourable whatsoever be seen. But when dogs work shame upon the hoary head and hoary beard
11. Hebrew Bible, Lamentations, 4.1 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •christianity, early, relationship between early christian and jewish feasting and feasting literature Found in books: König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 294
4.1. "אֵיכָה יוּעַם זָהָב יִשְׁנֶא הַכֶּתֶם הַטּוֹב תִּשְׁתַּפֵּכְנָה אַבְנֵי־קֹדֶשׁ בְּרֹאשׁ כָּל־חוּצוֹת׃", 4.1. "יְדֵי נָשִׁים רַחֲמָנִיּוֹת בִּשְּׁלוּ יַלְדֵיהֶן הָיוּ לְבָרוֹת לָמוֹ בְּשֶׁבֶר בַּת־עַמִּי׃", 4.1. "How is the gold become dim! How is the most fine gold changed! The hallowed stones are poured out At the head of every street.",
12. Hebrew Bible, Judges, 2.22 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •christianity/christians, early writings/literature Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 334
2.22. "לְמַעַן נַסּוֹת בָּם אֶת־יִשְׂרָאֵל הֲשֹׁמְרִים הֵם אֶת־דֶּרֶךְ יְהוָה לָלֶכֶת בָּם כַּאֲשֶׁר שָׁמְרוּ אֲבוֹתָם אִם־לֹא׃", 2.22. "that through them I may put Yisra᾽el to the proof, whether they will keep the way of the Lord to walk in it, as their fathers did keep it, or not.",
13. Hebrew Bible, Joshua, 2.5, 5.15, 7.1 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •christianity/christians, early writings/literature •sandals, in early christian literature •christian, literature/authors Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 169; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 230; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 334
2.5. "וַיְהִי הַשַּׁעַר לִסְגּוֹר בַּחֹשֶׁךְ וְהָאֲנָשִׁים יָצָאוּ לֹא יָדַעְתִּי אָנָה הָלְכוּ הָאֲנָשִׁים רִדְפוּ מַהֵר אַחֲרֵיהֶם כִּי תַשִּׂיגוּם׃", 5.15. "וַיֹּאמֶר שַׂר־צְבָא יְהוָה אֶל־יְהוֹשֻׁעַ שַׁל־נַעַלְךָ מֵעַל רַגְלֶךָ כִּי הַמָּקוֹם אֲשֶׁר אַתָּה עֹמֵד עָלָיו קֹדֶשׁ הוּא וַיַּעַשׂ יְהוֹשֻׁעַ כֵּן׃", 7.1. "וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה אֶל־יְהוֹשֻׁעַ קֻם לָךְ לָמָּה זֶּה אַתָּה נֹפֵל עַל־פָּנֶיךָ׃", 7.1. "וַיִּמְעֲלוּ בְנֵי־יִשְׂרָאֵל מַעַל בַּחֵרֶם וַיִּקַּח עָכָן בֶּן־כַּרְמִי בֶן־זַבְדִּי בֶן־זֶרַח לְמַטֵּה יְהוּדָה מִן־הַחֵרֶם וַיִּחַר־אַף יְהוָה בִּבְנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל׃", 2.5. "and it came to pass about the time of the shutting of the gate, when it was dark, that the men went out; whither the men went I know not; pursue after them quickly; for ye shall overtake them.’", 5.15. "And the captain of the LORD’S host said unto Joshua: ‘Put off thy shoe from off thy foot; for the place whereon thou standest is holy.’ And Joshua did so.", 7.1. "But the children of Israel committed a trespass concerning the devoted thing; for Achan, the son of Carmi, the son of Zabdi, the son of Zerah, of the tribe of Judah, took of the devoted thing; and the anger of the LORD was kindled against the children of Israel.",
14. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 6.1, 6.5, 8.14, 18.5, 26.8, 29.13, 30.10, 42.1-42.4, 55.6, 63.7-63.14 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature •pharisaic-rabbinic connection, in early christian literature •heracles/hercules, christian literature •christianity/christians, early writings/literature •pharisees, in christian literature •christian, literature/authors Found in books: Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 70; Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 44, 47, 48; Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 31, 35, 36, 37, 38, 42; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 229, 230, 246; Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 670; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 334
6.1. "בִּשְׁנַת־מוֹת הַמֶּלֶךְ עֻזִּיָּהוּ וָאֶרְאֶה אֶת־אֲדֹנָי יֹשֵׁב עַל־כִּסֵּא רָם וְנִשָּׂא וְשׁוּלָיו מְלֵאִים אֶת־הַהֵיכָל׃", 6.1. "הַשְׁמֵן לֵב־הָעָם הַזֶּה וְאָזְנָיו הַכְבֵּד וְעֵינָיו הָשַׁע פֶּן־יִרְאֶה בְעֵינָיו וּבְאָזְנָיו יִשְׁמָע וּלְבָבוֹ יָבִין וָשָׁב וְרָפָא לוֹ׃", 6.5. "וָאֹמַר אוֹי־לִי כִי־נִדְמֵיתִי כִּי אִישׁ טְמֵא־שְׂפָתַיִם אָנֹכִי וּבְתוֹךְ עַם־טְמֵא שְׂפָתַיִם אָנֹכִי יוֹשֵׁב כִּי אֶת־הַמֶּלֶךְ יְהוָה צְבָאוֹת רָאוּ עֵינָי׃", 8.14. "וְהָיָה לְמִקְדָּשׁ וּלְאֶבֶן נֶגֶף וּלְצוּר מִכְשׁוֹל לִשְׁנֵי בָתֵּי יִשְׂרָאֵל לְפַח וּלְמוֹקֵשׁ לְיוֹשֵׁב יְרוּשָׁלִָם׃", 18.5. "כִּי־לִפְנֵי קָצִיר כְּתָם־פֶּרַח וּבֹסֶר גֹּמֵל יִהְיֶה נִצָּה וְכָרַת הַזַּלְזַלִּים בַּמַּזְמֵרוֹת וְאֶת־הַנְּטִישׁוֹת הֵסִיר הֵתַז׃", 26.8. "אַף אֹרַח מִשְׁפָּטֶיךָ יְהוָה קִוִּינוּךָ לְשִׁמְךָ וּלְזִכְרְךָ תַּאֲוַת־נָפֶשׁ׃", 29.13. "וַיֹּאמֶר אֲדֹנָי יַעַן כִּי נִגַּשׁ הָעָם הַזֶּה בְּפִיו וּבִשְׂפָתָיו כִּבְּדוּנִי וְלִבּוֹ רִחַק מִמֶּנִּי וַתְּהִי יִרְאָתָם אֹתִי מִצְוַת אֲנָשִׁים מְלֻמָּדָה׃", 42.1. "הֵן עַבְדִּי אֶתְמָךְ־בּוֹ בְּחִירִי רָצְתָה נַפְשִׁי נָתַתִּי רוּחִי עָלָיו מִשְׁפָּט לַגּוֹיִם יוֹצִיא׃", 42.1. "שִׁירוּ לַיהוָה שִׁיר חָדָשׁ תְּהִלָּתוֹ מִקְצֵה הָאָרֶץ יוֹרְדֵי הַיָּם וּמְלֹאוֹ אִיִּים וְיֹשְׁבֵיהֶם׃", 42.2. "ראית [רָאוֹת] רַבּוֹת וְלֹא תִשְׁמֹר פָּקוֹחַ אָזְנַיִם וְלֹא יִשְׁמָע׃", 42.2. "לֹא יִצְעַק וְלֹא יִשָּׂא וְלֹא־יַשְׁמִיעַ בַּחוּץ קוֹלוֹ׃", 42.3. "קָנֶה רָצוּץ לֹא יִשְׁבּוֹר וּפִשְׁתָּה כֵהָה לֹא יְכַבֶּנָּה לֶאֱמֶת יוֹצִיא מִשְׁפָּט׃", 42.4. "לֹא יִכְהֶה וְלֹא יָרוּץ עַד־יָשִׂים בָּאָרֶץ מִשְׁפָּט וּלְתוֹרָתוֹ אִיִּים יְיַחֵילוּ׃", 55.6. "דִּרְשׁוּ יְהוָה בְּהִמָּצְאוֹ קְרָאֻהוּ בִּהְיוֹתוֹ קָרוֹב׃", 63.7. "חַסְדֵי יְהוָה אַזְכִּיר תְּהִלֹּת יְהוָה כְּעַל כֹּל אֲשֶׁר־גְּמָלָנוּ יְהוָה וְרַב־טוּב לְבֵית יִשְׂרָאֵל אֲשֶׁר־גְּמָלָם כְּרַחֲמָיו וּכְרֹב חֲסָדָיו׃", 63.8. "וַיֹּאמֶר אַךְ־עַמִּי הֵמָּה בָּנִים לֹא יְשַׁקֵּרוּ וַיְהִי לָהֶם לְמוֹשִׁיעַ׃", 63.9. "בְּכָל־צָרָתָם לא [לוֹ] צָר וּמַלְאַךְ פָּנָיו הוֹשִׁיעָם בְּאַהֲבָתוֹ וּבְחֶמְלָתוֹ הוּא גְאָלָם וַיְנַטְּלֵם וַיְנַשְּׂאֵם כָּל־יְמֵי עוֹלָם׃", 63.11. "וַיִּזְכֹּר יְמֵי־עוֹלָם מֹשֶׁה עַמּוֹ אַיֵּה הַמַּעֲלֵם מִיָּם אֵת רֹעֵי צֹאנוֹ אַיֵּה הַשָּׂם בְּקִרְבּוֹ אֶת־רוּחַ קָדְשׁוֹ׃", 63.12. "מוֹלִיךְ לִימִין מֹשֶׁה זְרוֹעַ תִּפְאַרְתּוֹ בּוֹקֵעַ מַיִם מִפְּנֵיהֶם לַעֲשׂוֹת לוֹ שֵׁם עוֹלָם׃", 63.13. "מוֹלִיכָם בַּתְּהֹמוֹת כַּסּוּס בַּמִּדְבָּר לֹא יִכָּשֵׁלוּ׃", 63.14. "כַּבְּהֵמָה בַּבִּקְעָה תֵרֵד רוּחַ יְהוָה תְּנִיחֶנּוּ כֵּן נִהַגְתָּ עַמְּךָ לַעֲשׂוֹת לְךָ שֵׁם תִּפְאָרֶת׃", 6.1. "In the year that king Uzziah died I saw the Lord sitting upon a throne high and lifted up, and His train filled the temple.", 6.5. "Then said I: Woe is me! for I am undone; Because I am a man of unclean lips, And I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean lips; For mine eyes have seen the King, The LORD of hosts.", 8.14. "And He shall be for a sanctuary; but for a stone of stumbling and for a rock of offence to both the houses of Israel, for a gin and for a snare to the inhabitants of Jerusalem.", 18.5. "For before the harvest, when the blossom is over, And the bud becometh a ripening grape, He will cut off the sprigs with pruning-hooks, And the shoots will He take away and lop off.", 26.8. "Yea, in the way of Thy judgments, O LORD, have we waited for Thee; To Thy name and to Thy memorial is the desire of our soul.", 29.13. "And the Lord said: Forasmuch as this people draw near, and with their mouth and with their lips do honour Me, But have removed their heart far from Me, And their fear of Me is a commandment of men learned by rote;", 30.10. "That say to the seers: ‘See not’, and to the prophets: ‘Prophesy not unto us right things, speak unto us smooth things, prophesy delusions;", 42.1. "Behold My servant, whom I uphold; Mine elect, in whom My soul delighteth; I have put My spirit upon him, He shall make the right to go forth to the nations.", 42.2. "He shall not cry, nor lift up, Nor cause his voice to be heard in the street.", 42.3. "A bruised reed shall he not break, And the dimly burning wick shall he not quench; He shall make the right to go forth according to the truth.", 42.4. "He shall not fail nor be crushed, Till he have set the right in the earth; And the isles shall wait for his teaching.", 55.6. "Seek ye the LORD while He may be found, Call ye upon Him while He is near;", 63.7. "I will make mention of the mercies of the LORD, and the praises of the LORD, according to all that the LORD hath bestowed on us; and the great goodness toward the house of Israel, which He hath bestowed on them according to His compassions, and according to the multitude of His mercies.", 63.8. "For He said: ‘Surely, they are My people, children that will not deal falsely’; so He was their Saviour.", 63.9. "In all their affliction He was afflicted, and the angel of His presence saved them; in His love and in His pity He redeemed them; And He bore them, and carried them all the days of old. .", 63.10. "But they rebelled, and grieved His holy spirit; therefore He was turned to be their enemy, Himself fought against them.", 63.11. "Then His people remembered the days of old, the days of Moses: ‘Where is He that brought them up out of the sea With the shepherds of His flock? Where is He that put His holy spirit In the midst of them?", 63.12. "That caused His glorious arm to go at the right hand of Moses? That divided the water before them, To make Himself an everlasting name?", 63.13. "That led them through the deep, as a horse in the wilderness, without stumbling?", 63.14. "As the cattle that go down into the valley, the spirit of the LORD caused them to rest; So didst Thou lead Thy people, To make Thyself a glorious name.’",
15. Septuagint, Isaiah, 29.23 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pharisees, in christian literature Found in books: Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 48, 49
16. Hebrew Bible, Amos, 1.3, 4.13 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature •church fathers, rabbinic awareness of later christian literature Found in books: Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 391; Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 50
1.3. "כֹּה אָמַר יְהוָה עַל־שְׁלֹשָׁה פִּשְׁעֵי דַמֶּשֶׂק וְעַל־אַרְבָּעָה לֹא אֲשִׁיבֶנּוּ עַל־דּוּשָׁם בַּחֲרֻצוֹת הַבַּרְזֶל אֶת־הַגִּלְעָד׃", 4.13. "כִּי הִנֵּה יוֹצֵר הָרִים וּבֹרֵא רוּחַ וּמַגִּיד לְאָדָם מַה־שֵּׂחוֹ עֹשֵׂה שַׁחַר עֵיפָה וְדֹרֵךְ עַל־בָּמֳתֵי אָרֶץ יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵי־צְבָאוֹת שְׁמוֹ׃", 1.3. "For thus saith the LORD: For three transgressions of Damascus, yea, for four, I will not reverse it: because they have threshed Gilead with sledges of iron.", 4.13. "For, lo, He that formeth the mountains, and createth the wind, And declareth unto man what is his thought, That maketh the morning darkness, And treadeth upon the high places of the earth; The LORD, the God of hosts, is His name.",
17. Hebrew Bible, 2 Samuel, 21.1-21.14, 22.31 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •christianity, ethiopic, and rabbinic literature •syriac, and ethiopic christian literature •christianity/christians, early writings/literature Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 145, 161; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 334
21.1. "וַיְהִי רָעָב בִּימֵי דָוִד שָׁלֹשׁ שָׁנִים שָׁנָה אַחֲרֵי שָׁנָה וַיְבַקֵּשׁ דָּוִד אֶת־פְּנֵי יְהוָה וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה אֶל־שָׁאוּל וְאֶל־בֵּית הַדָּמִים עַל־אֲשֶׁר־הֵמִית אֶת־הַגִּבְעֹנִים׃", 21.1. "וַתִּקַּח רִצְפָּה בַת־אַיָּה אֶת־הַשַּׂק וַתַּטֵּהוּ לָהּ אֶל־הַצּוּר מִתְּחִלַּת קָצִיר עַד נִתַּךְ־מַיִם עֲלֵיהֶם מִן־הַשָּׁמָיִם וְלֹא־נָתְנָה עוֹף הַשָּׁמַיִם לָנוּחַ עֲלֵיהֶם יוֹמָם וְאֶת־חַיַּת הַשָּׂדֶה לָיְלָה׃", 21.2. "וַיִּקְרָא הַמֶּלֶךְ לַגִּבְעֹנִים וַיֹּאמֶר אֲלֵיהֶם וְהַגִּבְעֹנִים לֹא מִבְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל הֵמָּה כִּי אִם־מִיֶּתֶר הָאֱמֹרִי וּבְנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל נִשְׁבְּעוּ לָהֶם וַיְבַקֵּשׁ שָׁאוּל לְהַכֹּתָם בְּקַנֹּאתוֹ לִבְנֵי־יִשְׂרָאֵל וִיהוּדָה׃", 21.2. "וַתְּהִי־עוֹד מִלְחָמָה בְּגַת וַיְהִי אִישׁ מדין [מָדוֹן] וְאֶצְבְּעֹת יָדָיו וְאֶצְבְּעֹת רַגְלָיו שֵׁשׁ וָשֵׁשׁ עֶשְׂרִים וְאַרְבַּע מִסְפָּר וְגַם־הוּא יֻלַּד לְהָרָפָה׃", 21.3. "וַיֹּאמֶר דָּוִד אֶל־הַגִּבְעֹנִים מָה אֶעֱשֶׂה לָכֶם וּבַמָּה אֲכַפֵּר וּבָרְכוּ אֶת־נַחֲלַת יְהוָה׃", 21.4. "וַיֹּאמְרוּ לוֹ הַגִּבְעֹנִים אֵין־לי [לָנוּ] כֶּסֶף וְזָהָב עִם־שָׁאוּל וְעִם־בֵּיתוֹ וְאֵין־לָנוּ אִישׁ לְהָמִית בְּיִשְׂרָאֵל וַיֹּאמֶר מָה־אַתֶּם אֹמְרִים אֶעֱשֶׂה לָכֶם׃", 21.5. "וַיֹּאמְרוּ אֶל־הַמֶּלֶךְ הָאִישׁ אֲשֶׁר כִּלָּנוּ וַאֲשֶׁר דִּמָּה־לָנוּ נִשְׁמַדְנוּ מֵהִתְיַצֵּב בְּכָל־גְּבֻל יִשְׂרָאֵל׃", 21.6. "ינתן־[יֻתַּן־] לָנוּ שִׁבְעָה אֲנָשִׁים מִבָּנָיו וְהוֹקַעֲנוּם לַיהוָה בְּגִבְעַת שָׁאוּל בְּחִיר יְהוָה וַיֹּאמֶר הַמֶּלֶךְ אֲנִי אֶתֵּן׃", 21.7. "וַיַּחְמֹל הַמֶּלֶךְ עַל־מְפִי־בֹשֶׁת בֶּן־יְהוֹנָתָן בֶּן־שָׁאוּל עַל־שְׁבֻעַת יְהוָה אֲשֶׁר בֵּינֹתָם בֵּין דָּוִד וּבֵין יְהוֹנָתָן בֶּן־שָׁאוּל׃", 21.8. "וַיִּקַּח הַמֶּלֶךְ אֶת־שְׁנֵי בְּנֵי רִצְפָּה בַת־אַיָּה אֲשֶׁר יָלְדָה לְשָׁאוּל אֶת־אַרְמֹנִי וְאֶת־מְפִבֹשֶׁת וְאֶת־חֲמֵשֶׁת בְּנֵי מִיכַל בַּת־שָׁאוּל אֲשֶׁר יָלְדָה לְעַדְרִיאֵל בֶּן־בַּרְזִלַּי הַמְּחֹלָתִי׃", 21.9. "וַיִּתְּנֵם בְּיַד הַגִּבְעֹנִים וַיֹּקִיעֻם בָּהָר לִפְנֵי יְהוָה וַיִּפְּלוּ שבעתים [שְׁבַעְתָּם] יָחַד והם [וְהֵמָּה] הֻמְתוּ בִּימֵי קָצִיר בָּרִאשֹׁנִים תחלת [בִּתְחִלַּת] קְצִיר שְׂעֹרִים׃", 21.11. "וַיֻּגַּד לְדָוִד אֵת אֲשֶׁר־עָשְׂתָה רִצְפָּה בַת־אַיָּה פִּלֶגֶשׁ שָׁאוּל׃", 21.12. "וַיֵּלֶךְ דָּוִד וַיִּקַּח אֶת־עַצְמוֹת שָׁאוּל וְאֶת־עַצְמוֹת יְהוֹנָתָן בְּנוֹ מֵאֵת בַּעֲלֵי יָבֵישׁ גִּלְעָד אֲשֶׁר גָּנְבוּ אֹתָם מֵרְחֹב בֵּית־שַׁן אֲשֶׁר תלום [תְּלָאוּם] שם הפלשתים [שָׁמָּה] [פְּלִשְׁתִּים] בְּיוֹם הַכּוֹת פְּלִשְׁתִּים אֶת־שָׁאוּל בַּגִּלְבֹּעַ׃", 21.13. "וַיַּעַל מִשָּׁם אֶת־עַצְמוֹת שָׁאוּל וְאֶת־עַצְמוֹת יְהוֹנָתָן בְּנוֹ וַיַּאַסְפוּ אֶת־עַצְמוֹת הַמּוּקָעִים׃", 21.14. "וַיִּקְבְּרוּ אֶת־עַצְמוֹת־שָׁאוּל וִיהוֹנָתָן־בְּנוֹ בְּאֶרֶץ בִּנְיָמִן בְּצֵלָע בְּקֶבֶר קִישׁ אָבִיו וַיַּעֲשׂוּ כֹּל אֲשֶׁר־צִוָּה הַמֶּלֶךְ וַיֵּעָתֵר אֱלֹהִים לָאָרֶץ אַחֲרֵי־כֵן׃", 22.31. "הָאֵל תָּמִים דַּרְכּוֹ אִמְרַת יְהוָה צְרוּפָה מָגֵן הוּא לְכֹל הַחֹסִים בּוֹ׃", 21.1. "Then there was a famine in the days of David three years, year after year; and David inquired of the Lord. And the Lord answered, It is for Sha᾽ul, and for his bloody house, because he slew the Giv῾onim.", 21.2. "And the king called the Giv῾onim, and said to them; (now the Giv῾onim were not of the children of Yisra᾽el, but of the remt of the Emori; and the children of Yisra᾽el had sworn to them: and Sha᾽ul sought to slay them in his zeal for the children of Yisra᾽el and Yehuda.)", 21.3. "Then David said to the Giv῾onim, What shall I do for you? and with what shall I make atonement, that you may bless the inheritance of the Lord?", 21.4. "And the Giv῾onim said to him, We will have no silver nor gold of Sha᾽ul, nor of his house; neither for us shalt thou kill any man in Yisra᾽el. And he said, What you shall say, that will I do for you.", 21.5. "And they answered the king, The man that consumed us, and that devised against us that we should be destroyed from remaining in any of the borders of Yisra᾽el,", 21.6. "let seven men of his sons be delivered to us, and we will hang them up to the Lord in Giv῾at-sha’ul (whom the Lord did choose.) And the king said, I will give them.", 21.7. "But the king spared Mefivoshet, the son of Yehonatan the son of Sha᾽ul, because of the Lord’s oath that was between them, between David and Yehonatan the son of Sha᾽ul.", 21.8. "But the king took the two sons of Riżpa the daughter of Ayya, whom she bore to Sha᾽ul, Armoni and Mefivoshet; and the five sons of Mikhal the daughter of Sha᾽ul, whom she bore to ῾Adri᾽el the son of Barzillay the Meĥolatite:", 21.9. "and he delivered them into the hands of the Giv῾onim, and they hanged them on the hill before the Lord: and they fell all seven together, and were put to death in the days of harvest, in the first days, in the beginning of the barley harvest.", 21.10. "And Riżpa the daughter of Ayya took sackcloth, and spread it for her upon the rock, from the beginning of harvest until water dropped upon them out of heaven, and suffered neither the birds of the air to rest on them by day, nor the beasts of the field by night.", 21.11. "And it was told David what Riżpa the daughter of Ayya, the concubine of Sha᾽ul, had done.", 21.12. "And David went and took the bones of Sha᾽ul and the bones of Yehonatan his son from the men of Yavesh-gil῾ad, who had stolen them from the open place of Bet-shan, where the Pelishtim had hanged them, when the Pelishtim had slain Sha᾽ul in Gilboa:", 21.13. "and he brought up from there the bones of Sha᾽ul and the bones of Yehonatan his son; and they gathered the bones of them that were hanged.", 21.14. "And the bones of Sha᾽ul and Yehonatan his son they buried in the country of Binyamin in Żela, in the tomb of Qish his father: and they performed all that the king commanded. And after that God was entreated for the land.", 22.31. "As for God, His way is perfect; the word of the Lord is tried: He is a shield to all them that trust in him.",
18. Hebrew Bible, 2 Kings, 6.26-6.29, 21.16 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •christianity, early, relationship between early christian and jewish feasting and feasting literature •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 44; König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 294
6.26. "וַיְהִי מֶלֶךְ יִשְׂרָאֵל עֹבֵר עַל־הַחֹמָה וְאִשָּׁה צָעֲקָה אֵלָיו לֵאמֹר הוֹשִׁיעָה אֲדֹנִי הַמֶּלֶךְ׃", 6.27. "וַיֹּאמֶר אַל־יוֹשִׁעֵךְ יְהוָה מֵאַיִן אוֹשִׁיעֵךְ הֲמִן־הַגֹּרֶן אוֹ מִן־הַיָּקֶב׃", 6.28. "וַיֹּאמֶר־לָהּ הַמֶּלֶךְ מַה־לָּךְ וַתֹּאמֶר הָאִשָּׁה הַזֹּאת אָמְרָה אֵלַי תְּנִי אֶת־בְּנֵךְ וְנֹאכְלֶנּוּ הַיּוֹם וְאֶת־בְּנִי נֹאכַל מָחָר׃", 6.29. "וַנְּבַשֵּׁל אֶת־בְּנִי וַנֹּאכְלֵהוּ וָאֹמַר אֵלֶיהָ בַּיּוֹם הָאַחֵר תְּנִי אֶת־בְּנֵךְ וְנֹאכְלֶנּוּ וַתַּחְבִּא אֶת־בְּנָהּ׃", 21.16. "וְגַם דָּם נָקִי שָׁפַךְ מְנַשֶּׁה הַרְבֵּה מְאֹד עַד אֲשֶׁר־מִלֵּא אֶת־יְרוּשָׁלִַם פֶּה לָפֶה לְבַד מֵחַטָּאתוֹ אֲשֶׁר הֶחֱטִיא אֶת־יְהוּדָה לַעֲשׂוֹת הָרַע בְּעֵינֵי יְהוָה׃", 6.26. "And as the king of Israel was passing by upon the wall, there cried a woman unto him, saying: ‘Help, my lord, O king.’", 6.27. "And he said: ‘If the LORD do not help thee, whence shall I help thee? out of the threshingfloor, or out of the winepress?’", 6.28. "And the king said unto her: ‘What aileth thee?’ And she answered: ‘This woman said unto me: Give thy son, that we may eat him to-day, and we will eat my son to-morrow.", 6.29. "So we boiled my son, and did eat him; and I said unto her on the next day: Give thy son, that we may eat him; and she hath hid her son.’", 21.16. "Moreover Manasseh shed innocent blood very much, till he had filled Jerusalem from one end to another; beside his sin wherewith he made Judah to sin, in doing that which was evil in the sight of the LORD.",
19. Hebrew Bible, Ezekiel, 5.1, 18.25 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 294; Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 5, 69; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 334
5.1. "וְאַתָּה בֶן־אָדָם קַח־לְךָ חֶרֶב חַדָּה תַּעַר הַגַּלָּבִים תִּקָּחֶנָּה לָּךְ וְהַעֲבַרְתָּ עַל־רֹאשְׁךָ וְעַל־זְקָנֶךָ וְלָקַחְתָּ לְךָ מֹאזְנֵי מִשְׁקָל וְחִלַּקְתָּם׃", 5.1. "לָכֵן אָבוֹת יֹאכְלוּ בָנִים בְּתוֹכֵךְ וּבָנִים יֹאכְלוּ אֲבוֹתָם וְעָשִׂיתִי בָךְ שְׁפָטִים וְזֵרִיתִי אֶת־כָּל־שְׁאֵרִיתֵךְ לְכָל־רוּחַ׃", 18.25. "וַאֲמַרְתֶּם לֹא יִתָּכֵן דֶּרֶךְ אֲדֹנָי שִׁמְעוּ־נָא בֵּית יִשְׂרָאֵל הֲדַרְכִּי לֹא יִתָּכֵן הֲלֹא דַרְכֵיכֶם לֹא יִתָּכֵנוּ׃", 5.1. "And thou, son of man, take thee a sharp sword, as a barber’s razor shalt thou take it unto thee, and cause it to pass upon thy head and upon thy beard; then take thee balances to weigh, and divide the hair.", 18.25. "Yet ye say: The way of the Lord is not equal. Hear now, O house of Israel: Is it My way that is not equal? is it not your ways that are unequal?",
20. Hebrew Bible, Haggai, 2.5 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian, literature/authors Found in books: Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 229
2.5. "אֶת־הַדָּבָר אֲשֶׁר־כָּרַתִּי אִתְּכֶם בְּצֵאתְכֶם מִמִּצְרַיִם וְרוּחִי עֹמֶדֶת בְּתוֹכְכֶם אַל־תִּירָאוּ׃", 2.5. "The word that I coveted with you when ye came out of Egypt have I established, and My spirit abideth among you; fear ye not.",
21. Hebrew Bible, Nehemiah, 9.20, 9.29-9.30 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian, literature/authors Found in books: Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 229, 230
9.29. "וַתָּעַד בָּהֶם לַהֲשִׁיבָם אֶל־תּוֹרָתֶךָ וְהֵמָּה הֵזִידוּ וְלֹא־שָׁמְעוּ לְמִצְוֺתֶיךָ וּבְמִשְׁפָּטֶיךָ חָטְאוּ־בָם אֲשֶׁר־יַעֲשֶׂה אָדָם וְחָיָה בָהֶם וַיִּתְּנוּ כָתֵף סוֹרֶרֶת וְעָרְפָּם הִקְשׁוּ וְלֹא שָׁמֵעוּ׃", 9.20. "Thou gavest also Thy good spirit to instruct them, and withheldest not Thy manna from their mouth, and gavest them water for their thirst.", 9.29. "and didst forewarn them, that Thou mightest bring them back unto Thy law; yet they dealt proudly, and hearkened not unto Thy commandments, but sinned against Thine ordices, which if a man do, he shall live by them, and presented a stubborn shoulder, and hardened their neck, and would not hear.", 9.30. "Yet many years didst Thou extend mercy unto them, and didst forewarn them by Thy spirit through Thy prophets; yet would they not give ear; therefore gavest Thou them into the hand of the peoples of the lands.",
22. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 668
23. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg (2023), Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity, 191
24. Xenophon, On Household Management, 10, 8-9, 7 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 69
25. Xenophon, Memoirs, 2.1.21-2.1.34 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 661
2.1.21. καὶ Πρόδικος δὲ ὁ σοφὸς ἐν τῷ συγγράμματι τῷ περὶ Ἡρακλέους, ὅπερ δὴ καὶ πλείστοις ἐπιδείκνυται, ὡσαύτως περὶ τῆς ἀρετῆς ἀποφαίνεται, ὧδέ πως λέγων, ὅσα ἐγὼ μέμνημαι. φησὶ γὰρ Ἡρακλέα, ἐπεὶ ἐκ παίδων εἰς ἥβην ὡρμᾶτο, ἐν ᾗ οἱ νέοι ἤδη αὐτοκράτορες γιγνόμενοι δηλοῦσιν εἴτε τὴν διʼ ἀρετῆς ὁδὸν τρέψονται ἐπὶ τὸν βίον εἴτε τὴν διὰ κακίας, ἐξελθόντα εἰς ἡσυχίαν καθῆσθαι ἀποροῦντα ποτέραν τῶν ὁδῶν τράπηται· 2.1.22. καὶ φανῆναι αὐτῷ δύο γυναῖκας προσιέναι μεγάλας, τὴν μὲν ἑτέραν εὐπρεπῆ τε ἰδεῖν καὶ ἐλευθέριον φύσει, κεκοσμημένην τὸ μὲν σῶμα καθαρότητι, τὰ δὲ ὄμματα αἰδοῖ, τὸ δὲ σχῆμα σωφροσύνῃ, ἐσθῆτι δὲ λευκῇ, τὴν δʼ ἑτέραν τεθραμμένην μὲν εἰς πολυσαρκίαν τε καὶ ἁπαλότητα, κεκαλλωπισμένην δὲ τὸ μὲν χρῶμα ὥστε λευκοτέραν τε καὶ ἐρυθροτέραν τοῦ ὄντος δοκεῖν φαίνεσθαι, τὸ δὲ σχῆμα ὥστε δοκεῖν ὀρθοτέραν τῆς φύσεως εἶναι, τὰ δὲ ὄμματα ἔχειν ἀναπεπταμένα, ἐσθῆτα δὲ ἐξ ἧς ἂν μάλιστα ὥρα διαλάμποι· κατασκοπεῖσθαι δὲ θαμὰ ἑαυτήν, ἐπισκοπεῖν δὲ καὶ εἴ τις ἄλλος αὐτὴν θεᾶται, πολλάκις δὲ καὶ εἰς τὴν ἑαυτῆς σκιὰν ἀποβλέπειν. 2.1.23. ὡς δʼ ἐγένοντο πλησιαίτερον τοῦ Ἡρακλέους, τὴν μὲν πρόσθεν ῥηθεῖσαν ἰέναι τὸν αὐτὸν τρόπον, τὴν δʼ ἑτέραν φθάσαι βουλομένην προσδραμεῖν τῷ Ἡρακλεῖ καὶ εἰπεῖν· ὁρῶ σε, ὦ Ἡράκλεις, ἀποροῦντα ποίαν ὁδὸν ἐπὶ τὸν βίον τράπῃ. ἐὰν οὖν ἐμὲ φίλην ποιησάμενος, ἐπὶ τὴν ἡδίστην τε καὶ ῥᾴστην ὁδὸν ἄξω σε, καὶ τῶν μὲν τερπνῶν οὐδενὸς ἄγευστος ἔσει, τῶν δὲ χαλεπῶν ἄπειρος διαβιώσῃ. 2.1.24. πρῶτον μὲν γὰρ οὐ πολέμων οὐδὲ πραγμάτων φροντιεῖς, ἀλλὰ σκοπούμενος διέσῃ τί ἂν κεχαρισμένον ἢ σιτίον ἢ ποτὸν εὕροις, ἢ τί ἂν ἰδὼν ἢ ἀκούσας τερφθείης ἢ τίνων ὀσφραινόμενος ἢ ἁπτόμενος, τίσι δὲ παιδικοῖς ὁμιλῶν μάλιστʼ ἂν εὐφρανθείης, καὶ πῶς ἂν μαλακώτατα καθεύδοις, καὶ πῶς ἂν ἀπονώτατα τούτων πάντων τυγχάνοις. 2.1.25. ἐὰν δέ ποτε γένηταί τις ὑποψία σπάνεως ἀφʼ ὧν ἔσται ταῦτα, οὐ φόβος μή σε ἀγάγω ἐπὶ τὸ πονοῦντα καὶ ταλαιπωροῦντα τῷ σώματι καὶ τῇ ψυχῇ ταῦτα πορίζεσθαι, ἀλλʼ οἷς ἂν οἱ ἄλλοι ἐργάζωνται, τούτοις σὺ χρήσῃ, οὐδενὸς ἀπεχόμενος ὅθεν ἂν δυνατὸν ᾖ τι κερδᾶναι. πανταχόθεν γὰρ ὠφελεῖσθαι τοῖς ἐμοὶ συνοῦσιν ἐξουσίαν ἐγὼ παρέχω. 2.1.26. καὶ ὁ Ἡρακλῆς ἀκούσας ταῦτα, ὦ γύναι, ἔφη, ὄνομα δέ σοι τί ἐστιν; ἡ δέ, οἱ μὲν ἐμοὶ φίλοι, ἔφη, καλοῦσί με Εὐδαιμονίαν, οἱ δὲ μισοῦντές με ὑποκοριζόμενοι ὀνομάζουσι Κακίαν. 2.1.27. καὶ ἐν τούτῳ ἡ ἑτέρα γυνὴ προσελθοῦσα εἶπε· καὶ ἐγὼ ἥκω πρὸς σέ, ὦ Ἡράκλεις, εἰδυῖα τοὺς γεννήσαντάς σε καὶ τὴν φύσιν τὴν σὴν ἐν τῇ παιδείᾳ καταμαθοῦσα, ἐξ ὧν ἐλπίζω, εἰ τὴν πρὸς ἐμὲ ὁδὸν τράποιο, σφόδρʼ ἄν σε τῶν καλῶν καὶ σεμνῶν ἀγαθὸν ἐργάτην γενέσθαι καὶ ἐμὲ ἔτι πολὺ ἐντιμοτέραν καὶ ἐπʼ ἀγαθοῖς διαπρεπεστέραν φανῆναι. οὐκ ἐξαπατήσω δέ σε προοιμίοις ἡδονῆς, ἀλλʼ ᾗπερ οἱ θεοὶ διέθεσαν τὰ ὄντα διηγήσομαι μετʼ ἀληθείας. 2.1.28. τῶν γὰρ ὄντων ἀγαθῶν καὶ καλῶν οὐδὲν ἄνευ πόνου καὶ ἐπιμελείας θεοὶ διδόασιν ἀνθρώποις, ἀλλʼ εἴτε τοὺς θεοὺς ἵλεως εἶναί σοι βούλει, θεραπευτέον τοὺς θεούς, εἴτε ὑπὸ φίλων ἐθέλεις ἀγαπᾶσθαι, τοὺς φίλους εὐεργετητέον, εἴτε ὑπό τινος πόλεως ἐπιθυμεῖς τιμᾶσθαι, τὴν πόλιν ὠφελητέον, εἴτε ὑπὸ τῆς Ἑλλάδος πάσης ἀξιοῖς ἐπʼ ἀρετῇ θαυμάζεσθαι, τὴν Ἑλλάδα πειρατέον εὖ ποιεῖν, εἴτε γῆν βούλει σοι καρποὺς ἀφθόνους φέρειν, τὴν γῆν θεραπευτέον, εἴτε ἀπὸ βοσκημάτων οἴει δεῖν πλουτίζεσθαι, τῶν βοσκημάτων ἐπιμελητέον, εἴτε διὰ πολέμου ὁρμᾷς αὔξεσθαι καὶ βούλει δύνασθαι τούς τε φίλους ἐλευθεροῦν καὶ τοὺς ἐχθροὺς χειροῦσθαι, τὰς πολεμικὰς τέχνας αὐτάς τε παρὰ τῶν ἐπισταμένων μαθητέον καὶ ὅπως αὐταῖς δεῖ χρῆσθαι ἀσκητέον· εἰ δὲ καὶ τῷ σώματι βούλει δυνατὸς εἶναι, τῇ γνώμῃ ὑπηρετεῖν ἐθιστέον τὸ σῶμα καὶ γυμναστέον σὺν πόνοις καὶ ἱδρῶτι. 2.1.29. καὶ ἡ Κακία ὑπολαβοῦσα εἶπεν, ὥς φησι Πρόδικος· ἐννοεῖς, ὦ Ἡράκλεις, ὡς χαλεπὴν καὶ μακρὰν ὁδὸν ἐπὶ τὰς εὐφροσύνας ἡ γυνή σοι αὕτη διηγεῖται; ἐγὼ δὲ ῥᾳδίαν καὶ βραχεῖαν ὁδὸν ἐπὶ τὴν εὐδαιμονίαν ἄξω σε. 2.1.30. καὶ ἡ Ἀρετὴ εἶπεν· ὦ τλῆμον, τί δὲ σὺ ἀγαθὸν ἔχεις; ἢ τί ἡδὺ οἶσθα μηδὲν τούτων ἕνεκα πράττειν ἐθέλουσα; ἥτις οὐδὲ τὴν τῶν ἡδέων ἐπιθυμίαν ἀναμένεις, ἀλλὰ πρὶν ἐπιθυμῆσαι πάντων ἐμπίμπλασαι, πρὶν μὲν πεινῆν ἐσθίουσα, πρὶν δὲ διψῆν πίνουσα, ἵνα μὲν ἡδέως φάγῃς, ὀψοποιοὺς μηχανωμένη, ἵνα δὲ ἡδέως πίῃς, οἴνους τε πολυτελεῖς παρασκευάζῃ καὶ τοῦ θέρους χιόνα περιθέουσα ζητεῖς, ἵνα δὲ καθυπνώσῃς ἡδέως, οὐ μόνον τὰς στρωμνὰς μαλακάς, ἀλλὰ καὶ τὰς κλίνας καὶ τὰ ὑπόβαθρα ταῖς κλίναις παρασκευάζῃ· οὐ γὰρ διὰ τὸ πονεῖν, ἀλλὰ διὰ τὸ μηδὲν ἔχειν ὅ τι ποιῇς ὕπνου ἐπιθυμεῖς· τὰ δʼ ἀφροδίσια πρὸ τοῦ δεῖσθαι ἀναγκάζεις, πάντα μηχανωμένη καὶ γυναιξὶ τοῖς ἀνδράσι χρωμένη· οὕτω γὰρ παιδεύεις τοὺς σεαυτῆς φίλους, τῆς μὲν νυκτὸς ὑβρίζουσα, τῆς δʼ ἡμέρας τὸ χρησιμώτατον κατακοιμίζουσα. 2.1.31. ἀθάνατος δὲ οὖσα ἐκ θεῶν μὲν ἀπέρριψαι, ὑπὸ δὲ ἀνθρώπων ἀγαθῶν ἀτιμάζῃ· τοῦ δὲ πάντων ἡδίστου ἀκούσματος, ἐπαίνου σεαυτῆς, ἀνήκοος εἶ, καὶ τοῦ πάντων ἡδίστου θεάματος ἀθέατος· οὐδὲν γὰρ πώποτε σεαυτῆς ἔργον καλὸν τεθέασαι. τίς δʼ ἄν σοι λεγούσῃ τι πιστεύσειε; τίς δʼ ἂν δεομένῃ τινὸς ἐπαρκέσειεν; ἢ τίς ἂν εὖ φρονῶν τοῦ σοῦ θιάσου τολμήσειεν εἶναι; οἳ νέοι μὲν ὄντες τοῖς σώμασιν ἀδύνατοί εἰσι, πρεσβύτεροι δὲ γενόμενοι ταῖς ψυχαῖς ἀνόητοι, ἀπόνως μὲν λιπαροὶ διὰ νεότητος τρεφόμενοι, ἐπιπόνως δὲ αὐχμηροὶ διὰ γήρως περῶντες, τοῖς μὲν πεπραγμένοις αἰσχυνόμενοι, τοῖς δὲ πραττομένοις βαρυνόμενοι, τὰ μὲν ἡδέα ἐν τῇ νεότητι διαδραμόντες, τὰ δὲ χαλεπὰ εἰς τὸ γῆρας ἀποθέμενοι. 2.1.32. ἐγὼ δὲ σύνειμι μὲν θεοῖς, σύνειμι δὲ ἀνθρώποις τοῖς ἀγαθοῖς· ἔργον δὲ καλὸν οὔτε θεῖον οὔτʼ ἀνθρώπειον χωρὶς ἐμοῦ γίγνεται. τιμῶμαι δὲ μάλιστα πάντων καὶ παρὰ θεοῖς καὶ παρὰ ἀνθρώποις οἷς προσήκω, ἀγαπητὴ μὲν συνεργὸς τεχνίταις, πιστὴ δὲ φύλαξ οἴκων δεσπόταις, εὐμενὴς δὲ παραστάτις οἰκέταις, ἀγαθὴ δὲ συλλήπτρια τῶν ἐν εἰρήνῃ πόνων, βεβαία δὲ τῶν ἐν πολέμῳ σύμμαχος ἔργων, ἀρίστη δὲ φιλίας κοινωνός. 2.1.33. ἔστι δὲ τοῖς μὲν ἐμοῖς φίλοις ἡδεῖα μὲν καὶ ἀπράγμων σίτων καὶ ποτῶν ἀπόλαυσις· ἀνέχονται γὰρ ἕως ἂν ἐπιθυμήσωσιν αὐτῶν· ὕπνος δʼ αὐτοῖς πάρεστιν ἡδίων ἢ τοῖς ἀμόχθοις, καὶ οὔτε ἀπολείποντες αὐτὸν ἄχθονται οὔτε διὰ τοῦτον μεθιᾶσι τὰ δέοντα πράττειν. καὶ οἱ μὲν νέοι τοῖς τῶν πρεσβυτέρων ἐπαίνοις χαίρουσιν, οἱ δὲ γεραίτεροι ταῖς τῶν νέων τιμαῖς ἀγάλλονται· καὶ ἡδέως μὲν τῶν παλαιῶν πράξεων μέμνηνται, εὖ δὲ τὰς παρούσας ἥδονται πράττοντες, διʼ ἐμὲ φίλοι μὲν θεοῖς ὄντες, ἀγαπητοὶ δὲ φίλοις, τίμιοι δὲ πατρίσιν· ὅταν δʼ ἔλθῃ τὸ πεπρωμένον τέλος, οὐ μετὰ λήθης ἄτιμοι κεῖνται, ἀλλὰ μετὰ μνήμης τὸν ἀεὶ χρόνον ὑμνούμενοι θάλλουσι. τοιαῦτά σοι, ὦ παῖ τοκέων ἀγαθῶν Ἡράκλεις, ἔξεστι διαπονησαμένῳ τὴν μακαριστοτάτην εὐδαιμονίαν κεκτῆσθαι. 2.1.34. οὕτω πως διώκει Πρόδικος τὴν ὑπʼ Ἀρετῆς Ἡρακλέους παίδευσιν· ἐκόσμησε μέντοι τὰς γνώμας ἔτι μεγαλειοτέροις ῥήμασιν ἢ ἐγὼ νῦν. σοὶ δʼ οὖν ἄξιον, ὦ Ἀρίστιππε, τούτων ἐνθυμουμένῳ πειρᾶσθαί τι καὶ τῶν εἰς τὸν μέλλοντα χρόνον τοῦ βίου φροντίζειν. 2.1.21. Aye, and Prodicus the wise expresses himself to the like effect concerning Virtue in the essay On Heracles that he recites to throngs of listeners. This, so far as I remember, is how he puts it: When Heracles was passing from boyhood to youth’s estate, wherein the young, now becoming their own masters, show whether they will approach life by the path of virtue or the path of vice, he went out into a quiet place, 2.1.22. and sat pondering which road to take. And there appeared two women of great stature making towards him. The one was fair to see and of high bearing; and her limbs were adorned with purity, her eyes with modesty; sober was her figure, and her robe was white. The other was plump and soft, with high feeding. Her face was made up to heighten its natural white and pink, her figure to exaggerate her height. Open-eyed was she; and dressed so as to disclose all her charms. Now she eyed herself; anon looked whether any noticed her; and often stole a glance at her own shadow. 2.1.23. When they drew nigh to Heracles, the first pursued the even tenor of her way: but the other, all eager to outdo her, ran to meet him, crying: Heracles, I see that you are in doubt which path to take towards life. Make me your friend; follow me, and I will lead you along the pleasantest and easiest road. You shall taste all the sweets of life; and hardship you shall never know. 2.1.24. First, of wars and worries you shall not think, but shall ever be considering what choice food or drink you can find, what sight or sound will delight you, what touch or perfume; what tender love can give you most joy, what bed the softest slumbers; and how to come by all these pleasures with least trouble. 2.1.25. And should there arise misgiving that lack of means may stint your enjoyments, never fear that I may lead you into winning them by toil and anguish of body and soul. Nay; you shall have the fruits of others’ toil, and refrain from nothing that can bring you gain. For to my companions I give authority to pluck advantage where they will. 2.1.26. Now when Heracles heard this, he asked, Lady, pray what is your name? My friends call me Happiness, she said, but among those that hate me I am nicknamed Vice. 2.1.27. Meantime the other had drawn near, and she said: I, too, am come to you, Heracles: I know your parents and I have taken note of your character during the time of your education. Therefore I hope that, if you take the road that leads to me, you will turn out a right good doer of high and noble deeds, and I shall be yet more highly honoured and more illustrious for the blessings I bestow. But I will not deceive you by a pleasant prelude: I will rather tell you truly the things that are, as the gods have ordained them. 2.1.28. For of all things good and fair, the gods give nothing to man without toil and effort. If you want the favour of the gods, you must worship the gods: if you desire the love of friends, you must do good to your friends: if you covet honour from a city, you must aid that city: if you are fain to win the admiration of all Hellas for virtue, you must strive to do good to Hellas : if you want land to yield you fruits in abundance, you must cultivate that land: if you are resolved to get wealth from flocks, you must care for those flocks: if you essay to grow great through war and want power to liberate your friends and subdue your foes, you must learn the arts of war from those who know them and must practise their right use: and if you want your body to be strong, you must accustom your body to be the servant of your mind, and train it with toil and sweat. 2.1.29. And Vice, as Prodicus tells, answered and said: Heracles, mark you how hard and long is that road to joy, of which this woman tells? but I will lead you by a short and easy road to happiness. And Virtue said: 2.1.30. What good thing is thine, poor wretch, or what pleasant thing dost thou know, if thou wilt do nought to win them? Thou dost not even tarry for the desire of pleasant things, but fillest thyself with all things before thou desirest them, eating before thou art hungry, drinking before thou art thirsty, getting thee cooks, to give zest to eating, buying thee costly wines and running to and fro in search of snow in summer, to give zest to drinking; to soothe thy slumbers it is not enough for thee to buy soft coverlets, but thou must have frames for thy beds. For not toil, but the tedium of having nothing to do, makes thee long for sleep. Thou dost rouse lust by many a trick, when there is no need, using men as women: thus thou trainest thy friends, waxing wanton by night, consuming in sleep the best hours of day. 2.1.31. Immortal art thou, yet the outcast of the gods, the scorn of good men. Praise, sweetest of all things to hear, thou hearest not: the sweetest of all sights thou beholdest not, for never yet hast thou beheld a good work wrought by thyself. Who will believe what thou dost say? who will grant what thou dost ask? Or what sane man will dare join thy throng? While thy votaries are young their bodies are weak, when they wax old, their souls are without sense; idle and sleek they thrive in youth, withered and weary they journey through old age, and their past deeds bring them shame, their present deeds distress. Pleasure they ran through in their youth: hardship they laid up for their old age. 2.1.32. But I company with gods and good men, and no fair deed of god or man is done without my aid. I am first in honour among the gods and among men that are akin to me: to craftsmen a beloved fellow-worker, to masters a faithful guardian of the house, to servants a kindly protector: good helpmate in the toils of peace, staunch ally in the deeds of war, best partner in friendship. 2.1.33. To my friends meat and drink bring sweet and simple enjoyment: for they wait till they crave them. And a sweeter sleep falls on them than on idle folk: they are not vexed at awaking from it, nor for its sake do they neglect to do their duties. The young rejoice to win the praise of the old; the elders are glad to be honoured by the young; with joy they recall their deeds past, and their present well-doing is joy to them, for through me they are dear to the gods, lovely to friends, precious to their native land. And when comes the appointed end, they lie not forgotten and dishonoured, but live on, sung and remembered for all time. O Heracles, thou son of goodly parents, if thou wilt labour earnestly on this wise, thou mayest have for thine own the most blessed happiness. 2.1.34. Such, in outline, is Prodicus’ story of the training of Heracles by Virtue; only he has clothed the thoughts in even finer phrases than I have done now. But anyhow, Aristippus, it were well that you should think on these things and try to show some regard for the life that lies before you.
26. Hebrew Bible, 2 Chronicles, 33.11, 33.13 (5th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 31, 42
33.11. "וַיָּבֵא יְהוָה עֲלֵיהֶם אֶת־שָׂרֵי הַצָּבָא אֲשֶׁר לְמֶלֶךְ אַשּׁוּר וַיִּלְכְּדוּ אֶת־מְנַשֶּׁה בַּחֹחִים וַיַּאַסְרֻהוּ בַּנְחֻשְׁתַּיִם וַיּוֹלִיכֻהוּ בָּבֶלָה׃", 33.13. "וַיִּתְפַּלֵּל אֵלָיו וַיֵּעָתֶר לוֹ וַיִּשְׁמַע תְּחִנָּתוֹ וַיְשִׁיבֵהוּ יְרוּשָׁלִַם לְמַלְכוּתוֹ וַיֵּדַע מְנַשֶּׁה כִּי יְהוָה הוּא הָאֱלֹהִים׃", 33.11. "Wherefore the LORD brought upon them the captains of the host of the king of Assyria, who took Manasseh with hooks, and bound him with fetters, and carried him to Babylon.", 33.13. "And he prayed unto Him; and He was entreated of him, and heard his supplication, and brought him back to Jerusalem into his kingdom. Then Manasseh knew that the LORD He was God.",
27. Euripides, Hercules Furens, '1250 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 661
28. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, a b c d\n0 '2.70 '2.70 '2 70 \n1 '1.38 '1.38 '1 38 \n2 '4.26 '4.26 '4 26 \n3 '1.41 '1.41 '1 41 \n4 '2.74 '2.74 '2 74 \n5 '4.25 '4.25 '4 25 \n6 '1.36 '1.36 '1 36 \n7 '3.39 '3.39 '3 39 \n8 '4.35 '4.35 '4 35 \n9 '4.15 '4.15 '4 15 \n10 '6.3 '6.3 '6 3 \n11 747 747 747 None\n12 746 746 746 None\n13 744 744 744 None\n14 745 745 745 None\n15 742 742 742 None\n16 743 743 743 None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 671
29. Isocrates, Antidosis, 178-179, 181-185, 180 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Spielman (2020), Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World. 214
30. Hebrew Bible, Zechariah, 7.12 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian, literature/authors Found in books: Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 230
7.12. "וְלִבָּם שָׂמוּ שָׁמִיר מִשְּׁמוֹעַ אֶת־הַתּוֹרָה וְאֶת־הַדְּבָרִים אֲשֶׁר שָׁלַח יְהוָה צְבָאוֹת בְּרוּחוֹ בְּיַד הַנְּבִיאִים הָרִאשֹׁנִים וַיְהִי קֶצֶף גָּדוֹל מֵאֵת יְהוָה צְבָאוֹת׃", 7.12. "Yea, they made their hearts as an adamant stone, lest they should hear the law, and the words which the LORD of hosts had sent by His spirit by the hand of the former prophets; therefore came there great wrath from the LORD of hosts.",
31. Herodotus, Histories, 5.8-5.10 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 668
5.8. The wealthy have the following funeral practices. First they lay out the dead for three days, and after killing all kinds of victims and making lamentation, they feast. After that they do away with the body either by fire or else by burial in the earth, and when they have built a barrow, they initiate all kinds of contests, in which the greatest prizes are offered for the hardest type of single combat. Such are the Thracian funeral rites. 5.9. As for the region which lies north of this country, none can tell with certainty what men dwell there, but what lies beyond the Ister is a desolate and infinitely large tract of land. I can learn of no men dwelling beyond the Ister save certain that are called Sigynnae and wear Median dress. ,Their horses are said to be covered all over with shaggy hair five fingers' breadth long, and to be small, blunt-nosed, and unable to bear men on their backs, but very swift when yoked to chariots. It is for this reason that driving chariots is the usage of the country. These men's borders, it is said, reach almost as far as the Eneti on the Adriatic Sea. ,They call themselves colonists from Media. How this has come about I myself cannot understand, but all is possible in the long passage of time. However that may be, we know that the Ligyes who dwell inland of Massalia use the word “sigynnae” for hucksters, and the Cyprians use it for spears. 5.10. According to the Thracians, all the land beyond the Ister is full of bees, and that by reason of these none can travel there. This, to my mind, is not a credible tale, for those creatures are ill able to bear cold. It appears to me rather that it is by reason of the cold that the northern lands are not inhabited. Such, then, are the stories about this region. Whatever the truth may be, Megabazus made its coastal area subject to the Persians.
32. Theocritus, Idylls, 17.20-17.33 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 669
33. Anon., 1 Enoch, 1.9, 19.3, 22.6-22.7 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 142; Reed (2005), Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature. 4, 148
1.9. And behold! He cometh with ten thousands of His holy ones To execute judgement upon all, And to destroy all the ungodly:And to convict all flesh of all the works of their ungodliness which they have ungodly committed, And of all the hard things which ungodly sinners have spoken against Him. 19.3. went astray shall become sirens.' And I, Enoch, alone saw the vision, the ends of all things: and no man shall see as I have seen. 22.6. with me, and I said unto him: 'This spirit which maketh suit, whose is it, whose voice goeth forth and maketh suit to heaven ' 22.7. And he answered me saying: 'This is the spirit which went forth from Abel, whom his brother Cain slew, and he makes his suit against him till his seed is destroyed from the face of the earth, and his seed is annihilated from amongst the seed of men.'
34. Cicero, Republic, a b c d\n0 '3.28.40 '3.28.40 '3 28 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 670
35. Dead Sea Scrolls, Damascus Covenant, 1.18-1.21, 12.22, 20.6 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pharisees, in christian literature Found in books: Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 44, 48
36. Anon., Jubilees, 20.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •christianity/christians, early writings/literature Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 334
20.2. And he commanded them that they should observe the way of the Lord; that they should work righteousness, and love each his neighbour, and act on this manner amongst all men; that they should each so walk with regard to them as to do judgment and righteousness on the earth.
37. Dead Sea Scrolls, Isaiah Pesher, None (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: nan nan
38. Septuagint, Ecclesiasticus (Siracides), 24.23 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •faith, in early christian literature Found in books: Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022), Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity, 401
24.23. All this is the book of the covet of the Most High God,the law which Moses commanded us as an inheritance for the congregations of Jacob.
39. Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 5.11-6.11 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •amoraic literature, shaped by christian discourse Found in books: Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg (2023), Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity, 19
40. Dead Sea Scrolls, 4Q266, None (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •enochic literature, christian preservation of Found in books: Reed (2005), Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature. 13, 15
41. Anon., Testament of Judah, 2.2-2.7 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 660
42. Hebrew Bible, Daniel, 9 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian arabic, literature Found in books: Zawanowska and Wilk (2022), The Character of David in Judaism, Christianity and Islam: Warrior, Poet, Prophet and King, 262
43. Dead Sea Scrolls, Community Rule, None (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 48; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 408
44. Dead Sea Scrolls, Hodayot, 4.9-4.10 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •festivals, non-christian, in early christian literature Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 50
45. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 1.5, 5.7, 24.23 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022), Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity, 401; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 240; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 334
1.5. For a holy and disciplined spirit will flee from deceit,and will rise and depart from foolish thoughts,and will be ashamed at the approach of unrighteousness. 5.7. We took our fill of the paths of lawlessness and destruction,and we journeyed through trackless deserts,but the way of the Lord we have not known.
46. Cicero, On Duties, a b c d\n0 '1.118 '1.118 '1 118 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 661
47. Dead Sea Scrolls, Hodayot, 4.9-4.10 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •festivals, non-christian, in early christian literature Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 50
48. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 146 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian, literature/authors Found in books: Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 247
146. Every man in regard of his intellect is connected with divine reason, being an impression of, or a fragment or a ray of that blessed nature; but in regard of the structure of his body he is connected with the universal world. For he is composed of the same materials as the world, that is of earth, and water, and air and fire, each of the elements having contributed its appropriate part towards the completion of most sufficient materials, which the Creator was to take in order to fashion this visible image.
49. Philo of Alexandria, On Curses, 100-130, 132-168, 85-99, 131 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 374
131. And Moses, by her child, means, a soul which has lately learnt to desire instruction, and which has, in a manner, just been born to learn. In reference to which, the boy, when he has grown up to man's estate, becomes a sophist, whom Moses calls an archer; for whatever argument he applies his mind to, at that, as at a target, he shoots all his reasons, as an archer shoots his arrows. XXXIX.
50. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 2.252 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian, literature/authors Found in books: Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 229
2.252. And again, the invisible spirit which is accustomed to converse with me in an unseen manner prompts me with a suggestion, and says, O my friend, you seem to be ignorant of an important and most desirable matter which I will explain to you completely; for I have also in a most seasonable manner explained many other things to you also.
51. Philo of Alexandria, Plant., 18 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian, literature/authors Found in books: Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 247
52. Philo of Alexandria, On The Contemplative Life, 40-57, 59-63, 75-79, 58 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 135, 136
58. but nevertheless even these, if compared with the banquets of the men of our time who have embraced the contemplative system of life, will appear ridiculous. Each description, indeed, has its own pleasures, but the recorded by Xenophon is the one the delights of which are most in accordance with human nature, for female harp-players, and dancers, and conjurors, and jugglers, and men who do ridiculous things, who pride themselves much on their powers of jesting and of amusing others, and many other species of more cheerful relaxation, are brought forward at it.
53. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 4.123 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian, literature/authors Found in books: Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 247
4.123. On which account Moses, in another passage, establishes a law concerning blood, that one may not eat the blood nor the Fat.{27}{#le 3:17.} The blood, for the reason which I have already mentioned, that it is the essence of the life; not of the mental and rational life, but of that which exists in accordance with the outward senses, to which it is owing that both we and irrational animals also have a common existence.CONCERNING THE SOUL OR LIFE OF MANXXIV. For the essence of the soul of man is the breath of God, especially if we follow the account of Moses, who, in his history of the creation of the world, says that God breathed into the first man, the founder of our race, the breath of life; breathing it into the principal part of his body, namely the face, where the outward senses are established, the body-guards of the mind, as if it were the great king. And that which was thus breathed into his face was manifestly the breath of the air, or whatever else there may be which is even more excellent than the breath of the air, as being a ray emitted from the blessed and thricehappy nature of God.
54. Livy, History, a b c d\n0 '1.7.12 '1.7.12 '1 7 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 665
55. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, a b c d\n0 '4.10.6 '4.10.6 '4 10\n1 '4.10.7 '4.10.7 '4 10\n2 '4.38.2 '4.38.2 '4 38\n3 '4.11.1 '4.11.1 '4 11\n4 '4.38.4 '4.38.4 '4 38 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 661
56. Anon., Sibylline Oracles, 1.125, 1.129, 1.281, 1.302, 2.56-2.148, 2.338, 5.206-5.213 (1st cent. BCE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 379, 380
57. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 5.22-5.54 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 668
5.22. Herculis antistare autem si facta putabis, 5.23. longius a vera multo ratione ferere. 5.24. quid Nemeaeus enim nobis nunc magnus hiatus 5.25. ille leonis obesset et horrens Arcadius sus, 5.26. tanto opere officerent nobis Stymphala colentes? 5.27. denique quid Cretae taurus Lernaeaque pestis 5.28. hydra venenatis posset vallata colubris? 5.29. quidve tripectora tergemini vis Geryonai 5.30. et Diomedis equi spirantes naribus ignem 5.31. Thracia Bistoniasque plagas atque Ismara propter 5.32. aureaque Hesperidum servans fulgentia mala, 5.33. asper, acerba tuens, immani corpore serpens 5.34. arboris amplexus stirpes? quid denique obesset 5.35. propter Atlanteum litus pelagique severa, 5.36. quo neque noster adit quisquam nec barbarus audet? 5.37. cetera de genere hoc quae sunt portenta perempta, 5.38. si non victa forent, quid tandem viva nocerent? 5.39. nil, ut opinor: ita ad satiatem terra ferarum 5.40. nunc etiam scatit et trepido terrore repleta est 5.41. per nemora ac montes magnos silvasque profundas; 5.42. quae loca vitandi plerumque est nostra potestas. 5.43. at nisi purgatumst pectus, quae proelia nobis 5.44. atque pericula tumst ingratis insinuandum! 5.45. quantae tum scindunt hominem cuppedinis acres 5.46. sollicitum curae quantique perinde timores! 5.47. quidve superbia spurcitia ac petulantia? quantas 5.48. efficiunt clades! quid luxus desidiaeque? 5.49. haec igitur qui cuncta subegerit ex animoque 5.50. expulerit dictis, non armis, nonne decebit 5.51. hunc hominem numero divom dignarier esse? 5.52. cum bene praesertim multa ac divinitus ipsis 5.53. iam mortalibus e divis dare dicta suerit 5.54. atque omnem rerum naturam pandere dictis.
58. Philo of Alexandria, That Every Good Person Is Free, '120, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 99 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 660
99. accordingly just see what Hercules says in Euripides. "Yes, burn and scorch my flesh, and glut your hate, Drinking my life-warm blood; for heaven's stars Shall quit their place, and darken 'neath the earth, And earth rise up and take the place of heaven, Before you wring from me a word of flattery." For in real truth flattery, and adulation, and hypocrisy, in which what is uttered is at variance with the sentiments which are really felt, are the most slavish of things. But without any disguise, and in a genuine honest spirit of truth to speak with freedom what is dictated by a clear conscience, is a line of conduct suited to those who are nobly born.
59. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 1.21 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •christianity, christian, literature Found in books: Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 161
60. Philo of Alexandria, On The Embassy To Gaius, '81, 78, 90, 91, 92, 93, 79 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 660
79. In the next place, like an actor in a theatre, he was continually wearing different dresses at different times, taking at one time a lion's skin and a club, both gilded over; being then dressed in the character of Hercules; at another time he would wear a felt hat upon his head, when he was disguised in imitation of the Spartan twins, Castor and Pollux; sometimes he also adorned himself with ivy, and a thyrsus, and skins of fawns, so as to appear in the guise of Bacchus.
61. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 1.274-1.277 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian, literature/authors Found in books: Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 229
1.274. Then, as he said that he ought to return back again, he asked of the vision which appeared to him, whether he should go back again to his own house; but the angel beholding his insincerity, and being indigt at it (for what need was there for him to ask questions in a matter which was so evident, which had its answer plain in itself, and which did not require any more positive information by means of words, unless a person's ears are more to be trusted than his eyes, and words than thing 1.275. But when the king heard that he was now near at hand, he went forth with his guards to meet him; and when they met at first there were, as was natural, greetings and salutations, and then a brief reproof of his tardiness and of his not having come more readily. After this there were feastings and costly entertainments, and all those other things which are usually prepared on the occasion of the reception of strangers, everything with royal magnificence being prepared, so as to give an exaggerated idea of the power and glory of the king. 1.276. The next day at the rising of the sun, Balak took the prophet and led him up to a high hill, where it also happened that a pillar had been erected to some deity which the natives of the country had been accustomed to worship; and from thence there was seen a portion of the camp of the Hebrews, which was shown to the magician from this point, as if from a watch tower. 1.277. And he when he beheld it said: "Do thou, O king, build here seven altars, and offer upon every one of them a bullock and a ram. And I will turn aside and inquire of God what I am to say." So, having gone forth, immediately he became inspired, the prophetic spirit having entered into him, which drove all his artificial system of divination and cunning out of his soul; for it was not possible that holy inspiration should dwell in the same abode with magic. Then, returning back to the king, and beholding the sacrifices and the altars flaming, he became like the interpreter of some other being who was prompting his words,
62. Ovid, Metamorphoses, a b c d\n0 '15.49 '15.49 '15 49 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 661
63. New Testament, Matthew, 1.24-1.25, 3.7-3.12, 4.1-4.11, 5.12, 5.17-5.48, 6.1, 7.26, 9.32-9.34, 12.22-12.28, 12.31-12.32, 15.1-15.20, 19.17-19.19, 23.1-23.36, 25.2-25.3, 25.8, 25.31-25.46, 27.5, 27.51-27.53, 28.9, 28.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 44, 45, 46, 48, 58, 59, 60, 169, 170; Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022), Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity, 71; Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 69; Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 386; Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 46, 47; Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 142; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 230; Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 661, 662, 663; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 381
1.24. Ἐγερθεὶς δὲ [ὁ] Ἰωσὴφ ἀπὸ τοῦ ὕπνου ἐποίησεν ὡς προσέταξεν αὐτῷ ὁ ἄγγελος Κυρίου καὶ παρέλαβεν τὴν γυναῖκα αὐτοῦ· 1.25. καὶ οὐκ ἐγίνωσκεν αὐτὴν ἕως [οὗ] ἔτεκεν υἱόν· καὶ ἐκάλεσεν τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ Ἰησοῦν. 3.7. Ἰδὼν δὲ πολλοὺς τῶν Φαρισαίων καὶ Σαδδουκαίων ἐρχομένους ἐπὶ τὸ βάπτισμα εἶπεν αὐτοῖς Γεννήματα ἐχιδνῶν, τίς ὑπέδειξεν ὑμῖν φυγεῖν ἀπὸ τῆς μελλούσης ὀργῆς; 3.8. ποιήσατε οὖν καρπὸν ἄξιον τῆς μετανοίας· 3.9. καὶ μὴ δόξητε λέγειν ἐν ἑαυτοῖς Πατέρα ἔχομεν τὸν Ἀβραάμ, λέγω γὰρ ὑμῖν ὅτι δύναται ὁ θεὸς ἐκ τῶν λίθων τούτων ἐγεῖραι τέκνα τῷ Ἀβραάμ. 3.10. ἤδη δὲ ἡ ἀξίνη πρὸς τὴν ῥίζαν τῶν δένδρων κεῖται· πᾶν οὖν δένδρον μὴ ποιοῦν καρπὸν καλὸν ἐκκόπτεται καὶ εἰς πῦρ βάλλεται. 3.11. ἐγὼ μὲν ὑμᾶς βαπτίζω ἐν ὕδατι εἰς μετάνοιαν· ὁ δὲ ὀπίσω μου ἐρχόμενος ἰσχυρότερός μου ἐστίν, οὗ οὐκ εἰμὶ ἱκανὸς τὰ ὑποδήματα βαστάσαι· αὐτὸς ὑμᾶς βαπτίσει ἐν πνεύματι ἁγίῳ καὶ πυρί· 3.12. οὗ τὸ πτύον ἐν τῇ χειρὶ αὐτοῦ, καὶ διακαθαριεῖ τὴν ἅλωνα αὐτοῦ, καὶ συνάξει τὸν σῖτον αὐτοῦ εἰς τὴν ἀποθήκην, τὸ δὲ ἄχυρον κατακαύσει πυρὶ ἀσβέστῳ. 4.1. Τότε [ὁ] Ἰησοῦς ἀνήχθη εἰς τὴν ἔρημον ὑπὸ τοῦ πνεύματος, πειρασθῆναι ὑπὸ τοῦ διαβόλου. 4.2. καὶ νηστεύσας ἡμέρας τεσσεράκοντα καὶ νύκτας τεσσεράκοντα ὕστερον ἐπείνασεν. 4.3. Καὶ προσελθὼν ὁ πειράζων εἶπεν αὐτῷ Εἰ υἱὸς εἶ τοῦ θεοῦ, εἰπὸν ἵνα οἱ λίθοι οὗτοι ἄρτοι γένωνται. 4.4. ὁ δὲ ἀποκριθεὶς εἶπεν Γέγραπται Οὐκ ἐπʼ ἄρτῳ μόνῳ ζήσεται ὁ ἄνθρωπος, ἀλλʼ ἐπὶ παντὶ ῥήματι ἐκπορευομένῳ διὰ στόματος θεοῦ. 4.5. Τότε παραλαμβάνει αὐτὸν ὁ διάβολος εἰς τὴν ἁγίαν πόλιν, καὶ ἔστησεν αὐτὸν ἐπὶ τὸ πτερύγιον τοῦ ἱεροῦ, 4.6. καὶ λέγει αὐτῷ Εἰ υἱὸς εἶ τοῦ θεοῦ, βάλε σεαυτὸν κάτω· γέγραπται γὰρ ὅτι Τοῖς ἀγγέλοις αὐτοῦ ἐντελεῖται περὶ σοῦ καὶ ἐπὶ χειρῶν ἀροῦσίν σε, μή ποτε προσκόψῃς πρὸς λίθον τὸν πόδα σου. 4.7. ἔφη αὐτῷ ὁ Ἰησοῦς Πάλιν γέγραπται Οὐκ ἐκπειράσεις Κύριον τὸν θεόν σου. 4.8. Πάλιν παραλαμβάνει αὐτὸν ὁ διάβολος εἰς ὄρος ὑψηλὸν λίαν, καὶ δείκνυσιν αὐτῷ πάσας τὰς βασιλείας τοῦ κόσμου καὶ τὴν δόξαν αὐτῶν, 4.9. καὶ εἶπεν αὐτῷ Ταῦτά σοι πάντα δώσω ἐὰν πεσὼν προσκυνήσῃς μοι. 4.10. τότε λέγει αὐτῷ ὁ Ἰησοῦς Ὕπαγε, Σατανᾶ· γέγραπται γάρ Κύριον τὸν θεόν σου προσκυνήσεις καὶ αὐτῷ μόνῳ λατρεύσεις. 4.11. Τότε ἀφίησιν αὐτὸν ὁ διάβολος, καὶ ἰδοὺ ἄγγελοι προσῆλθον καὶ διηκόνουν αὐτῷ. 5.12. χαίρετε καὶ ἀγαλλιᾶσθε, ὅτι ὁ μισθὸς ὑμῶν πολὺς ἐν τοῖς οὐρανοῖς· οὕτως γὰρ ἐδίωξαν τοὺς προφήτας τοὺς πρὸ ὑμῶν. 5.17. Μὴ νομίσητε ὅτι ἦλθον καταλῦσαι τὸν νόμον ἢ τοὺς προφήτας· οὐκ ἦλθον καταλῦσαι ἀλλὰ πληρῶσαι· 5.18. ἀμὴν γὰρ λέγω ὑμῖν, ἕως ἂν παρέλθῃ ὁ οὐρανὸς καὶ ἡ γῆ, ἰῶτα ἓν ἢ μία κερέα οὐ μὴ παρέλθῃ ἀπὸ τοῦ νόμου ἕως [ἂν] πάντα γένηται. 5.19. ὃς ἐὰν οὖν λύσῃ μίαν τῶν ἐντολῶν τούτων τῶν ἐλαχίστων καὶ διδάξῃ οὕτως τοὺς ἀνθρώπους, ἐλάχιστος κληθήσεται ἐν τῇ βασιλείᾳ τῶν οὐρανῶν· ὃς δʼ ἂν ποιήσῃ καὶ διδάξῃ, οὗτος μέγας κληθήσεται ἐν τῇ βασιλείᾳ τῶν οὐρανῶν. 5.20. λέγω γὰρ ὑμῖν ὅτι ἐὰν μὴ περισσεύσῃ ὑμῶν ἡ δικαιοσύνη πλεῖον τῶν γραμματέων καὶ Φαρισαίων, οὐ μὴ εἰσέλθητε εἰς τὴν βασιλείαν τῶν οὐρανῶν. 5.21. Ἠκούσατε ὅτι ἐρρέθη τοῖς ἀρχαίοις Οὐ φονεύσεις· ὃς δʼ ἂν φονεύσῃ, ἔνοχος ἔσται τῇ κρίσει. 5.22. Ἐγὼ δὲ λέγω ὑμῖν ὅτι πᾶς ὁ ὀργιζόμενος τῷ ἀδελφῷ αὐτοῦ ἔνοχος ἔσται τῇ κρίσει· ὃς δʼ ἂν εἴπῃ τῷ ἀδελφῷ αὐτοῦ Ῥακά, ἔνοχος ἔσται τῷ συνεδρίῳ· ὃς δʼ ἂν εἴπῃ Μωρέ, ἔνοχος ἔσται εἰς τὴν γέενναν τοῦ πυρός. 5.23. ἐὰν οὖν προσφέρῃς τὸ δῶρόν σου ἐπὶ τὸ θυσιαστήριον κἀκεῖ μνησθῇς ὅτι ὁ ἀδελφός σου ἔχει τι κατὰ σοῦ, 5.24. ἄφες ἐκεῖ τὸ δῶρόν σου ἔμπροσθεν τοῦ θυσιαστηρίου, καὶ ὕπαγε πρῶτον διαλλάγηθι τῷ ἀδελφῷ σου, καὶ τότε ἐλθὼν πρόσφερε τὸ δῶρόν σου. 5.25. ἴσθι εὐνοῶν τῷ ἀντιδίκῳ σου ταχὺ ἕως ὅτου εἶ μετʼ αὐτοῦ ἐν τῇ ὁδῷ, μή ποτέ σε παραδῷ ὁ ἀντίδικος τῷ κριτῇ, καὶ ὁ κριτὴς τῷ ὑπηρέτῃ, καὶ εἰς φυλακὴν βληθήσῃ· 5.26. ἀμὴν λέγω σοι, οὐ μὴ ἐξέλθῃς ἐκεῖθεν ἕως ἂν ἀποδῷς τὸν ἔσχατον κοδράντην. 5.27. Ἠκούσατε ὅτι ἐρρέθη Οὐ μοιχεύσεις. 5.28. Ἐγὼ δὲ λέγω ὑμῖν ὅτι πᾶς ὁ βλέπων γυναῖκα πρὸς τὸ ἐπιθυμῆσαι [αὐτὴν] ἤδη ἐμοίχευσεν αὐτὴν ἐν τῇ καρδίᾳ αὐτοῦ. 5.29. εἰ δὲ ὁ ὀφθαλμός σου ὁ δεξιὸς σκανδαλίζει σε, ἔξελε αὐτὸν καὶ βάλε ἀπὸ σοῦ, συμφέρει γάρ σοι ἵνα ἀπόληται ἓν τῶν μελῶν σου καὶ μὴ ὅλον τὸ σῶμά σου βληθῇ εἰς γέενναν· 5.30. καὶ εἰ ἡ δεξιά σου χεὶρ σκανδαλίζει σε, ἔκκοψον αὐτὴν καὶ βάλε ἀπὸ σοῦ, συμφέρει γάρ σοι ἵνα ἀπόληται ἓν τῶν μελῶν σου καὶ μὴ ὅλον τὸ σῶμά σου εἰς γέενναν ἀπέλθῃ. 5.31. Ἐρρέθη δέ Ὃς ἂν ἀπολύσῃ τὴν γυναῖκα αὐτοῦ, δότω αὐτῇ ἀποστάσιον. 5.32. Ἐγὼ δὲ λέγω ὑμῖν ὅτι πᾶς ὁ ἀπολύων τὴν γυναῖκα αὐτοῦ παρεκτὸς λόγου πορνείας ποιεῖ αὐτὴν μοιχευθῆναι[, καὶ ὃς ἐὰν ἀπολελυμένην γαμήσῃ μοιχᾶται]. 5.33. Πάλιν ἠκούσατε ὅτι ἐρρέθη τοῖς ἀρχαίοις Οὐκ ἐπιορκήσεις, ἀποδώσεις δὲ τῷ κυρίῳ τοὺς ὅρκους σου. 5.34. Ἐγὼ δὲ λέγω ὑμῖν μν̀ ὀμόσαι ὅλως· μήτε ἐν τῷ οὐρανῷ, ὅτι θρόνος ἐστὶν τοῦ θεοῦ· 5.35. μήτε ἐν τῇ γῇ, ὅτι ὑποπόδιόν ἐστιν τῶν ποδῶν αὐτοῦ· μήτε εἰς Ἰεροσόλυμα, ὅτι πόλις ἐστὶν τοῦ μεγάλου βασιλέως· 5.36. μήτε ἐν τῇ κεφαλῇ σου ὀμόσῃς, ὅτι οὐ δύνασαι μίαν τρίχα λευκὴν ποιῆσαι ἢ μέλαιναν. 5.37. ἔστω δὲ ὁ λόγος ὑμῶν ναὶ ναί, οὒ οὔ· τὸ δὲ περισσὸν τούτων ἐκ τοῦ πονηροῦ ἐστίν. 5.38. Ἠκούσατε ὅτι ἐρρέθη Ὀφθαλμὸν ἀντὶ ὀφθαλμοῦ καὶ ὀδόντα ἀντὶ ὀδόντος. 5.39. Ἐγὼ δὲ λέγω ὑμῖν μὴ ἀντιστῆναι τῷ πονηρῷ· ἀλλʼ ὅστις σε ῥαπίζει εἰς τὴν δεξιὰν σιαγόνα [σου], στρέψον αὐτῷ καὶ τὴν ἄλλην· 5.40. καὶ τῷ θέλοντί σοι κριθῆναι καὶ τὸν χιτῶνά σου λαβεῖν, ἄφες αὐτῷ καὶ τὸ ἱμάτιον· 5.41. καὶ ὅστις σε ἀγγαρεύσει μίλιον ἕν, ὕπαγε μετʼ αὐτοῦ δύο. 5.42. τῷ αἰτοῦντί σε δός, καὶ τὸν θέλοντα ἀπὸ σοῦ δανίσασθαι μὴ ἀποστραφῇς. 5.43. Ἠκούσατε ὅτι ἐρρέθη Ἀγαπήσεις τὸν πλησίον σου καὶ μισήσεις τὸν ἐχθρόν σου. 5.44. Ἐγὼ δὲ λέγω ὑμῖν, ἀγαπᾶτε τοὺς ἐχθροὺς ὑμῶν καὶ προσεύχεσθε ὑπὲρ τῶν διωκόντων ὑμᾶς· 5.45. ὅπως γένησθε υἱοὶ τοῦ πατρὸς ὑμῶν τοῦ ἐν οὐρανοῖς, ὅτι τὸν ἥλιον αὐτοῦ ἀνατέλλει ἐπὶ πονηροὺς καὶ ἀγαθοὺς καὶ βρέχει ἐπὶ δικαίους καὶ ἀδίκους. 5.46. ἐὰν γὰρ ἀγαπήσητε τοὺς ἀγαπῶντας ὑμᾶς, τίνα μισθὸν ἔχετε; οὐχὶ καὶ οἱ τελῶναι τὸ αὐτὸ ποιοῦσιν; 5.47. καὶ ἐὰν ἀσπάσησθε τοὺς ἀδελφοὺς ὑμῶν μόνον, τί περισσὸν ποιεῖτε; οὐχὶ καὶ οἱ ἐθνικοὶ τὸ αὐτὸ ποιοῦσιν; 5.48. Ἔσεσθε οὖν ὑμεῖς τέλειοι ὡς ὁ πατὴρ ὑμῶν ὁ οὐράνιος τέλειός ἐστιν. 6.1. Προσέχετε [δὲ] τὴν δικαιοσύνην ὑμῶν μὴ ποιεῖν ἔμπροσθεν τῶν ἀνθρώπων πρὸς τὸ θεαθῆναι αὐτοῖς· εἰ δὲ μήγε, μισθὸν οὐκ ἔχετε παρὰ τῷ πατρὶ ὑμῶν τῷ ἐν τοῖς οὐρανοῖς. 7.26. Καὶ πᾶς ὁ ἀκούων μου τοὺς λόγους τούτους καὶ μὴ ποιῶν αὐτοὺς ὁμοιωθήσεται ἀνδρὶ μωρῷ, ὅστις ᾠκοδόμησεν αὐτοῦ τὴν οἰκίαν ἐπὶ τὴν ἄμμον. 9.32. Αὐτῶν δὲ ἐξερχομένων ἰδοὺ προσήνεγκαν αὐτῷ κωφὸν δαιμονιζόμενον· 9.33. καὶ ἐκβληθέντος τοῦ δαιμονίου ἐλάλησεν ὁ κωφός. καὶ ἐθαύμασαν οἱ ὄχλοι λέγοντες Οὐδέποτε ἐφάνη οὕτως ἐν τῷ Ἰσραήλ. 9.34. [οἱ δὲ Φαρισαῖοι ἔλεγον Ἐν τῷ ἄρχοντι τῶν δαιμονίων ἐκβάλλει τὰ δαιμόνια.] 12.22. Τότε προσήνεγκαν αὐτῷ δαιμονιζόμενον τυφλὸν καὶ κωφόν· καὶ ἐθεράπευσεν αὐτόν, ὥστε τὸν κωφὸν λαλεῖν καὶ βλέπειν. 12.23. Καὶ ἐξίσταντο πάντες οἱ ὄχλοι καὶ ἔλεγον Μήτι οὗτός ἐστιν ὁ υἱὸς Δαυείδ; 12.24. οἱ δὲ Φαρισαῖοι ἀκούσαντες εἶπον Οὗτος οὐκ ἐκβάλλει τὰ δαιμόνια εἰ μὴ ἐν τῷ Βεεζεβοὺλ ἄρχοντι τῶν δαιμονίων. 12.25. Εἰδὼς δὲ τὰς ἐνθυμήσεις αὐτῶν εἶπεν αὐτοῖς Πᾶσα βασιλεία μερισθεῖσα καθʼ ἑαυτῆς ἐρημοῦται, καὶ πᾶσα πόλις ἢ οἰκία μερισθεῖσα καθʼ ἑαυτῆς οὐ σταθήσεται. 12.26. καὶ εἰ ὁ Σατανᾶς τὸν Σατανᾶν ἐκβάλλει, ἐφʼ ἑαυτὸν ἐμερίσθη· πῶς οὖν σταθήσεται ἡ βασιλεία αὐτοῦ; 12.27. καὶ εἰ ἐγὼ ἐν Βεεζεβοὺλ ἐκβάλλω τὰ δαιμόνια, οἱ υἱοὶ ὑμῶν ἐν τίνι ἐκβάλλουσιν; διὰ τοῦτο αὐτοὶ κριταὶ ἔσονται ὑμῶν. 12.28. εἰ δὲ ἐν πνεύματι θεοῦ ἐγὼ ἐκβάλλω τὰ δαιμόνια, ἄρα ἔφθασεν ἐφʼ ὑμᾶς ἡ βασιλεία τοῦ θεοῦ. 12.31. Διὰ τοῦτο λέγω ὑμῖν, πᾶσα ἁμαρτία καὶ βλασφημία ἀφεθήσεται τοῖς ἀνθρώποις, ἡ δὲ τοῦ πνεύματος βλασφημία οὐκ ἀφεθήσεται. 12.32. καὶ ὃς ἐὰν εἴπῃ λόγον κατὰ τοῦ υἱοῦ τοῦ ἀνθρώπου, ἀφεθήσεται αὐτῷ· ὃς δʼ ἂν εἴπῃ κατὰ τοῦ πνεύματος τοῦ ἁγίου, οὐκ ἀφεθήσεται αὐτῷ οὔτε ἐν τούτῳ τῷ αἰῶνι οὔτε ἐν τῷ μέλλοντι. 15.1. Τότε προσέρχονται τῷ Ἰησοῦ ἀπὸ Ἰεροσολύμων Φαρισαῖοι καὶ γραμματεῖς λέγοντες 15.2. Διὰ τί οἱ μαθηταί σου παραβαίνουσιν τὴν παράδοσιν τῶν πρεσβυτέρων; οὐ γὰρ νίπτονται τὰς χεῖρας ὅταν ἄρτον ἐσθίωσιν. 15.3. ὁ δὲ ἀποκριθεὶς εἶπεν αὐτοῖς Διὰ τί καὶ ὑμεῖς παραβαίνετε τὴν ἐντολὴν τοῦ θεοῦ διὰ τὴν παράδοσιν ὑμῶν; 15.4. ὁ γὰρ θεὸς εἶπεν Τίμα τὸν πατέρα καὶ τὴν μητέρα, καί Ὁ κακολογῶν πατέρα ἢ μητέρα θανάτῳ τελευτάτω· 15.5. ὑμεῖς δὲ λέγετε Ὃς ἂν εἴπῃ τῷ πατρὶ ἢ τῇ μητρί Δῶρον ὃ ἐὰν ἐξ ἐμοῦ ὠφεληθῇς, 15.6. οὐ μὴ τιμήσει τὸν πατέρα αὐτοῦ· καὶ ἠκυρώσατε τὸν λόγον τοῦ θεοῦ διὰ τὴν παράδοσιν ὑμῶν. 15.7. ὑποκριταί, καλῶς ἐπροφήτευσεν περὶ ὑμῶν Ἠσαίας λέγων 15.8. Ὁ λαὸς οὗτος τοῖς χείλεσίν με τιμᾷ, ἡ δὲ καρδία αὐτῶν πόρρω ἀπέχει ἀπʼ ἐμοῦ· 15.9. μάτην δὲ σέβονταί με, διδάσκοντες διδασκαλίας ἐντάλματα ἀνθρώπων. 15.10. Καὶ προσκαλεσάμενος τὸν ὄχλον εἶπεν αὐτοῖς Ἀκούετε καὶ συνίετε· 15.11. οὐ τὸ εἰσερχόμενον εἰς τὸ στόμα κοινοῖ τὸν ἄνθρωπον, ἀλλὰ τὸ ἐκπορευόμενον ἐκ τοῦ στόματος τοῦτο κοινοῖ τὸν ἄνθρωπον. 15.12. Τότε προσελθόντες οἱ μαθηταὶ λέγουσιν αὐτῷ Οἶδας ὅτι οἱ Φαρισαῖοι ἀκούσαντες τὸν λόγον ἐσκανδαλίσθησαν; 15.13. ὁ δὲ ἀποκριθεὶς εἶπεν Πᾶσα φυτεία ἣν οὐκ ἐφύτευσεν ὁ πατήρ μου ὁ οὐράνιος ἐκριζωθήσεται. 15.14. ἄφετε αὐτούς· τυφλοί εἰσιν ὁδηγοί· τυφλὸς δὲ τυφλὸν ἐὰν ὁδηγῇ, ἀμφότεροι εἰς βόθυνον πεσοῦνται. 15.15. Ἀποκριθεὶς δὲ ὁ Πέτρος εἶπεν αὐτῷ Φράσον ἡμῖν τὴν παραβολήν. 15.16. ὁ δὲ εἶπεν Ἀκμὴν καὶ ὑμεῖς ἀσύνετοί ἐστε; 15.17. οὐ νοεῖτε ὅτι πᾶν τὸ εἰσπορευόμενον εἰς τὸ στόμα εἰς τὴν κοιλίαν χωρεῖ καὶ εἰς ἀφεδρῶνα ἐκβάλλεται; 15.18. τὰ δὲ ἐκπορευόμενα ἐκ τοῦ στόματος ἐκ τῆς καρδίας ἐξέρχεται, κἀκεῖνα κοινοῖ τὸν ἄνθρωπον. 15.19. ἐκ γὰρ τῆς καρδίας ἐξέρχονται διαλογισμοὶ πονηροί, φόνοι, μοιχεῖαι, πορνεῖαι, κλοπαί, ψευδομαρτυρίαι, βλασφημίαι. 15.20. ταῦτά ἐστιν τὰ κοινοῦντα τὸν ἄνθρωπον, τὸ δὲ ἀνίπτοις χερσὶν φαγεῖν οὐ κοινοῖ τὸν ἄνθρωπον. 19.17. ὁ δὲ εἶπεν αὐτῷ Τί με ἐρωτᾷς περὶ τοῦ ἀγαθοῦ; εἷς ἐστὶν ὁ ἀγαθός· εἰ δὲ θέλέις εἰς τὴν ζωὴν εἰσελθεῖν, τήρει τὰς ἐντολάς. 19.18. λέγει αὐτῷ Ποίας; ὁ δὲ Ἰησοῦς ἔφη Τό Οὐ φονεύσεις, Οὐ μοιχεύσεις, Οὐ κλέψεις, Οὐ ψευδομαρτυρήσεις, 19.19. Τίμα τὸν πατέρα καὶ τὴν μητέρα, καί Ἀγαπήσεις τὸν πλησίον σου ὡς σεαυτόν. 23.1. Τότε [ὁ] Ἰησοῦς ἐλάλησεν τοῖς ὄχλοις καὶ τοῖς μαθηταῖς αὐτοῦ λέγων 23.2. Ἐπὶ τῆς Μωυσέως καθέδρας ἐκάθισαν οἱ γραμματεῖς καὶ οἱ Φαρισαῖοι. 23.3. πάντα οὖν ὅσα ἐὰν εἴπωσιν ὑμῖν ποιήσατε καὶ τηρεῖτε, κατὰ δὲ τὰ ἔργα αὐτῶν μὴ ποιεῖτε, λέγουσιν γὰρ καὶ οὐ ποιοῦσιν. 23.4. δεσμεύουσιν δὲ φορτία βαρέα καὶ ἐπιτιθέασιν ἐπὶ τοὺς ὤμους τῶν ἀνθρώπων, αὐτοὶ δὲ τῷ δακτύλῳ αὐτῶν οὐ θέλουσιν κινῆσαι αὐτά. 23.5. πάντα δὲ τὰ ἔργα αὐτῶν ποιοῦσιν πρὸς τὸ θεαθῆναι τοῖς ἀνθρώποις· πλατύνουσι γὰρ τὰ φυλακτήρια αὐτῶν καὶ μεγαλύνουσι τὰ κράσπεδα, 23.6. φιλοῦσι δὲ τὴν πρωτοκλισίαν ἐν τοῖς δείπνοις καὶ τὰς πρωτοκαθεδρίας ἐν ταῖς συναγωγαῖς 23.7. καὶ τοὺς ἀσπασμοὺς ἐν ταῖς ἀγοραῖς καὶ καλεῖσθαι ὑπὸ τῶν ἀνθρώπων Ῥαββεί. 23.8. ὑμεῖς δὲ μὴ κληθῆτε Ῥαββεί, εἷς γάρ ἐστιν ὑμῶν ὁ διδάσκαλος, πάντες δὲ ὑμεῖς ἀδελφοί ἐστε· 23.9. καὶ πατέρα μὴ καλέσητε ὑμῶν ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς, εἷς γάρ ἐστιν ὑμῶν ὁ πατὴρ ὁ οὐράνιος· 23.10. μηδὲ κληθῆτε καθηγηταί, ὅτι καθηγητὴς ὑμῶν ἐστὶν εἷς ὁ χριστός· 23.11. ὁ δὲ μείζων ὑμῶν ἔσται ὑμῶν διάκονος. 23.12. Ὅστις δὲ ὑψώσει ἑαυτὸν ταπεινωθήσεται, καὶ ὅστις ταπεινώσει ἑαυτὸν ὑψωθήσεται. 23.13. 23.14. Οὐαὶ δὲ ὑμῖν, γραμματεῖς καὶ Φαρισαῖοι ὑποκριταί, ὅτι κλείετε τὴν βασιλείαν τῶν οὐρανῶν ἔμπροσθεν τῶν ἀνθρώπων· ὑμεῖς γὰρ οὐκ εἰσέρχεσθε, οὐδὲ τοὺς εἰσερχομένους ἀφίετε εἰσελθεῖν. 23.15. Οὐαὶ ὑμῖν, γραμματεῖς καὶ Φαρισαῖοι ὑποκριταί, ὅτι περιάγετε τὴν θάλασσαν καὶ τὴν ξηρὰν ποιῆσαι ἕνα προσήλυτον, καὶ ὅταν γένηται ποιεῖτε αὐτὸν υἱὸν γεέννης διπλότερον ὑμῶν. 23.16. Οὐαὶ ὑμῖν, ὁδηγοὶ τυφλοὶ οἱ λέγοντες Ὃς ἂν ὀμόσῃ ἐν τῷ ναῷ, οὐδέν ἐστιν, ὃς δʼ ἂν ὀμόσῃ ἐν τῷ χρυσῷ τοῦ ναοῦ ὀφείλει· 23.17. μωροὶ καὶ τυφλοί, τίς γὰρ μείζων ἐστίν, ὁ χρυσὸς ἢ ὁ ναὸς ὁ ἁγιάσας τὸν χρυσόν; 23.18. καί Ὃς ἂν ὀμόσῃ ἐν τῷ θυσιαστηρίῳ, οὐδέν ἐστιν, ὃς δʼ ἂν ὀμόσῃ ἐν τῷ δώρῳ τῷ ἐπάνω αὐτοῦ ὀφείλει· 23.19. τυφλοί, τί γὰρ μεῖζον, τὸ δῶρον ἢ τὸ θυσιαστήριον τὸ ἁγιάζον τὸ δῶρον; 23.20. ὁ οὖν ὀμόσας ἐν τῷ θυσιαστηρίῳ ὀμνύει ἐν αὐτῷ καὶ ἐν πᾶσι τοῖς ἐπάνω αὐτοῦ· 23.21. καὶ ὁ ὀμόσας ἐν τῷ ναῷ ὀμνύει ἐν αὐτῷ καὶ ἐν τῷ κατοικοῦντι αὐτόν· 23.22. καὶ ὁ ὀμόσας ἐν τῷ οὐρανῷ ὀμνύει ἐν τῷ θρόνῳ τοῦ θεοῦ καὶ ἐν τῷ καθημένῳ ἐπάνω αὐτοῦ. 23.23. Οὐαὶ ὑμῖν, γραμματεῖς καὶ Φαρισαῖοι ὑποκριταί, ὅτι ἀποδεκατοῦτε τὸ ἡδύοσμον καὶ τὸ ἄνηθον καὶ τὸ κύμινον, καὶ ἀφήκατε τὰ βαρύτερα τοῦ νόμου, τὴν κρίσιν καὶ τὸ ἔλεος καὶ τὴν πίστιν· ταῦτα δὲ ἔδει ποιῆσαι κἀκεῖνα μὴ ἀφεῖναι. 23.24. ὁδηγοὶ τυφλοί, διυλίζοντες τὸν κώνωπα τὴν δὲ κάμηλον καταπίνοντες. 23.25. Οὐαὶ ὑμῖν, γραμματεῖς καὶ Φαρισαῖοι ὑποκριταί, ὅτι καθαρίζετε τὸ ἔξωθεν τοῦ ποτηρίου καὶ τῆς παροψίδος, ἔσωθεν δὲ γέμουσιν ἐξ ἁρπαγῆς καὶ ἀκρασίας. 23.26. Φαρισαῖε τυφλέ, καθάρισον πρῶτον τὸ ἔντος τοῦ ποτηρίου [καὶ τῆς παροψίδος], ἵνα γένηται καὶ τὸ ἐκτὸς αὐτοῦ καθαρόν. 23.27. Οὐαὶ ὑμῖν, γραμματεῖς καὶ Φαρισαῖοι ὑποκριταί, ὅτι παρομοιάζετε τάφοις κεκονιαμένοις, οἵτινες ἔξωθεν μὲν φαίνονται ὡραῖοι ἔσωθεν δὲ γέμουσιν ὀστέων νεκρῶν καὶ πάσης ἀκαθαρσίας· 23.28. οὕτως καὶ ὑμεῖς ἔξωθεν μὲν φαίνεσθε τοῖς ἀνθρώποις δίκαιοι, ἔσωθεν δέ ἐστε μεστοὶ ὑποκρίσεως καὶ ἀνομίας. 23.29. Οὐαὶ ὑμῖν, γραμματεῖς καὶ Φαρισαῖοι ὑποκριταί, ὅτι οἰκοδομεῖτε τοὺς τάφους τῶν προφητῶν καὶ κοσμεῖτε τὰ μνημεῖα τῶν δικαίων, 23.30. καὶ λέγετε Εἰ ἤμεθα ἐν ταῖς ἡμέραις τῶν πατέρων ἡμῶν, οὐκ ἂν ἤμεθα αὐτῶν κοινωνοὶ ἐν τῷ αἵματι τῶν προφητῶν· 23.31. ὥστε μαρτυρεῖτε ἑαυτοῖς ὅτι υἱοί ἐστε τῶν φονευσάντων τοὺς προφήτας. 23.32. καὶ ὑμεῖς πληρώσατε τὸ μέτρον τῶν πατέρων ὑμῶν. 23.33. ὄφεις γεννήματα ἐχιδνῶν, πῶς φύγητε ἀπὸ τῆς κρίσεως τῆς γεέννης; 23.34. διὰ τοῦτο ἰδοὺ ἐγὼ ἀποστέλλω πρὸς ὑμᾶς προφήτας καὶ σοφοὺς καὶ γραμματεῖς· ἐξ αὐτῶν ἀποκτενεῖτε καὶ σταυρώσετε, καὶ ἐξ αὐτῶν μαστιγώσετε ἐν ταῖς συναγωγαῖς ὑμῶν καὶ διώξετε ἀπὸ πόλεως εἰς πόλιν· 23.35. ὅπως ἔλθῃ ἐφʼ ὑμᾶς πᾶν αἱμα δίκαιον ἐκχυννόμενον ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς ἀπὸ τοῦ αἵματος Ἅβελ τοῦ δικαίου ἕως τοῦ αἵματος Ζαχαρίου υἱοῦ Βαραχίου, ὅν ἐφονεύσατε μεταξὺ τοῦ ναοῦ καὶ τοῦ θυσιαστηρίου. 23.36. ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν, ἥξει ταῦτα πάντα ἐπὶ τὴν γενεὰν ταύτην. 25.2. πέντε δὲ ἐξ αὐτῶν ἦσαν μωραὶ καὶ πέντε φρόνιμοι· 25.3. αἱ γὰρ μωραὶ λαβοῦσαι τὰς λαμπάδας [αὐτῶν] οὐκ ἔλαβον μεθʼ ἑαυτῶν ἔλαιον· 25.8. αἱ δὲ μωραὶ ταῖς φρονίμοις εἶπαν Δότε ἡμῖν ἐκ τοῦ ἐλαίου ὑμῶν, ὅτι αἱ λαμπάδες ἡμῶν σβέννυνται. 25.31. Ὅταν δὲ ἔλθῃ ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ἐν τῇ δόξῃ αὐτοῦ καὶ πάντες οἱ ἄγγελοι μετʼ αὐτοῦ, τότε καθίσει ἐπὶ θρόνου δόξης αὐτοῦ, 25.32. καὶ συναχθήσονται ἔμπροσθεν αὐτοῦ πάντα τὰ ἔθνη, καὶ ἀφορίσει αὐτοὺς ἀπʼ ἀλλήλων, ὥσπερ ὁ ποιμὴν ἀφορίζει τὰ πρόβατα ἀπὸ τῶν ἐρίφων, 25.33. καὶ στήσει τὰ μὲν πρόβατα ἐκ δεξιῶν αὐτοῦ τὰ δὲ ἐρίφια ἐξ εὐωνύμων. 25.34. τότε ἐρεῖ ὁ βασιλεὺς τοῖς ἐκ δεξιῶν αὐτοῦ Δεῦτε, οἱ εὐλογημένοι τοῦ πατρός μου, κληρονομήσατε τὴν ἡτοιμασμένην ὑμῖν βασιλείαν ἀπὸ καταβολῆς κόσμου· 25.35. ἐπείνασα γὰρ καὶ ἐδώκατέ μοι φαγεῖν, ἐδίψησα καὶ ἐποτίσατέ με, ξένος ἤμην καὶ συνηγάγετέ με, 25.36. γυμνὸς καὶ περιεβάλετέ με, ἠσθένησα καὶ ἐπεσκέψασθέ με, ἐν φυλακῇ ἤμην καὶ ἤλθατε πρός με. 25.37. τότε ἀποκριθήσονται αὐτῷ οἱ δίκαιοι λέγοντες Κύριε, πότε σε εἴδαμεν πεινῶντα καὶ ἐθρέψαμεν, ἢ διψῶντα καὶ ἐποτίσαμεν; 25.38. πότε δέ σε εἴδαμεν ξένον καὶ συνηγάγομεν, ἢ γυμνὸν καὶ περιεβάλομεν; 25.39. πότε δέ σε εἴδομεν ἀσθενοῦντα ἢ ἐν φυλακῇ καὶ ἤλθομεν πρός σε; 25.40. καὶ ἀποκριθεὶς ὁ βασιλεὺς ἐρεῖ αὐτοῖς Ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν, ἐφʼ ὅσον ἐποιήσατε ἑνὶ τούτων τῶν ἀδελφῶν μου τῶν ἐλαχίστων, ἐμοὶ ἐποιήσατε. 25.41. τότε ἐρεῖ καὶ τοῖς ἐξ εὐωνύμων Πορεύεσθε ἀπʼ ἐμοῦ κατηραμένοι εἰς τὸ πῦρ τὸ αἰώνιον τὸ ἡτοιμασμένον τῷ διαβόλῳ καὶ τοῖς ἀγγέλοις αὐτοῦ· 25.42. ἐπείνασα γὰρ καὶ οὐκ ἐδώκατέ μοι φαγεῖν, [καὶ] ἐδίψησα καὶ οὐκ ἐποτίσατέ με, 25.43. ξένος ἤμην καὶ οὐ συνηγάγετέ με, γυμνὸς καὶ οὐ περιεβάλετέ με, ἀσθενὴς καὶ ἐν φυλακῇ καὶ οὐκ ἐπεσκέψασθέ με. 25.44. τότε ἀποκριθήσονται καὶ αὐτοὶ λέγοντες Κύριε, πότε σε εἴδομεν πεινῶντα ἢ διψῶντα ἢ ξένον ἢ γυμνὸν ἢ ἀσθενῆ ἢ ἐν φυλακῇ καὶ οὐ διηκονήσαμέν σοι; 25.45. τότε ἀποκριθήσεται αὐτοῖς λέγων Ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν, ἐφʼ ὅσον οὐκ ἐποιήσατε ἑνὶ τούτων τῶν ἐλαχίστων, οὐδὲ ἐμοὶ ἐποιήσατε. 25.46. καὶ ἀπελεύσονται οὗτοι εἰς κόλασιν αἰώνιον, οἱ δὲ δίκαιοι εἰς ζωὴν αἰώνιον. 27.5. καὶ ῥίψας τὰ ἀργύρια εἰς τὸν ναὸν ἀνεχώρησεν, καὶ ἀπελθὼν ἀπήγξατο. 27.51. Καὶ ἰδοὺ τὸ καταπέτασμα τοῦ ναοῦ ἐσχίσθη [ἀπʼ] ἄνωθεν ἕως κάτω εἰς δύο, καὶ ἡ γῆ ἐσείσθη, καὶ αἱ πέτραι ἐσχίσθησαν, 27.52. καὶ τὰ μνημεῖα ἀνεῴχθησαν καὶ πολλὰ σώματα τῶν κεκοιμημένων ἁγίων ἠγέρθησαν, 27.53. καὶ ἐξελθόντες ἐκ τῶν μνημείων μετὰ τὴν ἔγερσιν αὐτοῦ εἰσῆλθον εἰς τὴν ἁγίαν πόλιν καὶ ἐνεφανίσθησαν πολλοῖς. 28.9. καὶ ἰδοὺ Ἰησοῦς ὑπήντησεν αὐταῖς λέγων Χαίρετε· αἱ δὲ προσελθοῦσαι ἐκράτησαν αὐτοῦ τοὺς πόδας καὶ προσεκύνησαν αὐτῷ. 28.19. πορευθέντες οὖν μαθητεύσατε πάντα τὰ ἔθνη, βαπτίζοντες αὐτοὺς εἰς τὸ ὄνομα τοῦ πατρὸς καὶ τοῦ υἱοῦ καὶ τοῦ ἁγίου πνεύματος, 1.24. Joseph arose from his sleep, and did as the angel of the Lord commanded him, and took his wife to himself; 1.25. and didn't know her sexually until she had brought forth her firstborn son. He named him Jesus. 3.7. But when he saw many of the Pharisees and Sadducees coming for his baptism, he said to them, "You offspring of vipers, who warned you to flee from the wrath to come? 3.8. Therefore bring forth fruit worthy of repentance! 3.9. Don't think to yourselves, 'We have Abraham for our father,' for I tell you that God is able to raise up children to Abraham from these stones. 3.10. "Even now the ax lies at the root of the trees. Therefore, every tree that doesn't bring forth good fruit is cut down, and cast into the fire. 3.11. I indeed baptize you in water for repentance, but he who comes after me is mightier than I, whose shoes I am not worthy to carry. He will baptize you in the Holy Spirit. 3.12. His winnowing fork is in his hand, and he will thoroughly cleanse his threshing floor. He will gather his wheat into the barn, but the chaff he will burn up with unquenchable fire." 4.1. Then Jesus was led up by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil. 4.2. When he had fasted forty days and forty nights, he was hungry afterward. 4.3. The tempter came and said to him, "If you are the Son of God, command that these stones become bread." 4.4. But he answered, "It is written, 'Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceeds out of the mouth of God.'" 4.5. Then the devil took him into the holy city. He set him on the pinnacle of the temple, 4.6. and said to him, "If you are the Son of God, throw yourself down, for it is written, 'He will give his angels charge concerning you.' and, 'On their hands they will bear you up, So that you don't dash your foot against a stone.'" 4.7. Jesus said to him, "Again, it is written, 'You shall not test the Lord, your God.'" 4.8. Again, the devil took him to an exceedingly high mountain, and showed him all the kingdoms of the world, and their glory. 4.9. He said to him, "I will give you all of these things, if you will fall down and worship me." 4.10. Then Jesus said to him, "Get behind me, Satan! For it is written, 'You shall worship the Lord your God, and him only shall you serve.'" 4.11. Then the devil left him, and behold, angels came and ministered to him. 5.12. Rejoice, and be exceedingly glad, for great is your reward in heaven. For that is how they persecuted the prophets who were before you. 5.17. "Don't think that I came to destroy the law or the prophets. I didn't come to destroy, but to fulfill. 5.18. For most assuredly, I tell you, until heaven and earth pass away, not even one smallest letter or one tiny pen stroke shall in any way pass away from the law, until all things are accomplished. 5.19. Whoever, therefore, shall break one of these least commandments, and teach others to do so, shall be called least in the Kingdom of Heaven; but whoever shall do and teach them shall be called great in the Kingdom of Heaven. 5.20. For I tell you that unless your righteousness exceeds that of the scribes and Pharisees, there is no way you will enter into the Kingdom of Heaven. 5.21. "You have heard that it was said to the ancient ones, 'You shall not murder;' and 'Whoever shall murder shall be in danger of the judgment.' 5.22. But I tell you, that everyone who is angry with his brother without a cause shall be in danger of the judgment; and whoever shall say to his brother, 'Raca!' shall be in danger of the council; and whoever shall say, 'You fool!' shall be in danger of the fire of Gehenna. 5.23. "If therefore you are offering your gift at the altar, and there remember that your brother has anything against you, 5.24. leave your gift there before the altar, and go your way. First be reconciled to your brother, and then come and offer your gift. 5.25. Agree with your adversary quickly, while you are with him in the way; lest perhaps the prosecutor deliver you to the judge, and the judge deliver you to the officer, and you be cast into prison. 5.26. Most assuredly I tell you, you shall by no means get out of there, until you have paid the last penny. 5.27. "You have heard that it was said, 'You shall not commit adultery;' 5.28. but I tell you that everyone who gazes at a woman to lust after her has committed adultery with her already in his heart. 5.29. If your right eye causes you to stumble, pluck it out and throw it away from you. For it is profitable for you that one of your members should perish, than for your whole body to be cast into Gehenna. 5.30. If your right hand causes you to stumble, cut it off, and throw it away from you: for it is profitable for you that one of your members should perish, and not your whole body be thrown into Gehenna. 5.31. "It was also said, 'Whoever shall put away his wife, let him give her a writing of divorce,' 5.32. but I tell you that whoever who puts away his wife, except for the cause of sexual immorality, makes her an adulteress; and whoever marries her when she is put away commits adultery. 5.33. "Again you have heard that it was said to them of old time, 'You shall not make false vows, but shall perform to the Lord your vows,' 5.34. but I tell you, don't swear at all: neither by heaven, for it is the throne of God; 5.35. nor by the earth, for it is the footstool of his feet; nor by Jerusalem, for it is the city of the great King. 5.36. Neither shall you swear by your head, for you can't make one hair white or black. 5.37. But let your 'Yes' be 'Yes' and your 'No' be 'no.' Whatever is more than these is of the evil one. 5.38. "You have heard that it was said, 'An eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth.' 5.39. But I tell you, don't resist him who is evil; but whoever strikes you on your right cheek, turn to him the other also. 5.40. If anyone sues you to take away your coat, let him have your cloak also. 5.41. Whoever compels you to go one mile, go with him two. 5.42. Give to him who asks you, and don't turn away him who desires to borrow from you. 5.43. "You have heard that it was said, 'You shall love your neighbor, and hate your enemy.' 5.44. But I tell you, love your enemies, bless those who curse you, do good to those who hate you, and pray for those who mistreat you and persecute you, 5.45. that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven. For he makes his sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the just and the unjust. 5.46. For if you love those who love you, what reward do you have? Don't even the tax collectors do the same? 5.47. If you only greet your friends, what more do you do than others? Don't even the tax collectors do the same? 5.48. Therefore you shall be perfect, just as your Father in heaven is perfect. 6.1. "Be careful that you don't do your charitable giving before men, to be seen by them, or else you have no reward from your Father who is in heaven. 7.26. Everyone who hears these words of mine, and doesn't do them will be like a foolish man, who built his house on the sand. 9.32. As they went out, behold, a mute man who was demon possessed was brought to him. 9.33. When the demon was cast out, the mute man spoke. The multitudes marveled, saying, "Nothing like this has ever been seen in Israel!" 9.34. But the Pharisees said, "By the prince of the demons, he casts out demons." 12.22. Then one possessed by a demon, blind and mute, was brought to him and he healed him, so that the blind and mute man both spoke and saw. 12.23. All the multitudes were amazed, and said, "Can this be the son of David?" 12.24. But when the Pharisees heard it, they said, "This man does not cast out demons, except by Beelzebul, the prince of the demons." 12.25. Knowing their thoughts, Jesus said to them, "Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation, and every city or house divided against itself will not stand. 12.26. If Satan casts out Satan, he is divided against himself. How then will his kingdom stand? 12.27. If I by Beelzebul cast out demons, by whom do your sons cast them out? Therefore they will be your judges. 12.28. But if I by the Spirit of God cast out demons, then the Kingdom of God has come upon you. 12.31. Therefore I tell you, every sin and blasphemy will be forgiven men, but the blasphemy against the Spirit will not be forgiven men. 12.32. Whoever speaks a word against the Son of Man, it will be forgiven him; but whoever speaks against the Holy Spirit, it will not be forgiven him, neither in this world, nor in that which is to come. 15.1. Then Pharisees and scribes came to Jesus from Jerusalem, saying, 15.2. "Why do your disciples disobey the tradition of the elders? For they don't wash their hands when they eat bread." 15.3. He answered them, "Why do you also disobey the commandment of God because of your tradition? 15.4. For God commanded, 'Honor your father and your mother,' and, 'He who speaks evil of father or mother, let him be put to death.' 15.5. But you say, 'Whoever may tell his father or his mother, "Whatever help you might otherwise have gotten from me is a gift devoted to God," 15.6. he shall not honor his father or mother.' You have made the commandment of God void because of your tradition. 15.7. You hypocrites! Well did Isaiah prophesy of you, saying, 15.8. 'These people draw near to me with their mouth, And honor me with their lips; But their heart is far from me. 15.9. And in vain do they worship me, Teaching as doctrine rules made by men.'" 15.10. He summoned the multitude, and said to them, "Hear, and understand. 15.11. That which enters into the mouth doesn't defile the man; but that which proceeds out of the mouth, this defiles the man." 15.12. Then the disciples came, and said to him, "Do you know that the Pharisees were offended, when they heard this saying?" 15.13. But he answered, "Every plant which my heavenly Father didn't plant will be uprooted. 15.14. Leave them alone. They are blind guides of the blind. If the blind guide the blind, both will fall into a pit." 15.15. Peter answered him, "Explain the parable to us." 15.16. So Jesus said, "Do you also still not understand? 15.17. Don't you understand that whatever goes into the mouth passes into the belly, and then out of the body? 15.18. But the things which proceed out of the mouth come out of the heart, and they defile the man. 15.19. For out of the heart come forth evil thoughts, murders, adulteries, sexual sins, thefts, false testimony, and blasphemies. 15.20. These are the things which defile the man; but to eat with unwashed hands doesn't defile the man." 19.17. He said to him, "Why do you call me good? No one is good but one, that is, God. But if you want to enter into life, keep the commandments." 19.18. He said to him, "Which ones?"Jesus said, "'You shall not murder.' 'You shall not commit adultery.' 'You shall not steal.' 'You shall not offer false testimony.' 19.19. 'Honor your father and mother.' And, 'You shall love your neighbor as yourself.'" 23.1. Then Jesus spoke to the multitudes and to his disciples, 23.2. saying, "The scribes and the Pharisees sat on Moses' seat. 23.3. All things therefore whatever they tell you to observe, observe and do, but don't do their works; for they say, and don't do. 23.4. For they bind heavy burdens that are grievous to be borne, and lay them on men's shoulders; but they themselves will not lift a finger to help them. 23.5. But all their works they do to be seen by men. They make their phylacteries broad, enlarge the fringes of their garments, 23.6. and love the place of honor at feasts, the best seats in the synagogues, 23.7. the salutations in the marketplaces, and to be called 'Rabbi, Rabbi' by men. 23.8. But don't you be called 'Rabbi,' for one is your teacher, the Christ, and all of you are brothers. 23.9. Call no man on the earth your father, for one is your Father, he who is in heaven. 23.10. Neither be called masters, for one is your master, the Christ. 23.11. But he who is greatest among you will be your servant. 23.12. Whoever will exalt himself will be humbled, and whoever will humble himself will be exalted. 23.13. "Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you devour widows' houses, and as a pretense you make long prayers. Therefore you will receive greater condemnation. 23.14. "But woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! Because you shut up the Kingdom of Heaven against men; for you don't enter in yourselves, neither do you allow those who are entering in to enter. 23.15. Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you travel around by sea and land to make one proselyte; and when he becomes one, you make him twice as much of a son of Gehenna as yourselves. 23.16. "Woe to you, you blind guides, who say, 'Whoever swears by the temple, it is nothing; but whoever swears by the gold of the temple, he is obligated.' 23.17. You blind fools! For which is greater, the gold, or the temple that sanctifies the gold? 23.18. 'Whoever swears by the altar, it is nothing; but whoever swears by the gift that is on it, he is a obligated.' 23.19. You blind fools! For which is greater, the gift, or the altar that sanctifies the gift? 23.20. He therefore who swears by the altar, swears by it, and by everything on it. 23.21. He who swears by the temple, swears by it, and by him who is living in it. 23.22. He who swears by heaven, swears by the throne of God, and by him who sits on it. 23.23. "Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you tithe mint, dill, and cumin, and have left undone the weightier matters of the law: justice, mercy, and faith. But you ought to have done these, and not to have left the other undone. 23.24. You blind guides, who strain out a gnat, and swallow a camel! 23.25. "Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you clean the outside of the cup and of the platter, but within they are full of extortion and unrighteousness. 23.26. You blind Pharisee, first clean the inside of the cup and of the platter, that the outside of it may become clean also. 23.27. "Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you are like whitened tombs, which outwardly appear beautiful, but inwardly are full of dead men's bones, and of all uncleanness. 23.28. Even so you also outwardly appear righteous to men, but inwardly you are full of hypocrisy and iniquity. 23.29. "Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you build the tombs of the prophets, and decorate the tombs of the righteous, 23.30. and say, 'If we had lived in the days of our fathers, we wouldn't have been partakers with them in the blood of the prophets.' 23.31. Therefore you testify to yourselves that you are sons of those who killed the prophets. 23.32. Fill up, then, the measure of your fathers. 23.33. You serpents, you offspring of vipers, how will you escape the judgment of Gehenna? 23.34. Therefore, behold, I send to you prophets, wise men, and scribes. Some of them you will kill and crucify; and some of them you will scourge in your synagogues, and persecute from city to city; 23.35. that on you may come all the righteous blood shed on the earth, from the blood of righteous Abel to the blood of Zachariah son of Barachiah, whom you killed between the sanctuary and the altar. 23.36. Most assuredly I tell you, all these things will come upon this generation. 25.2. Five of them were foolish, and five were wise. 25.3. Those who were foolish, when they took their lamps, took no oil with them, 25.8. The foolish said to the wise, 'Give us some of your oil, for our lamps are going out.' 25.31. "But when the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the holy angels with him, then he will sit on the throne of his glory. 25.32. Before him all the nations will be gathered, and he will separate them one from another, as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats. 25.33. He will set the sheep on his right hand, but the goats on the left. 25.34. Then the King will tell those on his right hand, 'Come, blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world; 25.35. for I was hungry, and you gave me food to eat; I was thirsty, and you gave me drink; I was a stranger, and you took me in; 25.36. naked, and you clothed me; I was sick, and you visited me; I was in prison, and you came to me.' 25.37. "Then the righteous will answer him, saying, 'Lord, when did we see you hungry, and feed you; or thirsty, and give you a drink? 25.38. When did we see you as a stranger, and take you in; or naked, and clothe you? 25.39. When did we see you sick, or in prison, and come to you?' 25.40. "The King will answer them, 'Most assuredly I tell you, inasmuch as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers, you did it to me.' 25.41. Then he will say also to those on the left hand, 'Depart from me, you cursed, into the eternal fire which is prepared for the devil and his angels; 25.42. for I was hungry, and you didn't give me food to eat; I was thirsty, and you gave me no drink; 25.43. I was a stranger, and you didn't take me in; naked, and you didn't clothe me; sick, and in prison, and you didn't visit me.' 25.44. "Then they will also answer, saying, 'Lord, when did we see you hungry, or thirsty, or a stranger, or naked, or sick, or in prison, and didn't help you?' 25.45. "Then he will answer them, saying, 'Most assuredly I tell you, inasmuch as you didn't do it to one of the least of these, you didn't do it to me.' 25.46. These will go away into eternal punishment, but the righteous into eternal life." 27.5. He threw down the pieces of silver in the sanctuary, and departed. He went away and hanged himself. 27.51. Behold, the veil of the temple was torn in two from the top to the bottom. The earth quaked and the rocks were split. 27.52. The tombs were opened, and many bodies of the saints who had fallen asleep were raised; 27.53. and coming out of the tombs after his resurrection, they entered into the holy city and appeared to many. 28.9. As they went to tell his disciples, behold, Jesus met them, saying, "Rejoice!"They came and took hold of his feet, and worshiped him. 28.19. Go, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit,
64. New Testament, Philippians, 2.6-2.11, 3.5-3.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature •pharisees, in christian literature Found in books: Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 45; Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 663
2.6. ὃς ἐν μορφῇ θεοῦ ὑπάρχων οὐχ ἁρπαγμὸν ἡγήσατο τὸ εἶναι ἴσα θεῷ, 2.7. ἀλλὰ ἑαυτὸν ἐκένωσεν μορφὴν δούλου λαβών, ἐν ὁμοιώματι ἀνθρώπων γενόμενος· καὶ σχήματι εὑρεθεὶς ὡς ἄνθρωπος 2.8. ἐταπείνωσεν ἑαυτὸν γενόμενος ὑπήκοος μέχρι θανάτου, θανάτου δὲ σταυροῦ· 2.9. διὸ καὶ ὁ θεὸς αὐτὸν ὑπερύψωσεν, καὶ ἐχαρίσατο αὐτῷ τὸ ὄνομα τὸ ὑπὲρ πᾶν ὄνομα, 2.10. ἵνα ἐν τῷ ὀνόματι Ἰησοῦπᾶν γόνυ κάμψῃἐπουρανίων καὶ ἐπιγείων καὶ καταχθονίων, 2.11. καὶ πᾶσα γλῶσσα ἐξομολογήσηταιὅτι ΚΥΡΙΟΣ ΙΗΣΟΥΣ ΧΡΙΣΤΟΣ εἰς δόξανθεοῦπατρός. 3.5. περιτομῇ ὀκταήμερος, ἐκ γένους Ἰσραήλ, φυλῆς Βενιαμείν, Ἐβραῖος ἐξ Ἐβραίων, κατὰ νόμον Φαρισαῖος, 3.6. κατὰ ζῆλος διώκων τὴν ἐκκλησίαν, κατὰ δικαιοσύνην τὴν ἐν νόμῳ γενόμενος ἄμεμπτος. 3.7. Ἀλλὰ ἅτινα ἦν μοι κέρδη, ταῦτα ἥγημαι διὰ τὸν χριστὸν ζημίαν. 2.6. who, existing in the form of God, didn't consider it robbery to be equal with God, 2.7. but emptied himself, taking the form of a servant, being made in the likeness of men. 2.8. And being found in human form, he humbled himself, becoming obedient to death, yes, the death of the cross. 2.9. Therefore God also highly exalted him, and gave to him the name which is above every name; 2.10. that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of those in heaven, those on earth, and those under the earth, 2.11. and that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father. 3.5. circumcised the eighth day, of the stock of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew of Hebrews; concerning the law, a Pharisee; 3.6. concerning zeal, persecuting the assembly; concerning the righteousness which is in the law, found blameless. 3.7. However, what things were gain to me, these have I counted loss for Christ.
65. New Testament, Mark, 1.7, 3.28-3.35, 6.48, 7.1-7.23, 10.27, 14.33-14.34 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 169, 170; Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 47, 48; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 230; Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 661, 662
1.7. καὶ ἐκήρυσσεν λέγων Ἔρχεται ὁ ἰσχυρότερός μου ὀπίσω [μου], οὗ οὐκ εἰμὶ ἱκανὸς κύψας λῦσαι τὸν ἱμάντα τῶν ὑποδημάτων αὐτοῦ· 3.28. Ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν ὅτι πάντα ἀφεθήσεται τοῖς υἱοῖς τῶν ἀνθρώπων, τὰ ἁμαρτήματα καὶ αἱ βλασφημίαι ὅσα ἐὰν βλασφημήσωσιν· 3.29. ὃς δʼ ἂν βλασφημήσῃ εἰς τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ ἅγιον, οὐκ ἔχει ἄφεσιν εἰς τὸν αἰῶνα, ἀλλὰ ἔνοχός ἐστιν αἰωνίου ἁμαρτήματος. 3.30. ὅτι ἔλεγον Πνεῦμα ἀκάθαρτον ἔχει. 3.31. Καὶ ἔρχονται ἡ μήτηρ αὐτοῦ καὶ οἱ ἀδελφοὶ αὐτοῦ καὶ ἔξω στήκοντες ἀπέστειλαν πρὸς αὐτὸν καλοῦντες αὐτόν. 3.32. καὶ ἐκάθητο περὶ αὐτὸν ὄχλος, καὶ λέγουσιν αὐτῷ Ἰδοὺ ἡ μήτηρ σου καὶ οἱ ἀδελφοί σου ἔξω ζητοῦσίν σε. 3.33. καὶ ἀποκριθεὶς αὐτοῖς λέγει Τίς ἐστιν ἡ μήτηρ μου καὶ οἱ ἀδελφοί; 3.34. καὶ περιβλεψάμενος τοὺς περὶ αὐτὸν κύκλῳ καθημένους λέγει Ἴδε ἡ μήτηρ μου καὶ οἱ ἀδελφοί μου· 3.35. ὃς ἂν ποιήσῃ τὸ θέλημα τοῦ θεοῦ, οὗτος ἀδελφός μου καὶ ἀδελφὴ καὶ μήτηρ ἐστίν. 6.48. καὶ ἰδὼν αὐτοὺς βασανιζομένους ἐν τῷ ἐλαύνειν, ἦν γὰρ ὁ ἄνεμος ἐναντίος αὐτοῖς, περὶ τετάρτην φυλακὴν τῆς νυκτὸς ἔρχεται πρὸς αὐτοὺς περιπατῶν ἐπὶ τῆς θαλάσσης· καὶ ἤθελεν παρελθεῖν αὐτούς. 7.1. Καὶ συνἄγονται πρὸς αὐτὸν οἱ Φαρισαῖοι καί τινες τῶν γραμματέων ἐλθόντες ἀπὸ Ἰεροσολύμων 7.2. καὶ ἰδόντες τινὰς τῶν μαθητῶν αὐτοῦ ὅτι κοιναῖς χερσίν, τοῦτʼ ἔστιν ἀνίπτοις, ἐσθίουσιν τοὺς ἄρτους. 7.3. —οἱ γὰρ Φαρισαῖοι καὶ πάντες οἱ Ἰουδαῖοι ἐὰν μὴ πυγμῇ νίψωνται τὰς χεῖρας οὐκ ἐσθίουσιν, κρατοῦντες τὴν παράδοσιν τῶν πρεσβυτέρων, 7.4. καὶ ἀπʼ ἀγορᾶς ἐὰν μὴ ῥαντίσωνται οὐκ ἐσθίουσιν, καὶ ἄλλα πολλά ἐστιν ἃ παρέλαβον κρατεῖν, βαπτισμοὺς ποτηρίων καὶ ξεστῶν καὶ χαλκίων. 7.5. —καὶ ἐπερωτῶσιν αὐτὸν οἱ Φαρισαῖοι καὶ οἱ γραμματεῖς Διὰ τί οὐ περιπατοῦσιν οἱ μαθηταί σου κατὰ τὴν παράδοσιν τῶν πρεσβυτέρων, ἀλλὰ κοιναῖς χερσὶν ἐσθίουσιν τὸν ἄρτον; 7.6. ὁ δὲ εἶπεν αὐτοῖς Καλῶς ἐπροφήτευσεν Ἠσαίας περὶ ὑμῶν τῶν ὑποκριτῶν, ὡς γέγραπται ὅτι Οὗτος ὁ λαὸς τοῖς χείλεσίν με τιμᾷ, ἡ δὲ καρδία αὐτῶν πόρρω ἀπέχει ἀπʼ ἐμοῦ· 7.7. μάτην δὲ σέβονταί με, διδάσκοντες διδασκαλίας ἐντάλματα ἀνθρώπων· 7.8. ἀφέντες τὴν ἐντολὴν τοῦ θεοῦ κρατεῖτε τὴν παράδοσιν τῶν ἀνθρώπων. 7.9. καὶ ἔλεγεν αὐτοῖς Καλῶς ἀθετεῖτε τὴν ἐντολὴν τοῦ θεοῦ, ἵνα τὴν παράδοσιν ὑμῶν τηρήσητε· 7.10. Μωυσῆς γὰρ εἶπεν Τίμα τὸν πατέρα σου καὶ τὴν μητέρα σου, καί Ὁ κακολογῶν πατέρα ἢ μητερα θανάτῳ τελευτάτω· 7.11. ὑμεῖς δὲ λέγετε Ἐὰν εἴπῃ ἄνθρωπος τῷ πατρὶ ἢ τῇ μητρί Κορβάν, ὅ ἐστιν Δῶρον, ὃ ἐὰν ἐξ ἐμοῦ ὠφεληθῇς, 7.12. οὐκέτι ἀφίετε αὐτὸν οὐδὲν ποιῆσαι τῷ πατρὶ ἢ τῇ μητρί, 7.13. ἀκυροῦντες τὸν λόγον τοῦ θεοῦ τῇ παραδόσει ὑμῶν ᾗ παρεδώκατε· καὶ παρόμοια τοιαῦτα πολλὰ ποιεῖτε. 7.14. Καὶ προσκαλεσάμενος πάλιν τὸν ὄχλον ἔλεγεν αὐτοῖς Ἀκούσατέ μου πάντες καὶ σύνετε. 7.15. οὐδὲν ἔστιν ἔξωθεν τοῦ ἀνθρώπου εἰσπορευόμενον εἰς αὐτὸν ὃ δύναται κοινῶσαι αὐτόν· ἀλλὰ τὰ ἐκ τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ἐκπορευόμενά ἐστιν τὰ κοινοῦντα τὸν ἄνθρωπον. 7.16. 7.17. Καὶ ὅτε εἰσῆλθεν εἰς οἶκον ἀπὸ τοῦ ὄχλου, ἐπηρώτων αὐτὸν οἱ μαθηταὶ αὐτοῦ τὴν παραβολήν. 7.18. καὶ λέγει αὐτοῖς Οὕτως καὶ ὑμεῖς ἀσύνετοί ἐστε; οὐ νοεῖτε ὅτι πᾶν τὸ ἔξωθεν εἰσπορευόμενον εἰς τὸν ἄνθρωπον οὐ δύναται αὐτὸν κοινῶσαι, 7.19. ὅτι οὐκ εἰσπορεύεται αὐτοῦ εἰς τὴν καρδίαν ἀλλʼ εἰς τὴν κοιλίαν, καὶ εἰς τὸν ἀφεδρῶνα ἐκπορεύεται; —καθαρίζων πάντα τὰ βρώματα. 7.20. ἔλεγεν δὲ ὅτι Τὸ ἐκ τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ἐκπορευόμενον ἐκεῖνο κοινοῖ τὸν ἄνθρωπον· 7.21. ἔσωθεν γὰρ ἐκ τῆς καρδίας τῶν ἀνθρώπων οἱ διαλογισμοὶ οἱ κακοὶ ἐκπορεύονται, πορνεῖαι, κλοπαί, φόνοι, 7.22. μοιχεῖαι, πλεονεξίαι, πονηρίαι, δόλος, ἀσέλγεια, ὀφθαλμὸς πονηρός, βλασφημία, ὑπερηφανία, ἀφροσύνη· 7.23. πάντα ταῦτα τὰ πονηρὰ ἔσωθεν ἐκπορεύεται καὶ κοινοῖ τὸν ἄνθρωπον. 10.27. ἐμβλέψας αὐτοῖς ὁ Ἰησοῦς λέγει Παρὰ ἀνθρώποις ἀδύνατον ἀλλʼ οὐ παρὰ θεῷ, πάντα γὰρ δυνατὰ παρὰ [τῷ] θεῷ . 14.33. καὶ παραλαμβάνει τὸν Πέτρον καὶ τὸν Ἰάκωβον καὶ τὸν Ἰωάνην μετʼ αὐτοῦ, καὶ ἤρξατο ἐκθαμβεῖσθαι καὶ ἀδημονεῖν, 14.34. καὶ λέγει αὐτοῖς Περίλυπός ἐστιν ἡ ψυχή μου ἕως θανάτου· μείνατε ὧδε καὶ γρηγορεῖτε. 1.7. He preached, saying, "After me comes he who is mightier than I, the thong of whose sandals I am not worthy to stoop down and loosen. 3.28. Most assuredly I tell you, all of the sons of men's sins will be forgiven them, including their blasphemies with which they may blaspheme; 3.29. but whoever may blaspheme against the Holy Spirit never has forgiveness, but is guilty of an eternal sin" 3.30. -- because they said, "He has an unclean spirit." 3.31. His mother and his brothers came, and standing outside, they sent to him, calling him. 3.32. A multitude was sitting around him, and they told him, "Behold, your mother, your brothers, and your sisters are outside looking for you." 3.33. He answered them, "Who are my mother and my brothers?" 3.34. Looking around at those who sat around him, he said, "Behold, my mother and my brothers! 3.35. For whoever does the will of God, the same is my brother, and my sister, and mother." 6.48. Seeing them distressed in rowing, for the wind was contrary to them, about the fourth watch of the night he came to them, walking on the sea, and he would have passed by them, 7.1. Then the Pharisees, and some of the scribes gathered together to him, having come from Jerusalem. 7.2. Now when they saw some of his disciples eating bread with defiled, that is, unwashed, hands, they found fault. 7.3. (For the Pharisees, and all the Jews, don't eat unless they wash their hands and forearms, holding to the tradition of the elders. 7.4. They don't eat when they come from the marketplace, unless they bathe themselves, and there are many other things, which they have received to hold to: washings of cups, pitchers, bronze vessels, and couches.) 7.5. The Pharisees and the scribes asked him, "Why don't your disciples walk according to the tradition of the elders, but eat their bread with unwashed hands?" 7.6. He answered them, "Well did Isaiah prophesy of you hypocrites, as it is written, 'This people honors me with their lips, But their heart is far from me. 7.7. But in vain do they worship me, Teaching as doctrines the commandments of men.' 7.8. "For you set aside the commandment of God, and hold tightly to the tradition of men -- the washing of pitchers and cups, and you do many other such things." 7.9. He said to them, "Full well do you reject the commandment of God, that you may keep your tradition. 7.10. For Moses said, 'Honor your father and your mother;' and, 'He who speaks evil of father or mother, let him be put to death.' 7.11. But you say, 'If a man tells his father or his mother, "Whatever profit you might have received from me is Corban, that is to say, given to God;"' 7.12. then you no longer allow him to do anything for his father or his mother, 7.13. making void the word of God by your tradition, which you have handed down. You do many things like this." 7.14. He called all the multitude to himself, and said to them, "Hear me, all of you, and understand. 7.15. There is nothing from outside of the man, that going into him can defile him; but the things which proceed out of the man are those that defile the man. 7.16. If anyone has ears to hear, let him hear!" 7.17. When he had entered into a house away from the multitude, his disciples asked him about the parable. 7.18. He said to them, "Are you thus without understanding also? Don't you perceive that whatever goes into the man from outside can't defile him, 7.19. because it doesn't go into his heart, but into his stomach, then into the latrine, thus making all foods clean?" 7.20. He said, "That which proceeds out of the man, that defiles the man. 7.21. For from within, out of the hearts of men, proceed evil thoughts, adulteries, sexual sins, murders, thefts, 7.22. covetings, wickedness, deceit, lustful desires, an evil eye, blasphemy, pride, and foolishness. 7.23. All these evil things come from within, and defile the man." 10.27. Jesus, looking at them, said, "With men it is impossible, but not with God, for all things are possible with God." 14.33. He took with him Peter, James, and John, and began to be greatly troubled and distressed. 14.34. He said to them, "My soul is exceedingly sorrowful, even to death. Stay here, and watch."
66. New Testament, 1 John, 2.20-2.24, 2.26-2.27, 3.24, 4.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian, literature/authors Found in books: Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 413, 417
2.20. καὶ ὑμεῖς χρίσμα ἔχετε ἀπὸ τοῦ ἁγίου· οἴδατε πάντες— 2.21. οὐκ ἔγραψα ὑμῖν ὅτι οὐκ οἴδατε τὴν ἀλήθειαν, ἀλλʼ ὅτι οἴδατε αὐτήν, καὶ ὅτι πᾶν ψεῦδος ἐκ τῆς ἀληθείας οὐκ ἔστιν. 2.22. Τίς ἐστιν ὁ ψεύστης εἰ μὴ ὁ ἀρνούμενος ὅτι Ἰησοῦς οὐκ ἔστιν ὁ χριστός; οὗτός ἐστιν ὁ ἀντίχριστος, ὁ ἀρνούμενος τὸν πατέρα καὶ τὸν υἱόν. 2.23. πᾶς ὁ ἀρνούμενος τὸν υἱὸν οὐδὲ τὸν πατέρα ἔχει· ὁ ὁμολογῶν τὸν υἱὸν καὶ τὸν πατέρα ἔχει. 2.24. Ὑμεῖς ὃ ἠκούσατε ἀπʼ ἀρχῆς, ἐν ὑμῖν μενέτω· ἐὰν ἐν ὑμῖν μείνῃ ὃ ἀπʼ ἀρχῆς ἠκούσατε, καὶ ὑμεῖς ἐν τῷ υἱῷ καὶ [ἐν] τῷ πατρὶ μενεῖτε. 2.26. Ταῦτα ἔγραψα ὑμῖν περὶ τῶν πλανώντων ὑμᾶς. 2.27. καὶ ὑμεῖς τὸ χρίσμα ὃ ἐλάβετε ἀπʼ αὐτοῦ μένει ἐν ὑμῖν, καὶ οὐ χρείαν ἔχετε ἵνα τις διδάσκῃ ὑμᾶς· ἀλλʼ ὡς τὸ αὐτοῦ χρίσμα διδάσκει ὑμᾶς περὶ πάντων, καὶ ἀληθές ἐστιν καὶ οὐκ ἔστιν ψεῦδος, καὶ καθὼς ἐδίδαξεν ὑμᾶς, μένετε ἐν αὐτῷ. 3.24. καὶ ὁ τηρῶν τὰς ἐντολὰς αὐτοῦ ἐν αὐτῷ μένει καὶ αὐτὸς ἐν αὐτῷ· καὶ ἐν τούτῳ γινώσκομεν ὅτι μένει ἐν ἡμῖν, ἐκ τοῦ πνεύματος οὗ ἡμῖν ἔδωκεν. 4.13. ἐν τούτῳ γινώσκομεν ὅτι ἐν αὐτῷ μένομεν καὶ αὐτὸς ἐν ἡμῖν, ὅτι ἐκ τοῦ πνεύματος αὐτοῦ δέδωκεν ἡμῖν. 2.20. You have an anointing from the Holy One, and you know the truth. 2.21. I have not written to you because you don't know the truth, but because you know it, and because no lie is of the truth. 2.22. Who is the liar but he who denies that Jesus is the Christ? This is the Antichrist, he who denies the Father and the Son. 2.23. Whoever denies the Son, the same doesn't have the Father. He who confesses the Son has the Father also. 2.24. Therefore, as for you, let that remain in you which you heard from the beginning. If that which you heard from the beginning remains in you, you also will remain in the Son, and in the Father. 2.26. These things I have written to you concerning those who would lead you astray. 2.27. As for you, the anointing which you received from him remains in you, and you don't need for anyone to teach you. But as his anointing teaches you concerning all things, and is true, and is no lie, and even as it taught you, you will remain in him. 3.24. He who keeps his commandments remains in him, and he in him. By this we know that he remains in us, by the Spirit which he gave us. 4.13. By this we know that we remain in him and he in us, because he has given us of his Spirit.
67. New Testament, Luke, 1.26, 1.39-1.52, 2.26, 2.46-2.47, 3.7-3.9, 3.16, 3.23, 4.1-4.15, 4.22, 4.43, 11.14-11.16, 11.24-11.26, 11.47-11.48, 12.8-12.12, 13.10-13.17, 14.1-14.4, 22.39-22.46, 23.34, 23.46, 24.47, 24.51 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 46, 48, 169, 170; Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022), Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity, 120; Boustan Janssen and Roetzel (2010), Violence, Scripture, and Textual Practices in Early Judaism and Christianity, 120; Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 46, 47; König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 134; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 229, 230; MacDougall (2022), Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition. 88; Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 661, 662, 663; Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 785
1.26. Ἐν δὲ τῷ μηνὶ τῷ ἕκτῳ ἀπεστάλη ὁ ἄγγελος Γαβριὴλ ἀπὸ τοῦ θεοῦ εἰς πόλιν τῆς Γαλιλαίας ᾗ ὄνομα Ναζαρὲτ 1.39. Ἀναστᾶσα δὲ Μαριὰμ ἐν ταῖς ἡμέραις ταύταις ἐπορεύθη εἰς τὴν ὀρινὴν μετὰ σπουδῆς εἰς πόλιν Ἰούδα, 1.40. καὶ εἰσῆλθεν εἰς τὸν οἶκον Ζαχαρίου καὶ ἠσπάσατο τὴν Ἐλεισάβετ. 1.41. καὶ ἐγένετο ὡς ἤκουσεν τὸν ἀσπασμὸν τῆς Μαρίας ἡ Ἐλεισάβετ, ἐσκίρτησεν τὸ βρέφος ἐν τῇ κοιλίᾳ αὐτῆς, καὶ ἐπλήσθη πνεύματος ἁγίου ἡ Ἐλεισάβετ, 1.42. καὶ ἀνεφώνησεν κραυγῇ μεγάλῃ καὶ εἶπεν Εὐλογημένη σὺ ἐν γυναιξίν, καὶ εὐλογημένος ὁ καρπὸς τῆς κοιλίας σου. 1.43. καὶ πόθεν μοι τοῦτο ἵνα ἔλθῃ ἡ μήτηρ τοῦ κυρίου μου πρὸς ἐμέ; 1.44. ἰδοὺ γὰρ ὡς ἐγένετο ἡ φωνὴ τοῦ ἀσπασμοῦ σου εἰς τὰ ὦτά μου, ἐσκίρτησεν ἐν ἀγαλλιάσει τὸ βρέφος ἐν τῇ κοιλίᾳ μου. 1.45. καὶ μακαρία ἡ πιστεύσασα ὅτι ἔσται τελείωσις τοῖς λελαλημένοις αὐτῇ παρὰ Κυρίου. 1.46. Καὶ εἶπεν Μαριάμ Μεγαλύνει ἡ ψυχή μου τὸν κύριον, 1.47. καὶ ἠγαλλίασεν τὸ πνεῦμά μου ἐπὶ τῷ θεῷ τῷ σωτῆρί μου· 1.48. ὅτι ἐπέβλεψεν ἐπὶ τὴν ταπείνωσιν τῆς δούλης αὐτοῦ, ἰδοὺ γὰρ ἀπὸ τοῦ νῦν μακαριοῦσίν με πᾶσαι αἱ γενεαί· 1.49. ὅτι ἐποίησέν μοι μεγάλα ὁ δυνατός, καὶ ἅγιον τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ, 1.50. καὶ τὸ ἔλεος αὐτοῦ εἰς γενεὰς καὶ γενεάς τοῖς φοβουμένοις αὐτόν. 1.51. Ἐποίησεν κράτος ἐν βραχίονι αὐτοῦ, διεσκόρπισεν ὑπερηφάνους διανοίᾳ καρδίας αὐτῶν· 1.52. καθεῖλεν δυνάστας ἀπὸ θρόνων καὶ ὕψωσεν ταπεινούς, 2.26. καὶ ἦν αὐτῷ κεχρηματισμένον ὑπὸ τοῦ πνεύματος τοῦ ἁγίου μὴ ἰδεῖν θάνατον πρὶν [ἢ] ἂν ἴδῃ τὸν χριστὸν Κυρίου. 2.46. καὶ ἐγένετο μετὰ ἡμέρας τρεῖς εὗρον αὐτὸν ἐν τῷ ἱερῷ καθεζόμενον ἐν μέσῳ τῶν διδασκάλων καὶ ἀκούοντα αὐτῶν καὶ ἐπερωτῶντα αὐτούς· 2.47. ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες οἱ ἀκούοντες αὐτοῦ ἐπὶ τῇ συνέσει καὶ ταῖς ἀποκρίσεσιν αὐτοῦ. 3.7. Ἔλεγεν οὖν τοῖς ἐκπορευομένοις ὄχλοις βαπτισθῆναι ὑπʼ αὐτοῦ Γεννήματα ἐχιδνῶν, τίς ὑπέδειξεν ὑμῖν φυγεῖν ἀπὸ τῆς μελλούσης ὀργῆς; 3.8. ποιήσατε οὖν καρποὺς ἀξίους τῆς μετανοίας· καὶ μὴ ἄρξησθε λέγειν ἐν ἑαυτοῖς Πατέρα ἔχομεν τὸν Ἀβραάμ, λέγω γὰρ ὑμῖν ὅτι δύναται ὁ θεὸς ἐκ τῶν λίθων τούτων ἐγεῖραι τέκνα τῷ Ἀβραάμ. 3.9. ἤδη δὲ καὶ ἡ ἀξίνη πρὸς τὴν ῥίζαν τῶν δένδρων κεῖται· πᾶν οὖν δένδρον μὴ ποιοῦν καρπὸν [καλὸν] ἐκκόπτεται καὶ εἰς πῦρ βάλλεται. 3.16. ἀπεκρίνατο λέγων πᾶσιν ὁ Ἰωάνης Ἐγὼ μὲν ὕδατι βαπτίζω ὑμᾶς· ἔρχεται δὲ ὁ ἰσχυρότερός μου, οὗ οὐκ εἰμὶ ἱκανὸς λῦσαι τὸν ἱμάντα τῶν ὑποδημάτων αὐτοῦ· αὐτὸς ὑμᾶς βαπτίσει ἐν πνεύματι ἁγίῳ καὶ πυρί· 3.23. Καὶ αὐτὸς ἦν Ἰησοῦς ἀρχόμενος ὡσεὶ ἐτῶν τριάκοντα, ὢν υἱός, ὡς ἐνομίζετο, Ἰωσήφ τοῦ Ἡλεί 4.1. Ἰησοῦς δὲ πλήρης πνεύματος ἁγίου ὑπέστρεψεν ἀπὸ τοῦ Ἰορδάνου, καὶ ἤγετο ἐν τῷ πνεύματι ἐν τῇ ἐρήμῳ 4.2. ἡμέρας τεσσεράκοντα πειραζόμενος ὑπὸ τοῦ διαβόλου. Καὶ οὐκ ἔφαγεν οὐδὲν ἐν ταῖς ἡμέραις ἐκείναις, καὶ συντελεσθεισῶν αὐτῶν ἐπείνασεν. 4.3. εἶπεν δὲ αὐτῷ ὁ διάβολος Εἰ υἱὸς εἶ τοῦ θεοῦ, εἰπὲ τῷ λίθῳ τούτῳ ἵνα γένηται ἄρτος. 4.4. καὶ ἀπεκρίθη πρὸς αὐτὸν ὁ Ἰησοῦς Γέγραπται ὅτι Οὐκ ἐπʼ ἄρτῳ μόνῳ ζήσεται ὁ ἄνθρωπος. 4.5. Καὶ ἀναγαγὼν αὐτὸν ἔδειξεν αὐτῷ πάσας τὰς βασιλείας τῆς οἰκουμένης ἐν στιγμῇ χρόνου· 4.6. καὶ εἶπεν αὐτῷ ὁ διάβολος Σοὶ δώσω τὴν ἐξουσίαν ταύτην ἅπασαν καὶ τὴν δόξαν αὐτῶν, ὅτι ἐμοὶ παραδέδοται καὶ ᾧ ἂν θέλω δίδωμι αὐτήν· 4.7. σὺ οὖν ἐὰν προσκυνήσῃς ἐνώπιον ἐμοῦ, ἔσται σοῦ πᾶσα. 4.8. καὶ ἀποκριθεὶς ὁ Ἰησοῦς εἶπεν αὐτῷ Γέγραπται Κύριον τὸν θεόν σου προσκυνήσεις καὶ αὐτῷ μόνῳ λατρεύσεις. 4.9. Ἤγαγεν δὲ αὐτὸν εἰς Ἰερουσαλὴμ καὶ ἔστησεν ἐπὶ τὸ πτερύγιον τοῦ ἱεροῦ, καὶ εἶπεν [αὐτῷ] Εἰ υἱὸς εἶ τοῦ θεοῦ, βάλε σεαυτὸν ἐντεῦθεν κάτω· 4.10. γέγραπται γὰρ ὅτι τοῖς ἀγγέλοις αὐτοῦ ἐντελεῖται περὶ σοῦ τοῦ διαφυλάξαι σε, 4.11. καὶ ὅτι ἐπὶ χειρῶν ἀροῦσίν σε μή ποτε προσκόψῃς πρὸς λίθον τὸν πόδα σου. 4.12. καὶ ἀποκριθεὶς εἶπεν αὐτῷ ὁ Ἰησοῦς ὅτι Εἴρηται 4.13. Οὐκ ἐκπειράσεις Κύριον τὸν θεόν σου. Καὶ συντελέσας πάντα πειρασμὸν ὁ διάβολος ἀπέστη ἀπʼ αὐτοῦ ἄχρι καιροῦ. 4.14. Καὶ ὑπέστρεψεν ὁ Ἰησοῦς ἐν τῇ δυνάμει τοῦ πνεύματος εἰς τὴν Γαλιλαίαν. καὶ φήμη ἐξῆλθεν καθʼ ὅλης τῆς περιχώρου περὶ αὐτοῦ. 4.15. καὶ αὐτὸς ἐδίδασκεν ἐν ταῖς συναγωγαῖς αὐτῶν, δοξαζόμενος ὑπὸ πάντων. 4.22. καὶ πάντες ἐμαρτύρουν αὐτῷ καὶ ἐθαύμαζον ἐπὶ τοῖς λόγοις τῆς χάριτος τοῖς ἐκπορευομένοις ἐκ τοῦ στόματος αὐτοῦ, καὶ ἔλεγον Οὐχὶ υἱός ἐστιν Ἰωσὴφ οὗτος; 4.43. ὁ δὲ εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτοὺς ὅτι Καὶ ταῖς ἑτέραις πόλεσιν εὐαγγελίσασθαί με δεῖ τὴν βασιλείαν τοῦ θεοῦ, ὅτι ἐπὶ τοῦτο ἀπεστάλην. 11.14. Καὶ ἦν ἐκβάλλων δαιμόνιον κωφόν· ἐγένετο δὲ τοῦ δαιμονίου ἐξελθόντος ἐλάλησεν ὁ κωφός. Καὶ ἐθαύμασαν οἱ ὄχλοι· 11.15. τινὲς δὲ ἐξ αὐτῶν εἶπαν Ἐν Βεεζεβοὺλ τῷ ἄρχοντι τῶν δαιμονίων ἐκβάλλει τὰ δαιμόνια· 11.16. ἕτεροι δὲ πειράζοντες σημεῖον ἐξ οὐρανοῦ ἐζήτουν παρʼ αὐτοῦ. 11.24. Ὅταν τὸ ἀκάθαρτον πνεῦμα ἐξέλθῃ ἀπὸ τοῦ ἀνθρώπου, διέρχεται διʼ ἀνύδρων τόπων ζητοῦν ἀνάπαυσιν, καὶ μὴ εὑρίσκον [τότε] λέγει Ὑποστρέψω εἰς τὸν οἶκόν μου ὅθεν ἐξῆλθον· 11.25. καὶ ἐλθὸν εὑρίσκει [σχολάζοντα,] σεσαρωμένον καὶ κεκοσμημένον. 11.26. τότε πορεύεται καὶ παραλαμβάνει ἕτερα πνεύματα πονηρότερα ἑαυτοῦ ἑπτά, καὶ εἰσελθόντα κατοικεῖ ἐκεῖ, καὶ γίνεται τὰ ἔσχατα τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ἐκείνου χείρονα τῶν πρώτων. 11.47. οὐαὶ ὑμῖν, ὅτι οἰκοδομεῖτε τὰ μνημεῖα τῶν προφητῶν οἱ δὲ πατέρες ὑμῶν ἀπέκτειναν αὐτούς. 11.48. ἄρα μάρτυρές ἐστε καὶ συνευδοκεῖτε τοῖς ἔργοις τῶν πατέρων ὑμῶν, ὅτι αὐτοὶ μὲν ἀπέκτειναν αὐτοὺς ὑμεῖς δὲ οἰκοδομεῖτε. 12.8. Λέγω δὲ ὑμῖν, πᾶς ὃς ἂν ὁμολογήσει ἐν ἐμοὶ ἔμπροσθεν τῶν ἀνθρώπων, καὶ ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ὁμολογήσει ἐν αὐτῷ ἔμπροσθεν τῶν ἀγγέλων τοῦ θεοῦ· 12.9. ὁ δὲ ἀρνησάμενός με ἐνώπιον τῶν ἀνθρώπων ἀπαρνηθήσεται ἐνώπιον τῶν ἀγγέλων τοῦ θεοῦ. 12.10. Καὶ πᾶς ὃς ἐρεῖ λόγον εἰς τὸν υἱὸν τοῦ ἀνθρώπου, ἀφεθήσεται αὐτῷ· τῷ δὲ εἰς τὸ ἅγιον πνεῦμα βλασφημήσαντι οὐκ ἀφεθήσεται. 12.11. Ὅταν δὲ εἰσφέρωσιν ὑμᾶς ἐπὶ τὰς συναγωγὰς καὶ τὰς ἀρχὰς καὶ τὰς ἐξουσίας, μὴ μεριμνήσητε πῶς [ἢ τί] ἀπολογήσησθε ἢ τί εἴπητε· 12.12. τὸ γὰρ ἅγιον πνεῦμα διδάξει ὑμᾶς ἐν αὐτῇ τῇ ὥρᾳ ἃ δεῖ εἰπεῖν. 13.10. Ἦν δὲ διδάσκων ἐν μιᾷ τῶν συναγωγῶν ἐν τοῖς σάββασιν. 13.11. καὶ ἰδοὺ γυνὴ πνεῦμα ἔχουσα ἀσθενείας ἔτη δέκα ὀκτώ, καὶ ἦν συνκύπτουσα καὶ μὴ δυναμένη ἀνακύψαι εἰς τὸ παντελές. 13.12. ἰδὼν δὲ αὐτὴν ὁ Ἰησοῦς προσεφώνησεν καὶ εἶπεν αὐτῇ Γύναι, ἀπολέλυσαι τῆς ἀσθενείας σου 13.13. , καὶ ἐπέθηκεν αὐτῇ τὰς χεῖρας· καὶ παραχρῆμα ἀνωρθώθη, καὶ ἐδόξαζεν τὸν θεόν. 13.14. ἀποκριθεὶς δὲ ὁ ἀρχισυνάγωγος, ἀγανακτῶν ὅτι τῷ σαββάτῳ ἐθεράπευσεν ὁ Ἰησοῦς, ἔλεγεν τῷ ὄχλῳ ὅτι Ἓξ ἡμέραι εἰσὶν ἐν αἷς δεῖ ἐργάζεσθαι· ἐν αὐταῖς οὖν ἐρχόμενοι θεραπεύεσθε καὶ μὴ τῇ ἡμέρᾳ τοῦ σαββάτου. 13.15. ἀπεκρίθη δὲ αὐτῷ ὁ κύριος καὶ εἶπεν Ὑποκριται, ἕκαστος ὑμῶν τῷ σαββάτῳ οὐ λύει τὸν βοῦν αὐτοῦ ἢ τὸν ὄνον ἀπὸ τῆς φάτνης καὶ ἀπάγων ποτίζει; 13.16. ταύτην δὲ θυγατέρα Ἀβραὰμ οὖσαν, ἣν ἔδησεν ὁ Σατανᾶς ἰδοὺ δέκα καὶ ὀκτὼ ἔτη, οὐκ ἔδει λυθῆναι ἀπὸ τοῦ δεσμοῦ τούτου τῇ ἡμέρᾳ τοῦ σαββάτου; 13.17. Καὶ ταῦτα λέγοντος αὐτοῦ κατῃσχύνοντο πάντες οἱ ἀντικείμενοι αὐτῷ, καὶ πᾶς ὁ ὄχλος ἔχαιρεν ἐπὶ πᾶσιν τοῖς ἐνδόξοις τοῖς γινομένοις ὑπʼ αὐτοῦ. 14.1. Καὶ ἐγένετο ἐν τῷ ἐλθεῖν αὐτὸν εἰς οἶκόν τινος τῶν ἀρχόντων [τῶν] Φαρισαίων σαββάτῳ φαγεῖν ἄρτον καὶ αὐτοὶ ἦσαν παρατηρούμενοι αὐτόν. 14.2. καὶ ἰδοὺ ἄνθρωπός τις ἦν ὑδρωπικὸς ἔμπροσθεν αὐτοῦ. 14.3. καὶ ἀποκριθεὶς ὁ Ἰησοῦς εἶπεν πρὸς τοὺς νομικοὺς καὶ Φαρισαίους λέγων Ἔξεστιν τῷ σαββάτῳ θεραπεῦσαι ἢ οὔ; οἱ δὲ ἡσύχασαν. 14.4. καὶ ἐπιλαβόμενος ἰάσατο αὐτὸν καὶ ἀπέλυσεν. 22.39. Καὶ ἐξελθὼν ἐπορεύθη κατὰ τὸ ἔθος εἰς τὸ Ὄρος τῶν Ἐλαιῶν· ἠκολούθησαν δὲ αὐτῷ [καὶ] οἱ μαθηταί. 22.40. γενόμενος δὲ ἐπὶ τοῦ τόπου εἶπεν αὐτοῖς Προσεύχεσθε μὴ εἰσελθεῖν εἰς πειρασμόν. 22.41. καὶ αὐτὸς ἀπεσπάσθη ἀπʼ αὐτῶν ὡσεὶ λίθου βολήν, καὶ θεὶς τὰ γόνατα προσηύχετο λέγων Πάτερ, 22.42. εἰ βούλει παρένεγκε τοῦτο τὸ ποτήριον ἀπʼ ἐμοῦ· πλὴν μὴ τὸ θέλημά μου ἀλλὰ τὸ σὸν γινέσθω. 22.43. ⟦ὤφθη δὲ αὐτῷ ἄγγελος ἀπὸ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ ἐνισχύων αὐτόν. 22.44. καὶ γενόμενος ἐν ἀγωνίᾳ ἐκτενέστερον προσηύχετο· καὶ ἐγένετο ὁ ἱδρὼς αὐτοῦ ὡσεὶ θρόμβοι αἵματος καταβαίνοντες ἐπὶ τὴν γῆν.⟧ 22.45. καὶ ἀναστὰς ἀπὸ τῆς προσευχῆς ἐλθὼν πρὸς τοὺς μαθητὰς εὗρεν κοιμωμένους αὐτοὺς ἀπὸ τῆς λύπης, καὶ εἶπεν αὐτοῖς Τί καθεύδετε; 22.46. ἀναστάντες προσεύχεσθε, ἵνα μὴ εἰσέλθητε εἰς πειρασμόν. 23.34. ⟦ὁ δὲ Ἰησοῦς ἔλεγεν Πάτερ, ἄφες αὐτοῖς, οὐ γὰρ οἴδασιν τί ποιοῦσιν.⟧ διαμεριζόμενοι δὲ τὰ ἱμάτια αὐτοῦ ἔβαλον κλῆρον. 23.46. καὶ φωνήσας φωνῇ μεγάλῃ ὁ Ἰησοῦς εἶπεν Πάτερ, εἰς χεῖράς σου παρατίθεμαι τὸ πνεῦμά μου· τοῦτο δὲ εἰπὼν ἐξέπνευσεν. 24.47. καὶ κηρυχθῆναι ἐπὶ τῷ ὀνόματι αὐτοῦ μετάνοιαν εἰς ἄφεσιν ἁμαρτιῶν εἰς πάντα τὰ ἔθνὴ, — ἀρξάμενοι ἀπὸ Ἰερουσαλήμ· 24.51. καὶ ἐγένετο ἐν τῷ εὐλογεῖν αὐτὸν αὐτοὺς διέστη ἀπʼ αὐτῶν ⟦καὶ ἀνεφέρετο εἰς τὸν οὐρανόν⟧. 1.26. Now in the sixth month, the angel Gabriel was sent from God to a city of Galilee, named Nazareth, 1.39. Mary arose in those days and went into the hill country with haste, into a city of Judah, 1.40. and entered into the house of Zacharias and greeted Elizabeth. 1.41. It happened, when Elizabeth heard Mary's greeting, that the baby leaped in her womb, and Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit. 1.42. She called out with a loud voice, and said, "Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb! 1.43. Why am I so favored, that the mother of my Lord should come to me? 1.44. For behold, when the voice of your greeting came into my ears, the baby leaped in my womb for joy! 1.45. Blessed is she who believed, for there will be a fulfillment of the things which have been spoken to her from the Lord!" 1.46. Mary said, "My soul magnifies the Lord. 1.47. My spirit has rejoiced in God my Savior, 1.48. For he has looked at the humble state of his handmaid. For behold, from now on, all generations will call me blessed. 1.49. For he who is mighty has done great things for me. Holy is his name. 1.50. His mercy is for generations of generations on those who fear him. 1.51. He has shown strength with his arm. He has scattered the proud in the imagination of their heart. 1.52. He has put down princes from their thrones. And has exalted the lowly. 2.26. It had been revealed to him by the Holy Spirit that he should not see death before he had seen the Lord's Christ. 2.46. It happened after three days they found him in the temple, sitting in the midst of the teachers, both listening to them, and asking them questions. 2.47. All who heard him were amazed at his understanding and his answers. 3.7. He said therefore to the multitudes who went out to be baptized by him, "You offspring of vipers, who warned you to flee from the wrath to come? 3.8. Bring forth therefore fruits worthy of repentance, and don't begin to say among yourselves, 'We have Abraham for our father;' for I tell you that God is able to raise up children to Abraham from these stones! 3.9. Even now the ax also lies at the root of the trees. Every tree therefore that doesn't bring forth good fruit is cut down, and thrown into the fire." 3.16. John answered them all, "I indeed baptize you with water, but he comes who is mightier than I, the latchet of whose sandals I am not worthy to loosen. He will baptize you in the Holy Spirit and fire, 3.23. Jesus himself, when he began to teach, was about thirty years old, being the son (as was supposed) of Joseph, the son of Heli, 4.1. Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan, and was led by the Spirit into the wilderness 4.2. for forty days, being tempted by the devil. He ate nothing in those days. Afterward, when they were completed, he was hungry. 4.3. The devil said to him, "If you are the Son of God, command this stone to become bread." 4.4. Jesus answered him, saying, "It is written, 'Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word of God.'" 4.5. The devil, leading him up on a high mountain, showed him all the kingdoms of the world in a moment of time. 4.6. The devil said to him, "I will give you all this authority, and their glory, for it has been delivered to me; and I give it to whomever I want. 4.7. If you therefore will worship before me, it will all be yours." 4.8. Jesus answered him, "Get behind me Satan! For it is written, 'You shall worship the Lord your God, and him only shall you serve.'" 4.9. He led him to Jerusalem, and set him on the pinnacle of the temple, and said to him, "If you are the Son of God, cast yourself down from here, 4.10. for it is written, 'He will give his angels charge concerning you, to guard you;' 4.11. and, 'On their hands they will bear you up, Lest perhaps you dash your foot against a stone.'" 4.12. Jesus answering, said to him, "It has been said, 'You shall not tempt the Lord your God.'" 4.13. When the devil had completed every temptation, he departed from him until another time. 4.14. Jesus returned in the power of the Spirit to Galilee, and news about him spread through all the surrounding area. 4.15. He taught in their synagogues, being glorified by all. 4.22. All testified about him, and wondered at the gracious words which proceeded out of his mouth, and they said, "Isn't this Joseph's son?" 4.43. But he said to them, "I must preach the good news of the Kingdom of God to the other cities also. For this reason I have been sent." 11.14. He was casting out a demon, and it was mute. It happened, when the demon had gone out, the mute man spoke; and the multitudes marveled. 11.15. But some of them said, "He casts out demons by Beelzebul, the prince of the demons." 11.16. Others, testing him, sought from him a sign from heaven. 11.24. The unclean spirit, when he has gone out of the man, passes through dry places, seeking rest, and finding none, he says, 'I will turn back to my house from which I came out.' 11.25. When he returns, he finds it swept and put in order. 11.26. Then he goes, and takes seven other spirits more evil than himself, and they enter in and dwell there. The last state of that man becomes worse than the first." 11.47. Woe to you! For you build the tombs of the prophets, and your fathers killed them. 11.48. So you testify and consent to the works of your fathers. For they killed them, and you build their tombs. 12.8. "I tell you, everyone who confesses me before men, him will the Son of Man also confess before the angels of God; 12.9. but he who denies me in the presence of men will be denied in the presence of the angels of God. 12.10. Everyone who speaks a word against the Son of Man will be forgiven, but those who blaspheme against the Holy Spirit will not be forgiven. 12.11. When they bring you before the synagogues, the rulers, and the authorities, don't be anxious how or what you will answer, or what you will say; 12.12. for the Holy Spirit will teach you in that same hour what you must say." 13.10. He was teaching in one of the synagogues on the Sabbath day. 13.11. Behold, there was a woman who had a spirit of infirmity eighteen years, and she was bent over, and could in no way straighten herself up. 13.12. When Jesus saw her, he called her, and said to her, "Woman, you are freed from your infirmity." 13.13. He laid his hands on her, and immediately she stood up straight, and glorified God. 13.14. The ruler of the synagogue, being indigt because Jesus had healed on the Sabbath, said to the multitude, "There are six days in which men ought to work. Therefore come on those days and be healed, and not on the Sabbath day!" 13.15. Therefore the Lord answered him, "You hypocrites! Doesn't each one of you free his ox or his donkey from the stall on the Sabbath, and lead him away to water? 13.16. Ought not this woman, being a daughter of Abraham, whom Satan had bound eighteen long years, be freed from this bondage on the Sabbath day?" 13.17. As he said these things, all his adversaries were put to shame, and all the multitude rejoiced for all the glorious things that were done by him. 14.1. It happened, when he went into the house of one of the rulers of the Pharisees on a Sabbath to eat bread, that they were watching him. 14.2. Behold, a certain man who had dropsy was in front of him. 14.3. Jesus, answering, spoke to the lawyers and Pharisees, saying, "Is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath?" 14.4. But they were silent. He took him, and healed him, and let him go. 22.39. He came out, and went, as his custom was, to the Mount of Olives. His disciples also followed him. 22.40. When he was at the place, he said to them, "Pray that you don't enter into temptation." 22.41. He was withdrawn from them about a stone's throw, and he knelt down and prayed, 22.42. saying, "Father, if you are willing, remove this cup from me. Nevertheless, not my will, but yours, be done." 22.43. An angel from heaven appeared to him, strengthening him. 22.44. Being in agony he prayed more earnestly. His sweat became like great drops of blood falling down on the ground. 22.45. When he rose up from his prayer, he came to the disciples, and found them sleeping because of grief, 22.46. and said to them, "Why do you sleep? Rise and pray that you may not enter into temptation." 23.34. Jesus said, "Father, forgive them, for they don't know what they are doing."Dividing his garments among them, they cast lots. 23.46. Jesus, crying with a loud voice, said, "Father, into your hands I commit my spirit!" Having said this, he breathed his last. 24.47. and that repentance and remission of sins should be preached in his name to all the nations, beginning at Jerusalem. 24.51. It happened, while he blessed them, that he withdrew from them, and was carried up into heaven.
68. New Testament, John, None (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 69
3.1. Ἦν δὲ ἄνθρωπος ἐκ τῶν Φαρισαίων, Νικόδημος ὄνομα αὐτῷ, ἄρχων τῶν Ἰουδαίων· 3.1. Now there was a man of the Pharisees named Nicodemus, a ruler of the Jews.
69. New Testament, Romans, 1.3-1.4, 12.2, 12.18-12.21, 14.1-14.15 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature •enemies, clemency toward ones, in early christian literature •christianity, early, relationship between early christian and jewish feasting and feasting literature Found in books: Boustan Janssen and Roetzel (2010), Violence, Scripture, and Textual Practices in Early Judaism and Christianity, 85; König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 129; Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 663
1.3. περὶ τοῦ υἱοῦ αὐτοῦ, τοῦ γενομένου ἐκ σπέρματος Δαυεὶδ κατὰ σάρκα, 1.4. τοῦ ὁρισθέντος υἱοῦ θεοῦ ἐν δυνάμει κατὰ πνεῦμα ἁγιωσύνης ἐξ ἀναστάσεως νεκρῶν, Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν, 12.2. καὶ μὴ συνσχηματίζεσθε τῷ αἰῶνι τούτῳ, ἀλλὰ μεταμορφοῦσθε τῇ ἀνακαινώσει τοῦ νοός, εἰς τὸ δοκιμάζειν ὑμᾶς τί τὸ θέλημα τοῦ θεοῦ, τὸ ἀγαθὸν καὶ εὐάρεστον καὶ τέλειον. 12.18. εἰ δυνατόν, τὸ ἐξ ὑμῶν μετὰ πάντων ἀνθρώπων εἰρηνεύοντες· 12.19. μὴ ἑαυτοὺς ἐκδικοῦντες, ἀγαπητοί, ἀλλὰ δότε τόπον τῇ ὀργῇ, γέγραπται γάρἘμοὶ ἐκδίκησις,ἐγὼἀνταποδώσω,λέγει Κύριος. 12.20. ἀλλὰ ἐὰν πεινᾷ ὁ ἐχθρός σου, ψώμιζε αὐτόν· ἐὰν διψᾷ, πότιζε αὐτόν· τοῦτο γὰρ ποιῶν ἄνθρακας πυρὸς σωρεύσεις ἐπὶ τὴν κεφαλὴν αὐτοῦ. 12.21. μὴ νικῶ ὑπὸ τοῦ κακοῦ, ἀλλὰ νίκα ἐν τῷ ἀγαθῷ τὸ κακόν. 14.1. Τὸν δὲ ἀσθενοῦντα τῇ πίστει προσλαμβάνεσθε, μὴ εἰς διακρίσεις διαλογισμῶν. 14.2. ὃς μὲν πιστεύει φαγεῖν πάντα, ὁ δὲ ἀσθενῶν λάχανα ἐσθίει. 14.3. ὁ ἐσθίων τὸν μὴ ἐσθίοντα μὴ ἐξουθενείτω, ὁ δὲ μὴ ἐσθίων τὸν ἐσθίοντα μὴ κρινέτω, ὁ θεὸς γὰρ αὐτὸν προσελάβετο. 14.4. σὺ τίς εἶ ὁ κρίνων ἀλλότριον οἰκέτην; τῷ ἰδίῳ κυρίῳ στήκει ἢ πίπτει· σταθήσεται δέ, δυνατεῖ γὰρ ὁ κύριος στῆσαι αὐτόν. 14.5. ὃς μὲν [γὰρ] κρίνει ἡμέραν παρʼ ἡμέραν, ὃς δὲ κρίνει πᾶσαν ἡμέραν· ἕκαστος ἐν τῷ ἰδίῳ νοῒ πληροφορείσθω· 14.6. ὁ φρονῶν τὴν ἡμέραν κυρίῳ φρονεῖ. καὶ ὁ ἐσθίων κυρίῳ ἐσθίει, εὐχαριστεῖ γὰρ τῷ θεῷ· καὶ ὁ μὴ ἐσθίων κυρίῳ οὐκ ἐσθίει, καὶ εὐχαριστεῖ τῷ θεῷ. 14.7. Οὐδεὶς γὰρ ἡμῶν ἑαυτῷ ζῇ, καὶ οὐδεὶς ἑαυτῷ ἀποθνήσκει· 14.8. ἐάν τε γὰρ ζῶμεν, τῷ κυρίῳ ζῶμεν, ἐάν τε ἀποθνήσκωμεν, τῷ κυρίῳ ἀποθνήσκομεν. ἐάν τε οὖν ζῶμεν ἐάν τε ἀποθνήσκωμεν, τοῦ κυρίου ἐσμέν. 14.9. εἰς τοῦτο γὰρ Χριστὸς ἀπέθανεν καὶ ἔζησεν ἵνα καὶ νεκρῶν καὶ ζώντων κυριεύσῃ. 14.10. Σὺ δὲ τί κρίνεις τὸν ἀδελφόν σου; ἢ καὶ σὺ τί ἐξουθενεῖς τὸν ἀδελφόν σου; πάντες γὰρ παραστησόμεθα τῷ βήματι τοῦ θεοῦ· 14.11. γέγραπται γάρ 14.12. ἄρα [οὖν] ἕκαστος ἡμῶν περὶ ἑαυτοῦ λόγον δώσει [τῷ θεῷ]. 14.13. Μηκέτι οὖν ἀλλήλους κρίνωμεν· ἀλλὰ τοῦτο κρίνατε μᾶλλον, τὸ μὴ τιθέναι πρόσκομμα τῷ ἀδελφῷ ἢ σκάνδαλον. 14.14. οἶδα καὶ πέπεισμαι ἐν κυρίῳ Ἰησοῦ ὅτι οὐδὲν κοινὸν διʼ ἑαυτοῦ· εἰ μὴ τῷ λογιζομένῳ τι κοινὸν εἶναι, ἐκείνῳ κοινόν. 14.15. εἰ γὰρ διὰ βρῶμα ὁ ἀδελφός σου λυπεῖται, οὐκέτι κατὰ ἀγάπην περιπατεῖς. μὴ τῷ βρώματί σου ἐκεῖνον ἀπόλλυε ὑπὲρ οὗ Χριστὸς ἀπέθανεν. 1.3. concerning his Son, who was born of the seed of David according to the flesh, 1.4. who was declared to be the Son of God with power, according to the Spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead, Jesus Christ our Lord, 12.2. Don't be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, so that you may prove what is the good and acceptable and perfect will of God. 12.18. If it is possible, as much as it is up to you, be at peace with all men. 12.19. Don't seek revenge yourselves, beloved, but give place to God's wrath. For it is written, "Vengeance belongs to me; I will repay, says the Lord." 12.20. Therefore "If your enemy is hungry, feed him. If he is thirsty, give him a drink. For in doing so, you will heap coals of fire on his head." 12.21. Don't be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good. 14.1. Now receive one who is weak in faith, but not for disputes over opinions. 14.2. One man has faith to eat all things, but he who is weak eats only vegetables. 14.3. Don't let him who eats despise him who doesn't eat. Don't let him who doesn't eat judge him who eats, for God has received him. 14.4. Who are you who judge another's servant? To his own lord he stands or falls. Yes, he will be made to stand, for God has power to make him stand. 14.5. One man esteems one day as more important. Another esteems every day alike. Let each man be fully assured in his own mind. 14.6. He who observes the day, observes it to the Lord; and he who does not observe the day, to the Lord he does not observe it. He who eats, eats to the Lord, for he gives God thanks. He who doesn't eat, to the Lord he doesn't eat, and gives God thanks. 14.7. For none of us lives to himself, and none dies to himself. 14.8. For if we live, we live to the Lord. Or if we die, we die to the Lord. If therefore we live or die, we are the Lord's. 14.9. For to this end Christ died, rose, and lived again, that he might be Lord of both the dead and the living. 14.10. But you, why do you judge your brother? Or you again, why do you despise your brother? For we will all stand before the judgment seat of Christ. 14.11. For it is written, "'As I live,' says the Lord, 'to me every knee will bow. Every tongue will confess to God.'" 14.12. So then each one of us will give account of himself to God. 14.13. Therefore let's not judge one another any more, but judge this rather, that no man put a stumbling block in his brother's way, or an occasion for falling. 14.14. I know, and am persuaded in the Lord Jesus, that nothing is unclean of itself; except that to him who considers anything to be unclean, to him it is unclean. 14.15. Yet if because of food your brother is grieved, you walk no longer in love. Don't destroy with your food him for whom Christ died.
70. Anon., Epistle of Barnabas, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 375
13.1. Now let us see whether this people or the first people hath the inheritance, and whether the covet had reference to us or to them.
71. New Testament, Hebrews, 1.3, 2.1, 2.10-2.18, 3.7, 9.8, 12.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature •christian, literature/authors Found in books: Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 229; Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 663, 664
1.3. ὃς ὢν ἀπαύγασμα τῆς δόξης καὶ χαρακτὴρ τῆς ὑποστάσεως αὐτοῦ, φέρων τε τὰ πάντα τῷ ῥήματι τῆς δυνάμεως αὐτοῦ, καθαρισμὸν τῶν ἁμαρτιῶν ποιησάμενοςἐκάθισεν ἐν δεξιᾷτῆς μεγαλωσύνης ἐν ὑψηλοῖς, 2.1. Διὰ τοῦτο δεῖ περισσοτέρως προσέχειν ἡμᾶς τοῖς ἀκουσθεῖσιν, μή ποτε παραρυῶμεν. 2.10. Ἔπρεπεν γὰρ αὐτῷ, διʼ ὃν τὰ πάντα καὶ διʼ οὗ τὰ πάντα, πολλοὺς υἱοὺς εἰς δόξαν ἀγαγόντα τὸν ἀρχηγὸν τῆς σωτηρίας αὐτῶν διὰ παθημάτων τελειῶσαι. 2.11. ὅ τε γὰρ ἁγιάζων καὶ οἱ ἁγιαζόμενοι ἐξ ἑνὸς πάντες· διʼ ἣν αἰτίαν οὐκ ἐπαισχύνεταιἀδελφοὺςαὐτοὺς καλεῖν, 2.12. λέγων 2.13. καὶ πάλιν 2.14. ἐπεὶ οὖντὰ παιδίακεκοινώνηκεν αἵματος καὶ σαρκός, καὶ αὐτὸς παραπλησίως μετέσχεν τῶν αὐτῶν, ἵνα διὰ τοῦ θανάτου καταργήσῃ τὸν τὸ κράτος ἔχοντα τοῦ θανάτου, τοῦτʼ ἔστι τὸν διάβολον, 2.15. καὶ ἀπαλλάξῃ τούτους, ὅσοι φόβῳ θανάτου διὰ παντὸς τοῦ ζῇν ἔνοχοι ἦσαν δουλείας. 2.16. οὐ γὰρ δή που ἀγγέλων ἐπιλαμβάνεται, ἀλλὰ σπέρματος Ἀβραὰμ ἐπιλαμβάνεται. 2.17. ὅθεν ὤφειλεν κατὰ πάντατοῖς ἀδελφοῖςὁμοιωθῆναι, ἵνα ἐλεήμων γένηται καὶ πιστὸς ἀρχιερεὺς τὰ πρὸς τὸν θεόν, εἰς τὸ ἱλάσκεσθαι τὰς ἁμαρτίας τοῦ λαοῦ· 2.18. ἐν ᾧ γὰρ πέπονθεν αὐτὸς πειρασθείς, δύναται τοῖς πειραζομένοις βοηθῆσαι. 3.7. Διό, καθὼς λέγει τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ ἅγιον 9.8. τοῦτο δηλοῦντος τοῦ πνεύματος τοῦ ἁγίου, μήπω πεφανερῶσθαι τὴν τῶν ἁγίων ὁδὸν ἔτι τῆς πρώτης σκηνῆς ἐχούσης στάσιν, 12.2. ἀφορῶντες εἰς τὸν τῆς πίστεως ἀρχηγὸν καὶ τελειωτὴν Ἰησοῦν, ὃς ἀντὶ τῆς προκειμένης αὐτῷ χαρᾶς ὑπέμεινεν σταυρὸν αἰσχύνης καταφρονήσας,ἐν δεξιᾷτε τοῦ θρόνου τοῦ θεοῦκεκάθικεν. 1.3. His Son is the radiance of his glory, the very image of his substance, and upholding all things by the word of his power, when he had by himself made purification for our sins, sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high; 2.1. Therefore we ought to pay greater attention to the things that were heard, lest perhaps we drift away. 2.10. For it became him, for whom are all things, and through whom are all things, in bringing many sons to glory, to make the author of their salvation perfect through sufferings. 2.11. For both he who sanctifies and those who are sanctified are all from one, for which cause he is not ashamed to call them brothers, 2.12. saying, "I will declare your name to my brothers. In the midst of the congregation I will sing your praise." 2.13. Again, "I will put my trust in him." Again, "Behold, here am I and the children whom God has given me." 2.14. Since then the children have shared in flesh and blood, he also himself in like manner partook of the same, that through death he might bring to nothing him who had the power of death, that is, the devil, 2.15. and might deliver all of them who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage. 2.16. For most assuredly, not to angels does he give help, but he gives help to the seed of Abraham. 2.17. Therefore he was obligated in all things to be made like his brothers, that he might become a merciful and faithful high priest in things pertaining to God, to make atonement for the sins of the people. 2.18. For in that he himself has suffered being tempted, he is able to help those who are tempted. 3.7. Therefore, even as the Holy Spirit says, "Today if you will hear his voice, 9.8. The Holy Spirit is indicating this, that the way into the Holy Place wasn't yet revealed while the first tabernacle was still standing; 12.2. looking to Jesus, the author and perfecter of faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising shame, and has sat down at the right hand of the throne of God.
72. New Testament, Colossians, 1.15-1.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 663
1.15. ὅς ἐστιν εἰκὼν τοῦ θεοῦ τοῦ ἀοράτου, πρωτότοκος πάσης κτίσεως, 1.16. ὅτι ἐν αὐτῷ ἐκτίσθη τὰ πάντα ἐν τοῖς οὐρανοῖς καὶ ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς, τὰ ὁρατὰ καὶ τὰ ἀόρατα, εἴτε θρόνοι εἴτε κυριότητες εἴτε ἀρχαὶ εἴτε ἐξουσίαι· τὰ πάντα διʼ αὐτοῦ καὶ εἰς αὐτὸν ἔκτισται· 1.17. καὶ αὐτὸς ἔστιν πρὸ πάντων καὶ τὰ πάντα ἐν αὐτῷ συνέστηκεν, 1.18. καὶ αὐτός ἐστιν ἡ κεφαλὴ τοῦ σώματος, τῆς ἐκκλησίας· ὅς ἐστιν [ἡ] ἀρχή, πρωτότοκος ἐκ τῶν νεκρῶν, ἵνα γένηται ἐν πᾶσιν αὐτὸς πρωτεύων, 1.19. ὅτι ἐν αὐτῷ εὐδόκησεν πᾶν τὸ πλήρωμα κατοικῆσαι 1.20. καὶ διʼ αὐτοῦ ἀποκαταλλάξαι τὰ πάντα εἰς αὐτόν, εἰρηνοποιήσας διὰ τοῦ αἵματος τοῦ σταυροῦ αὐτοῦ, [διʼ αὐτοῦ] εἴτε τὰ ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς εἴτε τὰ ἐν τοῖς οὐρανοῖς· 1.15. who is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. 1.16. For by him were all things created, in the heavens and on the earth, things visible and things invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or powers; all things have been created through him, and for him. 1.17. He is before all things, and in him all things are held together. 1.18. He is the head of the body, the assembly, who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all things he might have the preeminence. 1.19. For all the fullness was pleased to dwell in him; 1.20. and through him to reconcile all things to himself, having made peace through the blood of his cross. Through him, I say, whether things on the earth, or things in the heavens.
73. New Testament, Ephesians, 1.14, 3.5, 4.30, 5.3-5.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian, literature/authors •festivals, non-christian, in early christian literature Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 51; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 229, 230, 256
1.14. ὅ ἐστιν ἀρραβὼν τῆς κληρονομίας ἡμῶν, εἰς ἀπολύτρωσιν τῆς περιποιήσεως, εἰς ἔπαινον τῆς δόξης αὐτοῦ. 3.5. ὃ ἑτέραις γενεαῖς οὐκ ἐγνωρίσθη τοῖς υἱοῖς τῶν ἀνθρώπων ὡς νῦν ἀπεκαλύφθη τοῖς ἁγίοις ἀποστόλοις αὐτοῦ καὶ προφήταις ἐν πνεύματι, 4.30. καὶ μὴ λυπεῖτε τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ ἅγιον τοῦ θεοῦ, ἐν ᾧ ἐσφραγίσθητε εἰς ἡμέραν ἀπολυτρώσεως. 5.3. Πορνεία δὲ καὶ ἀκαθαρσία πᾶσα ἢ πλεονεξία μηδὲ ὀνομαζέσθω ἐν ὑμῖν, 5.4. καθὼς πρέπει ἁγίοις, καὶ αἰσχρότης καὶ μωρολογία ἢ εὐτραπελία, ἃ οὐκ ἀνῆκεν, ἀλλὰ μᾶλλον εὐχαριστία. 5.5. τοῦτο γὰρ ἴστε γινώσκοντες ὅτι πᾶς πόρνος ἢ ἀκάθαρτος ἢ πλεονέκτης, ὅ ἐστιν εἰδωλολάτρης, οὐκ ἔχει κληρονομίαν ἐν τῇ βασιλείᾳ τοῦ χριστοῦ καὶ θεοῦ. 5.6. Μηδεὶς ὑμᾶς ἀπατάτω κενοῖς λόγοις, διὰ ταῦτα γὰρ ἔρχεται ἡ ὀργὴ τοῦ θεοῦ ἐπὶ τοὺς υἱοὺς τῆς ἀπειθίας. 5.7. μὴ οὖν γίνεσθε συνμέτοχοι αὐτῶν· 1.14. who is a pledge of our inheritance, to the redemption of God's own possession, to the praise of his glory. 3.5. which in other generations was not made known to the sons of men, as it has now been revealed to his holy apostles and prophets in the Spirit; 4.30. Don't grieve the Holy Spirit of God, in whom you were sealed for the day of redemption. 5.3. But sexual immorality, and all uncleanness, or covetousness, let it not even be mentioned among you, as becomes saints; 5.4. nor filthiness, nor foolish talking, nor jesting, which are not appropriate; but rather giving of thanks. 5.5. Know this for sure, that no sexually immoral person, nor unclean person, nor covetous man, who is an idolater, has any inheritance in the Kingdom of Christ and God. 5.6. Let no one deceive you with empty words. For because of these things, the wrath of God comes on the sons of disobedience. 5.7. Therefore don't be partakers with them.
74. New Testament, James, 3.19, 4.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 663
4.6. μείζονα δὲ δίδωσιν χάριν· διὸ λέγει Ὁ θεὸς ὑπερηφάνοις ἀντιτάσσεται ταπεινοῖς δὲ δίδωσιν χάριν. 4.6. But he gives more grace. Therefore it says, "God resists the proud, but gives grace to the humble."
75. New Testament, Apocalypse, 19.11-19.16 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •enemies, clemency toward ones, in early christian literature Found in books: Boustan Janssen and Roetzel (2010), Violence, Scripture, and Textual Practices in Early Judaism and Christianity, 63
19.11. Καὶ εἶδον τὸν οὐρανὸν ἠνεῳγμένον,καὶ ἰδοὺ ἵππος λευκός, καὶ ὁ καθήμενος ἐπʼ αὐτὸν πιστὸς [καλούμενος] καὶ ἀληθινός, καὶἐν δικαιοσύνῃ κρίνεικαὶ πολεμεῖ. 19.12. οἱ δὲ ὀφθαλμοὶ αὐτοῦφλὸξπυρός,καὶ ἐπὶ τὴν κεφαλὴν αὐτοῦ διαδήματα πολλά, ἔχων ὄνομα γεγραμμένον ὃ οὐδεὶς οἶδεν εἰ μὴ αὐτός, 19.13. καὶ περιβεβλημένος ἱμάτιον ῤεραντισμένον αἵματι, καὶ κέκληται τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ Ὁ Λόγος τοῦ Θεοῦ. 19.14. καὶ τὰ στρατεύματα τὰ ἐν τῷ οὐρανῷ ἠκολούθει αὐτῷ ἐφʼ ἵπποις λευκοῖς, ἐνδεδυμένοιβύσσινον λευκὸν καθαρόν. 19.15. καὶ ἐκτοῦ στόματοςαὐτοῦ ἐκπορεύεται ῥομφαία ὀξεῖα, ἵνα ἐν αὐτῇπατάξῃ τὰ ἔθνη,καὶ αὐτὸςποιμανεῖ αὐτοὺς ἐν ῥάβδῳ σιδηρᾷ·καὶ αὐτὸςπατεῖ τὴν ληνὸντοῦ οἴνου τοῦ θυμοῦ τῆς ὀργῆςτοῦ θεοῦ τοῦ παντοκράτορος. 19.16. καὶ ἔχει ἐπὶ τὸ ἱμάτιον καὶ ἐπὶ τὸν μηρὸν αὐτοῦ ὄνομα γεγραμμένον ΒΑΣΙΛΕΥΣ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΝ ΚΑΙ ΚΥΡΙΟΣ ΚΥΡΙΩΝ. 19.11. I saw the heaven opened, and behold, a white horse, and he who sat on it is called Faithful and True. In righteousness he judges and makes war. 19.12. His eyes are a flame of fire, and on his head are many crowns. He has names written and a name written which no one knows but he himself. 19.13. He is clothed in a garment sprinkled with blood. His name is called "The Word of God." 19.14. The armies which are in heaven followed him on white horses, clothed in white, pure, fine linen. 19.15. Out of his mouth proceeds a sharp, double-edged sword, that with it he should strike the nations. He will rule them with a rod of iron. He treads the winepress of the fierceness of the wrath of God, the Almighty. 19.16. He has on his garment and on his thigh a name written, "KING OF KINGS, AND LORD OF LORDS."
76. New Testament, Acts, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 45
23.6. Γνοὺς δὲ ὁ Παῦλος ὅτι τὸ ἓν μέρος ἐστὶν Σαδδουκαίων τὸ δὲ ἕτερον Φαρισαίων ἔκραζεν ἐν τῷ συνεδρίῳ Ἄνδρες ἀδελφοί, ἐγὼ Φαρισαῖός εἰμι, υἱὸς Φαρισαίων· περὶ ἐλπίδος καὶ ἀναστάσεως νεκρῶν κρίνομαι. 23.6. But when Paul perceived that the one part were Sadducees and the other Pharisees, he cried out in the council, "Men and brothers, I am a Pharisee, a son of Pharisees. Concerning the hope and resurrection of the dead I am being judged!"
77. New Testament, 2 Timothy, 1.6-1.7, 2.22-2.26, 3.5-3.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian, literature/authors •festivals, non-christian, in early christian literature Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 50, 51; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 240, 423
1.6. διʼ ἣν αἰτίαν ἀναμιμνήσκω σε ἀναζωπυρεῖν τὸ χάρισμα τοῦ θεοῦ, ὅ ἐστιν ἐν σοὶ διὰ τῆς ἐπιθέσεως τῶν χειρῶν μου· 1.7. οὐ γὰρ ἔδωκεν ἡμῖν ὁ θεὸς πνεῦμα δειλίας, ἀλλὰ δυνάμεως καὶ ἀγάπης καὶ σωφρονισμοῦ. 2.22. τὰς δὲ νεωτερικὰς ἐπιθυμίας φεῦγε, δίωκε δὲ δικαιοσύνην, πίστιν, ἀγάπην, εἰρήνην μετὰ τῶν ἐπικαλουμένων τὸν κύριον ἐκ καθαρᾶς καρδίας. 2.23. τὰς δὲ μωρὰς καὶ ἀπαιδεύτους ζητήσεις παραιτοῦ, εἰδὼς ὅτι γεννῶσι μάχας· 2.24. δοῦλον δὲ κυρίου οὐ δεῖ μάχεσθαι, ἀλλὰ ἤπιον εἶναι πρὸς πάντας, διδακτικόν, ἀνεξίκακον, 2.25. ἐν πραΰτητι παιδεύοντα τοὺς ἀντιδιατιθεμένους, μή ποτε δῴη αὐτοῖς ὁ θεὸς μετάνοιαν εἰς ἐπίγνωσιν ἀληθείας, 2.26. καὶ ἀνανήψωσιν ἐκ τῆς τοῦ διαβόλου παγίδος, ἐζωγρημένοι ὑπʼ αὐτοῦ εἰς τὸ ἐκείνου θέλημα. 3.5. ἔχοντες μόρφωσιν εὐσεβείας τὴν δὲ δύναμιν αὐτῆς ἠρνημένοι· καὶ τούτους ἀποτρέπου. 3.6. ἐκ τούτων γάρ εἰσιν οἱ ἐνδύνοιτες εἰς τὰς οἰκίας καὶ αἰχμαλωτίζοντες γυναικάρια σεσωρευμένα ἁμαρτίαις, ἀγόμενα ἐπιθυμίαις ποικίλαις, 3.7. πάντοτε μανθάνοντα καὶ μηδέποτε εἰς ἐπίγνωσιν ἀληθείας ἐλθεῖν δυνάμενα. 3.8. ὃν τρόπον δὲ Ἰαννῆς καὶ Ἰαμβρῆς ἀντέστησαν Μωυσεῖ, οὕτως καὶ οὗτοι ἀνθίστανται τῇ ἀληθείᾳ, ἄνθρωποι κατεφθαρμένοι τὸν νοῦν, ἀδόκιμοι περὶ τὴν πίστιν. 3.9. ἀλλʼ οὐ προκόψουσιν ἐπὶ πλεῖον, ἡ γὰρ ἄνοια αὐτῶν ἔκδη λος ἔσται πᾶσιν, ὡς καὶ ἡ ἐκείνων ἐγένετο. 1.6. For this cause, I remind you that you should stir up the gift of God which is in you through the laying on of my hands. 1.7. For God didn't give us a spirit of fear, but of power, love, and self-control. 2.22. Flee from youthful lusts; but pursue righteousness, faith, love, and peace with those who call on the Lord out of a pure heart. 2.23. But refuse foolish and ignorant questionings, knowing that they generate strife. 2.24. The Lord's servant must not quarrel, but be gentle towards all, able to teach, patient, 2.25. in gentleness correcting those who oppose him: perhaps God may give them repentance leading to a full knowledge of the truth, 2.26. and they may recover themselves out of the devil's snare, having been taken captive by him to his will. 3.5. holding a form of godliness, but having denied the power thereof. Turn away from these, also. 3.6. For of these are those who creep into houses, and take captive gullible women loaded down with sins, led away by various lusts, 3.7. always learning, and never able to come to the knowledge of the truth. 3.8. Even as Jannes and Jambres opposed Moses, so do these also oppose the truth; men corrupted in mind, reprobate concerning the faith. 3.9. But they will proceed no further. For their folly will be evident to all men, as theirs also came to be.
78. New Testament, 2 Corinthians, 2.13, 4.8, 4.9, 6.4, 6.5, 6.6, 6.7, 7.5, 10.1, 10.1-13.10, 10.2, 10.3, 10.4, 10.5, 10.6, 11.4, 11.23, 11.24, 11.25, 11.26, 11.27, 11.28, 11.29 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 238, 423
6.7. ἐν λόγῳ ἀληθείας, ἐν δυνάμει θεοῦ· διὰ τῶν ὅπλων τῆς δικαιοσύνης τῶν δεξιῶν καὶ ἀριστερῶν, διὰ δόξης
79. New Testament, 2 Peter, 1.15-1.18, 2.1, 2.5, 3.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 375, 378, 379, 380
1.15. σπουδάσω δὲ καὶ ἑκάστοτε ἔχειν ὑμᾶς μετὰ τὴν ἐμὴν ἔξοδον τὴν τούτων μνήμην ποιεῖσθαι. 1.16. οὐ γὰρ σεσοφισμένοις μύθοις ἐξακολουθήσαντες ἐγνωρίσαμεν ὑμῖν τὴν τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ δύναμιν καὶ παρουσίαν, ἀλλʼ ἐπόπται γενηθέντες τῆς ἐκείνου μεγαλειότητος. 1.17. λαβὼν γὰρ παρὰ θεοῦ πατρὸς τιμὴν καὶ δόξαν φωνῆς ἐνεχθείσης αὐτῷ τοιᾶσδε ὑπὸ τῆς μεγαλοπρεποῦς δόξης Ὁ υἱός μου ὁ ἀγαπητός μου οὗτός ἐστιν, εἰς ὃν ἐγὼ εὐδόκησα,— 1.18. καὶ ταύτην τὴν φωνὴν ἡμεῖς ἠκούσαμεν ἐξ οὐρανοῦ ἐνεχθεῖσαν σὺν αὐτῷ ὄντες ἐν τῷ ἁγίῳ ὄρει. 2.1. Ἐγένοντο δὲ καὶ ψευδοπροφῆται ἐν τῷ λαῷ, ὡς καὶ ἐν ὑμῖν ἔσονται ψευδοδιδάσκαλοι, οἵτινες παρεισάξουσιν αἱρέσεις ἀπωλείας, καὶ τὸν ἀγοράσαντα αὐτοὺς δεσπότην ἀρνούμενοι, ἐπάγοντες ἑαυτοῖς ταχινὴν ἀπώλειαν· 2.5. καὶ ἀρχαίου κόσμου οὐκ ἐφείσατο, ἀλλὰ ὄγδοον Νῶε δικαιοσύνης κήρυκα ἐφύλαξεν, κατακλυσμὸν κόσμῳ ἀσεβῶν ἐπάξας, 3.1. Ταύτην ἤδη, ἀγαπητοί, δευτέραν ὑμῖν γράφω ἐπιστολήν, ἐν αἷς διεγείρω ὑμῶν ἐν ὑπομνήσει τὴν εἰλικρινῆ διάνοιαν, 1.15. Yes, I will make every effort that you may always be able to remember these things even after my departure. 1.16. For we did not follow cunningly devised fables, when we made known to you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but we were eyewitnesses of his majesty. 1.17. For he received from God the Father honor and glory, when the voice came to him from the Majestic Glory, "This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased." 1.18. This voice we heard come out of heaven when we were with him in the holy mountain. 2.1. But there also arose false prophets among the people, as among you also there will be false teachers, who will secretly bring in destructive heresies, denying even the Master who bought them, bringing on themselves swift destruction. 2.5. and didn't spare the ancient world, but preserved Noah with seven others, a preacher of righteousness, when he brought a flood on the world of the ungodly; 3.1. This is now, beloved, the second letter that I have written to you; and in both of them I stir up your sincere mind by reminding you;
80. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 2.6-2.16, 4.10-4.13, 5.1-5.5, 8.1-8.11, 9.6, 11.17-11.34, 12.11, 13.3, 14.14-14.16, 14.32, 15.26, 15.54-15.55, 16.22 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Boustan Janssen and Roetzel (2010), Violence, Scripture, and Textual Practices in Early Judaism and Christianity, 85; König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 127, 129; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 229, 238, 268; Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 665; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 374
2.6. Σοφίαν δὲ λαλοῦμεν ἐν τοῖς τελείοις, σοφίαν δὲ οὐ τοῦ αἰῶνος τούτου οὐδὲ τῶν ἀρχόντων τοῦ αἰῶνος τούτου τῶν καταργουμένων· 2.7. ἀλλὰ λαλοῦμεν θεοῦ σοφίαν ἐν μυστηρίῳ, τὴν ἀποκεκρυμμένην, ἣν προώρισεν ὁ θεὸς πρὸ τῶν αἰώνων εἰς δόξαν ἡμῶν· 2.8. ἣν οὐδεὶς τῶν ἀρχόντων τοῦ αἰῶνος τούτου ἔγνωκεν, εἰ γὰρ ἔγνωσαν, οὐκ ἂν τὸν κύριον τῆς δόξης ἐσταύρωσαν· 2.9. ἀλλὰ καθὼς γέγραπταιἋ ὀφθαλμὸς οὐκ εἶδεν καὶοὖς οὐκ ἤκουσεν 2.10. ἡμῖν γὰρ ἀπεκάλυψεν ὁ θεὸς διὰ τοῦ πνεύματος, τὸ γὰρ πνεῦμα πάντα ἐραυνᾷ, καὶ τὰ βάθη τοῦ θεοῦ. 2.11. τίς γὰρ οἶδεν ἀνθρώπων τὰ τοῦ ἀνθρώπου εἰ μὴ τὸ πνεῦμα τοῦ ἀνθρώπου τὸ ἐν αὐτῷ; οὕτως καὶ τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ οὐδεὶς ἔγνωκεν εἰ μὴ τὸ πνεῦμα τοῦ θεοῦ. 2.12. ἡμεῖς δὲ οὐ τὸ πνεῦμα τοῦ κόσμου ἐλάβομεν ἀλλὰ τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ ἐκ τοῦ θεοῦ, ἵνα εἰδῶμεν τὰ ὑπὸ τοῦ θεοῦ χαρισθέντα ἡμῖν· 2.13. ἃ καὶ λαλοῦμεν οὐκ ἐν διδακτοῖς ἀνθρωπίνης σοφίας λόγοις, ἀλλʼ ἐν διδακτοῖς πνεύματος, πνευματικοῖς πνευματικὰ συνκρίνοντες. 2.14. ψυχικὸς δὲ ἄνθρωπος οὐ δέχεται τὰ τοῦ πνεύματος τοῦ θεοῦ, μωρία γὰρ αὐτῷ ἐστίν, καὶ οὐ δύναται γνῶναι, ὅτι πνευματικῶς ἀνακρίνεται· 2.15. ὁ δὲ πνευματικὸς ἀνακρίνει μὲν πάντα, αὐτὸς δὲ ὑπʼ οὐδενὸς ἀνακρίνεται. 2.16. τίςγὰρἔγνω νοῦν Κυρίου, ὃς συνβιβάσει αὐτόν;ἡμεῖς δὲ νοῦν Χριστοῦ ἔχομεν. 4.10. ἡμεῖς μωροὶ διὰ Χριστόν, ὑμεῖς δὲ φρόνιμοι ἐν Χριστῷ· ἡμεῖς ἀσθενεῖς, ὑμεῖς δὲ ἰσχυροί· ὑμεῖς ἔνδοξοι, ἡμεῖς δὲ ἄτιμοι. 4.11. ἄχρι τῆς ἄρτι ὥρας καὶ πεινῶμεν καὶ διψῶμεν καὶ γυμνιτεύομεν καὶ κολαφιζόμεθα καὶ ἀστατοῦμεν 4.12. καὶ κοπιῶμεν ἐργαζόμενοι ταῖς ἰδίαις χερσίν· λοιδορούμενοι εὐλογοῦμεν, διωκόμενοι ἀνεχόμεθα, 4.13. δυσφημούμενοι παρακαλοῦμεν· ὡς περικαθάρματα τοῦ κόσμου ἐγενήθημεν, πάντων περίψημα, ἕως ἄρτι. 5.1. Ὅλως ἀκούεται ἐν ὑμῖν πορνεία, καὶ τοιαύτη πορνεία ἥτις οὐδὲ ἐν τοῖς ἔθνεσιν, ὥστε γυναῖκά τινα τοῦ πατρὸς ἔχειν. 5.2. καὶ ὑμεῖς πεφυσιωμένοι ἐστέ, καὶ οὐχὶ μᾶλλον ἐπενθήσατε, ἵνα ἀρθῇ ἐκ μέσου ὑμῶν ὁ τὸ ἔργον τοῦτο πράξας; 5.3. Ἐγὼ μὲν γάρ, ἀπὼν τῷ σώματι παρὼν δὲ τῷ πνεύματι, ἤδη κέκρικα ὡς παρὼν τὸν οὕτως τοῦτο κατεργασάμενον 5.4. ἐν τῷ ὀνόματι τοῦ κυρίου [ἡμῶν] Ἰησοῦ, συναχθέντων ὑμῶν καὶ τοῦ ἐμοῦ πνεύματος σὺν τῇ δυνάμει τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ, 5.5. παραδοῦναι τὸν τοιοῦτον τῷ Σατανᾷ εἰς ὄλεθρον τῆς σαρκός, ἵνα τὸ πνεῦμα σωθῇ ἐν τῇ ᾑμέρᾳ τοῦ κυρίου. 8.1. Περὶ δὲ τῶν εἰδωλοθύτων, οἴδαμεν ὅτι πάντες γνῶσιν ἔχομεν. 8.2. ἡ γνῶσις φυσιοῖ, ἡ δὲ ἀγάπη οἰκοδομεῖ. 8.3. εἴ τις δοκεῖ ἐγνωκέναι τι, οὔπω ἔγνω καθὼς δεῖ γνῶναι· εἰ δέ τις ἀγαπᾷ τὸν θεόν, οὗτος ἔγνωσται ὑπʼ αὐτοῦ. 8.4. Περὶ τῆς βρώσεως οὖν τῶν εἰδωλοθύτων οἴδαμεν ὅτι οὐδὲν εἴδωλον ἐν κόσμῳ, καὶ ὅτι οὐδεὶς θεὸς εἰ μὴ εἷς. 8.5. καὶ γὰρ εἴπερ εἰσὶν λεγόμενοι θεοὶ εἴτε ἐν οὐρανῷ εἴτε ἐπὶ γῆς, ὥσπερ εἰσὶν θεοὶ πολλοὶ καὶ κύριοι πολλοί, 8.6. [ἀλλʼ] ἡμῖν εἷς θεὸς ὁ πατήρ, ἐξ οὗ τὰ πάντα καὶ ἡμεῖς εἰς αὐτόν, καὶ εἷς κύριος Ἰησοῦς Χριστός, διʼ οὗ τὰ πάντα καὶ ἡμεῖς διʼ αὐτοῦ. Ἀλλʼ οὐκ ἐν πᾶσιν ἡ γνῶσις· 8.7. τινὲς δὲ τῇ συνηθείᾳ ἕως ἄρτι τοῦ εἰδώλου ὡς εἰδωλόθυτον ἐσθίουσιν, καὶ ἡ συνείδησις αὐτῶν ἀσθενὴς οὖσα μολύνεται. 8.8. βρῶμα δὲ ἡμᾶς οὐ παραστήσει τῷ θεῷ· οὔτε ἐὰν μὴ φάγωμεν, ὑστερούμεθα, οὔτε ἐὰν φάγωμεν, περισσεύομεν. 8.9. βλέπετε δὲ μή πως ἡ ἐξουσία ὑμῶν αὕτη πρόσκομμα γένηται τοῖς ἀσθενέσιν. 8.10. ἐὰν γάρ τις ἴδῃ [σὲ] τὸν ἔχοντα γνῶσιν ἐν εἰδωλίῳ κατακείμενον, οὐχὶ ἡ συνείδησις αὐτοῦ ἀσθενοῦς ὄντος οἰκοδομηθήσεται εἰς τὸ τὰ εἰδωλόθυτα ἐσθίειν; 8.11. ἀπόλλυται γὰρ ὁ ἀσθενῶν ἐν τῇ σῇ γνώσει, ὁ ἀδελφὸς διʼ ὃν Χριστὸς ἀπέθανεν. 9.6. ἢ μόνος ἐγὼ καὶ Βαρνάβας οὐκ ἔχομεν ἐξουσίαν μὴ ἐργάζεσθαι; 11.17. Τοῦτο δὲ παραγγέλλων οὐκ ἐπαινῶ ὅτι οὐκ εἰς τὸ κρεῖσσον ἀλλὰ εἰς τὸ ἧσσον συνέρχεσθε. 11.18. πρῶτον μὲν γὰρ συνερχομένων ὑμῶν ἐν ἐκκλησίᾳ ἀκούω σχίσματα ἐν ὑμῖν ὑπάρχειν, καὶ μέρος τι πιστεύω. 11.19. δεῖ γὰρ καὶ αἱρέσεις ἐν ὑμῖν εἶναι· ἵνα [καὶ] οἱ δόκιμοι φανεροὶ γένωνται ἐν ὑμῖν. 11.20. Συνερχομένων οὖν ὑμῶν ἐπὶ τὸ αὐτὸ οὐκ ἔστιν κυριακὸν δεῖπνον φαγεῖν, 11.21. ἕκαστος γὰρ τὸ ἴδιον δεῖπνον προλαμβάνει ἐν τῷ φαγεῖν, καὶ ὃς μὲν πεινᾷ, ὃς δὲ μεθύει. 11.22. μὴ γὰρ οἰκίας οὐκ ἔχετε εἰς τὸ ἐσθίειν καὶ πίνειν; ἢ τῆς ἐκκλησίας τοῦ θεοῦ καταφρονεῖτε, καὶ καταισχύνετε τοὺς μὴ ἔχοντας; τί εἴπω ὑμῖν; ἐπαινέσω ὑμᾶς; ἐν τούτῳ οὐκ ἐπαινῶ. 11.23. ἐγὼ γὰρ παρέλαβον ἀπὸ τοῦ κυρίου, ὃ καὶ παρέδωκα ὑμῖν, ὅτι ὁ κύριος Ἰησοῦς ἐν τῇ νυκτὶ ᾗ παρεδίδετο ἔλαβεν ἄρτον καὶ εὐχαριστήσας ἔκλασεν καὶ εἶπεν 11.24. Τοῦτό μού ἐστιν τὸ σῶμα τὸ ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν· τοῦτο ποιεῖτε εἰς τὴν ἐμὴν ἀνάμνησιν. ὡσαύτως καὶ τὸ ποτήριον μετὰ τὸ δειπνῆσαι, λέγων 11.25. Τοῦτο τὸ ποτήριον ἡ καινὴδιαθήκηἐστὶν ἐντῷἐμῷαἵματι·τοῦτο ποιεῖτε, ὁσάκις ἐὰν πίνητε, εἰς τὴν ἐμὴν ἀνάμνησιν. 11.26. ὁσάκις γὰρ ἐὰν ἐσθίητε τὸν ἄρτον τοῦτον καὶ τὸ ποτήριον πίνητε, τὸν θάνατον τοῦ κυρίου καταγγέλλετε, ἄχρι οὗ ἔλθῃ. 11.27. ὥστε ὃς ἂν ἐσθίῃ τὸν ἄρτον ἢ πίνῃ τὸ ποτήριον τοῦ κυρίου ἀναξίως, ἔνοχος ἔσται τοῦ σώματος καὶ τοῦ αἵματος τοῦ κυρίου. 11.28. δοκιμαζέτω δὲ ἄνθρωπος ἑαυτόν, καὶ οὕτως ἐκ τοῦ ἄρτου ἐσθιέτω καὶ ἐκ τοῦ ποτηρίου πινέτω· 11.29. ὁ γὰρ ἐσθίων καὶ πίνων κρίμα ἑαυτῷ ἐσθίει καὶ πίνει μὴ διακρίνων τὸ σῶμα. 11.30. διὰ τοῦτο ἐν ὑμῖν πολλοὶ ἀσθενεῖς καὶ ἄρρωστοι καὶ κοιμῶνται ἱκανοί. 11.31. εἰ δὲ ἑαυτοὺς διεκρίνομεν, οὐκ ἂν ἐκρινόμεθα· 11.32. κρινόμενοι δὲ ὑπὸ τοῦ κυρίου παιδευόμεθα, ἵνα μὴ σὺν τῷ κόσμῳ κατακριθῶμεν. 11.33. ὥστε, ἀδελφοί μου, συνερχόμενοι εἰς τὸ φαγεῖν ἀλλήλους ἐκδέχεσθε. 11.34. εἴ τις πεινᾷ, ἐν οἴκῳ ἐσθιέτω, ἵνα μὴ εἰς κρίμα συνέρχησθε. Τὰ δὲ λοιπὰ ὡς ἂν ἔλθω διατάξομαι. 12.11. πάντα δὲ ταῦτα ἐνεργεῖ τὸ ἓν καὶ τὸ αὐτὸ πνεῦμα, διαιροῦν ἰδίᾳ ἑκάστῳ καθὼς βούλεται. 13.3. κἂν ψωμίσω πάντα τὰ ὑπάρχοντά μου, κἂν παραδῶ τὸ σῶμά μου, ἵνα καυχήσωμαι, ἀγάπην δὲ μὴ ἔχω, οὐδὲν ὠφελοῦμαι. 14.14. ἐὰν [γὰρ] προσεύχωμαι γλώσσῃ, τὸ πνεῦμά μου προσεύχεται, ὁ δὲ νοῦς μου ἄκαρπός ἐστιν. 14.15. τί οὖν ἐστίν; προσεύξομαι τῷ πνεύματι, προσεύξομαι δὲ καὶ τῷ νοΐ· ψαλῶ τῷ πνεύματι, ψαλῶ [δὲ] καὶ τῷ νοΐ· 14.16. ἐπεὶ ἐὰν εὐλογῇς [ἐν] πνεύματι, ὁ ἀναπληρῶν τὸν τόπον τοῦ ἰδιώτου πῶς ἐρεῖ τό Ἀμήν ἐπὶ τῇ σῇ εὐχαριστίᾳ; ἐπειδὴ τί λέγεις οὐκ οἶδεν· 14.32. ?̔καὶ πνεύματα προφητῶν προφήταις ὑποτάσσεται, 15.26. ἔσχατος ἐχθρὸς καταργεῖται ὁ θάνατος, 15.54. ὅταν δὲ τὸ θνητὸν τοῦτο ἐνδύσηται [τὴν] ἀθανασίαν, τότε γενήσεται ὁ λόγος ὁ γεγραμμένος Κατεπόθη ὁ θάνατος εἰς νῖκος. 15.55. ποῦ σου, θάνατε, τὸ νῖκος; ποῦ σου, θάνατε, τὸ κέντρον; 16.22. εἴ τις οὐ φιλεῖ τὸν κύριον, ἤτω ἀνάθεμα. Μαρὰν ἀθά. 2.6. We speak wisdom, however, among those who are fullgrown; yet a wisdom not of this world, nor of the rulers of this world,who are coming to nothing. 2.7. But we speak God's wisdom in amystery, the wisdom that has been hidden, which God foreordained beforethe worlds to our glory, 2.8. which none of the rulers of this worldhas known. For had they known it, they wouldn't have crucified the Lordof glory. 2.9. But as it is written,"Things which an eye didn't see, and an ear didn't hear,Which didn't enter into the heart of man,These God has prepared for those who love him." 2.10. But to us, God revealed them through the Spirit. For theSpirit searches all things, yes, the deep things of God. 2.11. For whoamong men knows the things of a man, except the spirit of the man,which is in him? Even so, no one knows the things of God, except God'sSpirit. 2.12. But we received, not the spirit of the world, but theSpirit which is from God, that we might know the things that werefreely given to us by God. 2.13. Which things also we speak, not inwords which man's wisdom teaches, but which the Holy Spirit teaches,comparing spiritual things with spiritual things. 2.14. Now thenatural man doesn't receive the things of God's Spirit, for they arefoolishness to him, and he can't know them, because they arespiritually discerned. 2.15. But he who is spiritual discerns allthings, and he himself is judged by no one. 2.16. "For who has knownthe mind of the Lord, that he should instruct him?" But we haveChrist's mind. 4.10. We are fools for Christ's sake, but you are wisein Christ. We are weak, but you are strong. You have honor, but we havedishonor. 4.11. Even to this present hour we hunger, thirst, arenaked, are beaten, and have no certain dwelling place. 4.12. We toil,working with our own hands. Being reviled, we bless. Being persecuted,we endure. 4.13. Being defamed, we entreat. We are made as the filthof the world, the dirt wiped off by all, even until now. 5.1. It is actually reported that there is sexual immorality amongyou, and such sexual immorality as is not even named among theGentiles, that one has his father's wife. 5.2. You are puffed up, anddidn't rather mourn, that he who had done this deed might be removedfrom among you. 5.3. For I most assuredly, as being absent in body butpresent in spirit, have already, as though I were present, judged himwho has done this thing. 5.4. In the name of our Lord Jesus Christ,you being gathered together, and my spirit, with the power of our LordJesus Christ, 5.5. are to deliver such a one to Satan for thedestruction of the flesh, that the spirit may be saved in the day ofthe Lord Jesus. 8.1. Now concerning things sacrificed to idols: We know that we allhave knowledge. Knowledge puffs up, but love builds up. 8.2. But ifanyone thinks that he knows anything, he doesn't yet know as he oughtto know. 8.3. But if anyone loves God, the same is known by him. 8.4. Therefore concerning the eating of things sacrificed to idols, we knowthat no idol is anything in the world, and that there is no other Godbut one. 8.5. For though there are things that are called "gods,"whether in the heavens or on earth; as there are many "gods" and many"lords;" 8.6. yet to us there is one God, the Father, of whom are allthings, and we for him; and one Lord, Jesus Christ, through whom areall things, and we live through him. 8.7. However, that knowledgeisn't in all men. But some, with consciousness of the idol until now,eat as of a thing sacrificed to an idol, and their conscience, beingweak, is defiled. 8.8. But food will not commend us to God. Forneither, if we don't eat, are we the worse; nor, if we eat, are we thebetter. 8.9. But be careful that by no means does this liberty ofyours become a stumbling block to the weak. 8.10. For if a man seesyou who have knowledge sitting in an idol's temple, won't hisconscience, if he is weak, be emboldened to eat things sacrificed toidols? 8.11. And through your knowledge, he who is weak perishes, thebrother for whose sake Christ died. 9.6. Or have onlyBarnabas and I no right to not work? 11.17. But in giving you this command, I don't praise you, that youcome together not for the better but for the worse. 11.18. For firstof all, when you come together in the assembly, I hear that divisionsexist among you, and I partly believe it. 11.19. For there also mustbe factions among you, that those who are approved may be revealedamong you. 11.20. When therefore you assemble yourselves together, itis not possible to eat the Lord's supper. 11.21. For in your eatingeach one takes his own supper before others. One is hungry, and anotheris drunken. 11.22. What, don't you have houses to eat and to drink in?Or do you despise God's assembly, and put them to shame who don't have?What shall I tell you? Shall I praise you? In this I don't praise you. 11.23. For I received from the Lord that which also I delivered toyou, that the Lord Jesus on the night in which he was betrayed tookbread. 11.24. When he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, "Take,eat. This is my body, which is broken for you. Do this in memory ofme." 11.25. In the same way he also took the cup, after supper,saying, "This cup is the new covet in my blood. Do this, as often asyou drink, in memory of me." 11.26. For as often as you eat this breadand drink this cup, you proclaim the Lord's death until he comes. 11.27. Therefore whoever eats this bread or drinks the Lord's cup i unworthy manner will be guilty of the body and the blood of theLord. 11.28. But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of thebread, and drink of the cup. 11.29. For he who eats and drinks in anunworthy manner eats and drinks judgment to himself, if he doesn'tdiscern the Lord's body. 11.30. For this cause many among you are weakand sickly, and not a few sleep. 11.31. For if we discerned ourselves,we wouldn't be judged. 11.32. But when we are judged, we are punishedby the Lord, that we may not be condemned with the world. 11.33. Therefore, my brothers, when you come together to eat, wait one foranother. 11.34. But if anyone is hungry, let him eat at home, lestyour coming together be for judgment. The rest I will set in orderwhenever I come. 12.11. But the one andthe same Spirit works all of these, distributing to each one separatelyas he desires. 13.3. If I dole out all my goods tofeed the poor, and if I give my body to be burned, but don't have love,it profits me nothing. 14.14. For if I pray in another language, myspirit prays, but my understanding is unfruitful. 14.15. What is it then? I will pray with the spirit, and I willpray with the understanding also. I will sing with the spirit, and Iwill sing with the understanding also. 14.16. Otherwise if you blesswith the spirit, how will he who fills the place of the unlearned saythe "Amen" at your giving of thanks, seeing he doesn't know what yousay? 14.32. The spirits of the prophets are subject to theprophets, 15.26. The lastenemy that will be abolished is death. 15.54. But when this corruptible will have put onincorruption, and this mortal will have put on immortality, then whatis written will happen: "Death is swallowed up in victory." 15.55. "Death, where is your sting?Hades, where is your victory?" 16.22. Ifany man doesn't love the Lord Jesus Christ, let him be accursed. Come,Lord!
81. Epictetus, Discourses, a b c d\n0 '1.6.32 '1.6.32 '1 6 \n1 '3.22.49 '3.22.49 '3 22 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 662
82. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, a b c d\n0 '1.64 '1.64 '1 64\n1 '1.84 '1.84 '1 84\n2 8.14 8.14 8 14\n3 8.15 8.15 8 15\n4 8.12 8.12 8 12\n5 8.13 8.13 8 13\n6 8.18 8.18 8 18\n7 8.19 8.19 8 19\n8 8.16 8.16 8 16\n9 8.17 8.17 8 17\n10 8.11 8.11 8 11\n11 8.22 8.22 8 22\n12 8.23 8.23 8 23\n13 8.21 8.21 8 21\n14 8.25 8.25 8 25\n15 8.26 8.26 8 26\n16 8.24 8.24 8 24\n17 8.20 8.20 8 20\n18 32.12 32.12 32 12 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 661
83. New Testament, 1 Timothy, 4.1-4.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •festivals, non-christian, in early christian literature Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 48
4.1. Τὸ δὲ πνεῦμα ῥητῶς λέγει ὅτι ἐν ὑστέροις καιροῖς ἀποστήσονταί τινες τῆς πίστεως, προσέχοντες πνεύμασι πλάνοις καὶ διδασκαλίαις δαιμονίων 4.2. ἐν ὑποκρίσει ψευδολόγων, κεκαυστηριασμένων τὴν ἰδίαν συνείδησιν, 4.3. κωλυόντων γαμεῖν, ἀπέχεσθαι βρωμάτων ἃ ὁ θεὸς ἔκτισεν εἰς μετάλημψιν μετὰ εὐχαριστίας τοῖς πιστοῖς καὶ ἐπεγνωκόσι τὴν ἀλήθειαν. 4.1. But the Spirit says expressly that in later times some will fall away from the faith, paying attention to seducing spirits and doctrines of demons, 4.2. through the hypocrisy of men who speak lies, branded in their own conscience as with a hot iron; 4.3. forbidding marriage and commanding to abstain from foods which God created to be received with thanksgiving by those who believe and know the truth.
84. Anon., Didache, a b c d\n0 7.1 7.1 7 1 \n1 '1.6 '1.6 '1 6 \n2 14.1 14.1 14 1 \n3 9 9 9 None\n4 10 10 10 None\n5 8.1 8.1 8 1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022), Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity, 71
85. New Testament, Galatians, 1.8-1.9, 1.11-1.16, 2.13-2.14, 3.1-3.2, 4.6, 5.18 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •enemies, clemency toward ones, in early christian literature •pharisees, in christian literature •festivals, non-christian, in early christian literature •christianity, early, relationship between early christian and jewish feasting and feasting literature •christian, literature/authors Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 46, 48; Boustan Janssen and Roetzel (2010), Violence, Scripture, and Textual Practices in Early Judaism and Christianity, 85; Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 45; König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 129; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 229, 268
1.8. ἀλλὰ καὶ ἐὰν ἡμεῖς ἢ ἄγγελος ἐξ οὐρανοῦ εὐαγγελίσηται [ὑμῖν] παρʼ ὃ εὐηγγελισάμεθα ὑμῖν, ἀνάθεμα ἔστω. 1.9. ὡς προειρήκαμεν, καὶ ἄρτι πάλιν λέγω, εἴ τις ὑμᾶς εὐαγγελίζεται παρʼ ὃ παρελάβετε, ἀνάθεμα ἔστω. 1.11. γνωρίζω γὰρ ὑμῖν, ἀδελφοί, τὸ εὐαγγέλιον τὸ εὐαγγελισθὲν ὑπʼ ἐμοῦ ὅτι οὐκ ἔστιν κατὰ ἄνθρωπον· 1.12. οὐδὲ γὰρ ἐγὼ παρὰ ἀνθρώπου παρέλαβον αὐτό, οὔτε ἐδιδάχθην, ἀλλὰ διʼ ἀποκαλύψεως Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ. 1.13. Ἠκούσατε γὰρ τὴν ἐμὴν ἀναστροφήν ποτε ἐν τῷ Ἰουδαϊσμῷ, ὅτι καθʼ ὑπερβολὴν ἐδίωκον τὴν ἐκκλησίαν τοῦ θεοῦ καὶ ἐπόρθουν αὐτήν, 1.14. καὶ προέκοπτον ἐν τῷ Ἰουδαϊσμῷ ὑπὲρ πολλοὺς συνηλικιώτας ἐν τῷ γένει μου, περισσοτέρως ζηλωτὴς ὑπάρχων τῶν πατρικῶν μου παραδόσεων. 1.15. Ὅτε δὲ εὐδόκησεν [ὁ θεὸς] ὁ ἀφορίσας μεἐκ κοιλίας μητρός μουκαὶκαλέσαςδιὰ τῆς χάριτος αὐτοῦ 1.16. ἀποκαλύψαι τὸν υἱὸν αὐτοῦ ἐν ἐμοὶ ἵνα εὐαγγελίζωμαι αὐτὸν ἐν τοῖς ἔθνεσιν, εὐθέως οὐ προσανεθέμην σαρκὶ καὶ αἵματι, 2.13. καὶ συνυπεκρίθησαν αὐτῷ [καὶ] οἱ λοιποὶ Ἰουδαῖοι, ὥστε καὶ Βαρνάβας συναπήχθη αὐτῶν τῇ ὑποκρίσει. 2.14. ἀλλʼ ὅτε εἶδον ὅτι οὐκ ὀρθοποδοῦσιν πρὸς τὴν ἀλήθειαν τοῦ εὐαγγελίου, εἶπον τῷ Κηφᾷ ἔμπροσθεν πάντων Εἰ σὺ Ἰουδαῖος ὑπάρχων ἐθνικῶς καὶ οὐκ Ἰουδαϊκῶς ζῇς, πῶς τὰ ἔθνη ἀναγκάζεις Ἰουδαΐζειν; 3.1. Ὦ ἀνόητοι Γαλάται, τίς ὑμᾶς ἐβάσκανεν, οἷς κατʼ ὀφθαλμοὺς Ἰησοῦς Χριστὸς προεγράφη ἐσταυρωμένος; 3.2. τοῦτο μόνον θέλω μαθεῖν ἀφʼ ὑμῶν, ἐξ ἔργων νόμου τὸ πνεῦμα ἐλάβετε ἢ ἐξ ἀκοῆς πίστεως; 4.6. Ὅτι δέ ἐστε υἱοί, ἐξαπέστειλεν ὁ θεὸς τὸ πνεῦμα τοῦ υἱοῦ αὐτοῦ εἰς τὰς καρδίας ἡμῶν, κρᾶζον Ἀββά ὁ πατήρ. 5.18. εἰ δὲ πνεύματι ἄγεσθε, οὐκ ἐστὲ ὑπὸ νόμον. 1.8. But even though we, or an angelfrom heaven, should preach to you any gospel other than that which wepreached to you, let him be cursed. 1.9. As we have said before, so Inow say again: if any man preaches to you any gospel other than thatwhich you received, let him be cursed. 1.11. But Imake known to you, brothers, concerning the gospel which was preachedby me, that it is not according to man. 1.12. For neither did Ireceive it from man, nor was I taught it, but it came to me throughrevelation of Jesus Christ. 1.13. For you have heard of my way ofliving in time past in the Jews' religion, how that beyond measure Ipersecuted the assembly of God, and ravaged it. 1.14. I advanced inthe Jews' religion beyond many of my own age among my countrymen, beingmore exceedingly zealous for the traditions of my fathers. 1.15. Butwhen it was the good pleasure of God, who separated me from my mother'swomb, and called me through his grace, 1.16. to reveal his Son in me,that I might preach him among the Gentiles, I didn't immediately conferwith flesh and blood, 2.13. And the rest of the Jews joined him in his hypocrisy; so that evenBarnabas was carried away with their hypocrisy. 2.14. But when I sawthat they didn't walk uprightly according to the truth of the gospel, Isaid to Peter before them all, "If you, being a Jew, live as theGentiles do, and not as the Jews do, why do you compel the Gentiles tolive as the Jews do? 3.1. Foolish Galatians, who has bewitched you not to obey thetruth, before whose eyes Jesus Christ was openly set forth among you as crucified? 3.2. I just want to learn this from you. Did you receivethe Spirit by the works of the law, or by hearing of faith? 4.6. And because you are sons, God sent out theSpirit of his Son into your hearts, crying, "Abba, Father!" 5.18. But if you are led by theSpirit, you are not under the law.
86. Mishnah, Sanhedrin, 10.2 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 37
10.2. "שְׁלֹשָׁה מְלָכִים וְאַרְבָּעָה הֶדְיוֹטוֹת אֵין לָהֶם חֵלֶק לָעוֹלָם הַבָּא. שְׁלֹשָׁה מְלָכִים, יָרָבְעָם, אַחְאָב, וּמְנַשֶּׁה. רַבִּי יְהוּדָה אוֹמֵר, מְנַשֶּׁה יֶשׁ לוֹ חֵלֶק לָעוֹלָם הַבָּא, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (דברי הימים ב לג) וַיִּתְפַּלֵּל אֵלָיו וַיֵּעָתֶר לוֹ וַיִּשְׁמַע תְּחִנָּתוֹ וַיְשִׁיבֵהוּ יְרוּשָׁלַיִם לְמַלְכוּתוֹ. אָמְרוּ לוֹ, לְמַלְכוּתוֹ הֱשִׁיבוֹ וְלֹא לְחַיֵּי הָעוֹלָם הַבָּא הֱשִׁיבוֹ. אַרְבָּעָה הֶדְיוֹטוֹת, בִּלְעָם, וְדוֹאֵג, וַאֲחִיתֹפֶל, וְגֵחֲזִי: \n", 10.2. "Three kings and four commoners have no portion in the world to come:The three kings are Jeroboam, Ahab, and Manasseh. Rabbi Judah says: “Manasseh has a portion in the world to come, for it says, “He prayed to him, and He granted his prayer, and heard his plea and he restored him to Jerusalem, to his kingdom” (II Chronicles 33:13). They [the sages] said to him: “They restored him to his kingdom, but not to [his portion in] the world to come.” The four commoners are: Bilaam, Doeg, Ahitophel, and Gehazi.",
87. Seneca The Younger, Hercules Furens, 1265-1276, 1278, 1277 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 662
88. Mishnah, Nedarim, 9.1 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pharisees, in christian literature Found in books: Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 49
9.1. "רַבִּי אֱלִיעֶזֶר אוֹמֵר, פּוֹתְחִין לָאָדָם בִּכְבוֹד אָבִיו וְאִמּוֹ. וַחֲכָמִים אוֹסְרִין. אָמַר רַבִּי צָדוֹק, עַד שֶׁפּוֹתְחִין לוֹ בִכְבוֹד אָבִיו וְאִמּוֹ, יִפְתְּחוּ לוֹ בִכְבוֹד הַמָּקוֹם, אִם כֵּן אֵין נְדָרִים. וּמוֹדִים חֲכָמִים לְרַבִּי אֱלִיעֶזֶר בְּדָבָר שֶׁבֵּינוֹ לְבֵין אָבִיו וְאִמּוֹ, שֶׁפּוֹתְחִין לוֹ בִּכְבוֹד אָבִיו וְאִמּוֹ: \n", 9.1. "Rabbi Eliezer says: They release a vow [by reference] to the honor of his father and mother but the Sages forbid. Rabbi Zadok said: Instead of releasing through the honor of his father and mother, they should release [by reference] to the honor of God. If so, there would be no vows! But the Sages admit to Rabbi Eliezer that in a matter concerning himself and his father and mother one may release a vow [by reference] to the honor of his father and mother.",
89. Suetonius, Caligula, 27.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 50
90. Josephus Flavius, Against Apion, 1.37-1.38, 1.116-1.118 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pharisaic-rabbinic connection, in early christian literature •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 68; Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 660
1.37. and this is justly, or rather necessarily done, because every one is not permitted of his own accord to be a writer, nor is there any disagreement in what is written; they being only prophets that have written the original and earliest accounts of things as they learned them of God himself by inspiration; and others have written what hath happened in their own times, and that in a very distinct manner also. 8. 1.38. For we have not an innumerable multitude of books among us, disagreeing from and contradicting one another [as the Greeks have], but only twenty-two books, which contain the records of all the past times; which are justly believed to be divine; 1.116. 18. And now I shall add Meder the Ephesian, as an additional witness. This Meder wrote the Acts that were done both by the Greeks and Barbarians, under every one of the Tyrian kings; and had taken much pains to learn their history out of their own records. 1.117. Now, when he was writing about those kings that had reigned at Tyre, he came to Hirom, and says thus:—“Upon the death of Abibalus, his son Hirom took the kingdom; he lived fifty-three years, and reigned thirty-four. 1.118. He raised a bank on that called the Broad place, and dedicated that golden pillar which is in Jupiter’s temple; he also went and cut down timber from the mountain called Libanus, and got timber of cedar for the roofs of the temples. He also pulled down the old temples, and built new ones: besides this, he consecrated the temples of Hercules and Astarte.
91. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 2.163, 7.132-7.157 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pharisees, in christian literature •enemies, clemency toward ones, in early christian literature Found in books: Boustan Janssen and Roetzel (2010), Violence, Scripture, and Textual Practices in Early Judaism and Christianity, 63; Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 45
2.163. and yet allow, that to act what is right, or the contrary, is principally in the power of men, although fate does cooperate in every action. They say that all souls are incorruptible, but that the souls of good men only are removed into other bodies,—but that the souls of bad men are subject to eternal punishment. 7.132. 5. Now it is impossible to describe the multitude of the shows as they deserve, and the magnificence of them all; such indeed as a man could not easily think of as performed, either by the labor of workmen, or the variety of riches, or the rarities of nature; 7.133. for almost all such curiosities as the most happy men ever get by piecemeal were here one heaped on another, and those both admirable and costly in their nature; and all brought together on that day demonstrated the vastness of the dominions of the Romans; 7.134. for there was here to be seen a mighty quantity of silver, and gold, and ivory, contrived into all sorts of things, and did not appear as carried along in pompous show only, but, as a man may say, running along like a river. Some parts were composed of the rarest purple hangings, and so carried along; and others accurately represented to the life what was embroidered by the arts of the Babylonians. 7.135. There were also precious stones that were transparent, some set in crowns of gold, and some in other ouches, as the workmen pleased; and of these such a vast number were brought, that we could not but thence learn how vainly we imagined any of them to be rarities. 7.136. The images of the gods were also carried, being as well wonderful for their largeness, as made very artificially, and with great skill of the workmen; nor were any of these images of any other than very costly materials; and many species of animals were brought, every one in their own natural ornaments. 7.137. The men also who brought every one of these shows were great multitudes, and adorned with purple garments, all over interwoven with gold; those that were chosen for carrying these pompous shows having also about them such magnificent ornaments as were both extraordinary and surprising. 7.138. Besides these, one might see that even the great number of the captives was not unadorned, while the variety that was in their garments, and their fine texture, concealed from the sight the deformity of their bodies. 7.139. But what afforded the greatest surprise of all was the structure of the pageants that were borne along; for indeed he that met them could not but be afraid that the bearers would not be able firmly enough to support them, such was their magnitude; 7.140. for many of them were so made, that they were on three or even four stories, one above another. The magnificence also of their structure afforded one both pleasure and surprise; 7.141. for upon many of them were laid carpets of gold. There was also wrought gold and ivory fastened about them all; 7.142. and many resemblances of the war, and those in several ways, and variety of contrivances, affording a most lively portraiture of itself. 7.143. For there was to be seen a happy country laid waste, and entire squadrons of enemies slain; while some of them ran away, and some were carried into captivity; with walls of great altitude and magnitude overthrown and ruined by machines; with the strongest fortifications taken, and the walls of most populous cities upon the tops of hills seized on, 7.144. and an army pouring itself within the walls; as also every place full of slaughter, and supplications of the enemies, when they were no longer able to lift up their hands in way of opposition. Fire also sent upon temples was here represented, and houses overthrown, and falling upon their owners: 7.145. rivers also, after they came out of a large and melancholy desert, ran down, not into a land cultivated, nor as drink for men, or for cattle, but through a land still on fire upon every side; for the Jews related that such a thing they had undergone during this war. 7.146. Now the workmanship of these representations was so magnificent and lively in the construction of the things, that it exhibited what had been done to such as did not see it, as if they had been there really present. 7.147. On the top of every one of these pageants was placed the commander of the city that was taken, and the manner wherein he was taken. Moreover, there followed those pageants a great number of ships; 7.148. and for the other spoils, they were carried in great plenty. But for those that were taken in the temple of Jerusalem, they made the greatest figure of them all; that is, the golden table, of the weight of many talents; the candlestick also, that was made of gold, though its construction were now changed from that which we made use of; 7.149. for its middle shaft was fixed upon a basis, and the small branches were produced out of it to a great length, having the likeness of a trident in their position, and had every one a socket made of brass for a lamp at the tops of them. These lamps were in number seven, and represented the dignity of the number seven among the Jews; 7.150. and the last of all the spoils, was carried the Law of the Jews. 7.151. After these spoils passed by a great many men, carrying the images of Victory, whose structure was entirely either of ivory or of gold. 7.152. After which Vespasian marched in the first place, and Titus followed him; Domitian also rode along with them, and made a glorious appearance, and rode on a horse that was worthy of admiration. 7.153. 6. Now the last part of this pompous show was at the temple of Jupiter Capitolinus, whither when they were come, they stood still; for it was the Romans’ ancient custom to stay till somebody brought the news that the general of the enemy was slain. 7.154. This general was Simon, the son of Gioras, who had then been led in this triumph among the captives; a rope had also been put upon his head, and he had been drawn into a proper place in the forum, and had withal been tormented by those that drew him along; and the law of the Romans required that malefactors condemned to die should be slain there. 7.155. Accordingly, when it was related that there was an end of him, and all the people had sent up a shout for joy, they then began to offer those sacrifices which they had consecrated, in the prayers used in such solemnities; which when they had finished, they went away to the palace. 7.156. And as for some of the spectators, the emperors entertained them at their own feast; and for all the rest there were noble preparations made for their feasting at home; 7.157. for this was a festival day to the city of Rome, as celebrated for the victory obtained by their army over their enemies, for the end that was now put to their civil miseries, and for the commencement of their hopes of future prosperity and happiness.
92. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 4.108, 12.11-12.118, 13.295-13.298, 14.260, 18.14 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian, literature/authors •christian literature •pharisees, in christian literature •faith, in early christian literature Found in books: Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022), Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity, 401; Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 45, 50; Konig and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 363; König and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 363; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 229
4.108. but when the divine angel met him in the way, when he was in a narrow passage, and hedged in with a wall on both sides, the ass on which Balaam rode understood that it was a divine spirit that met him, and thrust Balaam to one of the walls, without regard to the stripes which Balaam, when he was hurt by the wall, gave her; 12.11. 1. When Alexander had reigned twelve years, and after him Ptolemy Soter forty years, Philadelphus then took the kingdom of Egypt, and held it forty years within one. He procured the law to be interpreted, and set free those that were come from Jerusalem into Egypt, and were in slavery there, who were a hundred and twenty thousand. The occasion was this: 12.12. Demetrius Phalerius, who was library keeper to the king, was now endeavoring, if it were possible, to gather together all the books that were in the habitable earth, and buying whatsoever was any where valuable, or agreeable to the king’s inclination, (who was very earnestly set upon collecting of books,) to which inclination of his Demetrius was zealously subservient. 12.13. And when once Ptolemy asked him how many ten thousands of books he had collected, he replied, that he had already about twenty times ten thousand; but that, in a little time, he should have fifty times ten thousand. 12.14. But he said he had been informed that there were many books of laws among the Jews worthy of inquiring after, and worthy of the king’s library, but which, being written in characters and in a dialect of their own, will cause no small pains in getting them translated into the Greek tongue; 12.15. that the character in which they are written seems to be like to that which is the proper character of the Syrians, and that its sound, when pronounced, is like theirs also; and that this sound appears to be peculiar to themselves. Wherefore he said that nothing hindered why they might not get those books to be translated also; for while nothing is wanting that is necessary for that purpose, we may have their books also in this library. 12.16. So the king thought that Demetrius was very zealous to procure him abundance of books, and that he suggested what was exceeding proper for him to do; and therefore he wrote to the Jewish high priest, that he should act accordingly. 12.17. 2. Now there was one Aristeus, who was among the king’s most intimate friends, and on account of his modesty very acceptable to him. This Aristeus resolved frequently, and that before now, to petition the king that he would set all the captive Jews in his kingdom free; 12.18. and he thought this to be a convenient opportunity for the making that petition. So he discoursed, in the first place, with the captains of the king’s guards, Sosibius of Tarentum, and Andreas, and persuaded them to assist him in what he was going to intercede with the king for. 12.19. Accordingly Aristeus embraced the same opinion with those that have been before mentioned, and went to the king, and made the following speech to him: 12.20. “It is not fit for us, O king, to overlook things hastily, or to deceive ourselves, but to lay the truth open. For since we have determined not only to get the laws of the Jews transcribed, but interpreted also, for thy satisfaction, by what means can we do this, while so many of the Jews are now slaves in thy kingdom? 12.21. Do thou then what will be agreeable to thy magimity, and to thy good nature: free them from the miserable condition they are in, because that God, who supporteth thy kingdom, was the author of their law 12.22. as I have learned by particular inquiry; for both these people, and we also, worship the same God the framer of all things. We call him, and that truly, by the name of Ζηνα, [or life, or Jupiter,] because he breathes life into all men. Wherefore do thou restore these men to their own country, and this do to the honor of God, because these men pay a peculiarly excellent worship to him. 12.23. And know this further, that though I be not of kin to them by birth, nor one of the same country with them, yet do I desire these favors to be done them, since all men are the workmanship of God; and I am sensible that he is well-pleased with those that do good. I do therefore put up this petition to thee, to do good to them.” 12.24. 3. When Aristeus was saying thus, the king looked upon him with a cheerful and joyful countece, and said, “How many ten thousands dost thou suppose there are of such as want to be made free?” To which Andreas replied, as he stood by, and said, “A few more than ten times ten thousand.” The king made answer, “And is this a small gift that thou askest, Aristeus?” 12.25. But Sosibius, and the rest that stood by, said that he ought to offer such a thank-offering as was worthy of his greatness of soul, to that God who had given him his kingdom. With this answer he was much pleased; and gave order, that when they paid the soldiers their wages, they should lay down [a hundred and] twenty drachmas for every one of the slaves? 12.26. And he promised to publish a magnificent decree, about what they requested, which should confirm what Aristeus had proposed, and especially what God willed should be done; whereby he said he would not only set those free who had been led away captive by his father and his army, but those who were in this kingdom before, and those also, if any such there were, who had been brought away since. 12.27. And when they said that their redemption money would amount to above four hundred talents, he granted it. A copy of which decree I have determined to preserve, that the magimity of this king may be made known. 12.28. Its contents were as follows: “Let all those who were soldiers under our father, and who, when they overran Syria and Phoenicia, and laid waste Judea, took the Jews captives, and made them slaves, and brought them into our cities, and into this country, and then sold them; as also all those that were in my kingdom before them, and if there be any that have been lately brought thither,—be made free by those that possess them; and let them accept of [a hundred and] twenty drachmas for every slave. And let the soldiers receive this redemption money with their pay, but the rest out of the king’s treasury: 12.29. for I suppose that they were made captives without our father’s consent, and against equity; and that their country was harassed by the insolence of the soldiers, and that, by removing them into Egypt, the soldiers have made a great profit by them. 12.30. Out of regard therefore to justice, and out of pity to those that have been tyrannized over, contrary to equity, I enjoin those that have such Jews in their service to set them at liberty, upon the receipt of the before-mentioned sum; and that no one use any deceit about them, but obey what is here commanded. 12.31. And I will that they give in their names within three days after the publication of this edict, to such as are appointed to execute the same, and to produce the slaves before them also, for I think it will be for the advantage of my affairs. And let every one that will inform against those that do not obey this decree, and I will that their estates be confiscated into the king’s treasury.” 12.32. When this decree was read to the king, it at first contained the rest that is here inserted, and omitted only those Jews that had formerly been brought, and those brought afterwards, which had not been distinctly mentioned; so he added these clauses out of his humanity, and with great generosity. He also gave order that the payment, which was likely to be done in a hurry, should be divided among the king’s ministers, and among the officers of his treasury. 12.33. When this was over, what the king had decreed was quickly brought to a conclusion; and this in no more than seven days’ time, the number of the talents paid for the captives being above four hundred and sixty, and this, because their masters required the [hundred and] twenty drachmas for the children also, the king having, in effect, commanded that these should be paid for, when he said in his decree, that they should receive the forementioned sum for every slave. 12.34. 4. Now when this had been done after so magnificent a manner, according to the king’s inclinations, he gave order to Demetrius to give him in writing his sentiments concerning the transcribing of the Jewish books; for no part of the administration is done rashly by these kings, but all things are managed with great circumspection. 12.35. On which account I have subjoined a copy of these epistles, and set down the multitude of the vessels sent as gifts [to Jerusalem], and the construction of every one, that the exactness of the artificers’ workmanship, as it appeared to those that saw them, and which workman made every vessel, may be made manifest, and this on account of the excellency of the vessels themselves. Now the copy of the epistle was to this purpose: 12.36. “Demetrius to the great king. When thou, O king, gavest me a charge concerning the collection of books that were wanting to fill your library, and concerning the care that ought to be taken about such as are imperfect, I have used the utmost diligence about those matters. And I let you know, that we want the books of the Jewish legislation, with some others; for they are written in the Hebrew characters, and being in the language of that nation, are to us unknown. 12.37. It hath also happened to them, that they have been transcribed more carelessly than they ought to have been, because they have not had hitherto royal care taken about them. Now it is necessary that thou shouldst have accurate copies of them. And indeed this legislation is full of hidden wisdom, and entirely blameless, as being the legislation of God; 12.38. for which cause it is, as Hecateus of Abdera says, that the poets and historians make no mention of it, nor of those men who lead their lives according to it, since it is a holy law, and ought not to be published by profane mouths. 12.39. If then it please thee, O king, thou mayest write to the high priest of the Jews, to send six of the elders out of every tribe, and those such as are most skillful of the laws, that by their means we may learn the clear and agreeing sense of these books, and may obtain an accurate interpretation of their contents, and so may have such a collection of these as may be suitable to thy desire.” 12.40. 5. When this epistle was sent to the king, he commanded that an epistle should be drawn up for Eleazar, the Jewish high priest, concerning these matters; and that they should inform him of the release of the Jews that had been in slavery among them. He also sent fifty talents of gold for the making of large basons, and vials, and cups, and an immense quantity of precious stones. 12.41. He also gave order to those who had the custody of the chest that contained those stones, to give the artificers leave to choose out what sorts of them they pleased. He withal appointed, that a hundred talents in money should be sent to the temple for sacrifices, and for other uses. 12.42. Now I will give a description of these vessels, and the manner of their construction, but not till after I have set down a copy of the epistle which was written to Eleazar the high priest, who had obtained that dignity on the occasion following: 12.43. When Onias the high priest was dead, his son Simon became his successor. He was called Simon the Just because of both his piety towards God, and his kind disposition to those of his own nation. 12.44. When he was dead, and had left a young son, who was called Onias, Simon’s brother Eleazar, of whom we are speaking, took the high priesthood; and he it was to whom Ptolemy wrote, and that in the manner following: 12.45. “King Ptolemy to Eleazar the high priest, sendeth greeting. There are many Jews who now dwell in my kingdom, whom the Persians, when they were in power, carried captives. These were honored by my father; some of them he placed in the army, and gave them greater pay than ordinary; to others of them, when they came with him into Egypt, he committed his garrisons, and the guarding of them, that they might be a terror to the Egyptians. 12.46. And when I had taken the government, I treated all men with humanity, and especially those that are thy fellow citizens, of whom I have set free above a hundred thousand that were slaves, and paid the price of their redemption to their masters out of my own revenues; 12.47. and those that are of a fit age, I have admitted into them number of my soldiers. And for such as are capable of being faithful to me, and proper for my court, I have put them in such a post, as thinking this [kindness done to them] to be a very great and an acceptable gift, which I devote to God for his providence over me. 12.48. And as I am desirous to do what will be grateful to these, and to all the other Jews in the habitable earth, I have determined to procure an interpretation of your law, and to have it translated out of Hebrew into Greek, and to be deposited in my library. 12.49. Thou wilt therefore do well to choose out and send to me men of a good character, who are now elders in age, and six in number out of every tribe. These, by their age, must be skillful in the laws, and of abilities to make an accurate interpretation of them; and when this shall be finished, I shall think that I have done a work glorious to myself. 12.50. And I have sent to thee Andreas, the captain of my guard, and Aristeus, men whom I have in very great esteem; by whom I have sent those first-fruits which I have dedicated to the temple, and to the sacrifices, and to other uses, to the value of a hundred talents. And if thou wilt send to us, to let us know what thou wouldst have further, thou wilt do a thing acceptable to me.” 12.51. 6. When this epistle of the king was brought to Eleazar, he wrote an answer to it with all the respect possible: “Eleazar the high priest to king Ptolemy, sendeth greeting. If thou and thy queen Arsinoe, and thy children, be well, we are entirely satisfied. 12.52. When we received thy epistle, we greatly rejoiced at thy intentions; and when the multitude were gathered together, we read it to them, and thereby made them sensible of the piety thou hast towards God. 12.53. We also showed them the twenty vials of gold, and thirty of silver, and the five large basons, and the table for the shew-bread; as also the hundred talents for the sacrifices, and for the making what shall be needful at the temple; which things Andreas and Aristeus, those most honored friends of thine, have brought us; and truly they are persons of an excellent character, and of great learning, and worthy of thy virtue. 12.54. Know then that we will gratify thee in what is for thy advantage, though we do what we used not to do before; for we ought to make a return for the numerous acts of kindness which thou hast done to our countrymen. 12.55. We immediately, therefore, offered sacrifices for thee and thy sister, with thy children and friends; and the multitude made prayers, that thy affairs may be to thy mind, and that thy kingdom may be preserved in peace, and that the translation of our law may come to the conclusion thou desirest, and be for thy advantage. 12.56. We have also chosen six elders out of every tribe, whom we have sent, and the law with them. It will be thy part, out of thy piety and justice, to send back the law, when it hath been translated, and to return those to us that bring it in safety. Farewell.” 12.57. 7. This was the reply which the high priest made. But it does not seem to me to be necessary to set down the names of the seventy [two] elders who were sent by Eleazar, and carried the law, which yet were subjoined at the end of the epistle. 12.58. However, I thought it not improper to give an account of those very valuable and artificially contrived vessels which the king sent to God, that all may see how great a regard the king had for God; for the king allowed a vast deal of expenses for these vessels, and came often to the workmen, and viewed their works, and suffered nothing of carelessness or negligence to be any damage to their operations. 12.59. And I will relate how rich they were as well as I am able, although perhaps the nature of this history may not require such a description; but I imagine I shall thereby recommend the elegant taste and magimity of this king to those that read this history. 12.60. 8. And first I will describe what belongs to the table. It was indeed in the king’s mind to make this table vastly large in its dimensions; but then he gave orders that they should learn what was the magnitude of the table which was already at Jerusalem, and how large it was, and whether there was a possibility of making one larger than it. 12.61. And when he was informed how large that was which was already there, and that nothing hindered but a larger might be made, he said that he was willing to have one made that should be five times as large as the present table; but his fear was, that it might be then useless in their sacred ministrations by its too great largeness; for he desired that the gifts he presented them should not only be there for show, but should be useful also in their sacred ministrations. 12.62. According to which reasoning, that the former table was made of so moderate a size for use, and not for want of gold, he resolved that he would not exceed the former table in largeness; but would make it exceed it in the variety and elegancy of its materials. 12.63. And as he was sagacious in observing the nature of all things, and in having a just notion of what was new and surprising, and where there was no sculptures, he would invent such as were proper by his own skill, and would show them to the workmen, he commanded that such sculptures should now be made, and that those which were delineated should be most accurately formed by a constant regard to their delineation. 12.64. 9. When therefore the workmen had undertaken to make the table, they framed it in length two cubits [and a half], in breadth one cubit, and in height one cubit and a half; and the entire structure of the work was of gold. They withal made a crown of a hand-breadth round it, with wave-work wreathed about it, and with an engraving which imitated a cord, and was admirably turned on its three parts; 12.65. for as they were of a triangular figure, every angle had the same disposition of its sculptures, that when you turned them about, the very same form of them was turned about without any variation. Now that part of the crown-work that was enclosed under the table had its sculptures very beautiful; but that part which went round on the outside was more elaborately adorned with most beautiful ornaments, because it was exposed to sight, and to the view of the spectators; 12.66. for which reason it was that both those sides which were extant above the rest were acute, and none of the angles, which we before told you were three, appeared less than another, when the table was turned about. Now into the cordwork thus turned were precious stones inserted, in rows parallel one to the other, enclosed in golden buttons, which had ouches in them; 12.67. but the parts which were on the side of the crown, and were exposed to the sight, were adorned with a row of oval figures obliquely placed, of the most excellent sort of precious stones, which imitated rods laid close, and encompassed the table round about. 12.68. But under these oval figures, thus engraven, the workmen had put a crown all round it, where the nature of all sorts of fruit was represented, insomuch that the bunches of grapes hung up. And when they had made the stones to represent all the kinds of fruit before mentioned, and that each in its proper color, they made them fast with gold round the whole table. 12.69. The like disposition of the oval figures, and of the engraved rods, was framed under the crown, that the table might on each side show the same appearance of variety and elegancy of its ornaments; so that neither the position of the wave-work nor of the crown might be different, although the table were turned on the other side, but that the prospect of the same artificial contrivances might be extended as far as the feet; 12.70. for there was made a plate of gold four fingers broad, through the entire breadth of the table, into which they inserted the feet, and then fastened them to the table by buttons and button-holes, at the place where the crown was situate, that so on what side soever of the table one should stand, it might exhibit the very same view of the exquisite workmanship, and of the vast expenses bestowed upon it: 12.71. but upon the table itself they engraved a meander, inserting into it very valuable stones in the middle like stars, of various colors; the carbuncle and the emerald, each of which sent out agreeable rays of light to the spectators; with such stones of other sorts also as were most curious and best esteemed, as being most precious in their kind. 12.72. Hard by this meander a texture of net-work ran round it, the middle of which appeared like a rhombus, into which were inserted rock-crystal and amber, which, by the great resemblance of the appearance they made, gave wonderful delight to those that saw them. 12.73. The chapiters of the feet imitated the first buddings of lilies, while their leaves were bent and laid under the table, but so that the chives were seen standing upright within them. 12.74. Their bases were made of a carbuncle; and the place at the bottom, which rested on that carbuncle, was one palm deep, and eight fingers in breadth. 12.75. Now they had engraven upon it with a very fine tool, and with a great deal of pains, a branch of ivy and tendrils of the vine, sending forth clusters of grapes, that you would guess they were nowise different from real tendrils; for they were so very thin, and so very far extended at their extremities, that they were moved with the wind, and made one believe that they were the product of nature, and not the representation of art. 12.76. They also made the entire workmanship of the table appear to be threefold, while the joints of the several parts were so united together as to be invisible, and the places where they joined could not be distinguished. Now the thickness of the table was not less than half a cubit. 12.77. So that this gift, by the king’s great generosity, by the great value of the materials, and the variety of its exquisite structure, and the artificer’s skill in imitating nature with graying tools, was at length brought to perfection, while the king was very desirous, that though in largeness it were not to be different from that which was already dedicated to God, yet that in exquisite workmanship, and the novelty of the contrivances, and in the splendor of its construction, it should far exceed it, and be more illustrious than that was. 12.78. 10. Now of the cisterns of gold there were two, whose sculpture was of scale-work, from its basis to its belt-like circle, with various sorts of stones enchased in the spiral circles. 12.79. Next to which there was upon it a meander of a cubit in height; it was composed of stones of all sorts of colors. And next to this was the rod-work engraven; and next to that was a rhombus in a texture of net-work, drawn out to the brim of the basin, 12.80. while small shields, made of stones, beautiful in their kind, and of four fingers’ depth, filled up the middle parts. About the top of the basin were wreathed the leaves of lilies, and of the convolvulus, and the tendrils of vines in a circular manner. 12.81. And this was the construction of the two cisterns of gold, each containing two firkins. But those which were of silver were much more bright and splendid than looking-glasses, and you might in them see the images that fell upon them more plainly than in the other. 12.82. The king also ordered thirty vials; those of which the parts that were of gold, and filled up with precious stones, were shadowed over with the leaves of ivy and of vines, artificially engraven. 12.83. And these were the vessels that were after an extraordinary manner brought to this perfection, partly by the skill of the workmen, who were admirable in such fine work, but much more by the diligence and generosity of the king, 12.84. who not only supplied the artificers abundantly, and with great generosity, with what they wanted, but he forbade public audiences for the time, and came and stood by the workmen, and saw the whole operation. And this was the cause why the workmen were so accurate in their performance, because they had regard to the king, and to his great concern about the vessels, and so the more indefatigably kept close to the work. 12.85. 11. And these were what gifts were sent by Ptolemy to Jerusalem, and dedicated to God there. But when Eleazar the high priest had devoted them to God, and had paid due respect to those that brought them, and had given them presents to be carried to the king, he dismissed them. 12.86. And when they were come to Alexandria, and Ptolemy heard that they were come, and that the seventy elders were come also, he presently sent for Andreas and Aristens, his ambassadors, who came to him, and delivered him the epistle which they brought him from the high priest, and made answer to all the questions he put to them by word of mouth. 12.87. He then made haste to meet the elders that came from Jerusalem for the interpretation of the laws; and he gave command, that every body who came on other occasions should be sent away, which was a thing surprising, and what he did not use to do; 12.88. for those that were drawn thither upon such occasions used to come to him on the fifth day, but ambassadors at the month’s end. But when he had sent those away, he waited for these that were sent by Eleazar; 12.89. but as the old men came in with the presents, which the high priest had given them to bring to the king, and with the membranes, upon which they had their laws written in golden letters he put questions to them concerning those books; 12.90. and when they had taken off the covers wherein they were wrapt up, they showed him the membranes. So the king stood admiring the thinness of those membranes, and the exactness of the junctures, which could not be perceived; (so exactly were they connected one with another;) and this he did for a considerable time. He then said that he returned them thanks for coming to him, and still greater thanks to him that sent them; and, above all, to that God whose laws they appeared to be. 12.91. Then did the elders, and those that were present with them, cry out with one voice, and wished all happiness to the king. Upon which he fell into tears by the violence of the pleasure he had, it being natural to men to afford the same indications in great joy that they do under sorrows. 12.92. And when he had bid them deliver the books to those that were appointed to receive them, he saluted the men, and said that it was but just to discourse, in the first place, of the errand they were sent about, and then to address himself to themselves. He promised, however, that he would make this day on which they came to him remarkable and eminent every year through the whole course of his life; 12.93. for their coming to him, and the victory which he gained over Antigonus by sea, proved to be on the very same day. He also gave orders that they should sup with him; and gave it in charge that they should have excellent lodgings provided for them in the upper part of the city. 12.94. 12. Now he that was appointed to take care of the reception of strangers, Nicanor by name, called for Dorotheus, whose duty it was to make provision for them, and bid him prepare for every one of them what should be requisite for their diet and way of living; which thing was ordered by the king after this manner: 12.95. he took care that those that belonged to every city, which did not use the same way of living, that all things should be prepared for them according to the custom of those that came to him, that, being feasted according to the usual method of their own way of living, they might be the better pleased, and might not be uneasy at any thing done to them from which they were naturally averse. And this was now done in the case of these men by Dorotheus, who was put into this office because of his great skill in such matters belonging to common life; 12.96. for he took care of all such matters as concerned the reception of strangers, and appointed them double seats for them to sit on, according as the king had commanded him to do; for he had commanded that half of their seats should be set at his right hand, and the other half behind his table, and took care that no respect should be omitted that could be shown them. 12.97. And when they were thus set down, he bid Dorotheus to minister to all those that were come to him from Judea, after the manner they used to be ministered to; for which cause he sent away their sacred heralds, and those that slew the sacrifices, and the rest that used to say grace; but called to one of those that were come to him, whose name was Eleazar, who w a priest, and desired him to say grace; 12.98. who then stood in the midst of them, and prayed, that all prosperity might attend the king, and those that were his subjects. Upon which an acclamation was made by the whole company, with joy and a great noise; and when that was over, they fell to eating their supper, and to the enjoyment of what was set before them. 12.99. And at a little interval afterward, when the king thought a sufficient time had been interposed, he began to talk philosophically to them, and he asked every one of them a philosophical question and such a one as might give light in those inquiries; and when they had explained all the problems that had been proposed by the king about every point, he was well-pleased with their answers. This took up the twelve days in which they were treated; 12.100. and he that pleases may learn the particular questions in that book of Aristeus, which he wrote on this very occasion. 12.101. 13. And while not the king only, but the philosopher Menedemus also, admired them, and said that all things were governed by Providence, and that it was probable that thence it was that such force or beauty was discovered in these men’s words, they then left off asking any more such questions. 12.102. But the king said that he had gained very great advantages by their coming, for that he had received this profit from them, that he had learned how he ought to rule his subjects. And he gave order that they should have every one three talents given them, and that those that were to conduct them to their lodging should do it. 12.103. Accordingly, when three days were over, Demetrius took them, and went over the causeway seven furlongs long: it was a bank in the sea to an island. And when they had gone over the bridge, he proceeded to the northern parts, and showed them where they should meet, which was in a house that was built near the shore, and was a quiet place, and fit for their discoursing together about their work. 12.104. When he had brought them thither, he entreated them (now they had all things about them which they wanted for the interpretation of their law) that they would suffer nothing to interrupt them in their work. Accordingly, they made an accurate interpretation, with great zeal and great pains, and this they continued to do till the ninth hour of the day; 12.105. after which time they relaxed, and took care of their body, while their food was provided for them in great plenty: besides, Dorotheus, at the king’s command, brought them a great deal of what was provided for the king himself. 12.106. But in the morning they came to the court and saluted Ptolemy, and then went away to their former place, where, when they had washed their hands, and purified themselves, they betook themselves to the interpretation of the laws. 12.107. Now when the law was transcribed, and the labor of interpretation was over, which came to its conclusion in seventy-two days, Demetrius gathered all the Jews together to the place where the laws were translated, and where the interpreters were, and read them over. 12.108. The multitude did also approve of those elders that were the interpreters of the law. They withal commended Demetrius for his proposal, as the inventor of what was greatly for their happiness; and they desired that he would give leave to their rulers also to read the law. Moreover, they all, both the priest and the ancientest of the elders, and the principal men of their commonwealth, made it their request, that since the interpretation was happily finished, it might continue in the state it now was, and might not be altered. 12.109. And when they all commended that determination of theirs, they enjoined, that if any one observed either any thing superfluous, or any thing omitted, that he would take a view of it again, and have it laid before them, and corrected; which was a wise action of theirs, that when the thing was judged to have been well done, it might continue for ever. 12.110. 14. So the king rejoiced when he saw that his design of this nature was brought to perfection, to so great advantage; and he was chiefly delighted with hearing the Laws read to him; and was astonished at the deep meaning and wisdom of the legislator. And he began to discourse with Demetrius, “How it came to pass, that when this legislation was so wonderful, no one, either of the poets or of the historians, had made mention of it.” 12.111. Demetrius made answer, “that no one durst be so bold as to touch upon the description of these laws, because they were divine and venerable, and because some that had attempted it were afflicted by God.” 12.112. He also told him, that “Theopompus was desirous of writing somewhat about them, but was thereupon disturbed in his mind for above thirty days’ time; and upon some intermission of his distemper, he appeased God [by prayer], as suspecting that his madness proceeded from that cause.” Nay, indeed, he further saw in a dream, that his distemper befell him while he indulged too great a curiosity about divine matters, and was desirous of publishing them among common men; but when he left off that attempt, he recovered his understanding again. 12.113. Moreover, he informed him of Theodectes, the tragic poet, concerning whom it was reported, that when in a certain dramatic representation he was desirous to make mention of things that were contained in the sacred books, he was afflicted with a darkness in his eyes; and that upon his being conscious of the occasion of his distemper, and appeasing God (by prayer), he was freed from that affliction. 12.114. 15. And when the king had received these books from Demetrius, as we have said already, he adored them, and gave order that great care should be taken of them, that they might remain uncorrupted. He also desired that the interpreters would come often to him out of Judea, 12.115. and that both on account of the respects that he would pay them, and on account of the presents he would make them; for he said it was now but just to send them away, although if, of their own accord, they would come to him hereafter, they should obtain all that their own wisdom might justly require, and what his generosity was able to give them. 12.116. So he then sent them away, and gave to every one of them three garments of the best sort, and two talents of gold, and a cup of the value of one talent, and the furniture of the room wherein they were feasted. And these were the things he presented to them. 12.117. But by them he sent to Eleazar the high priest ten beds, with feet of silver, and the furniture to them belonging, and a cup of the value of thirty talents; and besides these, ten garments, and purple, and a very beautiful crown, and a hundred pieces of the finest woven linen; as also vials and dishes, and vessels for pouring, and two golden cisterns to be dedicated to God. 12.118. He also desired him, by an epistle, that he would give these interpreters leave, if any of them were desirous of coming to him, because he highly valued a conversation with men of such learning, and should be very willing to lay out his wealth upon such men. And this was what came to the Jews, and was much to their glory and honor, from Ptolemy Philadelphus. 13.295. At this gentle sentence, Hyrcanus was very angry, and thought that this man reproached him by their approbation. It was this Jonathan who chiefly irritated him, and influenced him so far, 13.296. that he made him leave the party of the Pharisees, and abolish the decrees they had imposed on the people, and to punish those that observed them. From this source arose that hatred which he and his sons met with from the multitude: 13.297. but of these matters we shall speak hereafter. What I would now explain is this, that the Pharisees have delivered to the people a great many observances by succession from their fathers, which are not written in the laws of Moses; and for that reason it is that the Sadducees reject them, and say that we are to esteem those observances to be obligatory which are in the written word, but are not to observe what are derived from the tradition of our forefathers. 13.298. And concerning these things it is that great disputes and differences have arisen among them, while the Sadducees are able to persuade none but the rich, and have not the populace obsequious to them, but the Pharisees have the multitude on their side. But about these two sects, and that of the Essenes, I have treated accurately in the second book of Jewish affairs. 14.260. and desired of the people, that upon the restitution of their law and their liberty, by the senate and people of Rome, they may assemble together, according to their ancient legal custom, and that we will not bring any suit against them about it; and that a place may be given them where they may have their congregations, with their wives and children, and may offer, as did their forefathers, their prayers and sacrifices to God. 18.14. They also believe that souls have an immortal rigor in them, and that under the earth there will be rewards or punishments, according as they have lived virtuously or viciously in this life; and the latter are to be detained in an everlasting prison, but that the former shall have power to revive and live again;
93. Clement of Rome, 1 Clement, 1.1456, 5.6-5.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pharisaic-rabbinic connection, in early christian literature •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 69; Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 666
5.6. ἑπτάκις δεσμὰ φορέσας, φυγαδευθείς, λιθασθείς, κήρυξ γενόμενος ἔν τε τῇ ἀνατολῇ καὶ ἐν τῇ δύσει, τὸ γενναῖον τῆς πίστεως αὐτοῦ κλέος ἔλαβεν, 5.7. δικαιοσύνην διδάξας ὅλον τὸν κόσμον, καὶ ἐπὶ τὸ τέρμα τῆς δύσεως ἐλθὼν καὶ μαρτυρήσας ἐπὶ τῶν ἡγουμένων, οὕτως ἀπηλλάγη τοῦ κόσμου καὶ εἰς τὸν ἅγιον τόπον ἀνελήμφθη, So SLK, e)poreu/qh AC probably from v. 4. ὑπομονῆς γενόμενος μέγιστος ὑπογραμμός.
94. Tosefta, Berachot, 5.26-5.27 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pharisees, in christian literature Found in books: Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 48
5.26. "ב\"ש אומרים נוטלין לידים ואח\"כ מוזגין את הכוס שאם אתה אומר מוזגין תחלה [את הכוס] שמא נטמאו משקין שבאחורי הכוס מחמת ידיו ויחזרו ויטמאו את הכוס וב\"ה אומרים אחורי הכוס לעולם טמאין [דבר אחר אין נטילת ידים אלא סמוך לסעודה].", 5.27. "מוזגין את הכוס ואח\"כ נוטלין לידים שאם אתה אומר נוטלין תחלה שמא יטמאו משקין של ידים מחמת הכוס ויחזרו ויטמאו את הידים אלא מוזגין את הכוס ואח\"כ נוטלין לידים.",
95. Tosefta, Sotah, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 788
96. Xenophon of Ephesus, The Ephesian Story of Anthica And Habrocomes, 2.13, 3.8, 4.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian literature, acts of paul and thekla Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 67
97. Plutarch, On The Fortune Or Virtue of Alexander The Great, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 661
98. Heraclitus of Ephesus (Attributed Author), Letters, 4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 660
99. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, a b c d\n0 2.4.7 2.4.7 2 4\n1 '2.4.8 '2.4.8 '2 4\n2 2.4.8 2.4.8 2 4\n3 2.7.7 2.7.7 2 7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 661
2.4.7. ἀδικουμένης δὲ τῆς χώρας, ἕνα τῶν ἀστῶν παῖδα οἱ Θηβαῖοι κατὰ μῆνα προετίθεσαν αὐτῇ, πολλοὺς ἁρπαξούσῃ, 5 -- τοῦτʼ εἰ μὴ γένοιτο. ἀπαλλαγεὶς οὖν Ἀμφιτρύων εἰς Ἀθήνας πρὸς Κέφαλον τὸν Δηιονέως, συνέπειθεν ἐπὶ μέρει τῶν ἀπὸ Τηλεβοῶν λαφύρων ἄγειν ἐπὶ τὴν θήραν τὸν κύνα ὃν Πρόκρις ἤγαγεν ἐκ Κρήτης παρὰ Μίνωος λαβοῦσα· ἦν δὲ καὶ τούτῳ πεπρωμένον πᾶν, ὅ τι ἂν διώκῃ, λαμβάνειν. διωκομένης οὖν ὑπὸ τοῦ κυνὸς τῆς ἀλώπεκος, Ζεὺς ἀμφοτέρους λίθους ἐποίησεν. Ἀμφιτρύων δὲ ἔχων ἐκ μὲν Θορικοῦ τῆς Ἀττικῆς Κέφαλον συμμαχοῦντα, ἐκ δὲ Φωκέων Πανοπέα, ἐκ δὲ Ἕλους 1 -- τῆς Ἀργείας Ἕλειον τὸν Περσέως, ἐκ δὲ Θηβῶν Κρέοντα, τὰς τῶν Ταφίων νήσους ἐπόρθει. ἄχρι μὲν οὖν ἔζη Πτερέλαος, οὐκ ἐδύνατο τὴν Τάφον ἑλεῖν· ὡς δὲ ἡ Πτερελάου θυγάτηρ Κομαιθὼ ἐρασθεῖσα Ἀμφιτρύωνος τὴν χρυσῆν τρίχα τοῦ πατρὸς ἐκ τῆς κεφαλῆς ἐξείλετο, Πτερελάου τελευτήσαντος ἐχειρώσατο τὰς νήσους ἁπάσας. τὴν μὲν οὖν Κομαιθὼ κτείνει 2 -- Ἀμφιτρύων καὶ τὴν λείαν ἔχων εἰς Θήβας ἔπλει, καὶ τὰς νήσους Ἑλείῳ καὶ Κεφάλῳ δίδωσι. κἀκεῖνοι πόλεις αὐτῶν ἐπωνύμους κτίσαντες κατῴκησαν.
100. Seneca The Younger, Hercules Oetaeus, '1027, '1462, '1476, '1977, '1988, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1134, 1135, 1136, 1137, 1138, 1139, 1140, 1141, 1142, 1143, 1144, 1145, 1146, 1147, 1148, 1149, 1150, 1151, 1152, 1153, 1154, 1155, 1156, 1157, 1158, 1159, 1160, 1161, 1162, 1163, 1164, 1165, 1166, 1167, 1168, 1169, 1170, 1171, 1172, 1173, 1174, 1175, 1176, 1177, 1178, 1179, 1180, 1181, 1182, 1183, 1184, 1185, 1186, 1187, 1188, 1189, 1190, 1191, 1192, 1193, 1194, 1195, 1196, 1197, 1198, 1199, 1200, 1201, 1202, 1203, 1204, 1205, 1206, 1207, 1208, 1209, 1210, 1211, 1212, 1213, 1214, 1215, 1216, 1217, 1218, 1219, 1220, 1221, 1222, 1223, 1224, 1225, 1226, 1227, 1228, 1229, 1230, 1231, 1232, 1233, 1234, 1235, 1236, 1237, 1238, 1239, 1240, 1241, 1242, 1243, 1244, 1245, 1246, 1247, 1248, 1249, 1250, 1251, 1252, 1253, 1254, 1255, 1256, 1257, 1258, 1259, 1260, 1261, 1262, 1263, 1264, 1265, 1266, 1267, 1268, 1269, 1270, 1271, 1272, 1273, 1274, 1275, 1276, 1277, 1278, 1279, 1280, 1281, 1282, 1283, 1284, 1285, 1286, 1287, 1288, 1289, 1290, 1291, 1292, 1293, 1294, 1295, 1296, 1297, 1298, 1299, 1300, 1301, 1302, 1303, 1304, 1305, 1306, 1307, 1308, 1309, 1310, 1311, 1312, 1313, 1314, 1315, 1316, 1317, 1318, 1319, 1320, 1321, 1322, 1323, 1324, 1325, 1326, 1327, 1328, 1329, 1330, 1331, 1332, 1333, 1334, 1335, 1336, 1337, 1338, 1339, 1340, 1341, 1342, 1343, 1344, 1345, 1346, 1347, 1348, 1349, 1350, 1351, 1352, 1353, 1354, 1355, 1356, 1357, 1358, 1359, 1360, 1361, 1362, 1363, 1364, 1365, 1366, 1367, 1368, 1369, 1370, 1371, 1372, 1373, 1374, 1375, 1376, 1377, 1378, 1379, 1380, 1381, 1382, 1383, 1384, 1385, 1386, 1387, 1388, 1389, 1390, 1391, 1392, 1393, 1394, 1395, 1396, 1397, 1398, 1399, 1400, 1401, 1402, 1403, 1404, 1405, 1406, 1407, 1408, 1409, 1410, 1411, 1412, 1413, 1414, 1415, 1416, 1417, 1418, 1419, 1420, 1421, 1422, 1423, 1424, 1425, 1426, 1427, 1428, 1429, 1430, 1431, 1432, 1433, 1434, 1435, 1436, 1437, 1438, 1439, 1440, 1441, 1442, 1443, 1444, 1445, 1446, 1447, 1448, 1449, 1450, 1451, 1452, 1453, 1454, 1455, 1456, 1457, 1458, 1459, 1460, 1461, 1462, 1463, 1464, 1465, 1466, 1467, 1468, 1469, 1470, 1471, 1472, 1473, 1474, 1475, 1476, 1477, 1478, 1479, 1480, 1481, 1482, 1483, 1484, 1485, 1486, 1487, 1488, 1489, 1490, 1491, 1492, 1493, 1494, 1495, 1496, 1497, 1498, 1499, 1500, 1501, 1502, 1503, 1504, 1505, 1506, 1507, 1508, 1509, 1510, 1511, 1512, 1513, 1514, 1515, 1516, 1517, 1518, 1519, 1520, 1521, 1522, 1523, 1524, 1525, 1526, 1527, 1528, 1529, 1530, 1531, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1535, 1536, 1537, 1538, 1539, 1540, 1541, 1542, 1543, 1544, 1545, 1546, 1547, 1548, 1549, 1550, 1551, 1552, 1553, 1554, 1555, 1556, 1557, 1558, 1559, 1560, 1561, 1562, 1563, 1564, 1565, 1566, 1567, 1568, 1569, 1570, 1571, 1572, 1573, 1574, 1575, 1576, 1577, 1578, 1579, 1580, 1581, 1582, 1583, 1584, 1585, 1586, 1587, 1588, 1589, 1590, 1591, 1592, 1593, 1594, 1595, 1596, 1597, 1598, 1599, 1600, 1601, 1602, 1603, 1604, 1605, 1606, 1607, 1608, 1609, 1610, 1611, 1612, 1613, 1614, 1615, 1616, 1617, 1618, 1619, 1620, 1621, 1622, 1623, 1624, 1625, 1626, 1627, 1628, 1629, 1630, 1631, 1632, 1633, 1634, 1635, 1636, 1637, 1638, 1639, 1640, 1641, 1642, 1643, 1644, 1645, 1646, 1647, 1648, 1649, 1650, 1651, 1652, 1653, 1654, 1655, 1656, 1657, 1658, 1659, 1660, 1661, 1662, 1663, 1664, 1665, 1666, 1667, 1668, 1669, 1670, 1671, 1672, 1673, 1674, 1675, 1676, 1677, 1678, 1679, 1680, 1681, 1682, 1683, 1684, 1685, 1686, 1687, 1688, 1689, 1690, 1691, 1692, 1693, 1694, 1695, 1696, 1697, 1698, 1699, 1700, 1701, 1702, 1703, 1704, 1705, 1706, 1707, 1708, 1709, 1710, 1711, 1712, 1713, 1714, 1715, 1716, 1717, 1718, 1719, 1720, 1721, 1722, 1723, 1724, 1725, 1726, 1727, 1728, 1729, 1730, 1731, 1732, 1733, 1734, 1735, 1736, 1737, 1738, 1739, 1740, 1741, 1742, 1743, 1744, 1745, 1746, 1747, 1748, 1749, 1750, 1751, 1752, 1753, 1754, 1755, 1756, 1757, 1758, 1759, 1760, 1761, 1762, 1763, 1764, 1765, 1766, 1767, 1768, 1769, 1770, 1771, 1772, 1773, 1774, 1775, 1776, 1777, 1778, 1779, 1780, 1781, 1782, 1783, 1784, 1785, 1786, 1787, 1788, 1789, 1790, 1791, 1792, 1793, 1794, 1795, 1796, 1797, 1798, 1799, 1800, 1801, 1802, 1803, 1804, 1805, 1806, 1807, 1808, 1809, 1810, 1811, 1812, 1813, 1814, 1815, 1816, 1817, 1818, 1819, 1820, 1821, 1822, 1823, 1824, 1825, 1826, 1827, 1828, 1829, 1830, 1831, 1832, 1833, 1834, 1835, 1836, 1837, 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842, 1843, 1844, 1845, 1846, 1847, 1848, 1849, 1850, 1851, 1852, 1853, 1854, 1855, 1856, 1857, 1858, 1859, 1860, 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, 1865, 1866, 1867, 1868, 1869, 1870, 1871, 1872, 1873, 1874, 1875, 1876, 1877, 1878, 1879, 1881, 1882, 1883, 1884, 1885, 1886, 1887, 1888, 1889, 1890, 1891, 1892, 1893, 1894, 1895, 1896, 1897, 1898, 1899, 1900, 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918, 1919, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1880 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 661
101. Mishnah, Avot, 1.1-1.2, 4.4 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pharisees, in christian literature •amoraic literature, shaped by christian discourse Found in books: Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg (2023), Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity, 416; Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 48
1.1. "משֶׁה קִבֵּל תּוֹרָה מִסִּינַי, וּמְסָרָהּ לִיהוֹשֻׁעַ, וִיהוֹשֻׁעַ לִזְקֵנִים, וּזְקֵנִים לִנְבִיאִים, וּנְבִיאִים מְסָרוּהָ לְאַנְשֵׁי כְנֶסֶת הַגְּדוֹלָה. הֵם אָמְרוּ שְׁלשָׁה דְבָרִים, הֱווּ מְתוּנִים בַּדִּין, וְהַעֲמִידוּ תַלְמִידִים הַרְבֵּה, וַעֲשׂוּ סְיָג לַתּוֹרָה: \n", 1.2. "שִׁמְעוֹן הַצַּדִּיק הָיָה מִשְּׁיָרֵי כְנֶסֶת הַגְּדוֹלָה. הוּא הָיָה אוֹמֵר, עַל שְׁלשָׁה דְבָרִים הָעוֹלָם עוֹמֵד, עַל הַתּוֹרָה וְעַל הָעֲבוֹדָה וְעַל גְּמִילוּת חֲסָדִים: \n", 4.4. "רַבִּי לְוִיטָס אִישׁ יַבְנֶה אוֹמֵר, מְאֹד מְאֹד הֱוֵי שְׁפַל רוּחַ, שֶׁתִּקְוַת אֱנוֹשׁ רִמָּה. רַבִּי יוֹחָנָן בֶּן בְּרוֹקָא אוֹמֵר, כָּל הַמְחַלֵּל שֵׁם שָׁמַיִם בַּסֵּתֶר, נִפְרָעִין מִמֶּנּוּ בְגָלוּי. אֶחָד שׁוֹגֵג וְאֶחָד מֵזִיד בְּחִלּוּל הַשֵּׁם: \n", 1.1. "Moses received the torah at Sinai and transmitted it to Joshua, Joshua to the elders, and the elders to the prophets, and the prophets to the Men of the Great Assembly. They said three things: Be patient in [the administration of] justice, raise many disciples and make a fence round the Torah.", 1.2. "Shimon the Righteous was one of the last of the men of the great assembly. He used to say: the world stands upon three things: the Torah, the Temple service, and the practice of acts of piety.", 4.4. "Rabbi Levitas a man of Yavneh said: be exceeding humble spirit, for the end of man is the worm. Rabbi Yoha ben Berokah said: whoever profanes the name of heaven in secret, he shall be punished in the open. Unwittingly or wittingly, it is all one in profaning the name.",
102. Mishnah, Bava Qamma, 8.1 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •festivals, non-christian, in early christian literature Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 47
8.1. "הַחוֹבֵל בַּחֲבֵרוֹ חַיָּב עָלָיו מִשּׁוּם חֲמִשָּׁה דְבָרִים, בְּנֶזֶק, בְּצַעַר, בְּרִפּוּי, בְּשֶׁבֶת, וּבְבֹשֶׁת. בְּנֶזֶק כֵּיצַד. סִמָּא אֶת עֵינוֹ, קָטַע אֶת יָדוֹ, שִׁבֵּר אֶת רַגְלוֹ, רוֹאִין אוֹתוֹ כְּאִלּוּ הוּא עֶבֶד נִמְכָּר בַּשּׁוּק וְשָׁמִין כַּמָּה הָיָה יָפֶה וְכַמָּה הוּא יָפֶה. צַעַר, כְּוָאוֹ בְשַׁפּוּד אוֹ בְמַסְמֵר, וַאֲפִלּוּ עַל צִפָּרְנוֹ, מְקוֹם שֶׁאֵינוֹ עוֹשֶׂה חַבּוּרָה, אוֹמְדִין כַּמָּה אָדָם כַּיּוֹצֵא בָזֶה רוֹצֶה לִטֹּל לִהְיוֹת מִצְטַעֵר כָּךְ. רִפּוּי, הִכָּהוּ חַיָּב לְרַפְּאֹתוֹ. עָלוּ בוֹ צְמָחִים, אִם מֵחֲמַת הַמַּכָּה, חַיָּב. שֶׁלֹּא מֵחֲמַת הַמַּכָּה, פָּטוּר. חָיְתָה וְנִסְתְּרָה, חָיְתָה וְנִסְתְּרָה, חַיָּב לְרַפְּאֹתוֹ. חָיְתָה כָל צָרְכָּהּ, אֵינוֹ חַיָּב לְרַפְּאֹתוֹ. שֶׁבֶת, רוֹאִין אוֹתוֹ כְּאִלוּ הוּא שׁוֹמֵר קִשּׁוּאִין, שֶׁכְּבָר נָתַן לוֹ דְמֵי יָדוֹ וּדְמֵי רַגְלוֹ. בֹּשֶׁת, הַכֹּל לְפִי הַמְבַיֵּשׁ וְהַמִּתְבַּיֵּשׁ. הַמְבַיֵּשׁ אֶת הֶעָרֹם, הַמְבַיֵּשׁ אֶת הַסּוּמָא, וְהַמְבַיֵּשׁ אֶת הַיָּשֵׁן, חַיָּב. וְיָשֵׁן שֶׁבִּיֵּשׁ, פָּטוּר. נָפַל מִן הַגָּג, וְהִזִּיק וּבִיֵּשׁ, חַיָּב עַל הַנֶּזֶק וּפָטוּר עַל הַבֹּשֶׁת, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (דברים כה) וְשָׁלְחָה יָדָהּ וְהֶחֱזִיקָה בִּמְבֻשָׁיו, אֵינוֹ חַיָּב עַל הַבֹּשֶׁת עַד שֶׁיְהֵא מִתְכַּוֵּן: \n", 8.1. "He who wounds his fellow is liable to compensate him on five counts: for injury, for pain, for healing, for loss of income and for indignity. ‘For injury’: How so? If he blinded his fellow’s eye, cut off his hand or broke his foot, [his fellow] is looked upon as if he was a slave to be sold in the market and they assess how much he was worth and how much he is worth. ‘For pain’? If he burned him with a spit or a nail, even though it was on his fingernail, a place where it leaves no wound, they estimate how much money such a man would be willing to take to suffer so. ‘Healing’? If he struck him he is liable to pay the cost of his healing. If sores arise on him on account of the blow, he is liable [for the cost of their healing]. If not on account of the blow, he is not liable. If the wound healed and then opened and healed and then opened, he is liable for the cost of the healing. If it healed completely, he is no longer liable to pay the cost of the healing. ‘Loss of income’: He is looked upon as a watchman of a cucumber field, since he already gave him compensation for the loss of his hand or foot. ‘Indignity’: All is according to the status of the one that inflicts indignity and the status of the one that suffers indignity. If a man inflicted indignity on a naked man, or a blind man, or a sleeping man, he is [still] liable. If a man fell from the roof and caused injury and inflicted indignity, he is liable for the injury but not for the indignity, as it says, “And she puts forth her hand and grabs him by the private parts”, a man is liable only when he intended [to inflict indignity].",
103. Mishnah, Berachot, 8.23 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pharisees, in christian literature Found in books: Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 48
104. Mishnah, Ketuvot, 3.7 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •festivals, non-christian, in early christian literature Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 47
3.7. "אֵיזוֹהִי בֹשֶׁת, הַכֹּל לְפִי הַמְבַיֵּשׁ וְהַמִּתְבַּיֵּשׁ. פְּגָם, רוֹאִין אוֹתָהּ כְּאִלּוּ הִיא שִׁפְחָה נִמְכֶּרֶת, כַּמָּה הָיְתָה יָפָה וְכַמָּה הִיא יָפָה. קְנָס, שָׁוֶה בְכָל אָדָם. וְכֹל שֶׁיֶּשׁ לוֹ קִצְבָּה מִן הַתּוֹרָה, שָׁוֶה בְכָל אָדָם: \n", 3.7. "How is [the compensation that is paid for] embarrassment [reckoned]? It all depends on the status of the offender and the offended. How is [the compensation that is paid for] blemish [reckoned]? She is regarded as if she were a slave to be sold in the market place [and it is estimated] how much she was worth then and how much she is worth now. The fine is the same for all. And any sum that is fixed in the Torah remains the same for all.",
105. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 9.62 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •enemies, clemency toward ones, in early christian literature Found in books: Boustan Janssen and Roetzel (2010), Violence, Scripture, and Textual Practices in Early Judaism and Christianity, 63
106. Anon., Acts of John, 85.1-86.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •faith, in early christian literature Found in books: Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022), Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity, 222
107. Anon., Acts of Peter, 5.13-5.31 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •faith, in early christian literature Found in books: Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022), Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity, 208
108. Anon., Sifre Deuteronomy, 307 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •amoraic literature, shaped by christian discourse Found in books: Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg (2023), Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity, 455
109. Anon., Sifre Numbers, 119 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •rabbinic literature, relation to christians literature Found in books: Schremer (2010), Brothers Estranged: Heresy, Christianity and Jewish Identity in Late Antiquity, 10
110. Anon., Acts of Philip, 14 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), john eleemon, life of tychon Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 760
111. Palestinian Talmud, Avodah Zarah, None (2nd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •amoraic literature, shaped by christian discourse Found in books: Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg (2023), Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity, 47
112. Anon., Sifra, None (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg (2023), Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity, 416
113. Anon., Mekhilta Derabbi Yishmael, None (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •rabbinic literature, response to christianity in Found in books: Schremer (2010), Brothers Estranged: Heresy, Christianity and Jewish Identity in Late Antiquity, 125
114. Justin, Second Apology, a b c d\n0 '11.6 '11.6 '11 6 \n1 '11 '11 '11 None (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 666
115. Justin, First Apology, a b c d\n0 61 61 61 None\n1 '21.2 '21.2 '21 2 \n2 '21 '21 '21 None\n3 '54.9 '54.9 '54 9 \n4 14.3 14.3 14 3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022), Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity, 71
61. I will also relate the manner in which we dedicated ourselves to God when we had been made new through Christ; lest, if we omit this, we seem to be unfair in the explanation we are making. As many as are persuaded and believe that what we teach and say is true, and undertake to be able to live accordingly, are instructed to pray and to entreat God with fasting, for the remission of their sins that are past, we praying and fasting with them. Then they are brought by us where there is water, and are regenerated in the same manner in which we were ourselves regenerated. For, in the name of God, the Father and Lord of the universe, and of our Saviour Jesus Christ, and of the Holy Spirit, they then receive the washing with water. For Christ also said, Unless you be born again, you shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven. John 3:5 Now, that it is impossible for those who have once been born to enter into their mothers' wombs, is manifest to all. And how those who have sinned and repent shall escape their sins, is declared by Esaias the prophet, as I wrote above; he thus speaks: Wash you, make you clean; put away the evil of your doings from your souls; learn to do well; judge the fatherless, and plead for the widow: and come and let us reason together, says the Lord. And though your sins be as scarlet, I will make them white like wool; and though they be as crimson, I will make them white as snow. But if you refuse and rebel, the sword shall devour you: for the mouth of the Lord has spoken it. Isaiah 1:16-20 And for this [rite] we have learned from the apostles this reason. Since at our birth we were born without our own knowledge or choice, by our parents coming together, and were brought up in bad habits and wicked training; in order that we may not remain the children of necessity and of ignorance, but may become the children of choice and knowledge, and may obtain in the water the remission of sins formerly committed, there is pronounced over him who chooses to be born again, and has repented of his sins, the name of God the Father and Lord of the universe; he who leads to the laver the person that is to be washed calling him by this name alone. For no one can utter the name of the ineffable God; and if any one dare to say that there is a name, he raves with a hopeless madness. And this washing is called illumination, because they who learn these things are illuminated in their understandings. And in the name of Jesus Christ, who was crucified under Pontius Pilate, and in the name of the Holy Ghost, who through the prophets foretold all things about Jesus, he who is illuminated is washed.
116. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 3.11.9, 3.12-3.18, 4.16.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •enochic literature, christian rejection of •faith, in early christian literature •enochic literature, christian preservation of Found in books: Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022), Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity, 70; Reed (2005), Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature. 148, 200
117. Minucius Felix, Octavius, a b c d\n0 '22.7 '22.7 '22 7\n1 '23.5 '23.5 '23 5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 671
118. Hippolytus, Refutation of All Heresies, a b c d\n0 '10.15 '10.15 '10 15\n1 5.26 5.26 5 26\n2 5.25 5.25 5 25 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 668
119. Anon., Leviticus Rabba, 13.3, 30.2 (2nd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gymnastic events, in christian literature Found in books: Spielman (2020), Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World. 216
13.3. דָּבָר אַחֵר, זֹאת הַבְּהֵמָה, הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב (משלי ל, ה): כָּל אִמְרַת אֱלוֹהַּ צְרוּפָה, רַב אָמַר לֹא נִתְּנוּ הַמִּצְווֹת לְיִשְׂרָאֵל אֶלָּא לְצָרֵף בָּהֶן אֶת הַבְּרִיּוֹת, וְכָל כָּךְ לָמָּה, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (משלי ל, ה): מָגֵן הוּא לְכָל הַחֹסִים בּוֹ, אָמַר רַבִּי יוּדָן בְּרַבִּי שִׁמְעוֹן כָּל בְּהֵמוֹת וְלִוְיָתָן הֵן קֶנִיגִין שֶׁל צַדִּיקִים לֶעָתִיד לָבוֹא, וְכָל מִי שֶׁלֹּא רָאָה קֶנִיגִין שֶׁל אֻמּוֹת הָעוֹלָם בָּעוֹלָם הַזֶּה, זוֹכֶה לִרְאוֹתָהּ לָעוֹלָם הַבָּא, כֵּיצַד הֵם נִשְׁחָטִים, בְּהֵמוֹת נוֹתֵץ לַלִּוְיָתָן בְּקַרְנָיו וְקוֹרְעוֹ, וְלִוְיָתָן נוֹתֵץ לַבְּהֵמוֹת בִּסְנַפִּירָיו וְנוֹחֲרוֹ. וַחֲכָמִים אוֹמְרִים זוֹ שְׁחִיטָה כְּשֵׁרָה הִיא, וְלֹא כָּךְ תָּנִינַן הַכֹּל שׁוֹחֲטִין וּבַכֹּל שׁוֹחֲטִין וּלְעוֹלָם שׁוֹחֲטִין חוּץ מִמַּגַּל קָצִיר, וְהַמְגֵרָה, וְהַשִּׁנַּיִם, מִפְּנֵי שֶׁהֵן חוֹנְקִין. אָמַר רַבִּי אָבִין בַּר כַּהֲנָא אָמַר הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא (ישעיה נא, ד): תּוֹרָה חֲדָשָׁה מֵאִתִּי תֵצֵא, חִדּוּשׁ תּוֹרָה מֵאִתִּי תֵצֵא. אָמַר רַבִּי בֶּרֶכְיָה בְּשֵׁם רַבִּי יִצְחָק אֲרִיסְטוֹן עָתִיד הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא לַעֲשׂוֹת לַעֲבָדָיו הַצַּדִּיקִים לֶעָתִיד לָבוֹא וְכָל מִי שֶׁלֹּא אָכַל נְבֵלוֹת בָּעוֹלָם הַזֶּה זוֹכֶה לִרְאוֹתוֹ לָעוֹלָם הַבָּא, הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב (ויקרא ז, כד): וְחֵלֶב נְבֵלָה וְחֵלֶב טְרֵפָה יֵעָשֶׂה לְכָל מְלָאכָה וְאָכֹל לֹא תֹאכְלֻהוּ, בִּשְׁבִיל שֶׁתֹּאכְלוּ מִמֶּנּוּ לֶעָתִיד לָבוֹא, לְפִיכָךְ משֶׁה מַזְהִיר לְיִשְׂרָאֵל וְאוֹמֵר לָהֶם (ויקרא יא, ב): זֹאת הַחַיָּה אֲשֶׁר תֹּאכֵלוּ. 30.2. דָּבָר אַחֵר, וּלְקַחְתֶּם לָכֶם, הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב (תהלים טז, יא): תּוֹדִיעֵנִי אֹרַח חַיִּים שׂבַע שְׂמָחוֹת, אָמַר דָּוִד לִפְנֵי הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא תּוֹדִיעֵנִי בְּאֵיזֶה פִּילוֹן מְפֻלָּשׁ לְחַיֵּי הָעוֹלָם הַבָּא, רַבִּי יוּדָן אָמַר, אָמַר הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא לְדָוִד אִם חַיִּים אַתָּה צָרִיךְ, יִסּוּרִין אַתָּה צָרִיךְ, כְּדִכְתִיב (משלי ו, כג): וְדֶרֶךְ חַיִּים תּוֹכְחוֹת מוּסָר. שׂבַע שְׂמָחוֹת, שִׂבְּעָנוּ בַּחֲמִשָּׁה שְׂמָחוֹת, מִקְרָא, מִשְׁנָה, תַּלְמוּד, תּוֹסֶפְתָּא וְאַגָּדוֹת. דָּבָר אַחֵר, שׂבַע שְׂמָחוֹת אֶת פָּנֶיךָ, אֵלּוּ שֶׁבַע כִּתּוֹת שֶׁל צַדִּיקִים שֶׁעֲתִידִים לְהַקְבִּיל פְּנֵי שְׁכִינָה וּפְנֵיהֶם דּוֹמוֹת לַחַמָּה וּלְבָנָה, לָרָקִיעַ, לַכּוֹכָבִים, לַבְּרָקִים וּלְשׁוֹשַׁנִּים וְלַמְּנוֹרָה הַטְּהוֹרָה שֶׁהָיְתָה בְּבֵית הַמִּקְדָּשׁ. לַחַמָּה מִנַּיִן, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (שיר השירים ו, י): בָּרָה כַּחַמָּה. לַלְּבָנָה מִנַּיִן, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (שיר השירים ו, י): יָפָה כַלְּבָנָה. לָרָקִיעַ מִנַּיִן, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (דניאל יב, ג): וְהַמַּשְׂכִּלִים יַזְהִרוּ כְּזֹהַר הָרָקִיעַ. לַכּוֹכָבִים מִנַּיִן, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (דניאל יב, ג): וּמַצְדִּיקֵי הָרַבִּים כַּכּוֹכָבִים לְעוֹלָם וָעֶד. לַבְּרָקִים מִנַּיִן, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (נחום ב, ה): מַרְאֵיהֶן כַּלַּפִּידִים כַּבְּרָקִים יְרוֹצֵצוּ. לְשׁוֹשַׁנִּים מִנַּיַן, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (תהלים מה, א): לַמְנַצֵּחַ עַל שׁשַׁנִּים. לַמְּנוֹרָה הַטְּהוֹרָה מִנַּיִן, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (זכריה ד, ב): וַיֹּאמֶר אֵלַי מָה אַתָּה רֹאֶה וָאֹמַר רָאִיתִי וְהִנֵּה מְנוֹרַת זָהָב כֻּלָּהּ. (תהלים טז, יא): נְעִמוֹת בִּימִינְךָ נֶצַח, וְכִי מִי מוֹדִיעֵנוּ אֵיזוֹ כַּת הַחֲבִיבָה וְהַנְּעִימָה שֶׁבָּהֶן, תְּרֵין אָמוֹרָאִין, חַד אָמַר זוֹ שֶׁבָּאָה מִכֹּחָהּ שֶׁל תּוֹרָה וּמִכֹּחָן שֶׁל מִצְווֹת, וְאָחֳרָנָא אָמַר אֵלּוּ סוֹפְרִין וּמַשְׁנִין שֶׁמְּלַמְּדִין תִּינוֹקוֹת בַּאֲמִתָּן, שֶׁהֵן עֲתִידִין לַעֲמֹד בִּימִינוֹ שֶׁל הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא, הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב: נְעִמוֹת בִּימִינְךָ נֶצַח. דָּבָר אַחֵר, שׂבַע שְׂמָחוֹת, אַל תְּהִי קוֹרֵא כֵּן אֶלָּא שֶׁבַע שְׂמָחוֹת, אֵלּוּ שֶׁבַע מִצְווֹת שֶׁבֶּחָג, וְאֵלּוּ הֵן, אַרְבָּעָה מִינִין שֶׁבַּלּוּלָב, וְסֻכָּה, חֲגִיגָה וְשִׂמְחָה. אִם שִׂמְחָה לָמָּה חֲגִיגָה וְאִם חֲגִיגָה לָמָּה שִׂמְחָה, אָמַר רַבִּי אָבִין מָשָׁל לִשְׁנַיִם שֶׁנִּכְנְסוּ אֵצֶל הַדַּיָּן וְלֵית אֲנַן יָדְעִין מַאן הוּא נוֹצֵחַ, אֶלָּא מַאן דְּנָסַב בָּאיָין בִּידֵיהּ, אֲנַן יָדְעִין דְּהוּא נָצוֹחַיָיא, כָּךְ יִשְׂרָאֵל וְאֻמּוֹת הָעוֹלָם בָּאִין וּמְקַטְרְגִים לִפְנֵי הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא בְּרֹאשׁ הַשָּׁנָה וְלֵית אֲנַן יָדְעִין מַאן נָצַח, אֶלָּא בַּמֶּה שֶׁיִּשְׂרָאֵל יוֹצְאִין מִלִּפְנֵי הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא וְלוּלָבֵיהֶן וְאֶתְרוֹגֵיהֶן בְּיָדָן, אָנוּ יוֹדְעִין דְיִשְׂרָאֵל אִינוּן נָצוֹחַיָּא, לְפִיכָךְ משֶׁה מַזְהִיר לְיִשְׂרָאֵל וְאוֹמֵר לָהֶם: וּלְקַחְתֶּם לָכֶם בַּיּוֹם הָרִאשׁוֹן.
120. Heliodorus, Ethiopian Story, 1.13.4, 2.33, 3.10-3.11, 4.7, 5.16-5.17, 5.16.32, 6.11-6.15, 7.8, 7.27, 8.13-8.14, 10.7-10.9 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian literature, acts of paul and thekla •christian literature Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 50, 59, 62, 67, 69, 75
121. Lucian, Hermotimus, Or Sects, 5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gymnastic events, in christian literature Found in books: Spielman (2020), Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World. 214
122. Anon., Genesis Rabba, 15.7, 65.22 (2nd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature •amoraic literature, shaped by christian discourse Found in books: Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg (2023), Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity, 190; Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 35, 49, 50
15.7. מָה הָיָה אוֹתוֹ הָאִילָן שֶׁאָכַל מִמֶּנּוּ אָדָם וְחַוָּה, רַבִּי מֵאִיר אוֹמֵר חִטִּים הָיוּ, כַּד לָא הֲוָה בַּר נָשׁ דֵּעָה אִינּוּן אָמְרִין לָא אֲכַל הַהוּא אִינְשָׁא פִּתָּא דְּחִטֵּי מִן יוֹמוֹי. רַבִּי שְׁמוּאֵל בַּר רַבִּי יִצְחָק בָּעֵי קַמֵּי רַבִּי זְעֵירָא אֲמַר לֵיהּ אֶפְשָׁר חִטִּים הָיוּ, אָמַר לוֹ הֵן. אֲמַר לֵיהּ וְהָכְתִיב עֵץ, אֲמַר לֵיהּ מְתַמְּרוֹת הָיוּ כְּאַרְזֵי לְבָנוֹן. אָמַר רַבִּי יַעֲקֹב בַּר אַחָא אִתְפַּלְּגוּן רַבִּי נְחֶמְיָה וְרַבָּנָן, רַבִּי נְחֶמְיָה אָמַר הַמּוֹצִיא לֶחֶם מִן הָאָרֶץ, שֶׁכְּבָר הוֹצִיא לֶחֶם מִן הָאָרֶץ. וְרַבָּנָן אָמְרֵי מוֹצִיא לֶחֶם מִן הָאָרֶץ, שֶׁהוּא עָתִיד לְהוֹצִיא לֶחֶם מִן הָאָרֶץ, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (תהלים עב, טז): יְהִי פִסַּת בַּר בָּאָרֶץ. לֶפֶת, תְּרֵין אָמוֹרָאִין פְּלִיגֵי, רַבִּי חֲנִינָא בַּר יִצְחָק וְרַבִּי שְׁמוּאֵל בַּר אַמֵּי, חַד אָמַר לֶפֶת לֹא פַּת הָיְתָה, וְחוֹרָנָה אָמַר לֶפֶת לֹא פַּת הִיא עֲתִידָה לִהְיוֹת. רַבִּי יִרְמְיָה בָּרֵיךְ קַמֵּיהּ דְּרַבִּי זֵירָא הַמּוֹצִיא לֶחֶם מִן הָאָרֶץ וְקַלְסֵיהּ, כְּרַבִּי נְחֶמְיָה, אֶתְמְהָא. אֶלָּא שֶׁלֹא לְעָרֵב אֶת הָאוֹתִיּוֹת. רַבִּי יְהוּדָה בַּר אִלְעָאי אָמַר, עֲנָבִים הָיוּ, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (דברים לב, לב לג): עֲנָבֵמוֹ עִנְבֵי רוֹשׁ אַשְׁכְּלֹת מְרֹרֹת לָמוֹ, אוֹתָן הָאֶשְׁכּוֹלוֹת הֵבִיאוּ מְרוֹרוֹת לָעוֹלָם. רַבִּי אַבָּא דְּעַכּוֹ אָמַר אֶתְרוֹג הָיָה, הֲדָא הוּא דִּכְתִיב (בראשית ג, ו): וַתֵּרֶא הָאִשָּׁה כִּי טוֹב הָעֵץ וגו', אֲמַרְתְּ צֵא וּרְאֵה אֵיזֶהוּ אִילָן שֶׁעֵצוֹ נֶאֱכָל כְּפִרְיוֹ, וְאֵין אַתָּה מוֹצֵא אֶלָּא אֶתְרוֹג. רַבִּי יוֹסֵי אוֹמֵר תְּאֵנִים הָיוּ, דָּבָר לָמֵד מֵעִנְיָנוֹ, מָשָׁל לְבֶן שָׂרִים שֶׁקִּלְקֵל עִם אַחַת מִן הַשְּׁפָחוֹת, כֵּיוָן שֶׁשָּׁמַע הַשַֹּׂר טְרָדוֹ וְהוֹצִיאוֹ חוּץ לַפָּלָטִין, וְהָיָה מְחַזֵּר עַל פִּתְחֵיהֶן שֶׁל שְׁפָחוֹת וְלֹא הָיוּ מְקַבְּלוֹת אוֹתוֹ, אֲבָל אוֹתָהּ שֶׁקִּלְקְלָה עִמּוֹ פָּתְחָה דְלָתֶיהָ וְקִבִּלַתּוֹ. כָּךְ בְּשָׁעָה שֶׁאָכַל אָדָם הָרִאשׁוֹן מֵאוֹתוֹ הָאִילָן, טְרָדוֹ הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא וְהוֹצִיאוֹ חוּץ לְגַן עֵדֶן, וְהָיָה מְחַזֵּר עַל כָּל אִילָנוֹת וְלֹא הָיוּ מְקַבְּלִין אוֹתוֹ, וּמַה הָיוּ אוֹמְרִים לוֹ, אָמַר רַבִּי בֶּרֶכְיָה הָא גַּנָּב דְּגָנַב דַּעְתֵּיהּ דְּבָרְיֵהּ, הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב (תהלים לו, יב): אַל תְּבוֹאֵנִי רֶגֶל גַּאֲוָה, רֶגֶל שֶׁנִּתְגָּאֶה עַל בּוֹרְאוֹ, (תהלים לו, יב): וְיַד רְשָׁעִים אַל תְּנִדֵנִי, לָא תִיסַב מִמֶּנִּי עָלֶה. אֲבָל תְּאֵנָה שֶׁאָכַל מִפֵּרוֹתֶיהָ, פָּתְחָה דְּלָתֶיהָ וְקִבְּלַתּוֹ, הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב (בראשית ג, ז): וַיִּתְפְּרוּ עֲלֵה תְאֵנָה, מָה הָיְתָה אוֹתָהּ הַתְּאֵנָה, רַבִּי אָבִין אָמַר בְּרַת שֶׁבַע דְּאַמְטְיַת שִׁבְעַת יְמֵי אֶבְלָא לְעָלְמָא. רַבִּי יְהוֹשֻׁעַ דְּסִכְנִין בְּשֵׁם ר"א אָמַר בְּרַת אֱלִיתָא, דְּאַמְטְיַת אֱלִיתָא לְעָלְמָא. רַבִּי עֲזַרְיָה וְרַבִּי יְהוּדָה בַּר סִימוֹן בְּשֵׁם רַבִּי יְהוֹשֻׁעַ בֶּן לֵוִי אָמַר, חַס וְשָׁלוֹם לֹא גִּלָּה הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא אוֹתוֹ אִילָן לְאָדָם, וְלֹא עָתִיד לְגַלּוֹתוֹ. רְאֵה מַה כְּתִיב (ויקרא כ, טז): וְאִשָּׁה אֲשֶׁר תִּקְרַב אֶל כָּל בְּהֵמָה וגו', אִם אָדָם חָטָא בְּהֵמָה מַה חָטָאת, אֶלָּא שֶׁלֹא תְהֵא בְּהֵמָה עוֹבֶרֶת בַּשּׁוּק וְיֹאמְרוּ זוֹ הִיא הַבְּהֵמָה שֶׁנִּסְקַל פְּלוֹנִי עַל יָדָהּ, וְאִם עַל כְּבוֹד תּוֹלְדוֹתָיו חָס הַמָּקוֹם, עַל כְּבוֹדוֹ עַל אַחַת כַּמָּה וְכַמָּה, אֶתְמְהָא. 65.22. וְלֹא הִכִּירוֹ (בראשית כז, כג), בְּשָׁעָה שֶׁהָיוּ רְשָׁעִים עוֹמְדִים מִמֶּנּוּ לֹא הִכִּירוֹ. (בראשית כז, כו): וַיֹּאמֶר גְּשָׁה נָּא וּשְׁקָה לִּי, אָמַר לוֹ אַתְּ נוֹשְׁקֵנִי בַּקְּבוּרָה וְאֵין אַחֵר נוֹשְׁקֵנִי בַּקְּבוּרָה. (בראשית כז, כז): וַיִּגַּשׁ וַיִּשַּׁק לוֹ וַיָּרַח אֶת רֵיחַ בְּגָדָיו, אָמַר רַבִּי יוֹחָנָן אֵין לְךָ דָּבָר שֶׁרֵיחוֹ קָשֶׁה מִן הַשֶּׁטֶף הַזֶּה שֶׁל עִזִּים וְאַתְּ אֲמַרְתְּ וַיָּרַח אֶת רֵיחַ בְּגָדָיו וַיְבָרֲכֵהוּ, אֶלָּא בְּשָׁעָה שֶׁנִּכְנַס אָבִינוּ יַעֲקֹב אֵצֶל אָבִיו נִכְנְסָה עִמּוֹ גַּן עֵדֶן, הֲדָא הוּא דַּאֲמַר לֵיהּ (בראשית כז, כז): רְאֵה רֵיחַ בְּנִי כְּרֵיחַ שָׂדֶה, וּבְשָׁעָה שֶׁנִּכְנַס עֵשָׂו אֵצֶל אָבִיו נִכְנְסָה עִמּוֹ גֵּיהִנֹּם, הֵיאךְ מָה דְאַתְּ אָמַר (משלי יא, ב): בָּא זָדוֹן וַיָּבֹא קָלוֹן. דָּבָר אַחֵר, וַיָּרַח אֶת רֵיחַ בְּגָדָיו וַיְבָרֲכֵהוּ, כְּגוֹן יוֹסֵף מְשִׁיתָא וְיָקוּם אִישׁ צְרוֹרוֹת. יוֹסֵף מְשִׁיתָא, בְּשָׁעָה שֶׁבִּקְּשׁוּ שׂוֹנְאִים לְהִכָּנֵס לְהַר הַבַּיִת אָמְרוּ יִכָּנֵס מֵהֶם וּבָהֶם תְּחִלָּה, אֲמָרִין לֵיהּ עוּל וּמַה דְּאַתְּ מַפִּיק דִּידָךְ, נִכְנַס וְהוֹצִיא מְנוֹרָה שֶׁל זָהָב, אָמְרוּ לוֹ אֵין דַּרְכּוֹ שֶׁל הֶדְיוֹט לְהִשְׁתַּמֵּשׁ בָּזוֹ, אֶלָּא עוּל זְמַן תִּנְיָנוּת וּמַה דְּאַתְּ מַפִּיק דִּידָךְ, וְלֹא קִבֵּל עָלָיו. אָמַר רַבִּי פִּינְחָס נָתְנוּ לוֹ מֶכֶס שָׁלשׁ שָׁנִים, וְלֹא קִבֵּל עָלָיו, אָמַר לֹא דַּיִּי שֶׁהִכְעַסְתִּי לֵאלֹהַי פַּעַם אַחַת אֶלָּא שֶׁאַכְעִיסֶנּוּ פַּעַם שְׁנִיָּה. מֶה עָשׂוּ לוֹ נָתְנוּ אוֹתוֹ בַּחֲמוֹר שֶׁל חָרָשִׁים וְהָיוּ מְנַסְּרִים בּוֹ, הָיָה מְצַוֵּחַ וְאוֹמֵר וַוי אוֹי אוֹי שֶׁהִכְעַסְתִּי לְבוֹרְאִי. וְיָקוּם אִישׁ צְרוֹרוֹת הָיָה בֶּן אֲחוֹתוֹ שֶׁל רַבִּי יוֹסֵי בֶּן יוֹעֶזֶר אִישׁ צְרֵידָה, וַהֲוָה רָכֵיב סוּסְיָא בְּשַׁבְּתָא אֲזַל קוֹמֵי שָׁרִיתָא לְמִצְטַבָּלָא, אֲמַר לֵיהּ חֲמֵי סוּסִי דְּאַרְכְּבִי מָרִי וַחֲמֵי סוּסָךָ דְּאַרְכְּבֵךְ מָרָךְ. אָמַר לוֹ אִם כָּךְ לְמַכְעִיסָיו קַל וָחֹמֶר לְעוֹשֵׂי רְצוֹנוֹ, אָמַר לוֹ עָשָׂה אָדָם רְצוֹנוֹ יוֹתֵר מִמְּךָ, אָמַר לוֹ וְאִם כָּךְ לְעוֹשֵׂי רְצוֹנוֹ קַל וָחֹמֶר לְמַכְעִיסָיו. נִכְנַס בּוֹ הַדָּבָר כְּאֶרֶס שֶׁל עַכְנָא, הָלַךְ וְקִיֵּם בְּעַצְמוֹ אַרְבַּע מִיתוֹת בֵּית דִּין, סְקִילָה, שְׂרֵפָה, הֶרֶג וְחֶנֶק, מֶה עָשָׂה, הֵבִיא קוֹרָה נְעָצָהּ בָּאָרֶץ וְקָשַׁר בָּהּ נִימָא וְעָרַךְ הָעֵצִים וְהִקִּיפָן גָּדֵר שֶׁל אֲבָנִים, וְעָשָׂה מְדוּרָה לְפָנֶיהָ וְנָעַץ אֶת הַחֶרֶב בָּאֶמְצַע וְהִצִּית הָאוּר תַּחַת הָעֵצִים מִתַּחַת הָאֲבָנִים, וְנִתְלָה בַּקּוֹרָה וְנֶחְנַק, קִדְּמַתּוֹ הָאֵשׁ, נִפְסְקָה הַנִּימָה, נָפַל לָאֵשׁ, קִדְּמַתּוֹ חֶרֶב וְנָפַל עָלָיו גָּדֵר וְנִשְׂרַף. נִתְנַמְנֵם יוֹסֵי בֶּן יוֹעֶזֶר אִישׁ צְרֵידָה וְרָאָה מִטָּתוֹ פָּרְחָה בָּאֲוִיר, אָמַר בְּשָׁעָה קַלָּה קְדָמַנִּי זֶה לְגַן עֵדֶן. 15.7. "What was the tree, from which Adam and Eve ate? Rabbi Meir said, it was wheat. When a person lacks knowledge people say \"That person has not eaten bread made from wheat even a day.\" Rabbi Shmuel bar Rabbi Yitzhak asked before Rabbi Zeira and said to him \"Is it possible that it is wheat?\" He said to him, \"Yes!\" He said to him, \"But isn't it written, 'tree'\" He said to him, \"It rose like the ceders of Lebanon\" Rabbi Yaakov Bar Aha said: Rabbi Nechemiah and the Rabbis disagree. Rabbi Nechemiah said, \"[When we bless our bread we should say]...'the one who brings bread from the earth', since bread already came from the earth.\" But the Rabbis say, \"'who is bringing bread from the earth' since in the future he will bring bread from the earth, as it is said, 'There will be a abundant grain in the land.' (Psalm 72:16). What does the word lefet mean? Two [scholars] disagree. They are Rabbi Hanina son of Yitzhak and Rabbi Shmuel Bar Ami. One says: lefet means there was no bread and the other says lefet means there will be no bread in the future. Rabbi Jeremiah recited the blessing before Rabbi Zeira as \"The one who brings bread from the earth\" and he praised him. But does that mean we hold like Rabbi Nehemiah? Rather we say it so we don't mix up the letters.",
123. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, a b c d\n0 137.2 137.2 137 2 \n1 112.5 112.5 112 5 \n2 48.2 48.2 48 2 \n3 52 52 52 None\n4 None\n5 80.3 80.3 80 3 \n6 38.2 38.2 38 2 \n7 120.5 120.5 120 5 \n8 287 287 287 None\n9 92 92 92 None\n10 43 43 43 None\n11 23 23 23 None\n12 45 45 45 None\n13 '69.3 '69.3 '69 3 \n14 '67.2 '67.2 '67 2 \n15 49 49 49 None\n16 20 20 20 None\n17 22 22 22 None\n18 41 41 41 None\n19 40 40 40 None (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 70
124. Palestinian Talmud, Kiddushin, None (2nd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •syriac, and ethiopic christian literature Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 161
125. Palestinian Talmud, Berachot, None (2nd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg (2023), Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity, 455
126. Lucian, The Passing of Peregrinus, 21 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •amoraic literature, shaped by christian discourse Found in books: Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg (2023), Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity, 189
127. Cassius Dio, Roman History, a b c d\n0 '56.36.4 '56.36.4 '56 36 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 670
128. Clement of Alexandria, Extracts From The Prophets, 2.1, 53.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •enochic literature, christian preservation of Found in books: Reed (2005), Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature. 148
129. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, a b c d\n0 6.5.41.6 6.5.41.6 6 5 \n1 6.5.41.5 6.5.41.5 6 5 \n2 6.5.41.4 6.5.41.4 6 5 \n3 5.1.10 5.1.10 5 1 \n4 '1.16.73 '1.16.73 '1 16\n5 '1.24.158.3 '1.24.158.3 '1 24\n6 '5.14.103 '5.14.103 '5 14\n7 '1.15.73 '1.15.73 '1 15 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 376
130. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 6.18, 6.18.6, 6.20-6.22, 6.20.3, 6.21.2-6.21.3, 6.22.3, 7.13, 8.11-8.14 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian literature •christian literature, acts of paul and thekla Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 59, 69, 152, 154
131. Anon., The Acts of John, 85.1-86.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •faith, in early christian literature Found in books: Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022), Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity, 222
132. Anon., Acts of Thomas, 49 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •faith, in early christian literature Found in books: Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022), Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity, 401
49. And he laid his hands on them and blessed them, saying: The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ shall be upon you for ever. And they said, Amen. And the woman besought him, saying: O apostle of the Most High, give me the seal, that that enemy return not again unto me. Then he caused her to come near unto him (Syr. went to a river which was close by there), and laid his hands upon her and sealed her in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost; and many others also were sealed with her. And the apostle bade his minister (deacon) to set forth a table; and he set forth a stool which they found there, and spread a linen cloth upon it and set on the bread of blessing; and the apostle stood by it and said: Jesu, that hast accounted us worthy to partake of the eucharist of thine holy body and blood, lo, we are bold to draw near unto thine eucharist and to call upon thine holy name: come thou and communicate unto us (Syr. adds more).
133. Pausanias, Description of Greece, a b c d\n0 '9.27.7 '9.27.7 '9 27 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 669
134. Athenagoras, Apology Or Embassy For The Christians, a b c d\n0 28 28 28 None\n1 30 30 30 None\n2 29 29 29 None\n3 26 26 26 None\n4 27 27 27 None\n5 '30.1 '30.1 '30 1 \n6 20.3 20.3 20 3 \n7 18.5 18.5 18 5 \n8 18.4 18.4 18 4 \n9 20.2 20.2 20 2 \n10 '19.2 '19.2 '19 2 \n11 '4.1 '4.1 '4 1 \n12 '29.1 '29.1 '29 1 \n13 1.13 1.13 1 13 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 671
28. But it is perhaps necessary, in accordance with what has already been adduced, to say a little about their names. Herodotus, then, and Alexander the son of Philip, in his letter to his mother (and each of them is said to have conversed with the priests at Heliopolis, and Memphis, and Thebes), affirm that they learned from them that the gods had been men. Herodotus speaks thus: of such a nature were, they said, the beings represented by these images, they were very far indeed from being gods. However, in the times anterior to them it was otherwise; then Egypt had gods for its rulers, who dwelt upon the earth with men, one being always supreme above the rest. The last of these was Horus the son of Osiris, called by the Greeks Apollo. He deposed Typhon, and ruled over Egypt as its last god-king. Osiris is named Dionysus (Bacchus) by the Greeks. Almost all the names of the gods came into Greece from Egypt. Apollo was the son of Dionysus and Isis, as Herodotus likewise affirms: According to the Egyptians, Apollo and Diana are the children of Bacchus and Isis; while Latona is their nurse and their preserver. These beings of heavenly origin they had for their first kings: partly from ignorance of the true worship of the Deity, partly from gratitude for their government, they esteemed them as gods together with their wives. The male cattle, if clean, and the male calves, are used for sacrifice by the Egyptians universally; but the females, they are not allowed to sacrifice, since they are sacred to Isis. The statue of this goddess has the form of a woman but with horns like a cow, resembling those of the Greek representations of Io. And who can be more deserving of credit in making these statements, than those who in family succession son from father, received not only the priesthood, but also the history? For it is not likely that the priests, who make it their business to commend the idols to men's reverence, would assert falsely that they were men. If Herodotus alone had said that the Egyptians spoke in their histories of the gods as of men, when he says, What they told me concerning their religion it is not my intention to repeat, except only the names of their deities, things of very trifling importance, it would behoove us not to credit even Herodotus as being a fabulist. But as Alexander and Hermes surnamed Trismegistus, who shares with them in the attribute of eternity, and innumerable others, not to name them individually, [declare the same], no room is left even for doubt that they, being kings, were esteemed gods. That they were men, the most learned of the Egyptians also testify, who, while saying that ether, earth, sun, moon, are gods, regard the rest as mortal men, and the temples as their sepulchres. Apollodorus, too, asserts the same thing in his treatise concerning the gods. But Herodotus calls even their sufferings mysteries. The ceremonies at the feast of Isis in the city of Busiris have been already spoken of. It is there that the whole multitude, both of men and women, many thousands in number, beat themselves at the close of the sacrifice in honour of a god whose name a religious scruple forbids me to mention. If they are gods, they are also immortal; but if people are beaten for them, and their sufferings are mysteries, they are men, as Herodotus himself says: Here, too, in this same precinct of Minerva at Saïs, is the burial-place of one whom I think it not right to mention in such a connection. It stands behind the temple against the back wall, which it entirely covers. There are also some large stone obelisks in the enclosure, and there is a lake near them, adorned with an edging of stone. In form it is circular, and in size, as it seemed to me, about equal to the lake at Delos called the Hoop. On this lake it is that the Egyptians represent by night his sufferings whose name I refrain from mentioning, and this representation they call their mysteries. And not only is the sepulchre of Osiris shown, but also his embalming: When a body is brought to them, they show the bearer various models of corpses made in wood, and painted so as to resemble nature. The most perfect is said to be after the manner of him whom I do not think it religious to name in connection with such a matter.
135. Palestinian Talmud, Taanit, None (2nd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 161, 162, 163
136. Palestinian Talmud, Sotah, None (2nd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg (2023), Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity, 455
137. Athenaeus, The Learned Banquet, None (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian literature, acts of paul and thekla Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 83
138. Palestinian Talmud, Sanhedrin, None (2nd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 42, 44, 48, 51, 52
139. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 4.19, 10.97 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian literature, acts of paul and thekla •christianity, early, relationship between early christian and jewish feasting and feasting literature Found in books: König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 129; Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 69
4.19. To Calpurnia Hispulla. As you yourself are a model of the family virtues, as you returned the affection of your brother, who was the best of men and devoted to you, and as you love his daughter as though she were your own child, and show her not only the affection of an aunt but even that of the father she has lost, I feel sure you will be delighted to know that she is proving herself worthy of her father, worthy of you, and worthy of her grandfather. She has a sharp wit, she is wonderfully economical, and she loves me - which is a guarantee of her purity. Moreover, owing to her fondness for me she has developed a taste for study. She collects all my speeches, she reads them, and learns them by heart. When I am about to plead, what anxiety she shows; when the pleading is over, how pleased she is! She has relays of people to bring her news as to the reception I get, the applause I excite, and the verdicts I win from the judges. Whenever I recite, she sits near me screened from the audience by a curtain, and her ears greedily drink in what people say to my credit. She even sings my verses and sets them to music, though she has no master to teach her but love, which is the best instructor of all. Hence I feel perfectly assured that our mutual happiness will be lasting, and will continue to grow day by day. For she loves in me not my youth * nor my person - both of which are subject to gradual decay and age - but my reputation. Nor would other feelings become one who had been brought up at your knee, who had been trained by your precepts, who had seen in your house nothing that was not pure and honourable, and, in short, had been taught to love me at your recommendation. For as you loved and venerated my mother as a daughter, so even when I was a boy you used to shape my character, and encourage me, and prophesy that I should develop into the man that my wife now believes me to be. Consequently my wife and I try to see who can thank you best, I because you have given her to me, and she because you gave me to her, as though you chose us the one for the other. Farewell.
140. Aristides of Athens, Apology, a b c d\n0 '10.9 '10.9 '10 9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 668
141. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.97 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •christianity, early, relationship between early christian and jewish feasting and feasting literature Found in books: König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 129
142. Palestinian Talmud, Qiddushin, None (2nd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •syriac, and ethiopic christian literature Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 161
143. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 1.8, 1.8.10, 1.10, 1.19, 2.25, 2.27, 2.30, 6.31, 7.8, 10.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •christian literature •christian literature, acts of paul and thekla Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 50, 59, 67, 69
144. Tatian, Oration To The Greeks, a b c d\n0 41.2 41.2 41 2 \n1 12.17 12.17 12 17 \n2 12.16 12.16 12 16 \n3 41.1 41.1 41 1 \n4 12.19 12.19 12 19 \n5 12.18 12.18 12 18 \n6 '21 '21 '21 None\n7 '3.2 '3.2 '3 2 \n8 18.3 18.3 18 3 \n9 18.2 18.2 18 2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 671
145. Tertullian, To The Heathen, a b c d\n0 '2.14 '2.14 '2 14\n1 '2.10.14 '2.10.14 '2 10 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 668, 671
146. Tertullian, Against Marcion, a b c d\n0 '4.10.7 '4.10.7 '4 10 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 670
147. Tertullian, On The Soul, 9 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •scripture, xii; as the literature of christians Found in books: Sider (2001), Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian, 105
148. Tertullian, On The Apparel of Women, 1.2-1.3, 2.10 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •enochic literature, christian rejection of •enochic literature, christian preservation of Found in books: Reed (2005), Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature. 15, 148, 195
149. Tertullian, On Idolatry, 4.2-4.3, 15.6 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •enochic literature, christian preservation of Found in books: Reed (2005), Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature. 148
150. Tertullian, On Patience, 14.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 33
151. Tertullian, Apology, 50.14 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •amoraic literature, shaped by christian discourse Found in books: Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg (2023), Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity, 191
50.14. Christiani factis docendo. Illa ipsa obstinatio, quam exprobratis, magistra est. Quis enim non contemplatione eius concutitur ad requirendum quid intus in re sit? quis non, ubi requisivit, accedit?
152. Theophilus, To Autolycus, a b c d\n0 '1.13 '1.13 '1 13\n1 '1.9 '1.9 '1 9 \n2 '2.12 '2.12 '2 12\n3 '2.7 '2.7 '2 7 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 670
153. Tertullian, On The Veiling of Virgins, 17 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •scripture, xii; as the literature of christians Found in books: Sider (2001), Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian, 105
17. But we admonish you, too, women of the second (degree of) modesty, who have fallen into wedlock, not to outgrow so far the discipline of the veil, not even in a moment of an hour, as, because you cannot refuse it, to take some other means to nullify it, by going neither covered nor bare. For some, with their turbans and woollen bands, do not veil their head, but bind it up; protected, indeed, in front, but, where the head properly lies, bare. Others are to a certain extent covered over the region of the brain with linen coifs of small dimensions - I suppose for fear of pressing the head - and not reaching quite to the ears. If they are so weak in their hearing as not to be able to hear through a covering, I pity them. Let them know that the whole head constitutes the woman. Its limits and boundaries reach as far as the place where the robe begins. The region of the veil is co-extensive with the space covered by the hair when unbound; in order that the necks too may be encircled. For it is they which must be subjected, for the sake of which power ought to be had on the head: the veil is their yoke. Arabia's heathen females will be your judges, who cover not only the head, but the face also, so entirely, that they are content, with one eye free, to enjoy rather half the light than to prostitute the entire face. A female would rather see than be seen. And for this reason a certain Roman queen said that they were most unhappy, in that they could more easily fall in love than be fallen in love with; whereas they are rather happy in their immunity from that second (and indeed more frequent) infelicity, that females are more apt to be fallen in love with than to fall in love. And the modesty of heathen discipline, indeed, is more simple, and, so to say, more barbaric. To us the Lord has, even by revelations, measured the space for the veil to extend over. For a certain sister of ours was thus addressed by an angel, beating her neck, as if in applause: Elegant neck, and deservedly bare! It is well for you to unveil yourself from the head right down to the loins, lest withal this freedom of your neck profit you not! And, of course, what you have said to one you have said to all. But how severe a chastisement will they likewise deserve, who, amid (the recital of) the Psalms, and at any mention of (the name of) God, continue uncovered; (who) even when about to spend time in prayer itself, with the utmost readiness place a fringe, or a tuft, or any thread whatever, on the crown of their heads, and suppose themselves to be covered? of so small extent do they falsely imagine their head to be! Others, who think the palm of their hand plainly greater than any fringe or thread, misuse their head no less; like a certain (creature), more beast than bird, albeit winged, with small head, long legs, and moreover of erect carriage. She, they say, when she has to hide, thrusts away into a thicket her head alone - plainly the whole of it, (though)- leaving all the rest of herself exposed. Thus, while she is secure in head, (but) bare in her larger parts, she is taken wholly, head and all. Such will be their plight withal, covered as they are less than is useful. It is incumbent, then, at all times and in every place, to walk mindful of the law, prepared and equipped in readiness to meet every mention of God; who, if He be in the heart, will be recognised as well in the head of females. To such as read these (exhortations) with good will, to such as prefer Utility to Custom, may peace and grace from our Lord Jesus Christ redound: as likewise to Septimius Tertullianus, whose this tractate is.
154. Tertullian, On The Pallium, a b c d\n0 '4.3 '4.3 '4 3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 669
155. Eusebius of Caesarea, Life of Constantine, 2.71 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pharisaic-rabbinic connection, in early christian literature Found in books: Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 68
2.71. For as long as you continue to contend about these small and very insignificant questions, it is not fitting that so large a portion of God's people should be under the direction of your judgment, since you are thus divided between yourselves. I believe it indeed to be not merely unbecoming, but positively evil, that such should be the case. But I will refresh your minds by a little illustration, as follows. You know that philosophers, though they all adhere to one system, are yet frequently at issue on certain points, and differ, perhaps, in their degree of knowledge: yet they are recalled to harmony of sentiment by the uniting power of their common doctrines. If this be true, is it not far more reasonable that you, who are the ministers of the Supreme God, should be of one mind respecting the profession of the same religion? But let us still more thoughtfully and with closer attention examine what I have said, and see whether it be right that, on the ground of some trifling and foolish verbal difference between ourselves, brethren should assume towards each other the attitude of enemies, and the august meeting of the Synod be rent by profane disunion, because of you who wrangle together on points so trivial and altogether unessential? This is vulgar, and rather characteristic of childish ignorance, than consistent with the wisdom of priests and men of sense. Let us withdraw ourselves with a good will from these temptations of the devil. Our great God and common Saviour of all has granted the same light to us all. Permit me, who am his servant, to bring my task to a successful issue, under the direction of his Providence, that I may be enabled, through my exhortations, and diligence, and earnest admonition, to recall his people to communion and fellowship. For since you have, as I said, but one faith, and one sentiment respecting our religion, and since the Divine commandment in all its parts enjoins on us all the duty of maintaining a spirit of concord, let not the circumstance which has led to a slight difference between you, since it does not affect the validity of the whole, cause any division or schism among you. And this I say without in any way desiring to force you to entire unity of judgment in regard to this truly idle question, whatever its real nature may be. For the dignity of your synod may be preserved, and the communion of your whole body maintained unbroken, however wide a difference may exist among you as to unimportant matters. For we are not all of us like-minded on every subject, nor is there such a thing as one disposition and judgment common to all alike. As far, then, as regards the Divine Providence, let there be one faith, and one understanding among you, one united judgment in reference to God. But as to your subtle disputations on questions of little or no significance, though you may be unable to harmonize in sentiment, such differences should be consigned to the secret custody of your own minds and thoughts. And now, let the preciousness of common affection, let faith in the truth, let the honor due to God and to the observance of his law continue immovably among you. Resume, then, your mutual feelings of friendship, love, and regard: restore to the people their wonted embracings; and do ye yourselves, having purified your souls, as it were, once more acknowledge one another. For it often happens that when a reconciliation is effected by the removal of the causes of enmity, friendship becomes even sweeter than it was before.
156. Pseudo Clementine Literature, Homilies, a b c d\n0 '6.16 '6.16 '6 16 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 668
157. Babylonian Talmud, Sanhedrin, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 161, 162, 163
96b. ומי סליק נבוכד נצר לירושלים והכתיב (מלכים ב כה, ו) ויעלו אותו אל מלך בבל רבלתה ואמר ר' אבהו זו אנטוכיא רב חסדא ורב יצחק בר אבודימי חד אמר דמות דיוקנו היתה חקוקה לו על מרכבתו וחד אמר אימה יתירה היתה לו ממנו ודומה כמי שעומד לפניו,אמר רבא טעין תלת מאה כודנייתא נרגא דפרזלא דשליט בפרזלא שדר ליה נבוכדנצר לנבוזראדן כולהו בלעתינהו חד דשא דירושלם שנאמר (תהלים עד, ו) פתוחיה יחד בכשיל וכילפות יהלומון בעי למיהדר אמר מסתפינא דלא ליעבדו בי כי היכי דעבדו בסנחריב,נפקא קלא ואמר שוור בר שוור נבוזראדן שוור דמטא זימנא דמקדשא חריב והיכלא מיקלי פש ליה חד נרגא אתא מחייה בקופא ואיפתח שנאמר (תהלים עד, ה) יודע כמביא למעלה בסבך עץ קרדומות,הוה קטיל ואזל עד דמטא להיכלא אדליק ביה נורא גבה היכלא דרכו ביה מן שמיא שנאמר (איכה א, טו) גת דרך ה' לבתולת בת יהודה קא זיחא דעתיה נפקא בת קלא ואמרה ליה עמא קטילא קטלת היכלא קליא קלית קימחא טחינא טחינת שנאמר (ישעיהו מז, ב) קחי רחים וטחני קמח גלי צמתך חשפי שובל גלי שוק עברי נהרות חטים לא נאמר אלא קמח,חזא דמיה דזכריה דהוה קא רתח אמר להו מאי האי אמרו ליה דם זבחים הוא דאישתפיך אמר להו אייתי ואנסי אי מדמו כסי ולא אידמו אמר להו גלו לי ואי לא סריקנא לכו לבשרייכו במסריקא דפרזלא,אמרו ליה האי כהן ונביא הוא דאינבי להו לישראל בחורבנא דירושלם וקטלוהו אמר להו אנא מפייסנא ליה אייתי רבנן קטיל עילויה ולא נח אייתי דרדקי דבי רב קטיל עילויה ולא נח אייתי פרחי כהונה קטיל עילויה ולא נח עד די קטל עילויה תשעין וארבעה ריבוא ולא נח,קרב לגביה אמר זכריה זכריה טובים שבהן איבדתים ניחא לך דאיקטלינהו לכולהו מיד נח הרהר תשובה בדעתיה אמר מה הם שלא איבדו אלא נפש אחת כך ההוא גברא מה תיהוי עליה ערק שדר פורטיתא לביתיה ואיתגייר,תנו רבנן נעמן גר תושב היה נבוזר אדן גר צדק היה מבני בניו של סיסרא למדו תורה בירושלים מבני בניו של סנחריב לימדו תורה ברבים ומאן נינהו שמעיה ואבטליון,מבני בניו של המן למדו תורה בבני ברק ואף מבני בניו של אותו רשע ביקש הקב"ה להכניסן תחת כנפי השכינה אמרו מלאכי השרת לפני הקב"ה רבונו של עולם מי שהחריב את ביתך ושרף את היכלך תכניס תחת כנפי השכינה היינו דכתיב (ירמיהו נא, ט) רפינו את בבל ולא נרפתה עולא אמר זה נבוכדנצר רבי שמואל בר נחמני אמר אלו נהרות בבל ותרגמה דצינייתא (צרידתא) דבבלאי,אמר עולא עמון ומואב שיבבי בישי דירושלם הוו כיון דשמעינהו לנביאי דקא מיתנבאי לחורבנא דירושלם שלחו לנבוכדנצר פוק ותא אמר מסתפינא דלא ליעבדו לי כדעבדו בקמאי,שלחו ליה (משלי ז, יט) כי אין האיש בביתו הלך בדרך מרחוק ואין איש אלא הקדוש ברוך הוא שנאמר (שמות טו, ג) ה' איש מלחמה שלח להו בקריבא הוא ואתי שלחו ליה הלך בדרך מרחוק שלח להו אית להו צדיקי דבעו רחמי ומייתו ליה,שלחו ליה (משלי ז, כ) צרור הכסף לקח בידו ואין כסף אלא צדיקים שנאמר (הושע ג, ב) ואכרה לי בחמשה עשר כסף וחומר שעורים ולתך שעורים,שלח להו הדרי רשיעי בתשובה ובעו רחמי ומייתו ליה שלחו ליה כבר קבע להן זמן שנאמר (משלי ז, כ) ליום הכסא יבא (לביתו אין כסא אלא זמן שנאמר (תהלים פא, ד) בכסה ליום חגנו שלח להו סיתווא הוא ולא מצינא דאתי מתלגא וממיטרא,שלחו ליה תא אשינא דטורא שנאמר (ישעיהו טז, א) שלחו כר מושל ארץ מסלע מדברה אל הר בת ציון שלח להו אי אתינא לית לי דוכתא דיתיבנא ביה שלחו ליה קברות שלהם מעולין מפלטירין שלך דכתיב (ירמיהו ח, א) בעת ההיא נאום ה' יוציאו את עצמות מלכי יהודה ואת עצמות שריו ואת עצמות הכהנים ואת עצמות הנביאים ואת עצמות יושבי ירושלים מקבריהם ושטחום לשמש ולירח ולכל צבא השמים אשר אהבום ואשר עבדום ואשר הלכו אחריהם,אמר ליה רב נחמן לרבי יצחק מי שמיע לך אימת אתי בר נפלי אמר ליה מאן בר נפלי א"ל משיח משיח בר נפלי קרית ליה א"ל אין דכתיב (עמוס ט, יא) ביום ההוא אקים 96b. The Gemara asks: b And did Nebuchadnezzar ascend to Jerusalem? But isn’t it written /b with regard to Zedekiah: “And they took the king, b and brought him up to the king of Babylonia, to Riblah” /b (II Kings 25:6), b and Rabbi Abbahu says: This /b place called Riblah is a reference to b Antioch. /b Apparently, Nebuchadnezzar was in Antioch, not in Jerusalem. b Rav Ḥisda and Rav Yitzḥak bar Avudimi /b resolved this apparent contradiction. b One says: An image of /b Nebuchadnezzar’s b likeness was engraved on /b Nebuzaradan’s b chariot, /b and he regarded that image as though Nebuchadnezzar were actually there. b And one says: /b Nebuzaradan b was in extreme fear of /b Nebuchadnezzar, b and it was as though /b Nebuzaradan b was /b always b standing before /b Nebuchadnezzar. That is an example of the honor of a servant to his master mentioned in the verse.,§ The Gemara proceeds to discuss the role of Nebuzaradan in the destruction of the Temple. b Rava says: Nebuchadnezzar sent to Nebuzaradan three hundred mules laden with iron axes that cut iron. All of them were incapacitated /b in the attempt to breach b one gate of Jerusalem, as it is stated: “And now they pound its carved work together with hatchet and with hammers” /b (Psalms 74:6). Nebuzaradan b sought to return /b to Babylonia and b said: I am afraid. /b I want to ensure b that they will not do to me just as they did to Sennacherib, /b whose downfall was in Jerusalem.,A Divine b Voice emerged and said: Leaper, son of a leaper; Nebuzaradan, take /b the b leap, as the time has arrived for the Temple to be destroyed and the Sanctuary to burn. One ax remained for him /b to use. b He went and struck /b the gate b with the dull end /b of the ax b and it opened, as it is stated: “He became known as the wielder of axes upward in a thicket of trees” /b (Psalms 74:5). At the appropriate time the gate was breached as though the ax were cutting trees., b He was proceeding and killing until he reached the Sanctuary. /b When he reached the Sanctuary, b he ignited a fire in it. The Sanctuary rose, /b seeking to enter Heaven so that it would not burn. b They trod upon it from Heaven /b and returned it to its place, b as it is stated: “The Lord has trodden the virgin, the daughter of Judah, as in a winepress” /b (Lamentations 1:15). Nebuzaradan b became haughty, /b taking pride in his conquest. b A Divine Voice emerged and said to him: /b Your haughtiness is unwarranted, as b you killed a nation /b that was already b dead, you burned a Sanctuary /b that was already b burned, /b and b you ground flour /b that was already b ground, as it is stated /b with regard to Babylonia: b “Take millstones and grind flour; uncover your locks, tuck up the train, uncover the leg, pass over rivers” /b (Isaiah 47:2). b It was not stated: /b Grind b wheat, but /b “grind b flour,” /b indicating that all the destruction had already been wrought by God, and the role played by the enemy was insignificant.,When he reached the Sanctuary, b he saw the blood of Zechariah /b the priest b boiling. /b It had not calmed since he was killed in the Temple (see II Chronicles 24:20–22). Nebuzaradan b said to /b the priests there: b What is this? They said to him: It is the blood of offerings that was spilled. /b Nebuzaradan b said to them: Bring /b animals b and I will test /b to determine b if /b the blood of the animals b is similar /b to the blood that is boiling. b He slaughtered /b the animals b and /b their blood b was not similar /b to the boiling blood. Nebuzaradan b said to /b the priests: b Reveal /b the source of that blood b to me, and if not I will comb your flesh with an iron comb. /b ,The priests b said to /b Nebuzaradan: b This /b blood b is /b the blood of b a priest and a prophet who prophesied for the Jewish people with regard to the destruction of Jerusalem and whom they killed. He said to /b the priests: b I will pacify /b the blood so the boiling will stop. b He brought the Sages /b and b killed them over /b the blood b and /b its boiling b did not cease. He brought schoolchildren /b and b killed them over /b the blood b and /b its boiling b did not cease. He brought young priests /b and b killed them over /b the blood b and /b its boiling b did not cease. /b He continued killing b until he killed 940,000 /b people b over /b the blood, b and /b its boiling b did not cease. /b ,Nebuzaradan b approached /b the blood and b said: Zechariah, Zechariah, the worthy among them I killed /b on your behalf. b Is it satisfactory for you that I kill them all? Immediately /b the boiling b ceased. /b Nebuzaradan b contemplated repentance. He said: If they, who caused only one person to perish, /b gained atonement only after all b this /b killing, then with regard to b that man, /b referring to himself, b what will be /b required b for him /b to gain atonement? b He deserted /b his army and b dispatched /b a last b will to his house and converted. /b , b The Sages taught /b in a i baraita /i : b Naaman /b the Aramean (see II Kings, chapter 5) b was a i ger toshav /i , /b meaning that he accepted upon himself to refrain from idol worship but did not convert to Judaism. b Nebuzaradan was /b a completely b righteous convert. Among the descendants of Sisera /b (see Judges, chapter 4) were those who b studied Torah in Jerusalem. Among the descendants of Sennacherib /b were those who b taught Torah in public. /b The Gemara asks: b And who are they? /b The Gemara answers: They were b Shemaya and Avtalyon. /b ,The i baraita /i continues: b Among the descendants of Haman /b were those who b studied Torah in Bnei Brak. And even among the descendants of that wicked /b person, Nebuchadnezzar, were those whom b the Holy One, Blessed be He, sought to bring beneath the wings of the Divine Presence /b and have them convert. b The ministering angels said before the Holy One, Blessed be He: Master of the Universe: /b The b one who destroyed Your House and burned Your Sanctuary, /b will b You introduce /b him b beneath the wings of the Divine Presence? /b The Gemara explains: b That is /b the meaning of that b which is written: “We have healed Babylonia, but she is not healed” /b (Jeremiah 51:9). b Ulla says: This /b verse b is /b a reference to b Nebuchadnezzar, /b none of whose children converted. b Rabbi Shmuel bar Naḥmani says: /b This is not a reference to a person; rather, b these are the rivers of Babylonia, and interpret it /b as referring to b the bitter saltwater rivers of Babylonia. /b ,§ On a related note, the Gemara describes the events that led to the destruction of the Temple. b Ulla says: Ammon and Moab were bad neighbors of Jerusalem. Once they heard the prophets who prophesied about the destruction of the Jerusalem, they sent to Nebuchadnezzar: Emerge /b from your dwelling place b and come /b conquer them. Nebuchadnezzar b said /b to them: b I am afraid. /b I want to ensure b that they will not do to me just as they did to /b my b predecessors. /b ,Ammon and Moab b sent to him /b that it is written: b “For the i ish /i is not at home; he is gone on a long journey” /b (Proverbs 7:19), b and i ish /i /b is referring to b no /b one b but the Holy One, Blessed be He, as it is stated: “The Lord is an i ish /i of war” /b (Exodus 15:3). Nebuchadnezzar b sent to them /b is response: b He is in a nearby /b location, b and He will come. /b They b sent to /b Nebuchadnezzar: b “He has gone on a journey from afar” /b (Proverbs 7:19). Nebuchadnezzar b said to them: They have righteous /b among them b who will pray for mercy and bring Him /b to return.,Ammon and Moab b sent to /b Nebuchadnezzar: b “He has taken a bundle of i kesef /i with him” /b (Proverbs 7:20), b and i kesef /i /b is referring to b nothing other than the righteous, as it is stated: “So I bought her to me for fifteen pieces of i kesef /i and for a i kor /i of barley and a half- i kor /i of barley” /b (Hosea 3:2). The inference is that God acquired the congregation of Israel due to the presence of righteous people among them, and Ammon and Moab sent a message to Nebuchadnezzar that God had already taken the righteous and they no longer offered protection.,Nebuchadnezzar b sent to them: /b Perhaps b the wicked will repent /b and become righteous b and they will pray for mercy and they will bring Him /b to return. Ammon and Moab b sent to /b Nebuchadnezzar: b God already designated the time of their /b redemption, b as it is stated: “On the day of the i keseh /i , He will come home” /b (Proverbs 7:20), and b i keseh /i /b is referring to b nothing other than /b a designated b time, as it is stated: /b “Sound a i shofar /i at the New Moon, b at the i keseh /i on the day of our feast” /b (Psalms 81:4). Since there is a time designated for redemption, until then you can do as you please. Nebuchadnezzar b sent to them: It is winter /b now b and I cannot come /b and conquer Jerusalem b due to the snow and the rain. /b ,Ammon and Moab b sent to him: Come on the peaks of mountains, /b where the rain does not pool, b as it is stated: “Send the lamb to the ruler of the land from the peaks of the wilderness to the mount of the daughter of Zion” /b (Isaiah 16:1). Nebuchadnezzar b sent to them: If I come /b to Jerusalem, b I /b will b have no place to dwell /b while laying siege to the city. Ammon and Moab b sent to him: Their burial caves are superior to your palaces, /b and you can clear the caves and dwell there, b as it is written: “At that time, says the Lord, they shall remove the bones of the kings of Judea, and the bones of his princes, and the bones of the priests, and the bones of the prophets and the bones of the inhabitants of Jerusalem from their graves; and they shall spread them before the sun and the moon and all of the hosts of heaven, whom they have loved, and whom they have served, and after whom they have walked” /b (Jeremiah 8:1–2). Ultimately Nebuchadnezzar came to conquer Judea and removed the corpses to make room for his army.,§ b Rav Naḥman said to Rabbi Yitzḥak: Have you heard when the son of giants [ i bar niflei /i ] will come? /b Rabbi Yitzḥak b said to him: Who /b is b the son of giants? /b Rav Naḥman b said to him: /b He is the b Messiah. /b Rabbi Yitzḥak asked him: Do b you call the Messiah son of giants? /b Rav Naḥman b said to him: Yes, as it is written: “On that day I will establish /b
158. Babylonian Talmud, Pesahim, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •church fathers, rabbinic awareness of later christian literature •motifs, shared, rabbinic and christian literature Found in books: Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 386
159. Babylonian Talmud, Niddah, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •festivals, non-christian, in early christian literature Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 60
52b. איוב מן הסערה ויאמר אליו שוטה שבעולם הרבה נימין בראתי בראשו של אדם ולכל נימא ונימא בראתי לו גומא בפני עצמה שלא יהיו שתים יונקות מגומא אחת שאלמלא שתים יונקות מגומא אחת מכחיש מאור עיניו של אדם גומא בגומא לא נתחלף לי איוב באויב נתחלף לי,לא קשיא הא בגופא הא ברישא,אמר רב יהודה אמר שמואל שתי שערות שאמרו אפילו אחת על הכף ואחת על הביצים,תניא נמי הכי שתי שערות שאמרו אפילו אחת בגבה ואחת בכריסה אחת ע"ג קשרי אצבעותיה של יד ואחת ע"ג קשרי אצבעותיה של רגל דברי ר' שמעון בן יהודה איש כפר עכו שאמר משום רבי שמעון ורבנן אמר רב חסדא עד שיהו ב' שערות במקום אחד,ת"ר עד מתי הבת ממאנת עד שתביא שתי שערות דברי רבי מאיר ר' יהודה אומר עד שירבה השחור רבי יוסי אומר עד שתקיף העטרה בן שלקות אומר עד שתכלכל,ואמר רבי שמעון מצאני חנינא בן חכינאי בצידן ואמר כשאתה מגיע אצל ר"ע אמור לו עד מתי הבת ממאנת אם יאמר לך עד שתביא שתי שערות אמור לו והלא בן שלקות העיד במעמד כולכם ביבנה עד שתכלכל ולא אמרתם לו דבר,כשבאתי אצל רבי עקיבא אמר לי כלכול זה איני יודע מהו בן שלקות איני מכיר עד מתי הבת ממאנת עד שתביא ב' שערות, big strongמתני׳ /strong /big שתי שערות האמורות בפרה ובנגעים והאמורות בכל מקום כדי לכוף ראשן לעיקרן דברי רבי ישמעאל ר"א אומר כדי לקרוץ בציפורן ר' עקיבא אומר כדי שיהו ניטלות בזוג, big strongגמ׳ /strong /big אמר רב חסדא אמר מר עוקבא הלכה כדברי כולן להחמיר, big strongמתני׳ /strong /big הרואה כתם הרי זו מקולקלת,וחוששת משום זוב דברי רבי מאיר וחכ"א אין בכתמים משום זוב, big strongגמ׳ /strong /big מאן חכמים ר' חנינא בן אנטיגנוס היא דתניא ר"ח בן אנטיגנוס אומר כתמים אין בהן משום זוב ופעמים שהכתמים מביאין לידי זיבה,כיצד לבשה ג' חלוקות הבדוקות לה ומצאה עליהם כתם או שראתה ב' ימים וחלוק אחד הן הן הכתמים המביאין לידי זיבה,השתא שלשה חלוקות דלאו מגופה קחזיא חיישינן ב' ימים וחלוק אחד מיבעיא,מהו דתימא כל כי האי גוונא מביאה קרבן ונאכל קא משמע לן,אמר רבא בהא זכנהו ר' חנינא בן אנטיגנוס לרבנן מאי שנא פחות מג' גריסין במקום אחד דלא חיישינן דאמרי' בתרי יומי חזיתיה שלשה גריסין במקום אחד נמי נימא תרתי ופלגא מגופה חזיתיה ואידך אגב זוהמא דם מאכולת הוא,ורבנן כיון דאיכא לפלוגי בגריס ועוד לכל יומא לא תלינן,ור"ח בן אנטיגנוס ג' גריסין במקום א' הוא דלא חיישינן הא בג' מקומות חיישינן הא אמרת בג' חלוקות אין בג' מקומות לא,לדבריהם דרבנן קאמר להו לדידי בג' חלוקות אין בג' מקומות לא אלא לדידכו אודו לי מיהת דהיכא דחזאי ג' גריסין במקום אחד דאמרינן תרי ופלגא מגופה חזיתיה ואידך אגב זוהמא דם מאכולת הוא,ורבנן כיון דאיכא לפלוגי בגריס ועוד לכל יומא לא תלינן,ת"ר הרואה כתם אם יש בו כדי לחלק ג' גריסין שהן כגריס ועוד חוששת ואם לאו אינה חוששת,ר' יהודה בן אגרא אומר משום רבי יוסי אחת זו ואחת זו חוששת 52b. b Job out of the tempest, and said” /b (Job 38:1–3) b to him: /b Greatest b imbecile in the world! I have created many hairs on a person’s head, and for each and every hair I created /b its own b distinct follicle, so that two hairs should not draw /b sustece b from one follicle. As, were two /b hairs b to draw /b sustece b from one follicle, /b it would b weaken a man’s vision. /b Now if b I did not confuse one follicle with another, would I confuse /b a man named b Iyyov with i oyev /i ? /b This indicates that two hairs do not grow from one follicle.,The Gemara answers: It is b not difficult; that /b statement above, that two hairs in one follicle is a valid sign of adulthood, is referring to the hairs b in /b the rest of a person’s b body, /b whereas b this /b statement, that there cannot be two hairs in one follicle, is referring to the hairs b on /b a person’s b head. /b , b Rav Yehuda says /b that b Shmuel says: /b The b two hairs that /b the Sages b said /b are signs of adulthood are valid signs b even if /b they are not adjacent; but rather b one /b hair is b on the spoon- /b shaped area above his organ b and one /b is b on the /b young boy’s b testicles. /b ,The Gemara notes b that /b this b is also taught /b in a i baraita /i : The b two hairs that /b the Sages b said /b are signs of adulthood are valid signs b even /b if b one /b hair is b on /b the young girl’s b back, /b below her pubic area, b and one on her lower abdomen. /b The same applies if b one /b hair is b on the finger joints of her hand and one /b hair is b on the toe joints of her foot. /b This is b the statement of Rabbi Shimon ben Yehuda, of the village of Akko, who said /b it b in the name of Rabbi Shimon. And /b what do b the Rabbis /b say about this matter? b Rav Ḥisda says: /b According to the Rabbis, they are not a valid sign of adulthood b unless /b the b two hairs are in one place. /b ,§ The mishna teaches that Rabbi Yehuda and the Rabbis disagree with regard to when a young girl can perform refusal. According to the Rabbis, it is until she grows two pubic hairs after she reaches the age of twelve years and one day. According to Rabbi Yehuda she still retains the right to perform refusal at that point, until the majority of the pubic area is filled with hair. In this regard, b the Sages taught /b in a i baraita /i : b Until when can a young girl perform refusal? Until she grows two /b pubic b hairs; /b this is b the statement of Rabbi Meir. Rabbi Yehuda says: /b She can perform refusal b until /b the area covered by the b black /b pubic hairs b is greater /b than the white skin of the genital area. b Rabbi Yosei says: Until the nipple is surrounded /b by hair. b Ben Shelakot says: Until /b the pubic area is b filled with hair. /b , b And Rabbi Shimon said: Ḥanina ben Ḥakhinai found me in /b the city of b Tzaidan and said /b to me: b When you reach Rabbi Akiva, say to him: Until when can a young girl perform refusal? If he says to you /b that she may perform refusal b until she grows two /b pubic b hairs, say to him: But didn’t ben Shelakot testify in the presence of all of you in Yavne /b that she may perform refusal b until /b the pubic area b is filled with hair [ i shetekhalkel /i ], and you did not say anything to him, /b thereby indicating that you conceded to him?,Rabbi Shimon continued: b When I reached Rabbi Akiva, /b and I said what I had been told to say to him, b he said to me: I do not know what this filling with hair [ i kilkul /i ] is, I don’t know /b any b ben Shelakot, /b and my opinion with regard to your question, b until when can a young girl perform refusal, /b is that she can perform refusal b until she grows two /b pubic b hairs. /b , strong MISHNA: /strong The b two /b white or black b hairs that are mentioned with regard to /b disqualification of a red b heifer; and /b the two white hairs mentioned b with regard to leprous marks, /b i.e., that if they grow within a white leprous mark, it is impure; b and /b the two hairs b that are mentioned in every place, /b i.e., with regard to a young boy and girl, are significant only if they are long b enough to bend the top /b of the hairs b to /b reach b their roots. /b This is b the statement of Rabbi Yishmael. Rabbi Eliezer says: /b They must be long b enough to /b grasp them and b cut /b them b with a fingernail. Rabbi Akiva says: /b They must be long b enough to be cut with a pair [ i bezug /i ] /b of scissors., strong GEMARA: /strong b Rav Ḥisda says /b that b Mar Ukva says /b with regard to the various opinions in the mishna on the measure of hairs: The b i halakha /i /b is b in accordance with the statements of all of them to be stringent. /b One should consider it hair only if all of the criteria are met, or consider it to be hair if any one condition is met, depending on which standard yields the more stringent result., strong MISHNA: /strong With regard to a woman b who sees /b a red b stain /b on her garment, b that /b woman’s reckoning b is distorted. /b Since she does not know when the blood that caused the stain appeared, she does not know when the seven days of menstrual flow end and when the eleven days of the flow of the i zava /i begin., b And /b therefore she must be b concerned due to /b the possibility that it might have been caused by the b flow of a i zava /i . /b If she wore the same garment for three days on which she can assume the status of a i zava /i , and subsequently discovered a stain with an area that is the size of at least three split beans, the concern is that on each of those three days a stain with the area of at least one split bean, the minimum area that transmits impurity, was formed. The result is that she is a greater i zava /i and is required to count seven clean days before immersion. This is b the statement of Rabbi Meir. And the Rabbis say: No /b configuration b of stains /b leads to concern b due to the flow of a i zava /i . /b , strong GEMARA: /strong The Gemara asks: b Who /b are b the Rabbis /b in this mishna? b It is Rabbi Ḥanina ben Antigonus, as it is taught /b in a i baraita /i that b Rabbi Ḥanina ben Antigonus says: Stains do not /b lead to concern b due to the flow of a i zava /i , but stains can sometimes lead to i ziva /i . /b , b How so, /b i.e., how can stains lead to i ziva /i according to Rabbi Ḥanina ben Antigonus? If a woman b wore three /b different b robes that /b had been b examined by her /b for blood stains, b and /b she then b found a stain on /b each of b them; or /b if she b saw /b blood flowing from her body on b two /b consecutive b days and /b on the third day she saw a stain on b one /b of the b robes /b that she wore that day, b those are the stains that lead to i ziva /i . /b ,The Gemara raises a difficulty with regard to the above statement: According to the opinion of Rabbi Ḥanina ben Antigonus, b now /b that in a case where she sees stains on b three robes we /b are b concerned /b for i ziva /i , despite the fact b that /b she b does not see /b the blood flowing b from her body, is /b it b necessary /b to state that we are concerned if she experiences bleeding from her body on b two days and /b sees a stain on b one /b of the b robes? /b ,The Gemara answers: It is necessary to state that, b lest you say /b that in b any case like this, /b where she experiences bleeding from her body on two days and on the third day she sees a stain on one of the robes, b she brings an offering and it is consumed, /b like one who is definitely a i zava /i . Therefore, Rabbi Ḥanina ben Antigonus b teaches us /b that her status as a i zava /i is uncertain, and consequently she brings a bird for a sin offering that is due to uncertainty, which is not eaten., b Rava said: With this /b claim b Rabbi Ḥanina ben Antigonus bested the /b other b Rabbis, /b who agree with the opinion of Rabbi Meir in the mishna: b What is different /b about a stain that is b less than three split beans in one place, that we are not concerned /b she might be a i zava /i ? The reason is b that we say /b she b saw /b blood b on /b only b two days. /b But in a case where she discovered a stain on her robe with the area of at least b three split beans in one place, /b one can b also say: /b The area of b two and a half /b split beans should be attributed to blood b seen from her body, but the other is /b the b blood of a louse that /b was there b due to the dirt /b associated with her bleeding.,The Gemara asks: b And /b how do b the Rabbis /b respond to this claim? The Gemara answers: They maintain that b since it is possible to divide /b the stain into b at least one split bean for each /b of the three b days, we do not attribute /b the stain to the blood of a louse.,The Gemara raises a difficulty with regard to the statement of Rava: b And /b according to the opinion of b Rabbi Ḥanina ben Antigonus, /b one can infer that b it is /b specifically in the case of a stain with the area of at least b three split beans in one place that we are not concerned /b she might be a i zava /i . It can be inferred from here that if it is b in three places, we are concerned. /b But b didn’t you say /b that if she discovered stains b in three robes, yes, /b we are concerned, which indicates that if it is b in three places /b on a single robe we are b not /b concerned.,The Gemara answers that it was b in accordance with the statement of the Rabbis /b that Rabbi Ḥanina ben Antigonus b stated /b his opinion b to them, /b as follows: b According to my /b opinion, if she discovered stains b in three robes, yes /b we are concerned, whereas if it is b in three places /b we are b not /b concerned. b But according to your /b opinion, b at least concede to me that where /b she b saw /b a stain on her robe with the area of at least b three split beans in one place, that we say /b that the area of b two and a half /b split beans can be attributed to blood b seen from her body, and the other is /b the b blood of a louse /b that was there b due to the dirt /b associated with her bleeding.,The Gemara asks: b And /b how do b the Rabbis /b respond to this claim? The Gemara answers: They maintain that b since it is possible to divide /b the stain into b at least one split bean for each /b of the three b days, we do not attribute /b the stain to the blood of a louse.,§ With regard to a woman who finds a stain on her robe, b the Sages taught /b in a i baraita /i : In the case of a woman b who sees /b a red b stain /b on her garment that she wore for a number of days and she does not know when and where it is from, what is her status? b If /b the area is large b enough to be divided /b into three parts, where the total area is the size of b three split beans, /b each of b which is /b the minimum measure to render her a i zava /i , i.e., an area the size of b at least a split bean, /b she must be b concerned /b that she is a i zava /i , as this stain might be the result of seeing a sufficient measure of blood on each of three occasions. b But if /b the stain is b not /b that size, she does b not /b need to b be concerned. /b , b Rabbi Yehuda ben Agra says in the name of Rabbi Yosei: Both /b in b this /b case, where she saw a stain large enough to be divided into three parts, where the total area is the size of three split beans, b and that /b case, where the stain was not that large, she must be b concerned /b that she might be a i zava /i . This is due to the fact that she possibly saw stains of sufficient size on only two occasions, but one was during twilight, which counts as two days, amounting to a total of three days.
160. Babylonian Talmud, Menachot, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 58
65b. b And if Moses, our teacher, was a lover of the Jewish people, why did he delay them in the wilderness forty years? /b The elderly man b said to him: My teacher, you dismiss me with this /b retort? Rabbi Yoḥa ben Zakkai b said to him: Fool! And will our perfect Torah not be /b as worthy b as your frivolous speech? /b Your claim can easily be refuted.,Rabbi Yoḥa ben Zakkai cites a proof that i Shavuot /i does not need to occur specifically on a Sunday. b One verse states: /b “Even to the morrow after the seventh week b you shall number fifty days; /b and you shall present a new meal offering to the Lord” (Leviticus 23:16), b and one verse, /b the preceding one, apparently contradicts this when it b states: /b “And you shall count for you from the morrow after the day of rest, from the day that you brought the sheaf of the waving; b seven weeks shall there be complete.” /b Is the festival of i Shavuot /i seven full weeks after Passover, i.e., counting from Sunday through Shabbat seven times; or is it fifty days after Passover?,The Gemara explains: b How so, /b i.e., how can one reconcile these two verses? b Here, /b the verse that mentions seven complete weeks, is referring to a year b when the festival /b of Passover b occurs on Shabbat. /b In such a year, the fifty-day period between Passover and i Shavuot /i contains seven complete weeks, from Sunday through Shabbat. b There, /b the verse that defines the period as fifty days, is referring to a year b when the festival /b of Passover b occurs in the middle of the week. /b ,The Gemara presents b a mnemonic /b for several other proofs in refutation of the claim of the Boethusians: That b of Rabbi Eliezer: Number; Rabbi Yehoshua: Count; Rabbi Yishmael: From the i omer /i ; Rabbi Yehuda: Below. /b , b Rabbi Eliezer says: /b The previous proof b is not necessary, as /b the verse b states: /b “Seven weeks b you shall number for you; /b from the time the sickle is first put to the standing grain you shall begin to number seven weeks” (Deuteronomy 16:9). The term “for you” indicates that the b counting /b of the weeks b is dependent upon /b the decision of the b court, as they know /b how to b calculate the new /b months, upon which the date of the Festival depends. Therefore, when the verse states: b “The morrow after the day of rest [ i hashabbat /i ]” /b (Leviticus 23:16), it means: b The morrow after the Festival, /b as the determination of Festivals is by the court. This serves to b exclude /b the interpretation that the counting starts after the b Shabbat of Creation, /b i.e., a regular weekly Shabbat, b whose counting /b can be performed b by every person, /b not exclusively by the court.,Citing a different proof, b Rabbi Yehoshua says: /b The b Torah said /b to b count days, /b as it is stated: “A month of days” (Numbers 11:20), b and /b then b sanctify /b the b month /b with offerings. And the Torah also said to b count days /b from Passover b and /b then b sanctify the festival of i Shavuot /i /b with offerings, as it is stated: “You shall count fifty days” (Leviticus 23:16). From this comparison, one can learn that b just as /b the start of the counting toward the new b month is known /b even b before it comes, /b as one begins counting toward the following new month on the first day of a month, b so too /b the start of the counting toward b the festival of i Shavuot /i is known /b even b before it comes, /b as one begins counting toward i Shavuot /i on a fixed day of the month.,The Gemara elaborates: b And if you say /b that the festival of b i Shavuot /i always /b occurs the b day after Shabbat, how /b is the counting toward Shavuot b known /b based on b what came before it? /b If the occurrence of i Shavuot /i depends upon a Shabbat, there would be no specific date after Passover upon which the counting occurs yearly., b Rabbi Yishmael says /b there is another refutation of the Boethusian interpretation. b The Torah said: Bring /b the b i omer /i /b offering on the festival b on Passover and the two loaves on i Shavuot /i . Just as there, /b with regard to the offering on the b festival /b of i Shavuot /i , the two loaves are brought at b the beginning of the Festival, /b as it lasts only one day, b so too here, /b with regard to the b festival /b of Passover, the i omer /i must be brought at b the beginning of the Festival. /b If the i omer /i were to always be brought on a Sunday, this might occur at the end of the festival of Passover. For example, if Passover started on a Monday, the i omer /i would be brought only on the next Sunday, at the end of the Festival., b Rabbi Yehuda ben Beteira says /b there is yet another refutation. It is b stated “ i shabbat /i ” above /b (Leviticus 23:15), with regard to starting the counting of the i omer /i , b and /b it is also b stated “ i shabbat /i ” below /b (Leviticus 23:16), with regard to the commencement of the festival of i Shavuot /i . b Just as /b there, with regard to the b festival /b of i Shavuot /i , it is stated: “Even until the morrow after the seventh week [ i hashabbat /i ] you shall number fifty days,” b and /b the word i shabbat /i is referring to the b beginning of the Festival /b and it immediately b follows /b the end of the seventh week; b so too here, /b with regard to the bringing of the i omer /i , the word i shabbat /i means b Festival, /b so that the i omer /i offering immediately b follows the beginning of the Festival, /b on the second day of Passover. According to the Boethusians, the commencement of the counting could start well after the beginning of Passover. For example, if Passover occurs on a Sunday, the counting of the i omer /i would start only the following Sunday., b The Sages taught /b in a i baraita /i : The verse states: “And you shall count for you from the morrow after the day of rest [ i hashabbat /i ], from the day that you brought the sheaf of the waving; seven weeks there shall be complete” (Leviticus 23:15). The phrase: b “And you shall count for you,” /b teaches b that /b the mitzva of counting is not a communal obligation. Rather, b there should be a counting by each and every /b person.,The i baraita /i continues: b From the morrow after the day of rest [ i hashabbat /i ], /b this means b from the morrow after the festival /b of Passover. b Or /b perhaps this is b not /b the meaning of the verse, but b rather /b it means b after the Shabbat of Creation, /b i.e., Sunday. b Rabbi Yosei bar Yehuda says: /b This cannot be correct, b as /b the verse b states: /b “Even until the morrow after the seventh week b you shall number fifty days” /b (Leviticus 23:16). This teaches that b all the countings that you count shall be only fifty days. /b ,Rabbi Yosei bar Yehuda elaborates: b And if you say /b that the clause: b “From the morrow after /b the day of rest [ i hashabbat /i ],” is referring to the b Shabbat of Creation, sometimes you will find /b a count of b fifty-one /b days from the first day of Passover, which is the date that the count began the previous year, until i Shavuot /i ; b and sometimes you will find fifty-two, /b or b fifty-three, /b or b fifty-four, /b or b fifty-five, /b or b fifty-six. /b For example, in one year, Passover occurs on Shabbat, and the counting of the i omer /i would start on Sunday, the sixteenth of Nisan, and i Shavuot /i would occur fifty days later. Another year, Passover occurs on a Friday, and the counting starts on Sunday, then the date that i Shavuot /i will occur this year is fifty-one days from the sixteenth of Nisan. If Passover occurs on a Thursday, and the counting begins on the following Sunday, i Shavuot /i will occur fifty-two days from the sixteenth of Nisan., b Rabbi Yehuda ben Beteira says: /b That proof b is not necessary, /b
161. Babylonian Talmud, Ketuvot, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 63
112a. והויא כמבי מיכסי עד אקרא דתולבנקי כ"ב פרסי אורכא ופותיא שיתא פרסי,רבי חלבו ור' עוירא ור' יוסי בר חנינא איקלעו לההוא אתרא אייתו קמייהו אפרסקא דהוה כאילפס כפר הינו ואילפס כפר הינו כמה הוי ה' סאין אכלו שליש והפקירו שליש ונתנו לפני בהמתן שליש,לשנה איקלע ר' אלעזר להתם ואייתו לקמיה נקטו בידיה ואמר (תהלים קז, לד) ארץ פרי למלחה מרעת יושבי בה,רבי יהושע בן לוי איקלע לגבלא חזנהו להנהו קטופי דהוו קיימי כי עיגלי אמר עגלים בין הגפנים אמרו ליה קטופי נינהו אמר ארץ ארץ הכניסי פירותייך למי את מוציאה פירותייך לערביים הללו שעמדו עלינו בחטאתינו,לשנה איקלע ר' חייא להתם חזנהו דהוו קיימי כעיזי אמר עזים בין הגפנים אמרו ליה זיל לא תעביד לן כי חברך:,תנו רבנן בברכותיה של ארץ ישראל בית סאה עושה חמשת ריבוא כורין בישיבתה של צוען בית סאה עושה שבעים כורין דתניא אמר רבי מאיר אני ראיתי בבקעת בית שאן בית סאה עושה שבעים כורין,ואין לך מעולה בכל ארצות יותר מארץ מצרים שנאמר (בראשית יג, י) כגן ה' כארץ מצרים ואין לך מעולה בכל ארץ מצרים יותר מצוען דהוו מרבו בה מלכים דכתיב (ישעיהו ל, ד) כי היו בצוען שריו ואין לך טרשים בכל א"י יותר מחברון דהוו קברי בה שיכבי,ואפילו הכי חברון מבונה על אחת משבעה בצוען דכתיב (במדבר יג, כב) וחברון שבע שנים נבנתה לפני צוען מצרים מאי נבנתה אילימא נבנתה ממש אפשר אדם בונה בית לבנו קטן קודם שיבנה לבנו גדול שנאמר (בראשית י, ו) ובני חם כוש ומצרים ופוט וכנען,אלא שמבונה על אחת משבעה בצוען והני מילי בטרשים אבל שלא בטרשים חמש מאה,והני מילי שלא בברכותיה אבל בברכותיה כתיב (בראשית כו, יב) ויזרע יצחק בארץ ההיא וגו',תניא אמר רבי יוסי סאה ביהודה היתה עושה חמש סאין סאה קמח סאה סלת סאה סובין סאה מורסין וסאה קיבוריא א"ל ההוא צדוקי לר' חנינא יאה משבחיתו בה בארעכון בית סאה אחת הניח לי אבא ממנה משח ממנה חמר ממנה עיבור ממנה קיטניות ממנה רועות מקנתי,א"ל ההוא בר אמוראה לבר ארעא דישראל האי [תאלתא] דקיימא אגודא דירדנא כמה גדריתו מינה אמר ליה שיתין כורי א"ל אכתי לא עייליתו בה אחריבתוה אנן מאה ועשרים כורי הוה גזרינן מינה אמר ליה אנא נמי מחד גיסא קאמינא לך,אמר רב חסדא מאי דכתיב (ירמיהו ג, יט) ואתן לך ארץ חמדה נחלת צבי למה ארץ ישראל נמשלה לצבי לומר לך מה צבי זה אין עורו מחזיק בשרו אף ארץ ישראל אינה מחזקת פירותיה דבר אחר מה צבי זה קל מכל החיות אף ארץ ישראל קלה מכל הארצות לבשל את פירותיה,אי מה צבי זה קל ואין בשרו שמן אף ארץ ישראל קלה לבשל ואין פירותיה שמנים תלמוד לומר זבת חלב ודבש שמנים מחלב ומתוקים מדבש,רבי אלעזר כי הוה סליק לארץ ישראל אמר פלטי לי מחדא כי סמכוהו אמר פלטי לי מתרתי כי אותבוהו בסוד העיבור אמר פלטי לי מתלת,שנאמר (יחזקאל יג, ט) והיתה ידי אל הנביאים החוזים שוא וגו' בסוד עמי לא יהיו זה סוד עיבור ובכתב בית ישראל לא יכתבו זה סמיכה ואל אדמת ישראל לא יבואו כמשמעו,רבי זירא כי הוה סליק לא"י לא אשכח מברא למעבר נקט במצרא וקעבר אמר ליה ההוא צדוקי עמא פזיזא דקדמיתו פומייכו לאודנייכו אכתי בפזיזותייכו קיימיתו אמר ליה דוכתא דמשה ואהרן לא זכו לה אנא מי יימר דזכינא לה:,ר' אבא מנשק כיפי דעכו ר' חנינא מתקן מתקליה ר' אמי ורבי אסי 112a. b and it was /b the same in area b as /b that which stretches b from /b the city of b Bei Mikhsei until the fortress of Tulbanki: Its length twenty-two parasangs and its width six parasangs, /b 132 square parasangs, which is 2,112 square i mil /i .,§ The Gemara relates that b Rabbi Ḥelbo, Rabbi Avira, and Rabbi Yosei bar Ḥanina happened /b to come on one occasion b to a certain place. /b The locals b brought before /b these Sages b a peach [ i afarseka /i ] that was /b as large b as a stewpot [ i ilpas /i ] of Kefar Hino. /b The Gemara asks: b And how big is a stewpot of Kefar Hino? /b The Gemara answers: It has a capacity of b five i se’a /i . They ate one-third /b of it, b they declared ownerless one-third /b of it, b and they placed before their animals one-third /b of it., b In /b the following b year, Rabbi Elazar happened /b to come b to that /b same place, b and they brought /b a peach b before him. He held it in his hand, /b as the peach was small enough for him to grasp in one hand, b and he said, /b in reference to the change in size of the fruit from the previous year: b “A fruitful land into a salt waste, from the wickedness of they who dwell there” /b (Psalms 107:34), i.e., their sins caused the drastic change in the yield of the produce.,§ Once b Rabbi Yehoshua ben Levi happened /b to come b to Gavla, /b in the Golan, and b he saw those clusters /b of vines b that were standing /b as large b as calves. He said /b to the locals: b Calves are /b standing b between the grapevines /b and you are not concerned that they will cause damage? b They said to him: They are clusters. /b Rabbi Yehoshua ben Levi b said: O earth, O earth! Gather in your fruit. For whom do you produce your fruit? For these gentiles who stand over us in our sins? /b It would be preferable if you did not produce such large fruit.,The following b year, Rabbi Ḥiyya happened /b to come b to that /b same place, and b he saw clusters that were standing /b as large b as goats. He said: Goats are /b standing b between the grapevines. They said to him: Go /b away; b do not do to us what your colleague /b has done. Rabbi Yehoshua ben Levi’s curse was already fulfilled, as the fruit had shrunk from the previous year.,§ b The Sages taught: In /b years of b blessings of Eretz Yisrael, /b an area of land measuring b one i beit se’a /i produces five thousand i kor /i . /b By way of comparison, b when Zoan, /b a fertile region in Egypt, b was settled, one i beit se’a /i /b there b would produce /b only b seventy i kor /i . As it is taught /b in a i baraita /i that b Rabbi Meir said: I saw in the valley of Beit She’an /b that one b i beit se’a /i produced seventy i kor /i , /b which teaches that the soil of a good-quality and irrigated stretch of land outside the borders of Eretz Yisrael will naturally yield this quantity of produce., b And you have no more outstanding /b earth b among all the lands /b other b than the land of Egypt, as it is stated: “Like the garden of the Lord, like the land of Egypt” /b (Genesis 13:10). b And you have no more outstanding /b region b in all of the land of Egypt than Zoan. /b The superior quality of Zoan is derived from the fact b that they would raise kings there, as it is written: “For his princes are at Zoan” /b (Isaiah 30:4). b And you have no rockier /b terrain b in all of Eretz Yisrael than Hebron, as /b people b would bury /b their b dead there, /b e.g., the Patriarchs in the Cave of Machpelah, because the land was not arable., b And even so, Hebron was more developed, /b i.e., more fertile, b than Zoan /b by b sevenfold, as it is written: “Now Hebron was built [ i nivneta /i ] seven years before Zoan in Egypt” /b (Numbers 13:22). b What /b is the meaning of the term: b i Nivneta /i , /b in this verse? b If we say /b it means b literally /b that Hebron b was built /b before Zoan, b would a person build a house for his younger son before building /b one b for his older son? As it is stated: “And the sons of Ham: Cush, and Mizraim, and Put, and Canaan” /b (Genesis 10:6), which indicates that Egypt, Mizraim, was older than Canaan, in whose territory Hebron was located., b Rather, /b the meaning of the verse is that Hebron b was more developed /b and more fertile b than Zoan /b by b sevenfold, /b which means that Hebron produced 490 i kor /i , seven times more than the seventy i kor /i of regular fertile land, as stated above. b And this applies only to the rocky /b terrain of Eretz Yisrael, e.g., Hebron, b whereas /b those parts of Eretz Yisrael that were b not rocky /b produced even more, up to b five hundred /b i kor /i ., b And this applies /b only b to /b a year when Eretz Yisrael is b not blessed. However, /b with regard to a year b when it was blessed, it is written: “And Isaac sowed in that land, /b and found in the same year a hundredfold” (Genesis 26:12). Isaac’s field produced one hundred times the normal yield, which according to the above calculations is five thousand i kor /i , as stated in the i baraita /i .,§ b It is taught /b in a i baraita /i that b Rabbi Yosei said: A i se’a /i /b of wheat b in Judea would produce five i se’a /i . /b How so? It would yield b a i se’a /i of flour; a i se’a /i of fine flour; a i se’a /i of bran /b fiber, from the outer layer of the grain; b a i se’a /i of coarse bran, /b i.e., flour mixed with bran fiber; b and a i se’a /i of cibarium [ i kiburaya /i ], /b inferior flour. b A certain Sadducee said to Rabbi Ḥanina: You are improving your land very well; /b my b father left me one i beit se’a /i /b of land in Eretz Yisrael b and from it /b I am able to produce b oil, from it /b I produce b wine, from it /b I grow b produce, from it /b I grow b legumes, /b and with it I provide pasture from which b my sheep graze. /b , b A certain Amorite /b once b said to /b a resident b of Eretz Yisrael: That palm tree which stands on the banks of the Jordan, how many /b dates b are you able to pick from it? He said to him: Sixty i kor /i . /b The Amorite b said to him: You have not yet /b fully b entered /b Eretz Yisrael and yet b you have /b already succeeded in b destroying it. We would pick off that /b tree b 120 i  kor /i . /b The resident b said to him: I too am speaking to you /b about only b one side /b of the tree, as I have not yet picked the fruit off the other side.,§ b Rav Ḥisda said: What is /b the meaning of that b which is written: “And give you a pleasant land, the goodliest [ i tzvi /i ] heritage” /b (Jeremiah 3:19)? b Why is Eretz Yisrael likened to a deer [ i tzvi /i ]? /b This comparison comes b to tell you /b that b just as /b with regard to b this deer, its skin cannot contain its meat /b once it has been skinned, b so too, Eretz Yisrael cannot contain its fruit /b once it has been picked, due to the great quantity of the produce. b Alternatively, just as this deer is swifter than all the /b other b beasts, so too Eretz Yisrael is swifter to ripen its fruit than all /b the other b countries. /b ,The Gemara asks: b If /b so, one can suggest the following comparison: b Just as this deer is swift and its meat is not fatty, so too, Eretz Yisrael is swift to ripen /b its fruit b but its fruit is not fat /b and juicy. The Gemara explains: For this reason b the verse states: “Flowing with milk and honey” /b (Exodus 3:8), to say that its fruit is b fat /b and juicier b than milk and sweeter than honey. /b ,§ The Gemara relates that b when Rabbi Elazar ascended to Eretz Yisrael he said: I have been spared one /b curse. b When they ordained him /b and awarded him the title of Rabbi, b he said: I have been spared two. When they appointed him to sit in the council /b of Sages who dealt with the b intercalation of the calendar, he said: I have been spared three. /b , b As it is stated: “And My hand shall be against the prophets that see vanity, /b and that divine lies; they shall not be in the council of My people, neither shall they be written in the register of the house of Israel, neither shall they enter into the land of Israel; and you shall know that I am the Lord God” (Ezekiel 13:9). b “They shall not be in the council of My people,” this /b is referring to b the council /b of the b intercalation of the calendar; “neither shall they be written in the register of the house of Israel,” this /b is referring to b ordination; “neither shall they enter into the land of Israel,” /b this is understood b as per its plain meaning. /b Rabbi Elazar merited that these three curses were not fulfilled in him.,§ b When Rabbi Zeira ascended to Eretz Yisrael he could not find a ferry to cross /b the Jordan River. b He took hold of a rope /b that was strung across as a makeshift bridge b and crossed /b the Jordan. b A certain Sadducee said to him: Hasty people who put your mouths before your ears, /b when you said at the time of the giving of the Torah: “We will do” before “we will hear” (Exodus 24:7), b you remain hasty /b to this day. Why couldn’t you wait a little longer to cross the river on a ferry? Rabbi Zeira b said to him: /b This is b a place where Moses and Aaron did not merit /b entering; b who is to say that I will merit /b seeing this land? I hurried across before anything might occur to prevent my entrance into Eretz Yisrael.,§ b Rabbi Abba would kiss the rocks of Akko, /b which was on the coast of Eretz Yisrael. b Rabbi Ḥanina would repair its stumbling blocks, /b i.e., any potholes in the land, so that travelers would not fall and consequently speak ill of Eretz Yisrael. b Rabbi Ammi and Rabbi Asi /b
162. Athanasius, Against The Pagans, '12 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 669
163. Babylonian Talmud, Hulin, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •church fathers, rabbinic awareness of later christian literature Found in books: Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 391
87a. הכי השתא התם משתא וברוכי בהדי הדדי לא אפשר הכא אפשר דשחיט בחדא ומכסי בחדא:, big strongמתני׳ /strong /big שחט ולא כסה וראהו אחר חייב לכסות כסהו ונתגלה פטור מלכסות כסהו הרוח חייב לכסות:, big strongגמ׳ /strong /big ת"ר (ויקרא יז, יג) ושפך וכסה מי ששפך יכסה שחט ולא כסה וראהו אחר מנין שחייב לכסות שנאמר (ויקרא יז, יד) ואומר לבני ישראל אזהרה לכל בני ישראל,תניא אידך ושפך וכסה במה ששפך בו יכסה שלא יכסנו ברגל שלא יהיו מצות בזויות עליו תניא אידך ושפך וכסה מי ששפך הוא יכסנו מעשה באחד ששחט וקדם חבירו וכסה וחייבו רבן גמליאל ליתן לו י' זהובים,איבעיא להו שכר מצוה או שכר ברכה למאי נפקא מינה לברכת המזון אי אמרת שכר מצוה אחת היא ואי אמרת שכר ברכה הויין ארבעים מאי,תא שמע דא"ל ההוא צדוקי לרבי מי שיצר הרים לא ברא רוח ומי שברא רוח לא יצר הרים דכתיב (עמוס ד, יג) כי הנה יוצר הרים ובורא רוח אמר ליה שוטה שפיל לסיפיה דקרא ה' צבאות שמו,אמר ליה נקוט לי זימנא תלתא יומי ומהדרנא לך תיובתא יתיב רבי תלת תעניתא כי הוה קא בעי מיברך אמרו ליה צדוקי קאי אבבא אמר (תהלים סט, כב) ויתנו בברותי רוש וגו',א"ל רבי מבשר טובות אני לך לא מצא תשובה אויבך ונפל מן הגג ומת אמר לו רצונך שתסעוד אצלי אמר לו הן לאחר שאכלו ושתו א"ל כוס של ברכה אתה שותה או ארבעים זהובים אתה נוטל אמר לו כוס של ברכה אני שותה יצתה בת קול ואמרה כוס של ברכה ישוה ארבעים זהובים,אמר רבי יצחק עדיין שנה לאותה משפחה בין גדולי רומי וקוראין אותה משפחת בר לויאנוס:,כסהו ונתגלה: אמר ליה רב אחא בריה דרבא לרב אשי מאי שנא מהשבת אבדה דאמר מר (דברים כב, א) השב אפילו מאה פעמים,אמר ליה התם לא כתיב מיעוטא הכא כתיב מיעוטא וכסהו:,כסהו הרוח: אמר רבה בר בר חנה אמר רבי יוחנן לא שנו אלא שחזר ונתגלה אבל לא חזר ונתגלה פטור מלכסות וכי חזר ונתגלה מאי הוי הא אידחי ליה אמר רב פפא זאת אומרת אין דיחוי אצל מצות,ומאי שנא מהא דתניא השוחט ונבלע דם בקרקע חייב לכסות התם כשרשומו ניכר:, big strongמתני׳ /strong /big דם שנתערב במים אם יש בו מראית דם חייב לכסות נתערב ביין רואין אותו כאילו הוא מים נתערב בדם הבהמה 87a. The Gemara rejects this: b How can /b these cases b be compared? There, /b in the incident involving the students of Rav, it is b impossible to drink and recite a blessing simultaneously. /b Accordingly, by requesting a cup over which to recite the blessing of Grace after Meals, they demonstrated their desire to cease drinking. b Here, /b when one covers the blood of the undomesticated animal before slaughtering the bird, it is b possible to slaughter /b the bird b with the one /b hand b and cover /b the blood of the undomesticated animal b with the /b other b one. /b Accordingly, the act of covering the blood of the undomesticated animal is not considered an interruption of the acts of slaughter, since they could have been performed simultaneously., strong MISHNA: /strong If one b slaughtered /b an undomesticated animal or bird b and did not cover /b the blood, b and another /b person b saw /b the uncovered blood, the second person is b obligated to cover /b the blood. If one b covered /b the blood b and it was /b then b uncovered, /b he is b exempt from covering it /b again. If b the wind /b blew earth on the blood and b covered it, /b and it was consequently uncovered, he is b obligated to cover /b the blood., strong GEMARA: /strong b The Sages taught /b in a i baraita /i : The verse states: b “And he shall pour out /b its blood b and cover /b it with earth” (Leviticus 17:13), indicating that b the one who poured out /b its blood, i.e., slaughtered the animal, b shall cover it. /b If one b slaughtered /b the animal or bird b and did not cover /b the blood, b and another person saw /b the uncovered blood, b from where /b is it derived b that /b the person who saw the blood b is obligated to cover /b it? It is derived from the following verse, b as it is stated: “Therefore I said to the children of Israel” /b (Leviticus 17:12), which is b a warning to all the children of Israel /b to fulfill the mitzva of covering the blood., b It is taught /b in b another /b i baraita /i : The verse states: b “And he shall pour out /b its blood b and cover /b it with earth,” indicating that b with that which he poured out /b the blood b he shall cover it, /b i.e., he must use his hand, and b he /b may b not cover it with /b his b foot, so that mitzvot will not be contemptible to him. It is taught /b in b another /b i baraita /i : The verse states: b “And he shall pour out /b its blood b and cover /b it with earth,” indicating that b the one who poured out /b the blood b shall cover it. An incident /b occurred b involving one who slaughtered /b an undomesticated animal or bird b and another /b individual b preempted /b him b and covered /b the blood, b and Rabban Gamliel deemed him obligated to give ten gold coins to /b the one who performed the act of slaughter., b A dilemma was raised before /b the Sages: Are these ten gold coins b compensation /b for the stolen b mitzva or /b are they b compensation /b for the stolen b blessing /b recited over the mitzva? The Gemara elaborates: b What is the /b practical b difference? /b The difference is b with regard to /b a similar case involving b Grace after Meals. If you say /b the coins are b compensation for the mitzva, /b then with regard to Grace after Meals, since all its blessings constitute b one /b mitzva, one would be obligated to give only ten gold coins. b But if you say /b they are b compensation for the /b lost b blessing, /b then with regard to Grace after Meals the compensation b is forty /b gold coins, since Grace after Meals comprises four blessings. b What /b is the conclusion?,The Gemara suggests: b Come /b and b hear /b a proof from an incident in b which a certain heretic said to Rabbi /b Yehuda HaNasi: b He who created mountains did not create wind, and he who created wind did not create mountains; /b rather, each was created by a separate deity, b as it is written: “For behold, He Who forms the mountains and He Who creates the wind” /b (Amos 4:13), indicating that there are two deities: One who forms the mountains and one who creates the wind. Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi b said to him: Imbecile, go to the end of the verse, /b which states: b “The Lord, the God of hosts, is His name.” /b The verse emphasizes that God is the One Who both forms and creates.,The heretic b said to /b Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi: b Give me three days’ time and I will respond to you /b with b a rebuttal /b of your claim. b Rabbi /b Yehuda HaNasi b sat /b and fasted b three /b days of b fasting /b while awaiting the heretic, in order that he would not find a rebuttal. b When /b Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi b wanted to have a meal /b at the conclusion of those three days, b they said to him: /b That b heretic is standing at the doorway. /b Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi b recited /b the following verse about himself: b “They put gall into my food, /b and for my thirst they gave me vinegar to drink” (Psalms 69:22), i.e., my meal is embittered with the presence of this heretic.,When Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi came to the door he saw that it was in fact a different heretic, not the one who asked for three days to prepare a rebuttal. This heretic b said to him: Rabbi, I am a bearer of good tidings for you: Your enemy did not find a response, and he threw himself from the roof and died. /b Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi b said to /b the heretic: Since you have brought me good tidings, b would you like to dine with me? /b The heretic b said to him: Yes. After they ate and drank, /b Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi b said to /b the heretic: Would b you /b like to b drink the cup of blessing, /b i.e., the cup of wine over which the Grace after Meals is recited, b or /b would b you /b like to b take forty gold coins /b instead, and I will recite the Grace after Meals? The heretic b said to him: I /b will b drink the cup of blessing. A Divine Voice emerged and said: The cup of blessing is worth forty gold coins. /b Evidently, each one of the blessings in the Grace after Meals is worth ten gold coins.,The Gemara adds: b Rabbi Yitzḥak says: That family /b of the heretic who dined with Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi b still exists among the prominent /b families b of Rome, and /b that family b is called: The family of bar Luyyanus. /b ,§ The mishna teaches that if one b covered /b the blood b and it was /b then b uncovered /b he is not obligated to cover it again. b Rav Aḥa, son of Rava, said to Rav Ashi: What is different /b about this case from the mitzva of b returning a lost item, where the Master said: /b The verse states with regard to the obligation to return a lost item: b “You shall return /b them to your brother” (Deuteronomy 22:1), b even one hundred times? /b ,Rav Ashi b said to /b Rav Aḥa: b There, /b in the verse discussing the obligation to return a lost item, b a restriction is not written /b in the verse to limit the obligation. b Here, /b in the verse discussing the obligation to cover the blood, b a restriction is written, /b as the verse states: b “And he shall cover it.” /b The usage of the term “it” indicates that one must cover the blood only one time.,§ The mishna teaches that if b the wind /b blew earth on the blood and b covered it /b one is obligated to cover the blood. b Rabba bar bar Ḥana says /b that b Rabbi Yoḥa says: They taught /b this i halakha /i b only /b if the blood b was again uncovered. But /b if the blood b was not again uncovered /b one is b exempt from /b the obligation b to cover it. /b The Gemara asks: b And when /b the blood b was again uncovered, what of it? Isn’t it /b already b rejected /b from the mitzva of covering since it was covered by the wind? b Rav Pappa said: That is to say /b that b there is no permanent /b rejection b with regard to mitzvot. /b Although the wind covered the blood, the mitzva to cover it was not rendered null; rather, the mitzva simply could not be performed. Consequently, once the blood is again uncovered, the mitzva to cover the blood remains in place.,The Gemara asks: b But /b even if the wind covered the blood and it remained covered, why is one exempt from performing the mitzva of covering the blood? b What is different /b about this case b from that which is taught /b in a i baraita /i : In a case where b one slaughters /b an undomesticated animal or a bird b and /b its b blood is absorbed by the ground, /b one is b obligated to cover /b the blood? The Gemara responds: b There, /b the i baraita /i is referring to a case b where the impression /b of the blood b is /b still b recognizable, /b i.e., it was not entirely absorbed in the ground., strong MISHNA: /strong In a case of the b blood /b of an undomesticated animal or bird b that was mixed with water, if there is in /b the mixture b the appearance of blood /b one is b obligated to cover /b it. If the blood b was mixed with wine one views /b the wine b as though it is water, /b and if a mixture with that amount of water would have the appearance of blood one is obligated to cover it. Likewise, if the blood of an undomesticated animal or a bird b was mixed with the blood of a domesticated animal, /b which one does not have to cover,
164. Babylonian Talmud, Gittin, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •rabbinic literature, and christian literature Found in books: Spielman (2020), Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World. 264
47a. פירקן אמר ליה תנן המוכר עצמו ואת בניו לעובדי כוכבים אין פודין אותו אבל פודין את הבנים משום קלקולא וכ"ש הכא דאיכא קטלא,אמרו לי' רבנן לר' אמי האי ישראל מומר הוא דקא חזו ליה דקאכיל נבילות וטריפות אמר להו אימא לתיאבון הוא דקאכיל,אמרו ליה והא זמנין דאיכא היתירא ואיסורא קמיה ושביק היתירא ואכיל איסורא א"ל זיל לא קא שבקי לי דאפרקינך:,ריש לקיש זבין נפשיה ללודאי שקל בהדיה חייתא וגלגלתא אמר גמירי דיומא בתרא כל דבעי מינייהו עבדי ליה כי היכי דליחול אדמיה,יומא בתרא אמרו ליה מאי ניחא לך אמר להו בעינא אקמטינכו ואותבינכו וכל חד מינייכו אמחי' חייתא ופלגא קמטינהו ואותבינהו כל חד מינייהו כד מחייה חד חייתא נפק נשמתיה חרקיניה לשיניה א"ל אחוכי קא מחייכת בי אכתי פש לך גבי פלגא דחייתא קטלינהו כולהו,נפק ואתא יתיב קאכיל ושתי אמרה ליה ברתיה לא בעית מידי למזגא עליה אמר לה בתי כריסי כרי כי נח נפשיה שבק קבא דמוריקא קרא אנפשיה (תהלים מט, יא) ועזבו לאחרים חילם:, big strongמתני׳ /strong /big המוכר את שדהו לעובד כוכבים לוקח ומביא ממנו בכורים מפני תיקון העולם:, big strongגמ׳ /strong /big אמר רבה אע"פ שאין קנין לעובד כוכבים בארץ ישראל להפקיע מידי מעשר שנאמר (ויקרא כה, כג) כי לי הארץ לי קדושת הארץ אבל יש קנין לעובד כוכבים בא"י לחפור בה בורות שיחין ומערות שנאמר (תהלים קטו, טז) השמים שמים לה' והארץ נתן לבני אדם,ור"א אומר אע"פ שיש קנין לעובד כוכבים בא"י להפקיע מידי מעשר שנאמר דגנך ולא דגן עובד כוכבים אבל אין קנין לעובד כוכבים בא"י לחפור בה בורות שיחין ומערות שנאמר לה' הארץ,במאי קמיפלגי מ"ס דגנך ולא דגן עובד כוכבים ומר סבר דיגונך ולא דיגון עובד כוכבים,אמר רבה מנא אמינא לה דתנן הלקט והשכחה והפאה של עובד כוכבים חייבין במעשר אלא א"כ הפקיר,היכי דמי אילימא דישראל וליקטינהו עובד כוכבים אלא א"כ הפקיר הא מפקרי וקיימי אלא לאו דעובד כוכבים וליקטינהו ישראל,טעמא דהפקיר הא לא הפקיר חייב,לא לעולם דישראל וליקטינהו עובד כוכבים ודקא אמרת הא מפקרי וקיימי נהי דמפקרי אדעתא דישראל אדעתא דעובד כוכבים מי מפקרי,ת"ש ישראל שלקח שדה מעובד כוכבים עד שלא הביאה שליש וחזר ומכרה לו משהביאה שליש חייבת במעשר שכבר נתחייבה נתחייבה אין לא נתחייבה לא,הכא במאי עסקינן בסוריא וקסבר כיבוש יחיד לא שמיה כיבוש,תא שמע ישראל ועובד כוכבים שלקחו שדה בשותפות 47a. b Redeem me. /b Rabbi Ami b said to him: We learned /b in a mishna: With regard to b one who sells himself and his children /b as slaves b to gentiles, he is not redeemed. However, his children are redeemed due to the harm /b of becoming assimilated among the gentiles, b and all the more so here, where there is /b a concern that leaving him in bondage may lead to his b death, /b he should be redeemed., b The Sages said to Rabbi Ami: This /b man b is a Jewish apostate, as they saw him when he was eating /b unslaughtered b animal carcasses and animals with a wound that will cause them to die within twelve months [ i tereifot /i ]. He said to them: Say /b that b he was eating /b them b due to /b his b appetite, /b not because he is an apostate, but because he was overcome by temptation., b They said to him: But /b there are b times when there are permitted and forbidden /b foods b before him, and he sets aside the permitted /b food b and eats the forbidden /b food, indicating that it is not temptation alone that causes him to transgress. Once he heard this, Rabbi Ami b said to /b that man: b Go, /b because b they do not allow me to redeem you. /b ,The Gemara recounts a related incident: b Reish Lakish sold himself to gladiators. He took a bag and a round stone /b inside of it b with him. He said: /b There is b a tradition that /b on b the final day /b of a captive’s life, before his captors kill him, b they do for him anything that he requests of them, so that he would forgive /b them for the spilling b of his blood. /b , b On the final day /b before they were set to kill him b they said to him: What is amenable to you? He said to them: I want to tie you /b up b and have you sit, and I will strike each one of you one and a half /b times. b He tied them /b up b and had each one of them sit. When he struck /b each of them with b one strike /b with the stone in the bag, the one whom he struck b died, /b because Reish Lakish was of great strength. Reish Lakish b gritted his teeth /b in anger, and b said to /b the one whom he killed, in order to prevent the others from realizing what was happening: b Are you laughing at me? You still /b have b half of a strike remaining /b with b me, /b as I struck you only once. b He killed them all, /b and Reish Lakish escaped his captors., b He left and came /b back home, and after some time had passed b he was sitting, eating, and drinking, /b without concern for his livelihood. b His daughter said to him: You don’t want something to lie upon? He said to her: My daughter, my belly is my pillow, /b and this is enough for me. b When he died he left /b only b a i kav /i of saffron /b as an inheritance, and even so b he recited /b this verse b about himself: “And they leave their wealth for others” /b (Psalms 49:11), meaning that he was pained that he did not use all of his property. He exhibited his confidence that God would provide his needs by not saving money for the future., strong MISHNA: /strong b One who sells his field to a gentile must purchase and bring /b the b first fruits from /b the field that he sold, b for the betterment of the world. /b , strong GEMARA: /strong b Rabba says: Even though a gentile has no /b capability of b acquisition /b of land b in Eretz Yisrael to /b cause the b abrogation /b of the sanctity of the land, thereby removing it b from /b the obligation to b tithe /b its produce, b as it is stated: “For the land is Mine” /b (Leviticus 25:23), which teaches: b The sanctity of the land is Mine, /b and it is not abrogated when the land is sold to a gentile; b a gentile does have, however, /b the capability of b acquisition /b of land b in Eretz Yisrael /b to allow him b to dig pits, ditches, and caves /b in the land he has purchased, b as it is stated: “The heavens are the heavens of the Lord; but the earth has He given to the children of men” /b (Psalms 115:16)., b And Rabbi Elazar says: Even though a gentile has /b the capability of b acquisition /b of land b in Eretz Yisrael to /b cause the b abrogation /b of the sanctity of the land, removing it b from /b the obligation to b tithe /b its produce, b as it is stated /b with regard to tithes: “The tithe of b your grain” /b (Deuteronomy 12:17), which teaches that it is only the grain of a Jew that is obligated in tithes b and not the grain of a gentile; a gentile does not have, however, /b the capability of b acquisition /b of land b in Eretz Yisrael /b to allow him b to dig pits, ditches, and caves, /b in the land he has purchased, b as it is stated: “The earth is the Lord’s” /b (Psalms 24:1).,The Gemara asks: b With regard to what /b principle b do /b Rabba and Rabbi Elazar b disagree? /b The Gemara answers: One b Sage, /b Rabbi Elazar, b holds /b that b “your grain” /b teaches that only grain grown in the field of a Jew is obligated in tithes, b but not the grain /b grown in the field b of a gentile. And /b one b Sage, /b Rabba, b holds /b that “your grain” is not referring to the produce itself, but rather to b your accumulation /b of the produce b into a pile, /b which obligates the produce in tithes, b and not the accumulation /b of the produce b into a pile /b by b a gentile, /b as Rabba holds that if a gentile harvests and gathers grain, the grain is not obligated in tithes., b Rabba said: From where do I say /b that a gentile’s acquisition of land in Eretz Yisrael does not cause the abrogation of the sanctity of the land with regard to tithes? b As we learned /b in a mishna ( i Pe’a /i 4:9): With regard to b the gleanings /b left for the poor, b and the forgotten /b sheaves left for the poor, b and the produce in the corner of the field, which is given to the poor [ i pe’a /i ], of a gentile, /b one is b obligated to tithe /b them b unless /b the owner b rendered them ownerless. /b ,The Gemara discusses: b What are the circumstances? If we say /b that this is referring to the gleanings, forgotten sheaves, and i pe’a /i b of a Jew, and a gentile collected them /b and sold them to a Jew, then how could the mishna write: b Unless he rendered them ownerless? But they are already ownerless, /b since gleanings, forgotten sheaves, and i pe’a /i are already ownerless, as anyone can take them. b Rather, is it not /b the case that the mishna is referring to produce b of a gentile, /b who then separated gleanings, forgotten sheaves, and i pe’a /i , and declared them to be ownerless, b and a Jew gathered them. /b ,Rabba explains his inference: b The reason /b that this produce is exempt from tithes is specifically b because /b the gentile b rendered it ownerless, but /b if b he did not render it ownerless, /b then it would be b obligated /b in tithes. One can infer from this mishna that the acquisition of land by a gentile does not cause the abrogation of the sanctity of the land with regard to tithes.,The Gemara rejects this: b No, actually /b it may be that these were gleanings, forgotten sheaves, and i pe’a /i b of a Jew, and a gentile collected them. And that which you said: But they are already ownerless, /b is incorrect. b Let it be that he rendered them ownerless with the intent that a Jew /b would collect them, but b did he render them ownerless with the intent that a gentile /b would collect them? He did not in fact render them ownerless, as he expected only a Jew to collect them. Therefore, if a gentile collects them and sells them to a Jew, the Jew is obligated to tithe them.,The Gemara suggests: b Come /b and b hear /b another proof from a i baraita /i : If there was b a Jew who acquired a field from a gentile before /b its produce b reached a third /b of its growth, at which point one is obligated to tithe the produce, b and he then sold it to /b the gentile b after /b its produce b reached a third /b of its growth, then the owner is b obligated to tithe /b the produce b because /b the produce b already became obligated /b in tithes when it reached a third of its growth while under Jewish ownership. The Gemara deduces from here: It is only when the produce b became obligated /b in tithes while under Jewish ownership, that b yes, /b the owner is obligated to tithe, but if the produce b did not become obligated /b in tithes while under Jewish ownership, then b no, /b the owner is not obligated to tithe. This teaches that produce that grows while the field is owned by a gentile is exempt from tithes, and a gentile’s acquisition in Eretz Yisrael abrogates the sanctity of the land with regard to tithes.,The Gemara rejects this: b With what are we dealing here? /b We are not dealing with Eretz Yisrael proper, but with land b in Syria, and /b this i tanna /i b holds /b that b the conquest of an individual is not called a conquest. /b Since Syria was conquered in battle by King David, and not by the Jewish people as a whole, it is not bound by all the same i halakhot /i that apply in Eretz Yisrael.,The Gemara suggests: b Come /b and b hear /b a proof from a i baraita /i ( i Tosefta /i , i Terumot /i 2:10): If there were b a Jew and a gentile who purchased a field in partnership, /b
165. Babylonian Talmud, Eruvin, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •festivals, non-christian, in early christian literature Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 60
53b. ירשיע,ואמר ר' יוחנן מניין שמחל לו הקב"ה על אותו עון שנאמר (שמואל א כח, יט) מחר אתה ובניך עמי עמי במחיצתי,א"ר אבא אי איכא דמשאיל להו לבני יהודה דדייקי לשני מאברין תנן או מעברין תנן אכוזו תנן או עכוזו תנן ידעי,שאילינהו ואמרי ליה איכא דתני מאברין ואיכא דתני מעברין איכא דתני אכוזו ואיכא דתני עכוזו,בני יהודה דייקי לישנא מאי היא דההוא בר יהודה דאמר להו טלית יש לי למכור אמרו ליה מאי גוון טליתך אמר להו כתרדין עלי אדמה,בני גליל דלא דייקי לישנא מאי היא (דתניא) דההוא בר גלילא [דהוה קאזיל] ואמר להו אמר למאן אמר למאן אמרו ליה גלילאה שוטה חמר למירכב או חמר למישתי עמר למילבש או אימר לאיתכסאה,ההיא איתתא דבעיא למימר לחברתה תאי דאוכליך חלבא אמרה לה שלוכתי תוכליך לביא,ההיא אתתא דאתיא לקמיה דדיינא אמרה ליה מרי כירי תפלא הוית לי וגנבוך מין וכדו הוות דכד שדרו לך עילויה לא מטי כרעיך אארעא,אמהתא דבי רבי כי הוה משתעיא בלשון חכמה אמרה הכי עלת נקפת בכד ידאון נישריא לקיניהון,וכד הוה בעי דליתבון הוה אמרה להו יעדי בתר חברתה מינה ותתקפי עלת בכד כאילפא דאזלא בימא,רבי יוסי בר אסיין כי הוה משתעי בלשון חכמה אמר עשו לי שור במשפט בטור מסכן,וכד הוה שאיל באושפיזא אמר הכי גבר פום דין חי מה זו טובה יש,רבי אבהו כי הוה משתעי בלשון חכמה הוה אמר הכי אתריגו לפחמין ארקיעו לזהבין ועשו לי שני מגידי בעלטה איכא דאמרי ויעשו לי בהן שני מגידי בעלטה,אמרו ליה רבנן לרבי אבהו הצפיננו היכן רבי אלעאי צפון אמר להן עלץ בנערה אהרונית אחרונית עירנית והנעירתו,אמרי לה אשה,ואמרי לה מסכתא,אמרי ליה לרבי אלעאי הצפיננו הכין רבי אבהו [צפון] אמר להן נתייעץ במכתיר והנגיב למפיבשת,אמר רבי יהושע בן חנניה מימי לא נצחני אדם חוץ מאשה תינוק ותינוקת אשה מאי היא פעם אחת נתארחתי אצל אכסניא אחת עשתה לי פולין ביום ראשון אכלתים ולא שיירתי מהן כלום שנייה ולא שיירתי מהן כלום ביום שלישי הקדיחתן במלח כיון שטעמתי משכתי ידי מהן,אמרה לי רבי מפני מה אינך סועד אמרתי לה כבר סעדתי מבעוד יום אמרה לי היה לך למשוך ידיך מן הפת,אמרה לי רבי שמא לא הנחת פאה בראשונים ולא כך אמרו חכמים אין משיירין פאה באילפס אבל משיירין פאה בקערה,תינוקת מאי היא פעם אחת הייתי מהלך בדרך והיתה דרך עוברת בשדה והייתי מהלך בה אמרה לי תינוקת אחת רבי לא שדה היא זו אמרתי לה לא דרך כבושה היא אמרה לי ליסטים כמותך כבשוה,תינוק מאי היא פעם אחת הייתי מהלך בדרך וראיתי תינוק יושב על פרשת דרכים ואמרתי לו באיזה דרך נלך לעיר אמר לי זו קצרה וארוכה וזו ארוכה וקצרה והלכתי בקצרה וארוכה כיון שהגעתי לעיר מצאתי שמקיפין אותה גנות ופרדיסין,חזרתי לאחורי אמרתי לו בני הלא אמרת לי קצרה אמר לי ולא אמרתי לך ארוכה נשקתיו על ראשו ואמרתי לו אשריכם ישראל שכולכם חכמים גדולים אתם מגדולכם ועד קטנכם:,רבי יוסי הגלילי הוה קא אזיל באורחא אשכחה לברוריה אמר לה באיזו דרך נלך ללוד אמרה ליה גלילי שוטה לא כך אמרו חכמים אל תרבה שיחה עם האשה היה לך לומר באיזה ללוד,ברוריה אשכחתיה לההוא תלמידא דהוה קא גריס בלחישה 53b. b he did them mischief” /b (i Samuel 14:47).,The Gemara concludes the mention of Saul on a positive note. b And Rabbi Yoḥa said: From where /b is it derived b that the Holy One, Blessed be He, forgave him for that sin, /b the massacre of Nov, the city of priests? b As it is stated /b that the spirit of Samuel said to him: “And the Lord will also deliver Israel with you into the hand of the Philistines, b and tomorrow shall you and your sons be with me” /b (i Samuel 28:19); the phrase b “with me” /b means b within my partition /b together with me in heaven, i.e., on the same level as the righteous prophet Samuel.,The Gemara returns to the earlier question with regard to the correct reading of the word i me’abberin /i . b Rabbi Abba said: If there is anyone who can ask the people of Judea, who are precise in their language, /b whether the term in the mishna that b we learned /b is b i me’abberin /i /b with an i alef /i b or i me’abberin /i /b with an i ayin /i , he should ask them. Similarly, with regard to the blemishes of a firstborn animal, b was /b the term meaning its hindquarters that b we learned /b in the mishna b i akkuzo /i /b with an i alef /i , b or did we learn i akkuzo /i /b with an i ayin /i ? b They would know. /b ,The Gemara answers: b One asked /b the people of Judea, b and they said to him: Some teach i me’abberin /i /b with an i alef /i , b and some teach i me’abberin /i /b with an i ayin /i . b Some teach i akkuzo /i /b with an i alef /i , b and some teach i akkuzo /i /b with an i ayin /i . Both versions are well founded and neither one is erroneous.,Having mentioned that b the people of Judea are precise in their speech, /b the Gemara asks: b What is /b the meaning of this? The Gemara answers with an example: b As /b in the case of b a certain person from Judea who said to those /b within earshot: b I have a cloak to sell. They said to him: What color is your cloak? He said to them: Like beets on the ground, /b providing an exceedingly precise description of the exact shade of the cloak, the green tint of beet greens when they first sprout.,The Gemara returns to b the people of the Galilee, who are not precise in their speech. What is /b the meaning of this? The Gemara cites examples: b As it was taught /b in a i baraita /i b that /b there was b a certain person from the Galilee who would walk and say /b to people: b Who has i amar /i ? Who has i amar /i ? They said to him: Foolish Galilean, /b what do you mean? Galileans did not pronounce the guttural letters properly, so it was unclear whether he sought b a donkey [ i ḥamor /i ] to ride, or wine [ i ḥamar /i ] to drink, wool [ i amar /i ] to wear, or a lamb [ i imar /i ] to slaughter. /b This is an example of the lack of precision in the Galileans’ speech.,The Gemara cites another example of the lack of linguistic precision of the Galileans: There was b a certain woman who wanted to say to her friend: /b My neighbor, b come and I will feed you milk [ i ta’i de’okhlikh ḥelba /i ]; /b however, due to the imprecise articulation of her words, b she said to her: My neighbor, /b may a b lioness eat you [ i tokhlikh lavya /i ]. /b ,The Gemara cites another example of the ignorance and incivility of the Galileans: There was b a certain woman who came before a judge /b intending to say: Master, sir [ i Mari kiri /i , spelled with a i kuf /i ], I had a board, and they stole it from me [ i tavla havet li ugenavuha mimeni /i ]. But instead b she said to him: Master, servant [ i Mari kiri /i , /b spelled with a i kaf /i ], b I had a beam and they stole you from me /b [ b i tafla havet li ugenavukh min /i /b ]. b And it was so /b large, b that when they would hang you upon it, your feet would not reach the ground. /b ,In contrast to the speech of the Galileans, which indicates ignorance and loutishness, the Gemara cites examples of the clever phraseology of the inhabitants of Judea and the Sages: b The maidservant in the house of Rabbi /b Yehuda HaNasi, b when she would speak enigmatically, /b employing euphemistic terminology or in riddles, b she would say as follows: The ladle /b used for drawing wine from the jug b is /b already b knocking against /b the bottom of b the jug, /b i.e., the wine jug is almost empty. b Let the eagles fly to their nests, /b i.e., let the students return home, as there is nothing left for them to drink., b And when /b Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi b wanted them to sit, she would say to them: Let us remove /b the stopper b from another /b jug, b and let the ladle /b float b in the jug like a ship sailing in the sea. /b ,The Gemara also relates that b when Rabbi Yosei bar Asyan would speak enigmatically, he would say: Prepare for me an ox in judgment on a poor mountain. /b His method was to construct words by combining words from Aramaic translations of Hebrew words or Hebrew translations of Aramaic words. Ox is i tor /i in Aramaic; judgment is i din /i . Combined they form i teradin /i , beets. Mountain in Hebrew is i har /i , which they pronounced i ḥar /i ; poor is i dal /i . Together it spells i ḥardal /i , mustard. Thus, Rabbi Yosei bar Asyan was requesting beets in mustard., b And when he would inquire about an inn, he would say as follows: This man here is raw; what is this good that there is? /b The phrase “this man here is raw” is used in a similar syllable-by-syllable translation: man in Hebrew is i ish /i ; here is i po /i ; this is i zeh /i ; and raw is i na /i . All together, they sound like i ushpazikhna /i , i.e., an innkeeper (Rabbeinu Ḥael). In other words, Rabbi Yosei bar Asyan was asking after the innkeeper., b When Rabbi Abbahu would speak enigmatically, he would say as follows: Make the coals the color of an i etrog /i ; beat the golden ones, /b i.e., spread out the coals, which redden like gold when they glow; b and make me two speakers-in-the-dark, /b i.e., roosters, which announce the dawn when it is still dark. b Some say /b a slightly different version: b And they shall make me in them, /b on the coals, i.e., roast for me on top of the coals, b two speakers-in-the-dark. /b ,In a similarly clever manner, b the Sages said to Rabbi Abbahu: Show us [ i hatzpinenu /i ] where Rabbi Elai is hiding [ i tzafun /i ], /b as we do not know his whereabouts. b He said to them: He rejoiced with the latter [ i aḥaronit /i ] Aharonic [ i Aharonit /i ] girl; she is lively [ i eiranit /i ] and kept him awake [ i vehiniratu /i ]. /b ,There are two ways to understand this cryptic statement: b Some say /b it refers to b a woman, /b i.e., he married a young girl from a priestly family [Aharonic], who is his second [latter] wife, from a village [ i eiranit /i ], and he is sleeping now because she kept him awake during the night., b And some say /b it refers to b a tractate. /b The term girl refers to the tractate; Aharonic indicates that it is a tractate from the order of i Kodashim /i , which deals with the priestly service. The phrase the latter means that it is his latest course of study, and lively alludes to the challenging nature of the subject matter. Since he was awake all night studying, he is presently sleeping.,The Gemara continues: b They said to Rabbi Elai: Show us where Rabbi Abbahu is hiding, /b as we do not know where he is. b He said to them: He has taken counsel with the one who crowns, /b i.e., the i Nasi /i , who appoints the Sages, b and has gone south /b [ b i hingiv /i /b ] b to Mephibosheth, /b i.e., he has headed to the Sages of the south, referred to here as Mephibosheth, who was King Saul’s grandson and a great Sage of his time.,Having discussed the clever speech of various Sages, the Gemara relates that b Rabbi Yehoshua ben Ḥaya said /b as follows: b In /b all b my days, no person defeated me /b in a verbal encounter b except for a woman, a young boy, and a young girl. What is /b the encounter in which b a woman /b got the better of me? b One time I was staying at a certain inn /b and the hostess b prepared me beans. On the first day I ate them and left nothing over, /b although proper etiquette dictates that one should leave over something on his plate. On the b second /b day I again ate b and left nothing over. /b On the third day b she over-salted them /b so that they were inedible. b As soon as I tasted /b them, b I withdrew my hands from them. /b , b She said to me: My Rabbi, why aren’t you eating /b beans as on the previous days? Not wishing to offend her, b I said to her: I have already eaten during the daytime. She said to me: You should have withdrawn your hand from bread /b and left room for some beans., b She /b then b said to me: My Rabbi, perhaps you did not leave a remainder /b of food on your plate b on the first /b days, which is why you are leaving over food today. b Isn’t this what the Sages said: One need not leave a remainder in the pot [ i ilpas /i ], but one must leave a remainder on the plate /b as an expression of etiquette ( i Tosafot /i ). This is the incident in which a woman got the better of Rabbi Yehoshua ben Ḥaya., b What is /b the incident with b a young girl? One time I was walking along the path, and the path passed through a field, and I was walking on it. A certain young girl said to me: My Rabbi, isn’t this a field? /b One should not walk through a field, so as not to damage the crops growing there. b I said to her: Isn’t it a well-trodden path /b in the field, across which one is permitted to walk? b She said to me: Robbers like you have trodden it. /b In other words, it previously had been prohibited to walk through this field, and it is only due to people such as you, who paid no attention to the prohibition, that a path has been cut across it. Thus, the young girl defeated Rabbi Yehoshua ben Ḥaya in a debate., b What is /b the incident with b a young boy? One time I was walking along the path, and I saw a young boy sitting at the crossroads. And I said to him: On which path shall we walk /b in order to get b to the city? He said to me: This /b path b is short and long, and that /b path b is long and short. I walked on the /b path that was b short and long. When I approached the city I found that gardens and orchards surrounded it, /b and I did not know the trails leading through them to the city., b I went back /b and met the young boy again and b said to him: My son, didn’t you tell me /b that this way is b short? He said to me: And didn’t I tell you /b that it is also b long? I kissed him on his head and said to him: Happy are you, O Israel, for you are all exceedingly wise, from your old to your young. /b ,Having discussed wise speech and the wisdom of Jewish women, the Gemara cites the following story: b Rabbi Yosei HaGelili was walking along the way, /b and b met Berurya. He said to her: On which path shall we walk /b in order to get b to Lod? She said to him: Foolish Galilean, didn’t the Sages say: Do not talk much with women? You should have said /b your question more succinctly: b Which /b way b to Lod? /b ,The Gemara relates more of Berurya’s wisdom: b Berurya came across a certain student who was whispering his studies /b rather than raising his voice.
166. Lactantius, Epitome Divinarum Institutionum, 1.1.10, 1.11.24, 3.1.1-3.1.8, 5.1.9-5.1.10, 5.1.18, 5.2.1, 5.4.8, 6.21.4-6.21.10, 6.25.12, 57.6 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022), Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity, 302
167. Porphyry, On Statues, 13.3-13.9 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 667
168. Babylonian Talmud, Berachot, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •amoraic literature, shaped by christian discourse Found in books: Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg (2023), Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity, 455
61b. ריאה שואבת כל מיני משקין כבד כועס מרה זורקת בו טפה ומניחתו טחול שוחק קרקבן טוחן קיבה ישנה אף נעור נעור הישן ישן הנעור נמוק והולך לו תנא אם שניהם ישנים או שניהם נעורים מיד מת,תניא רבי יוסי הגלילי אומר צדיקים יצר טוב שופטן שנאמר (תהלים קט, כב) ולבי חלל בקרבי רשעים יצר רע שופטן שנאמר (תהלים לו, ב) נאם פשע לרשע בקרב לבי אין פחד אלהים לנגד עיניו בינונים זה וזה שופטן שנאמר (תהלים קט, לא) יעמוד לימין אביון להושיע משופטי נפשו,אמר רבא כגון אנו בינונים אמר ליה אביי לא שביק מר חיי לכל בריה,ואמר רבא לא איברי עלמא אלא לרשיעי גמורי או לצדיקי גמורי אמר רבא לידע אינש בנפשיה אם צדיק גמור הוא אם לאו אמר רב לא איברי עלמא אלא לאחאב בן עמרי ולר' חנינא בן דוסא לאחאב בן עמרי העולם הזה ולרבי חנינא בן דוסא העולם הבא:,ואהבת את י"י אלהיך: תניא ר' אליעזר אומר אם נאמר בכל נפשך למה נאמר בכל מאדך ואם נאמר בכל מאדך למה נאמר בכל נפשך אלא אם יש לך אדם שגופו חביב עליו מממונו לכך נאמר בכל נפשך ואם יש לך אדם שממונו חביב עליו מגופו לכך נאמר בכל מאדך רבי עקיבא אומר בכל נפשך אפילו נוטל את נפשך,תנו רבנן פעם אחת גזרה מלכות הרשעה שלא יעסקו ישראל בתורה בא פפוס בן יהודה ומצאו לרבי עקיבא שהיה מקהיל קהלות ברבים ועוסק בתורה אמר ליה עקיבא אי אתה מתירא מפני מלכות,אמר לו אמשול לך משל למה הדבר דומה לשועל שהיה מהלך על גב הנהר וראה דגים שהיו מתקבצים ממקום למקום אמר להם מפני מה אתם בורחים אמרו לו מפני רשתות שמביאין עלינו בני אדם אמר להם רצונכם שתעלו ליבשה ונדור אני ואתם כשם שדרו אבותי עם אבותיכם אמרו לו אתה הוא שאומרים עליך פקח שבחיות לא פקח אתה אלא טפש אתה ומה במקום חיותנו אנו מתיראין במקום מיתתנו על אחת כמה וכמה אף אנחנו עכשיו שאנו יושבים ועוסקים בתורה שכתוב בה (דברים ל, כ) כי הוא חייך ואורך ימיך כך אם אנו הולכים ומבטלים ממנה עאכ"ו,אמרו לא היו ימים מועטים עד שתפסוהו לר"ע וחבשוהו בבית האסורים ותפסו לפפוס בן יהודה וחבשוהו אצלו אמר לו פפוס מי הביאך לכאן אמר ליה אשריך רבי עקיבא שנתפסת על דברי תורה אוי לו לפפוס שנתפס על דברים בטלים,בשעה שהוציאו את ר' עקיבא להריגה זמן ק"ש היה והיו סורקים את בשרו במסרקות של ברזל והיה מקבל עליו עול מלכות שמים אמרו לו תלמידיו רבינו עד כאן אמר להם כל ימי הייתי מצטער על פסוק זה בכל נפשך אפילו נוטל את נשמתך אמרתי מתי יבא לידי ואקיימנו ועכשיו שבא לידי לא אקיימנו היה מאריך באחד עד שיצתה נשמתו באחד יצתה ב"ק ואמרה אשריך ר"ע שיצאה נשמתך באחד,אמרו מלאכי השרת לפני הקב"ה זו תורה וזו שכרה (תהלים יז, יד) ממתים ידך י"י ממתים וגו' אמר להם חלקם בחיים יצתה בת קול ואמרה אשריך ר"ע שאתה מזומן לחיי העוה"ב:,לא יקל אדם את ראשו כנגד שער המזרח שהוא מכוון כנגד בית קדשי הקדשים וכו': אמר רב יהודה אמר רב לא אמרו אלא מן הצופים ולפנים וברואה איתמר נמי א"ר אבא בריה דרבי חייא בר אבא הכי אמר רבי יוחנן לא אמרו אלא מן הצופים ולפנים וברואה ובשאין גדר ובזמן שהשכינה שורה,ת"ר הנפנה ביהודה לא יפנה מזרח ומערב אלא צפון ודרום ובגליל לא יפנה אלא מזרח ומערב ורבי יוסי מתיר שהיה ר' יוסי אומר לא אסרו אלא ברואה ובמקום שאין שם גדר ובזמן שהשכינה שורה וחכמים אוסרים,חכמים היינו ת"ק איכא בינייהו צדדין,תניא אידך הנפנה ביהודה לא יפנה מזרח ומערב אלא צפון ודרום ובגליל צפון ודרום אסור מזרח ומערב מותר ורבי יוסי מתיר שהיה רבי יוסי אומר לא אסרו אלא ברואה רבי יהודה אומר בזמן שבית המקדש קיים אסור בזמן שאין בית המקדש קיים מותר רבי עקיבא אוסר בכל מקום,רבי עקיבא היינו ת"ק איכא בינייהו חוץ לארץ,רבה הוו שדיין ליה לבני מזרח ומערב אזל אביי שדנהו צפון ודרום על רבה תרצנהו אמר מאן האי דקמצער לי אנא כר' עקיבא סבירא לי דאמר בכל מקום אסור: 61b. and the b lungs draw all kinds of liquids, /b the b liver becomes angry, /b the b gall /b bladder b injects a drop /b of gall b into /b the liver and b allays /b anger, the b spleen laughs, /b the b maw grinds /b the food, and the b stomach /b brings b sleep, /b the b nose awakens. /b If they reversed roles such that b the /b organ which brings on b sleep /b were to b awaken, /b or b the /b organ which b awakens /b were to bring on b sleep, /b the individual b would gradually deteriorate. It was taught: If both /b bring on b sleep or both awaken, /b the person b immediately dies. /b ,With regard to one’s inclinations, b it was taught /b in a i baraita /i that b Rabbi Yosei HaGelili says: The good inclination rules the righteous, as it is stated: “And my heart is dead within me” /b (Psalms 109:22); the evil inclination has been completely banished from his heart. The b evil inclination rules the wicked, as it is stated: “Transgression speaks to the wicked, there is no fear of God before his eyes” /b (Psalms 36:2). b Middling people are ruled by both /b the good and evil inclinations, b as it is stated: “Because He stands at the right hand of the needy, to save him from them that rule his soul” /b (Psalms 109:31)., b Rabba said: /b People b like us /b are b middling. Abaye, /b his student and nephew, b said to him: /b If b the Master /b claims that he is merely middling, he b does not leave /b room for b any creature to live. /b If a person like you is middling, what of the rest of us?, b And Rava said: The world was created only for /b the sake of b the full-fledged wicked or the full-fledged righteous; /b others do not live complete lives in either world. b Rava said: One should know of himself whether or not he is completely righteous, /b as if he is not completely righteous, he knows that his life will be a life of suffering. b Rav said: The world was only created for /b the wicked b Ahab ben Omri and for Rabbi Ḥanina ben Dosa. /b The Gemara explains: For b Ahab ben Omri, this world /b was created, as he has no place in the World-to-Come, b and /b for b Rabbi Ḥanina ben Dosa, the World-to-Come /b was created.,We learned in our mishna the explanation of the verse: b “And you shall love the Lord your God /b with all your heart and all your soul and all your might” (Deuteronomy 6:5). This was elaborated upon when b it was taught /b in a i baraita /i : b Rabbi Eliezer says: If it is stated: “With all your soul,” why does it state: “With all your might”? /b Conversely, b if it stated: “With all your might,” why does it state: “With all your soul”? Rather, /b this means that b if one’s body is dearer to him than his property, therefore it is stated: “With all your soul”; /b one must give his soul in sanctification of God. b And if one’s money is dearer to him than his body, therefore it is stated: “With all your might”; /b with all your assets. b Rabbi Akiva says: “With all your soul” /b means: b Even if /b God b takes your soul. /b ,The Gemara relates at length how Rabbi Akiva fulfilled these directives. b The Sages taught: One time, /b after the bar Kokheva rebellion, b the evil empire /b of Rome b decreed that Israel may not engage in /b the study and practice of b Torah. Pappos ben Yehuda came and found Rabbi Akiva, who was convening assemblies in public and engaging in Torah /b study. Pappos b said to him: Akiva, are you not afraid of the empire? /b ,Rabbi Akiva b answered him: I will relate a parable. To what can this be compared? /b It is like b a fox walking along a riverbank when he sees fish gathering /b and fleeing b from place to place. /b br The fox b said to them: From what are you fleeing? /b br b They said to him: /b We are fleeing b from the nets that people cast upon us. /b br b He said to them: Do you wish to come up onto dry land, and we will reside together just as my ancestors resided with your ancestors? /b br The fish b said to him: You are the one of whom they say, he is the cleverest of animals? You are not clever; you are a fool. If we are afraid in /b the water, b our /b natural b habitat /b which gives us b life, /b then b in a habitat /b that causes our b death, all the more so. /b br The moral is: b So too, we /b Jews, b now that we sit and engage in Torah /b study, b about which it is written: “For that is your life, and the length of your days” /b (Deuteronomy 30:20), we fear the empire b to this extent; if we proceed to /b sit b idle from its /b study, as its abandonment is the habitat that causes our death, b all the more so /b will we fear the empire.,The Sages b said: Not a few days passed until they seized Rabbi Akiva and incarcerated him in prison, and seized Pappos ben Yehuda and incarcerated him alongside him. /b Rabbi Akiva b said to him: Pappos, who brought you here? /b Pappos b replied: Happy are you, Rabbi Akiva, for you were arrested on /b the charge of engaging in b Torah /b study. b Woe unto Pappos who was seized on /b the charge of engaging in b idle matters. /b ,The Gemara relates: b When they took Rabbi Akiva out to be executed, it was time for the recitation of i Shema /i . And they were raking his flesh with iron combs, and he was /b reciting i Shema /i , thereby b accepting upon himself the yoke of Heaven. His students said to him: Our teacher, even now, /b as you suffer, you recite i Shema /i ? b He said to them: All my days I have been troubled by the verse: With all your soul, /b meaning: b Even if God takes your soul. I said /b to myself: b When will the /b opportunity b be afforded me to fulfill this /b verse? b Now that it has been afforded me, shall I not fulfill it? He prolonged /b his uttering of the word: b One, until his soul left /b his body as he uttered his final word: b One. A voice descended /b from heaven b and said: Happy are you, Rabbi Akiva, that your soul left /b your body b as /b you uttered: b One. /b , b The ministering angels said before the Holy One, Blessed be He: This is Torah and this its reward? /b As it is stated: b “From death, by Your hand, O Lord, from death /b of the world” (Psalms 17:14); Your hand, God, kills and does not save. God b said /b the end of the verse b to /b the ministering angels: b “Whose portion is in this life.” /b And then b a Divine Voice emerged and said: Happy are you, Rabbi Akiva, as you are destined for life in the World-to-Come, /b as your portion is already in eternal life.,We learned in the mishna that b one may not act irreverently opposite the Eastern Gate, which is aligned with the Holy of Holies. /b Limiting this i halakha /i , b Rav Yehuda said /b that b Rav said: They only said /b this i halakha /i with regard to irreverent behavior b from /b Mount b Scopus [ i Tzofim /i ] and within, and /b specifically areas from where b one can see /b the Temple. b It is also stated: Rabbi Abba, son of Rabbi Ḥiyya bar Abba, said: Rabbi Yoḥa said the following: They only said /b this i halakha /i with regard to Mount b Scopus and within, /b when b one can see, and when there is no fence /b obstructing his view, b and when the Divine Presence is resting /b there, i.e., when the Temple is standing.,In this context, b the Sages taught: One who defecates in Judea should not defecate /b when facing b east and west, /b for then he is facing Jerusalem; b rather /b he should do so b facing north and south. But in the Galilee /b which is north of Jerusalem, b one should only defecate /b facing b east and west. Rabbi Yosei permits /b doing so, b as Rabbi Yosei was wont to say: They only prohibited /b doing so when b one can see /b the Temple, b where there is no fence, and when the Divine Presence is resting /b there. b And the Rabbis prohibit /b doing so.,The Gemara argues: But the opinion of the b Rabbis, /b who prohibit this, b is /b identical to that of the b first /b anonymous b i tanna, /i /b who also prohibits doing so. The Gemara replies: The practical difference b between them is /b with regard to b the sides, /b i.e., a place in Judea that is not directly east or west of Jerusalem, or a place in the Galilee that is not directly north of Jerusalem. According to the first i tanna /i , it is prohibited; according to the Rabbis, it is permitted., b It was taught /b in b another /b i baraita /i : b One who defecates in Judea should not defecate /b when facing b east and west; rather, /b he should only do so facing b north and south. And in the Galilee, /b defecating while facing b north and south is prohibited, /b while b east and west is permitted. And Rabbi Yosei permitted /b doing so, b as Rabbi Yosei was wont to say: They only prohibited /b doing so when b one can see /b the Temple. b Rabbi Yehuda says: When the Temple is standing, it is prohibited, /b but b when the Temple is not standing, it is permitted. /b The Gemara adds that b Rabbi Akiva prohibits /b defecating b anywhere /b while facing east and west.,The Gemara challenges this: b Rabbi Akiva’s /b position b is identical to /b that of b the first, /b anonymous b i tanna /i , /b who also prohibits doing so. The Gemara responds: The practical difference b between them /b is with regard to places b outside of Eretz /b Yisrael b , /b as according to Rabbi Akiva, even outside of Eretz Yisrael, defecating while facing east and west is prohibited.,The Gemara relates that in b Rabba’s /b bathroom, b the bricks were placed east and west /b in order to ensure that he would defecate facing north and south. b Abaye went /b and b placed them north and south, /b to test if Rabba was particular about their direction or if they had simply been placed east and west incidentally. b Rabba entered /b and b fixed them. He said: Who is the one that is upsetting me? I hold in accordance with /b the opinion of b Rabbi Akiva, /b who b said: It is prohibited everywhere. /b
169. Babylonian Talmud, Bava Qamma, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •festivals, non-christian, in early christian literature Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 47
58b. ולאסטמורי בגוה תיקו,כיצד משלמת מה שהזיקה וכו': מנה"מ,אמר רב מתנה דאמר קרא (שמות כב, ד) ובער בשדה אחר מלמד ששמין על גב שדה אחר,האי ובער בשדה אחר מבעי ליה לאפוקי רה"ר,א"כ לכתוב רחמנא ובער בשדה חבירו א"נ שדה אחר מאי בשדה אחר ששמין על גב שדה אחר,ואימא כוליה להכי הוא דאתא לאפוקי רה"ר מנלן,אם כן לכתביה רחמנא גבי תשלומין (שמות כב, ד) מיטב שדהו ומיטב כרמו ישלם בשדה אחר ל"ל דכתביה רחמנא גבי ובער ש"מ תרתי,היכי שיימינן א"ר יוסי בר חנינא סאה בששים סאין ר' ינאי אמר תרקב בששים תרקבים חזקיה אמר קלח בששים קלחים,מיתיבי אכלה קב או קביים אין אומרים תשלם דמיהן אלא רואין אותה כאילו היא ערוגה קטנה ומשערים אותה מאי לאו בפני עצמה,לא בששים,ת"ר אין שמין קב מפני שמשביחו ולא בית כור מפני שפוגמו,מאי קאמר א"ר פפא ה"ק אין שמין קב בששים קבים מפני שמשביח מזיק ולא כור בששים כורין מפני שפוגם מזיק,מתקיף לה רב הונא בר מנוח האי ולא בית כור ולא כור מבעי ליה,אלא אמר רב הונא בר מנוח משמיה דרב אחא בריה דרב איקא הכי קתני אין שמין קב בפני עצמו מפני שמשביח ניזק ולא קב בבית כור מפני שפוגם ניזק אלא בששים,ההוא גברא דקץ קשבא מחבריה אתא לקמיה דריש גלותא א"ל לדידי חזי לי ותלתא תאלתא בקינא הוו קיימי והוו שוו מאה זוזי זיל הב ליה תלתין ותלתא ותילתא אמר גבי ריש גלותא דדאין דינא דפרסאה למה לי אתא לקמיה דר"נ א"ל בששים,א"ל רבא אם אמרו בנזקי ממונו יאמרו בנזקי גופו,אמר ליה אביי לרבא בנזקי גופו מאי דעתיך דתניא המבכיר כרמו של חבירו סמדר רואין אותו כמה היתה יפה קודם לכן וכמה היא יפה לאחר מכאן ואילו בששים לא קתני,אטו גבי בהמתו נמי מי לא תניא כי האי גוונא דתניא קטמה נטיעה רבי יוסי אומר גוזרי גזירות שבירושלים אומרים נטיעה בת שנתה שתי כסף בת שתי שנים ארבעה כסף אכלה חזיז רבי יוסי הגלילי אומר נידון במשוייר שבו וחכמים אומרים רואין אותה כמה היתה יפה וכמה היא יפה 58b. b and taken care of it, /b and he bears responsibility for failing to do so. The dilemma b shall stand /b unresolved.,§ The mishna teaches: b How does /b the court appraise the value of the damage when the owner b pays /b for b what it damaged? /b The court appraises a large piece of land with an area required for sowing one se’a of seed [ i beit se’a /i ] in that field, including the garden bed in which the damage took place, it appraises how much it was worth before the animal damaged it and how much is it worth now, and the owner must pay the difference. The Gemara asks: b From where are these matters /b derived?, b Rav Mattana says: As the verse states: “And it feed in another field [ i uvi’er bisde aḥer /i ]” /b (Exodus 22:4). This b teaches that /b the court b appraises /b the damage b relative to another field, /b i.e., relative to the damaged field as a whole and not an appraisal of only the specific garden bed that was damaged.,The Gemara asks: But b this /b phrase: b “ i Uvi’er bisde aḥer /i ,” /b can be understood as meaning: “And it feed in another’s field,” and accordingly, b is necessary /b to teach that the owner is not liable unless it was a field with an owner, b to exclude /b damage caused by an animal in b the public domain, /b for which the owner is not liable.,The Gemara answers: b If so, /b if this was the sole intention of the verse, b let the Merciful One write /b in the Torah: b And it feed in a field belonging to another [ i uvi’er bisde ḥaveiro /i ], or alternatively, /b let it write: And it consume b another field [ i sedeh aḥer /i ].” What /b is conveyed by the particular expression: b “In another field [ i bisde aḥer /i ]”? /b It is to teach that the court b appraises /b the damage b relative to another field. /b , b But /b why not b say /b that this verse b comes entirely for this /b purpose, i.e., to teach that the court appraises the damage relative to another field? And in that case, b from where do we /b derive the b exclusion /b of liability for damage by Eating in b the public domain? /b ,The Gemara answers: b If /b it is b so /b that the verse was referring solely to the method of appraising the damage, b the Merciful One should have written this /b in the Torah b in the context of payment, /b as follows: b His best-quality field and the best quality of his vineyard he shall pay in another field /b (see Exodus 22:4), thereby adding the term: In another field, and, by extension, the directive concerning how the damage is appraised, to the verse discussing payment. b Why do I /b need b the Merciful One to write it in /b the context of the act of damaging, in the verse: b “And it feed /b in another field”? b Conclude two /b conclusions b from it: /b The verse is referring to both the place where the damage occurred and the method by which the damage is appraised.,§ The Gemara asks: b How do we, /b the court, b appraise /b the value of the damage? b Rabbi Yosei bar Ḥanina says: /b The court appraises the value of an area required for sowing one b i se’a /i /b of seed [ i beit se’a /i ] b relative to /b an area required for sowing b sixty i se’a /i /b of seed, and according to this calculation determines the value of the damage. b Rabbi Yannai says: /b The court appraises each b i tarkav /i , /b equivalent to half a i beit se’a /i , b relative to /b an area of b sixty i tarkav /i . Ḥizkiyya says: /b The court appraises the value of each b stalk /b eaten b relative to sixty stalks. /b ,The Gemara b raises an objection /b from a i baraita /i : If an animal b ate /b one b i kav /i or two i kav /i , /b the court b does not say that /b the owner b pays /b compensation according to b their value, /b i.e., the value of the actual damage; b rather, /b they b view it as if it were a small garden bed and evaluate it /b accordingly. b What, is it not /b that this means that the court evaluates that garden bed according to what it would cost if sold b by itself, /b which contradicts all the previous explanations?,The Gemara rejects this interpretation: b No, /b it means that the court appraises the value b in /b relation to an area b sixty /b times greater., b The Sages taught: /b When appraising the damage, the court b does not appraise /b it based on an area of a i beit b kav /b /i b , because /b doing so b enhances his /b position, b and /b they also do b not /b appraise it relative to an area of b a i beit kor /i , /b equivalent to the area in which one can plant thirty i se’a /i of seed, b because this weakens his /b position.,The Gemara asks: b What is /b this i baraita /i b saying? Rav Pappa said: This /b is what the i baraita /i is b saying: /b The court b does not appraise /b the value of one b i kav /i relative to /b an area of b sixty i kav /i , /b which, being too large for an individual but too small for a trader, is always sold in the market at a lower price, b because that /b would b enhance /b the position of b the one liable for damage. /b Conversely, the court does b not /b appraise the value of b a i kor /i relative to /b an area of b sixty i kor /i , /b an area so large that it is purchased only by a person with a specific need and therefore for a high price, b because that /b would b weaken /b the position of b the one liable for damage. /b , b Rav Huna bar Manoaḥ objects to this: /b According to this interpretation, b this /b term employed by the i baraita /i : b And /b they also b do not /b appraise it relative to b an area /b of b a i beit kor /i , /b is imprecise. According to the explanation of Rav Pappa, the i baraita /i b should have said: And /b they also b do not /b appraise it relative to b a i kor /i , /b to parallel the term in the previous clause: A i kav /i ., b Rather, Rav Huna bar Manoaḥ said in the name of Rav Aḥa, son of Rav Ika, /b that b this /b is what the i baraita /i b is teaching: /b The court b does not appraise a i kav /i by itself, because that /b would b enhance /b the position of b the injured /b party, b nor /b does the court appraise b a i kav /i /b as one part of b a i beit kor /i , because that /b would b weaken /b the position of b the injured /b party, since damage inside such a large area is insignificant. b Rather, /b the court appraises the damage b in /b relation to an area b sixty /b times greater than the area that was damaged.,§ The Gemara relates: There was b a certain man who cut down a date palm [ i kashba /i ] /b belonging b to another. /b The latter b came /b with the perpetrator for arbitration b before the Exilarch. /b The Exilarch b said to /b the perpetrator: b I personally saw /b that place where the date palm was planted, and it actually contained b three date palms [ i talata /i ] standing /b together b in a cluster, /b growing out of a single root, b and they were worth /b altogether b one hundred dinars. /b Consequently, since you, the perpetrator, cut down one of the three, b go /b and b give him thirty-three and one-third /b dinars, one third of the total value. The perpetrator rejected this ruling and b said: Why do I /b need to be judged by b the Exilarch, who rules according to Persian law? He came before Rav Naḥman /b for judgment in the same case, who b said to him: /b The court appraises the damage b in /b relation to an area b sixty /b times greater than the damage caused. This amount is much less than thirty-three and one-third dinars., b Rava said to /b Rav Naḥman: b If /b the Sages b said /b that the court appraises b damage /b caused b by one’s property, /b such as his animal, relative to an area sixty times greater, b would /b they also b say /b that the court appraises damage relative to an area sixty times greater even b for /b direct b damage /b caused by b one’s body? /b , b Abaye said to Rava: With regard to damage /b caused by b one’s body, what is your opinion? /b Are you basing your opinion on the following, b as it is taught /b in a i baraita /i : If one b destroys the vineyard of another /b while the grapes are b budding [ i semadar /i ], /b the court b views how much /b the vineyard b was worth before /b he destroyed it, b and how much it is worth afterward. /b Abaye states the inference: b Whereas, /b the method of appraising one part in b sixty is not taught. /b Is the basis of your ruling the fact that in this i baraita /i that discusses damage caused directly by a person, the method of appraising one part in sixty is not mentioned?,Abaye continued: b Is that to say /b that b with regard to /b damage caused by b an animal it is not taught /b in a mishna or i baraita /i without mentioning the method of appraising one part in sixty b like this case? /b But this is not so, b as it is taught /b in a i baraita /i : If an animal b broke down a sapling /b that had not yet borne fruit, b Rabbi Yosei says: Those who issue decrees in Jerusalem say /b that the damages are determined based on a fixed formula: If the b sapling /b was b in its first year, /b the owner of the animal pays b two /b pieces of b silver; /b if the sapling was b two years old, /b he pays b four /b pieces of b silver. /b If the animal b ate unripe blades of grain /b used for pasture, b Rabbi Yosei HaGelili says: It is judged according to what remains of it, /b i.e., the court waits until the rest of the field ripens and then appraises the value of what was previously eaten. b And the Rabbis say: /b The court b views how much /b the field b was worth /b before he destroyed it, b and how much it is worth /b now.
170. Babylonian Talmud, Bava Batra, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 386
171. Athanasius, On The Incarnation, '49 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 670
172. Athanasius, Epistula Festalis Xxxix (Fragmentum In Collectione Canonum), 39 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •enochic literature, christian rejection of Found in books: Reed (2005), Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature. 200
173. Athanasius, History of The Arians, 78.1 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •enochic literature, christian rejection of Found in books: Reed (2005), Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature. 200
174. Lactantius, Divine Institutes, a b c d\n0 6.21.4 6.21.4 6 21\n1 5.1.10 5.1.10 5 1 \n2 3.1.5 3.1.5 3 1 \n3 3.1.6 3.1.6 3 1 \n4 3.1.7 3.1.7 3 1 \n5 3.1.4 3.1.4 3 1 \n6 3.1.8 3.1.8 3 1 \n7 5.1.9 5.1.9 5 1 \n8 5.1.18 5.1.18 5 1 \n9 5.1.21-5.2.1 5.1.21 5 1 \n10 5.2.1 5.2.1 5 2 \n11 3.1.3 3.1.3 3 1 \n12 1.1.10 1.1.10 1 1 \n13 1.11.24 1.11.24 1 11\n14 3.1.1 3.1.1 3 1 \n15 6.21.10 6.21.10 6 21\n16 3.1.2 3.1.2 3 1 \n17 6.21.5 6.21.5 6 21\n18 6.21.6 6.21.6 6 21\n19 6.21.9 6.21.9 6 21\n20 6.25.12 6.25.12 6 25\n21 6.21.8 6.21.8 6 21\n22 5.4.8 5.4.8 5 4 \n23 6.21.7 6.21.7 6 21\n24 1.18.15 1.18.15 1 18\n25 1.18.5 1.18.5 1 18\n26 1.18.6 1.18.6 1 18\n27 1.18.14 1.18.14 1 18\n28 '1.9 '1.9 '1 9 \n29 1.18.4 1.18.4 1 18\n30 1.18.17 1.18.17 1 18\n31 1.18.16 1.18.16 1 18\n32 1.18.10 1.18.10 1 18\n33 '1.15 '1.15 '1 15\n34 1.18.8 1.18.8 1 18\n35 1.18.2 1.18.2 1 18\n36 1.18.9 1.18.9 1 18\n37 1.18.11 1.18.11 1 18\n38 1.18.3 1.18.3 1 18\n39 1.18.13 1.18.13 1 18\n40 1.18.7 1.18.7 1 18\n41 '1.9.8 '1.9.8 '1 9 \n42 1.18.12 1.18.12 1 18\n43 '1.21.8 '1.21.8 '1 21\n44 1.21.8 1.21.8 1 21\n45 '1.20.36 '1.20.36 '1 20\n46 '5.10.16 '5.10.16 '5 10\n47 '1.20.5 '1.20.5 '1 20\n48 1.21.7 1.21.7 1 21 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022), Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity, 288, 303
175. Babylonian Talmud, Yevamot, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 33, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 44, 45, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52
176. Babylonian Talmud, Shabbat, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 171, 172; Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 386
177. Cyprian, Letters, 10.4 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •gymnastic events, in christian literature Found in books: Spielman (2020), Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World. 214
178. Anon., Protevangelium of James, 19.3, 20.1 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •christianity/christians, early writings/literature Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 382
179. Origen, Commentary On John, 6.25 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •enochic literature, christian preservation of Found in books: Reed (2005), Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature. 148
6.25. Let us look at the words of the Gospel now before us. Jordan means their going down. The name Jared is etymologically akin to it, if I may say so; it also yields the meaning going down; for Jared was born to Maleleel, as it is written in the Book of Enoch- if any one cares to accept that book as sacred - in the days when the sons of God came down to the daughters of men. Under this descent some have supposed that there is an enigmatical reference to the descent of souls into bodies, taking the phrase daughters of men as a tropical expression for this earthly tabernacle. Should this be so, what river will their going down be, to which one must come to be purified, a river going down, not with its own descent, but theirs, that, namely, of men, what but our Saviour who separates those who received their lots from Moses from those who obtained their own portions through Jesus (Joshua)? His current, flowing in the descending stream, makes glad, as we find in the Psalms, the city of God, not the visible Jerusalem - for it has no river beside it - but the blameless Church of God, built on the foundation of the Apostles and Prophets, Christ Jesus our Lord being the chief corner-stone. Under the Jordan, accordingly, we have to understand the Word of God who became flesh and tabernacled among us, Jesus who gives us as our inheritance the humanity which He assumed, for that is the head corner-stone, which being taken up into the deity of the Son of God, is washed by being so assumed, and then receives into itself the pure and guileless dove of the Spirit, bound to it and no longer able to fly away from it. For Upon whomsoever, we read, you shall see the Spirit descending and abiding upon Him, the same is He that baptizes with the Holy Spirit. Hence, he who receives the Spirit abiding on Jesus Himself is able to baptize those who come to him in that abiding Spirit. But John baptizes beyond Jordan, in the regions verging on the outside of Jud a, in Bethabara, being the forerunner of Him who came to call not the righteous but sinners, and who taught that the whole have no need of a physician, but they that are sick. For it is for forgiveness of sins that this washing is given.
180. Origen, Commentariorum Series In Evangelium Matthaei (Mt. 22.342763), 20, 27 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 69
181. Anon., The Acts of Paul And Thecla, 33, 21 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 67
182. Origen, Commentary On Matthew, 15.4.4 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •christianity/christians, early writings/literature Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 381
183. Origen, Against Celsus, a b c d\n0 5.52 5.52 5 52\n1 5.53 5.53 5 53\n2 5.54 5.54 5 54\n3 5.55 5.55 5 55\n4 '3.22 '3.22 '3 22\n5 '7.53 '7.53 '7 53\n6 3.23 3.23 3 23\n7 '3.42 '3.42 '3 42\n8 '2.70 '2.70 '2 70\n9 '2.55 '2.55 '2 55\n10 3.22 3.22 3 22\n11 '3.23 '3.23 '3 23\n12 8.41 8.41 8 41\n13 8.42 8.42 8 42\n14 '3.66 '3.66 '3 66\n15 7.53 7.53 7 53\n16 7.54 7.54 7 54\n17 7.55 7.55 7 55 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Reed (2005), Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature. 148
5.52. But the statement of Celsus which we wish to examine at present is the following: Let us then pass over the refutations which might be adduced against the claims of their teacher, and let him be regarded as really an angel. But is he the first and only one who came (to men), or were there others before him? If they should say that he is the only one, they would be convicted of telling lies against themselves. For they assert that on many occasions others came, and sixty or seventy of them together, and that these became wicked, and were cast under the earth and punished with chains, and that from this source originate the warm springs, which are their tears; and, moreover, that there came an angel to the tomb of this said being - according to some, indeed, one, but according to others, two - who answered the women that he had arisen. For the Son of God could not himself, as it seems, open the tomb, but needed the help of another to roll away the stone. And again, on account of the pregcy of Mary, there came an angel to the carpenter, and once more another angel, in order that they might take up the young Child and flee away (into Egypt). But what need is there to particularize everything, or to count up the number of angels said to have been sent to Moses, and others among them? If, then, others were sent, it is manifest that he also came from the same God. But he may be supposed to have the appearance of announcing something of greater importance (than those who preceded him), as if the Jews had been committing sin, or corrupting their religion, or doing deeds of impiety; for these things are obscurely hinted at.
184. Origen, On First Principles, 1.3.3, 4.4.8 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •enochic literature, christian preservation of Found in books: Reed (2005), Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature. 148
1.3.3. That all things were created by God, and that there is no creature which exists but has derived from Him its being, is established from many declarations of Scripture; those assertions being refuted and rejected which are falsely alleged by some respecting the existence either of a matter co-eternal with God, or of unbegotten souls, in which they would have it that God implanted not so much the power of existence, as equality and order. For even in that little treatise called The Pastor or Angel of Repentance, composed by Hermas, we have the following: First of all, believe that there is one God who created and arranged all things; who, when nothing formerly existed, caused all things to be; who Himself contains all things, but Himself is contained by none. And in the Book of Enoch also we have similar descriptions. But up to the present time we have been able to find no statement in holy Scripture in which the Holy Spirit could be said to be made or created, not even in the way in which we have shown above that the divine wisdom is spoken of by Solomon, or in which those expressions which we have discussed are to be understood of the life, or the word, or the other appellations of the Son of God. The Spirit of God, therefore, which was borne upon the waters, as is written in the beginning of the creation of the world, is, I am of opinion, no other than the Holy Spirit, so far as I can understand; as indeed we have shown in our exposition of the passages themselves, not according to the historical, but according to the spiritual method of interpretation.
185. Nag Hammadi, Apocalypse of Peter, 2.10, 2.13 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 377
186. Eusebius of Caesarea, Martyrs of Palestine, 3.1, 11.19 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •amoraic literature, shaped by christian discourse Found in books: Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg (2023), Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity, 189
187. Commodianus, Instructiones, '15 (3rd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 671
188. Pseudo-Justinus, Exhortation To The Greeks, '2 (3rd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 669
189. Eusebius of Caesarea, Oration of Constantine, a b c d\n0 '13.4 '13.4 '13 4\n1 '7.4 '7.4 '7 4 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 671
190. Origen, Homilies On Numbers, 28 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •enochic literature, christian preservation of Found in books: Reed (2005), Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature. 15, 148
191. Eusebius of Caesarea, De Theophania (Fragmenta), a b c d\n0 '3.61 '3.61 '3 61\n1 '2.12 '2.12 '2 12 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 671
192. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 3.25.1-3.25.7, 6.5.5-6.5.6, 6.14.1, 6.25, 7.32.19 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •enochic literature, christian rejection of •amoraic literature, shaped by christian discourse •christianity/christians, early writings/literature •enochic literature, christian preservation of Found in books: Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg (2023), Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity, 191; Reed (2005), Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature. 148, 204; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 377
3.25.1. Since we are dealing with this subject it is proper to sum up the writings of the New Testament which have been already mentioned. First then must be put the holy quaternion of the Gospels; following them the Acts of the Apostles. 3.25.2. After this must be reckoned the epistles of Paul; next in order the extant former epistle of John, and likewise the epistle of Peter, must be maintained. After them is to be placed, if it really seem proper, the Apocalypse of John, concerning which we shall give the different opinions at the proper time. These then belong among the accepted writings. 3.25.3. Among the disputed writings, which are nevertheless recognized by many, are extant the so-called epistle of James and that of Jude, also the second epistle of Peter, and those that are called the whether they belong to the evangelist or to another person of the same name. 3.25.4. Among the rejected writings must be reckoned also the Acts of Paul, and the so-called Shepherd, and the Apocalypse of Peter, and in addition to these the extant epistle of Barnabas, and the so-called Teachings of the Apostles; and besides, as I said, the Apocalypse of John, if it seem proper, which some, as I said, reject, but which others class with the accepted books. 3.25.5. And among these some have placed also the Gospel according to the Hebrews, with which those of the Hebrews that have accepted Christ are especially delighted. And all these may be reckoned among the disputed books. 3.25.6. But we have nevertheless felt compelled to give a catalogue of these also, distinguishing those works which according to ecclesiastical tradition are true and genuine and commonly accepted, from those others which, although not canonical but disputed, are yet at the same time known to most ecclesiastical writers — we have felt compelled to give this catalogue in order that we might be able to know both these works and those that are cited by the heretics under the name of the apostles, including, for instance, such books as the Gospels of Peter, of Thomas, of Matthias, or of any others besides them, and the Acts of Andrew and John and the other apostles, which no one belonging to the succession of ecclesiastical writers has deemed worthy of mention in his writings. 3.25.7. And further, the character of the style is at variance with apostolic usage, and both the thoughts and the purpose of the things that are related in them are so completely out of accord with true orthodoxy that they clearly show themselves to be the fictions of heretics. Wherefore they are not to be placed even among the rejected writings, but are all of them to be cast aside as absurd and impious.Let us now proceed with our history. 6.5.5. Not long after this Basilides, being asked by his fellow-soldiers to swear for a certain reason, declared that it was not lawful for him to swear at all, for he was a Christian, and he confessed this openly. At first they thought that he was jesting, but when he continued to affirm it, he was led to the judge, and, acknowledging his conviction before him, he was imprisoned. But the brethren in God coming to him and inquiring the reason of this sudden and remarkable resolution, he is reported to have said that Potamiaena, for three days after her martyrdom, stood beside him by night and placed a crown on his head and said that she had besought the Lord for him and had obtained what she asked, and that soon she would take him with her. 6.5.6. Thereupon the brethren gave him the seal of the Lord; and on the next day, after giving glorious testimony for the Lord, he was beheaded. And many others in Alexandria are recorded to have accepted speedily the word of Christ in those times. 6.14.1. To sum up briefly, he has given in the Hypotyposes abridged accounts of all canonical Scripture, not omitting the disputed books, — I refer to Jude and the other Catholic epistles, and Barnabas and the so-called Apocalypse of Peter. 7.32.19. I know that many other things have been said by them, some of them probable, and some approaching absolute demonstration, by which they endeavor to prove that it is altogether necessary to keep the passover and the feast of unleavened bread after the equinox. But I refrain from demanding this sort of demonstration for matters from which the veil of the Mosaic law has been removed, so that now at length with uncovered face we continually behold as in a glass Christ and the teachings and sufferings of Christ. But that with the Hebrews the first month was near the equinox, the teachings also of the Book of Enoch show.
193. Eusebius of Caesarea, Preparation For The Gospel, a b c d\n0 12.16 12.16 12 16\n1 12.17 12.17 12 17\n2 '10.19 '10.19 '10 19\n3 '10.9.9 '10.9.9 '10 9 \n4 '11.28 '11.28 '11 28\n5 12.27 12.27 12 27\n6 12.28 12.28 12 28\n7 12.18 12.18 12 18\n8 12.19 12.19 12 19\n9 '10.9.7 '10.9.7 '10 9 \n10 '3.11.25 '3.11.25 '3 11\n11 '9.41.1 '9.41.1 '9 41\n12 '4.16.18 '4.16.18 '4 16\n13 '13.13.30 '13.13.30 '13 13\n14 '15.4.16 '15.4.16 '15 4 \n15 3.13.18 3.13.18 3 13\n16 3.13.17 3.13.17 3 13\n17 3.13.16 3.13.16 3 13\n18 3.13.15 3.13.15 3 13 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 671
194. Firmicus Maternus Julius., De Errore Profanarum Religionum, a b c d\n0 '7.6 '7.6 '7 6\n1 '12.8 '12.8 '12 8 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 671
195. Origen, Letter To Africanus, 13 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •enochic literature, christian rejection of Found in books: Reed (2005), Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature. 204
196. Julian (Emperor), Against The Galileans, None (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), gregory of nyssa, sermon in praise of the forty martyrs Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 755
197. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Severus, 121.10 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pharisaic-rabbinic connection, in early christian literature Found in books: Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 70
198. Cassian, Institutiones, a b c d\n0 '3.39 '3.39 '3 39\n1 '2.62 '2.62 '2 62 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 671
199. Didymus, Commonatrii In Psalmos, 34.19 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 36
200. Prudentius, Hamartigenia, 402-405, 401 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 668
201. Prudentius, On The Crown of Martyrdom, 10.212-10.215, 10.239-10.240, 10.281-10.285 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature •christian literature, acts of paul and thekla Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 669; Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 67
202. Prudentius, Contra Symmachum, a b c d\n0 '1.116 '1.116 '1 116 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 669
203. Prudentius, Apotheosis, '458 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 669
204. Methodius of Olympus, Symposium, a b c d\n0 '8.14.215 '8.14.215 '8 14 (4th cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 667
205. Socrates Scholasticus, Ecclesiastical History, a b c d\n0 '2.42 '2.42 '2 42 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 666
206. Gregory of Nazianzus, De Vita Sua, 2.1.11 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: MacDougall (2022), Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition. 160
207. Anon., Historia Apollonii Regis Tyri, 1, 12-16, 25, 30, 32, 38, 44, 50, 20 (4th cent. CE - th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 62
208. Ammianus Marcellinus, History, 20.10.7 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •education and pedagogy, paideia, julian’s interdict on christian teaching of pagan literature Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 374
209. Basil of Caesarea, Homiliae In Hexaemeron, 23 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), gregory of nyssa, sermon in praise of the forty martyrs Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 755
210. Epiphanius, Panarion, 19.5, 20.3 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pharisaic-rabbinic connection, in early christian literature Found in books: Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 69
211. Augustine, Sermons, 322 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., life of st. letardus •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., life of st. maximinus, bishop of trier •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), bede, ecclesiastical history •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), ps.-augustine, on the miracles of st. stephen Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 787
212. Augustine, The City of God, a b c d\n0 15 15 15 None\n1 '22.1 '22.1 '22 1 \n2 '22.10 '22.10 '22 10 \n3 '4.27 '4.27 '4 27 \n4 '22.4 '22.4 '22 4 \n5 '3.11 '3.11 '3 11 \n6 '18.19 '18.19 '18 19 \n7 '2.14 '2.14 '2 14 \n8 '18.12 '18.12 '18 12 \n9 '6.7 '6.7 '6 7 \n10 22.8.22 22.8.22 22 8 \n11 22.8.19 22.8.19 22 8 \n12 22.8.17 22.8.17 22 8 \n13 22.8.20 22.8.20 22 8 \n14 22.8.16 22.8.16 22 8 \n15 22.8.11 22.8.11 22 8 \n16 22.8.12 22.8.12 22 8 \n17 22.8.10 22.8.10 22 8 \n18 22.8.14 22.8.14 22 8 \n19 22.8.13 22.8.13 22 8 \n20 22.8.21 22.8.21 22 8 \n21 22.8.18 22.8.18 22 8 \n22 22.8.15 22.8.15 22 8 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Reed (2005), Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature. 15, 218
213. Ambrose, The Patriarchs, 4.21-4.22 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •sandals, in early christian literature Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 172, 173
214. Gregory of Nyssa, De Vita Mosis, 2.13 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •education and pedagogy, paideia, julian’s interdict on christian teaching of pagan literature Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 339
215. Cassiodorus, Historia Ecclesiastica, a b c d\n0 '7.2.32 '7.2.32 '7 2 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 671
216. Theodosius Ii Emperor of Rome, Theodosian Code, 13.3.5 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •education and pedagogy, paideia, julian’s interdict on christian teaching of pagan literature Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 374
217. Jerome, Letters, 127 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pharisaic-rabbinic connection, in early christian literature Found in books: Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 70
218. Jerome, Letters, 127 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pharisaic-rabbinic connection, in early christian literature Found in books: Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 70
219. Jerome, Letters, 127 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pharisaic-rabbinic connection, in early christian literature Found in books: Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 70
220. Theodoret of Cyrrhus, Pg, 2.47-2.48, 3.23-3.24, 8.15-8.18 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 669, 671, 672
221. Boethius, De Consolatione, a b c d\n0 '4.7.13.33 '4.7.13.33 '4 7 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 666
222. Jerome, On Illustrious Men, 4, 80, 2 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 381
223. Jerome, Commentary On Isaiah, 1.1.10 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 36
224. Jerome, Commentaria In Matthaeum (Commentaria In Evangelium S. Matthaei), 3.11 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •sandals, in early christian literature Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 170, 171
225. Gregory of Tours, Liber De Passione Et Virtutibus Sancti Iuliani Martyris, 23, 9, 47 (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 776, 777, 786
226. Gregory of Tours, Liber In Gloria Martyrum, 30, 5, 97, 99 (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 779
227. Gregory of Tours, Liber In Gloria Confessorum, 94 (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), augustine, on the city of god •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), gregory of tours, glory of the confessors •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), gregory of tours, glory of the martyrs •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), gregory of tours, on the suffering and powerful deeds of the martyr st. julian •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), ps.-augustine, on the miracles of st. stephen Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 786
228. Gregory of Tours, De Virtutibus Sancti Martini Episcopi), 1.16, 1.22, 2.4, 2.6, 2.23, 2.26, 2.56, 3.23 (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), gregory of tours, on the powerful deeds of the bishop st. martin •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), gregory of tours, glory of the confessors •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), gregory of tours, glory of the martyrs •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), gregory of tours, on the suffering and powerful deeds of the martyr st. julian Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 783, 784, 785
229. Sophronius, Narratio Miraculorum Sanctorum Cyri Et Joannis, 28.9 (6th cent. CE - 7th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 776
230. Gregory of Tours, Historia Francorum, 8.16, 10.31 (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), gregory of tours, on the powerful deeds of the bishop st. martin •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), gregory of tours, glory of the martyrs Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 784, 799
231. Gregory The Great, Dialogorum Libri Iv, 3.38 (6th cent. CE - 7th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., book of the appearance of st. michael at monte gargano •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., life of st. magdalveus •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., miracles of st. agnello •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), gregory the great, dialogues •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), ps.-ambrose, suffering of st. agnes Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 789, 802
232. Evagrius Scholasticus, Ecclesiastical History, 3.8 (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., life of st. symeon stylites the younger •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), cyril of scythopolis, life of st. euthymios •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), cyril of scythopolis, life of st. saba •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), eustratios, life of st. eutychios •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), evagrius scholasticus, ecclesiastical history •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), severus of antioch, on the martyr st. leontius Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 747
233. Anon., Avot Derabbi Nathan A, 11 (6th cent. CE - 8th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •literature, rabbinic, palestinian, and christian monastic sources Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2013), Early Christian Monastic Literature and the Babylonian Talmud, 69
234. Procopius, On Buildings, 2.11.4 (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., [untitled syriac life of st. dometios] Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 764
235. Bede The Venerable, Historia Ecclesiastica, 2.6 (7th cent. CE - 8th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., life of st. letardus •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., life of st. maximinus, bishop of trier •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), bede, ecclesiastical history •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), ps.-augustine, on the miracles of st. stephen Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 787
236. Augustine, Letters, '50 (7th cent. CE - 7th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 665
237. Papyri, P.Murabba'T, 12.11226  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), zacharias scholasticus, life of severus Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 388
239. Palestinian Talmud, Shev, None  Tagged with subjects: •motifs, shared, rabbinic and christian literature Found in books: Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 385
243. Papyri, P.Eleph., 11.1380  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), zacharias scholasticus, life of severus Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 388
244. Anon., Ascension of Isaiah, 1.7-1.10, 3.6-3.10, 5.1-5.2, 5.6-5.7, 5.11, 5.13-5.16, 11.41  Tagged with subjects: •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 31, 32, 36, 37
245. Anon., Epistle To Diognetus, 3-5, 2  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: nan nan nan nan
247. Papyri, P.Lond.Copt. London., 329  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., [kollouthos in untitled coptic miracle tales] Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 774
251. Anon., Apocalypse of Peter, 2.10, 2.13  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 377
254. Epigraphy, Borg. Copt., None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: nan nan nan nan nan
255. Abū-Raihūn Muhammad Ibn Ahmad Al-Bīrūnī, The Chronology of Ancient Nations, None  Tagged with subjects: •christianity, ethiopic, and rabbinic literature •syriac, and ethiopic christian literature Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 144, 145
256. Athanasius, Expositiones In Psalmos, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 60
257. Epigraphy, Igur, 148  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), tatian, against the greeks Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 260
258. Gregory of Elvira, Tract. Sanc. Script., 4  Tagged with subjects: •sandals, in early christian literature Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 171
259. Hom., Hom. Heb., 91  Tagged with subjects: •sandals, in early christian literature Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 169
260. Menander, Sik., 127.4  Tagged with subjects: •pharisaic-rabbinic connection, in early christian literature Found in books: Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 70
261. Petronius, Saturnalia, 11, 35-37  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ando and Ruepke (2006), Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome, 98
262. New Testament, Q Source, 11.42  Tagged with subjects: •pharisees, in christian literature Found in books: Jaffee (2001), Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE - 400 CE, 46, 49
263. Eusebius of Caesarea, Chronicon, 7.7  Tagged with subjects: •christianity/christians, early writings/literature Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 347
264. Eustratios Presbyter, Vita Eutychii, 24, 17  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 779
265. Firmicus Maternus, Matheseos, a b c d\n0 '12.2 '12.2 '12 2  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 669
266. Septuagint, 4 Maccabees, 4.15-4.26  Tagged with subjects: •amoraic literature, shaped by christian discourse Found in books: Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg (2023), Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity, 19
4.15. When King Seleucus died, his son Antiochus Epiphanes succeeded to the throne, an arrogant and terrible man, 4.16. who removed Onias from the priesthood and appointed Onias's brother Jason as high priest. 4.17. Jason agreed that if the office were conferred upon him he would pay the king three thousand six hundred and sixty talents annually. 4.18. So the king appointed him high priest and ruler of the nation. 4.19. Jason changed the nation's way of life and altered its form of government in complete violation of the law, 4.20. o that not only was a gymnasium constructed at the very citadel of our native land, but also the temple service was abolished. 4.21. The divine justice was angered by these acts and caused Antiochus himself to make war on them. 4.22. For when he was warring against Ptolemy in Egypt, he heard that a rumor of his death had spread and that the people of Jerusalem had rejoiced greatly. He speedily marched against them, 4.23. and after he had plundered them he issued a decree that if any of them should be found observing the ancestral law they should die. 4.24. When, by means of his decrees, he had not been able in any way to put an end to the people's observance of the law, but saw that all his threats and punishments were being disregarded, 4.25. even to the point that women, because they had circumcised their sons, were thrown headlong from heights along with their infants, though they had known beforehand that they would suffer this -- 4.26. when, then, his decrees were despised by the people, he himself, through torture, tried to compel everyone in the nation to eat defiling foods and to renounce Judaism.
267. Menander, Thais, 1.43  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: nan nan
268. Jovianus, Epistulae, a b c d\n0 '2.13.8 '2.13.8 '2 13  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 666
269. Eusebius of Caesarea, Gcs, 5.20.1-5.20.3, 7.11.13-7.11.14  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 666, 667
270. Filaster, Divers. Heres. Lib., a b c d\n0 '8.2 '8.2 '8 2  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 666
271. Julius Africanus, Chron. Frag., a b c d\n0 '13.7 '13.7 '13 7  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 671
272. Anon., Mart. Apollon., '22  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 671
273. Maximus of Turin, Serm., a b c d\n0 '48.4 '48.4 '48 4  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 669
274. Herodorus, Fgh, None  Tagged with subjects: •heracles/hercules, christian literature Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 667
275. Epigraphy, Ig Iv ,1, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: nan nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
277. Babylonian Talmud, Avodah Zarah, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 386
278. Asterius, Homilies, 9  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), gregory of nyssa, sermon in praise of the forty martyrs Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 754
279. Simplicius of Cilicia, In Aristotelis Physicorum Libros Commentaria, 5 (missingth cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •festivals, non-christian, in early christian literature Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018), Jewish-Christian Dialogues on Scripture in Late Antiquity: Heretic Narratives of the Babylonian Talmud, 63
280. Sozomenus, Ecclesiastical History, a b c d\n0 '4.24.10 '4.24.10 '4 24\n1 2.3.9 2.3.9 2 3 \n2 2.3.11 2.3.11 2 3 \n3 2.3.12 2.3.12 2 3 \n4 2.3.13 2.3.13 2 3 \n5 2.3.10 2.3.10 2 3  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 666
281. Stesichorus, Fragments, None  Tagged with subjects: •christian literature, acts of paul and thekla Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 83
282. Strabo, Geography, 1.2.35, 14.5.25  Tagged with subjects: •christianity, christian, literature •christian literature Found in books: Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 160; Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 46
1.2.35. There are many who would make the Erembi a tribe of the Ethiopians, or of the Cephenes, or again of the Pygmies, and a thousand other fancies. These ought to be regarded with little trust; since their opinion is not only incredible, but they evidently labour under a certain confusion as to the different characters of history and fable. In the same category must be reckoned those who place the Sidonians and Phoenicians in the Persian Gulf, or somewhere else in the Ocean, and make the wanderings of Menelaus to have happened there. Not the least cause for mistrusting these writers is the manner in which they contradict each other. One half would have us believe that the Sidonians are a colony from the people whom they describe as located on the shores of the [Indian] Ocean, and who they say were called Phoenicians from the colour of the Erythraean Sea, while the others declare the opposite. Some again would transport Ethiopia into our Phoenicia, and make Joppa the scene of the adventures of Andromeda; and this not from any ignorance of the topography of those places, but by a kind of mythic fiction similar to those of Hesiod and other writers censured by Apollodorus, who, however, couples Homer with them, without, as it appears, any cause. He cites as instances what Homer relates of the Euxine and Egypt, and accuses him of ignorance for pretending to speak the actual truth, and then recounting fable, all the while ignorantly mistaking it for fact. Will anyone then accuse Hesiod of ignorance on account of his Hemicynes, his Macrocephali, and his Pygmies; or Homer for his like fables, and amongst others the Pygmies themselves; or Alcman for describing the Steganopodes; or Aeschylus for his Cynocephali, Sternophthalmi, and Monommati; when amongst prose writers, and in works bearing the appearance of veritable history, we frequently meet with similar narrations, and that without any admission of their having inserted such myths. Indeed it becomes immediately evident that they have woven together a tissue of myths not through ignorance of the real facts, but merely to amuse by a deceptive narration of the impossible and marvellous. If they appear to do this in ignorance, it is because they can romance more frequently and with greater plausibility on those things which are uncertain and unknown. This Theopompus plainly confesses in the announcement of his intention to relate the fables in his history in a better style than Herodotus, Ctesias, Hellanicus, and those who had written on the affairs of India. 14.5.25. And who are the mixed tribes? For we would be unable to say that, as compared with the aforesaid places, others were either named or omitted by him which we shall assign to the mixed tribes; neither can we call mixed any of these peoples themselves whom he has mentioned or omitted; for, even if they had become mixed, still the predomit element has made them either Hellenes or barbarians; and I know nothing of a third tribe of people that is mixed.
284. Anon., Kallimachos And Chrysorrhoë, 1066-1322, 1324-1412, 316-318, 770-796, 828-840, 926-927, 1323  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 82
285. Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 19, 21-22, 20  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 388
286. Anastasius, Quaestio, 26.4  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), celestine i, [untitled encomium] •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), daniel of sketis, andronikos the money-dealer and his wife athanasia •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), eustratios, life of st. eutychios •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), john eleemon, life of tychon •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), john rufus, plerophoria •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), mark the deacon, life of saint porphyrius Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 759, 760
287. Anon., Semahot, 8.9-8.16  Tagged with subjects: •amoraic literature, shaped by christian discourse Found in books: Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg (2023), Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity, 194
288. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah (Septuagint), 65.4  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), gregory of nyssa, sermon in praise of the forty martyrs Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 755
289. Gregory of Nazianzus, Orations, a b c d\n0 24.1 24.1 24 1 \n1 41 41 41 None\n2 41.1 41.1 41 1 \n3 45.2 45.2 45 2 \n4 4.4 4.4 4 4 \n5 39.8 39.8 39 8 \n6 40 40 40 None\n7 39.1 39.1 39 1 \n8 2.22 2.22 2 22 \n9 '25 '25 '25 None\n10 '4.122 '4.122 '4 122 \n11 '4.70 '4.70 '4 70  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: MacDougall (2022), Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition. 31
290. Anon., Epit. Vit. Tychonis, 30.16, 30.17, 30.18, 30.19, 30.20, 30.21, 30.22, 30.23, 30.24, 30.25, 30.26, 30.27, 30.28, 31.1, 31.2, 31.3, 31.4, 31.5, 31.6, 31.7, 31.8, 31.9, 31.10, 31.11, 31.12, 31.13, 31.14, 31.15, 31.16, 31.17-36.5, 42.26, 42.27, 42.28, 42.29, 42.30, 43.1, 43.2, 43.3, 43.4, 43.5, 43.6, 43.7, 43.8, 43.9, 43.10, 43.11, 43.12, 43.13, 43.14, 43.15, 43.16, 43.17  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 760
291. Mark The Deacon, Life of Porphyrius, 7  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), celestine i, [untitled encomium] •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), daniel of sketis, andronikos the money-dealer and his wife athanasia •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), eustratios, life of st. eutychios •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), john rufus, plerophoria •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), mark the deacon, life of saint porphyrius Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 759
292. Anon., Miracula Cosmae Et Damiani, 18, 24-25  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 747
293. Anon., Mir. Menae (Coptic), 1, 16, 9, 3  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 747
294. Anon., Mir. Menae (Greek), 1, 13, 2, 6, 9, 5  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 769, 770
295. Anon., Mir. Menae (Arabic), 11, 17, 23, 14  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 770
296. Agathon, Book of The Consecration, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: nan nan
297. Anon., Miracula Artemii, 2, 41-42, 44, 6, 12  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 765, 766
299. Bedjan, Acta Martyrum, 6.536-6.556  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., life of st. symeon stylites the younger •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), gregory of tours, glory of the martyrs Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 779
300. Council of Carthage, Canons (Ed. C. Munier,Concilia Africae A. 345 - A. 525 (Ccsl 149; Turnhout, 1974)), 83  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), john eleemon, life of tychon Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 760
301. Ps.-Cyril, Miracles of The Three Children, 7  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), agathon(?), book of the consecration of the sanctuary of benjamin •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., miracles of st. ptolemaios Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 776
302. Anon., 2Nd Life of Sts. Cyrus And John, 16, 2  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 776
303. Greg. Nyss., Sermo In Xl Martyres Ii, 166-168  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 754
304. Anon., Vit. Et Passio S. Dometii, 12  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., [untitled syriac life of st. dometios] Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 764
305. Anon., Les Dix Merveilles De La Archange Michel, 10, 4-8, 2  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 777
306. Sophronios, Panegyric, 27  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), sophronios, panegyric •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), first life of sts. cyrus and john Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 372
307. Sophronios, Preface [To Panegyric], 1  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), sophronios, panegyric •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), first life of sts. cyrus and john Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 372
308. Epigraphy, Morgan Library, None  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., encomium [of st. menas] •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., further miracles [ofst. menas] •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), timothy of alexandria(?), concerning the miracles of the glorious martyr st. menas Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 769
309. Epigraphy, Cod. M 587 760 (Fol. 96 Verso-102 Recto), None  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., encomium [of st. menas] •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., further miracles [ofst. menas] •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), timothy of alexandria(?), concerning the miracles of the glorious martyr st. menas Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 769
310. Anon., Narratio De Miraculo A Michaele Archangelo Chonis Patrato, 3  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., book of the appearance of st. michael at monte gargano •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., life of st. magdalveus Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 790
311. Epigraphy, Ms. St. Makairos, Hagiog. 35, Fol. 75 Recto-100 Verso, Ed. Zanetti, 11-12, 2, 4-6, 1  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 773, 774
312. Anon., Vit. S. Magdalvei, 2.24  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., book of the appearance of st. michael at monte gargano •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., life of st. magdalveus •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), gregory the great, dialogues •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), ps.-ambrose, suffering of st. agnes Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 789, 790
313. Epigraphy, Edfou, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: nan nan
314. Ps.-Ambrose, Epistles, 1.9  Tagged with subjects: •christian literature, acts of paul and thekla Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 67
315. Anon., 4 Baruch, 9.19-9.21  Tagged with subjects: •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 33
9.19. And he will bless the isles so that they become fruitful by the word of the mouth of his messiah. 9.20. For he shall come, and he will go out and choose for himself twelve apostles to proclaim the news among the nations-- he whom I have seen adorned by his father and coming into the world on the Mount of Olives -- and he shall fill the hungry souls. 9.21. When Jeremiah was saying this concerning the son of God -- that he iscoming into the world -- the people became very angry and said: This is a repetition of the words spoken by Isaiah son of Amos, when he said: I saw God and the son of God.
316. Anon., Pesiqta De Rav Kahana, 28.3  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 162; Spielman (2020), Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World. 216
317. Longus, Daphnis And Chloe, 4.31.3  Tagged with subjects: •christian literature •christian literature, acts of paul and thekla Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 59
4.31.3.
318. Anon., Wängel Qǝddus, 163  Tagged with subjects: •christianity, ethiopic, and rabbinic literature •syriac, and ethiopic christian literature Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 161
319. Origen, Homiliae In Isaiam, 1.5  Tagged with subjects: •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 36
320. Anon., Avesta Yast, 19.49  Tagged with subjects: •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 45
321. Anon., History of King Jamshed And The Demon, None  Tagged with subjects: •isaiah, execution of, in ancient christian literature Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 48
322. Anon., The History of Al-Tabari, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kalmin (2014), Migrating tales: the Talmud's narratives and their historical context, 48, 51, 163
323. Hebrew Bible, 4 Maccabees, 4.16.14  Tagged with subjects: •christian literature Found in books: Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 154
324. Anon., Midrash On Song of Songs, 1.3.2, 2.7.1  Tagged with subjects: •amoraic literature, shaped by christian discourse Found in books: Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg (2023), Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity, 35, 45
1.3.2. דָּבָר אַחֵר, לְרֵיחַ שְׁמָנֶיךָ טוֹבִים, רַבִּי אַחָא בְּשֵׁם רַבִּי תַּנְחוּם בְּרַבִּי חִיָּא, שְׁנֵי שְׁמָנִים הֵם, שֶׁמֶן כְּהֻנָּה וְשֶׁמֶן מַלְכוּת. וְרַבָּנָן אָמְרִין שְׁתֵּי תוֹרוֹת הֵן, תּוֹרָה שֶׁבִּכְתָב וְשֶׁבְּעַל פֶּה. אָמַר רַבִּי יוּדָן שֶׁמֶן תּוּרַק שְׁמֶךָ שֶׁמֶן מִתְגַּדֵּל עַל כָּל מִי שֶׁהוּא עוֹסֵק בְּשַׁמְנָהּ שֶׁל תּוֹרָה, הִיא דַּעְתֵּיהּ דְּרַבִּי יוּדָן, דְּאָמַר (ישעיה י, כז): וְחֻבַּל עֹל מִפְּנֵי שָׁמֶן, חֻבַּל עֻלּוֹ שֶׁל סַנְחֵרִיב מִפְּנֵי חִזְקִיָּהוּ וְסִיעָתוֹ, שֶׁהָיוּ עוֹסְקִין בְּשַׁמְנָהּ שֶׁל תּוֹרָה. דָּבָר אַחֵר, שֶׁמֶן תּוּרַק שְׁמֶךָ, מָה הַשֶּׁמֶן הַזֶּה מַר מִתְּחִלָּתוֹ וְסוֹפוֹ מָתוֹק, כָּךְ (איוב ח, ז): וְהָיָה רֵאשִׁיתְךָ מִצְעָר וְאַחֲרִיתְךָ יִשְׂגֶּה מְאֹד. מָה הַשֶּׁמֶן הַזֶּה אֵין מִשְׁתַּבֵּחַ אֶלָא עַל יְדֵי כְּתִישָׁה, כָּךְ יִשְׂרָאֵל אֵין עוֹשִׂין תְּשׁוּבָה אֶלָּא עַל יְדֵי יִסּוּרִין. מָה הַשֶּׁמֶן הַזֶּה אֵין מִתְעָרֵב בִּשְׁאָר מַשְׁקִין, כָּךְ יִשְׂרָאֵל אֵין מִתְעָרְבִים בְּאֻמּוֹת הָעוֹלָם, דִּכְתִיב (דברים ז, ג): וְלֹא תִתְחַתֵּן בָּם. מָה הַשֶּׁמֶן הַזֶּה כּוֹס מָלֵא אֵינוֹ מְזַרְזֵיף כִּשְׁאָר כָּל הַמַּשְׁקִים, כָּךְ דִּבְרֵי תוֹרָה אֵין מְזַרְזְפִים בְּדִבְרֵי לֵיצָנוּת. מָה הַשֶּׁמֶן הַזֶּה כּוֹס מָלֵא שֶׁמֶן בְּיָדְךָ וְנָפַל לְתוֹכוֹ טִפָּה שֶׁל מַיִם וְיָצָאת כְּנֶגְדָּהּ טִפָּה שֶׁל שֶׁמֶן, כָּךְ אִם נִכְנַס דָּבָר שֶׁל תּוֹרָה לַלֵּב יָצָא כְּנֶגְדּוֹ דָּבָר שֶׁל לֵיצָנוּת, נִכְנַס לַלֵּב דָּבָר שֶׁל לֵיצָנוּת, יָצָא כְּנֶגְדּוֹ דָּבָר שֶׁל תּוֹרָה. מָה הַשֶּׁמֶן הַזֶּה מֵבִיא אוֹרָה לָעוֹלָם, כָּךְ יִשְׂרָאֵל אוֹרָה לָעוֹלָם, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (ישעיה ס, ג): וְהָלְכוּ גוֹיִם לְאוֹרֵךְ. מָה הַשֶּׁמֶן הַזֶּה עֶלְיוֹן עַל כָּל הַמַּשְׁקִין, כָּךְ הֵם יִשְׂרָאֵל עֶלְיוֹנִים עַל כָּל הָאֻמּוֹת, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (דברים כח, א): וּנְתָנְךָ ה' אֱלֹהֶיךָ עֶלְיוֹן. מָה הַשֶּׁמֶן אֵין לוֹ בַּת קוֹל, כָּךְ יִשְׂרָאֵל אֵין לָהֶם בַּת קוֹל בָּעוֹלָם הַזֶּה, אֲבָל לָעוֹלָם הַבָּא כְּתִיב (ישעיה כט, ד): וְשָׁפַלְתְּ מֵאֶרֶץ תְּדַבֵּרִי. 2.7.1. הִשְׁבַּעְתִּי אֶתְכֶם בְּנוֹת יְרוּשָׁלָיִם, בַּמֶּה הִשְׁבִּיעָן, רַבִּי אֱלִיעֶזֶר אוֹמֵר הִשְׁבִּיעָן בַּשָּׁמַיִם וּבָאָרֶץ, בִּצְבָאוֹת, בְּצָבָא שֶׁל מַעְלָה וּבְצָבָא שֶׁל מַטָּה, בִּשְׁתֵּי צְבָאוֹת, הֱוֵי אוֹמֵר בִּצְבָאוֹת אוֹ בְּאַיְלוֹת הַשָֹּׂדֶה, זוֹ חַיַּת הַשָֹּׂדֶה, הָאֵיךְ מָה דְאַתְּ אָמַר (איוב ה, כג): כִּי עִם אַבְנֵי הַשָֹּׂדֶה בְרִיתֶךָ וְחַיַּת הַשָֹּׂדֶה הָשְׁלְמָה לָּךְ. רַבִּי חֲנִינָא בַּר פַּפָּא וְרַבִּי יְהוּדָה בְּרַבִּי סִימוֹן. רַבִּי חֲנִינָא אָמַר הִשְׁבִּיעָן בָּאָבוֹת וּבָאִמָּהוֹת, בִּצְבָאוֹת אֵלּוּ אָבוֹת שֶׁעָשׂוּ צִבְיוֹנִי וְעָשִׂיתִי צִבְיוֹנִי בָּם. אוֹ בְּאַיְלוֹת הַשָֹּׂדֶה, אֵלּוּ הַשְּׁבָטִים, הָאֵיךְ מָה דְאַתְּ אָמַר (בראשית מט, כא): נַפְתָּלִי אַיָּלָה שְׁלֻחָה. רַבִּי יְהוּדָה בְּרַבִּי סִימוֹן אָמַר הִשְׁבִּיעָן בַּמִּילָה, בִּצְבָאוֹת, בְּצָבָא שֶׁיֵּשׁ בָּהּ אוֹת. אוֹ בְּאַיְלוֹת הַשָֹּׂדֶה, שֶׁשּׁוֹפְכִין דָּמָם כְּדַם צְבִי וְאַיָּל. וְרַבָּנָן אָמְרֵי הִשְׁבִּיעָן בְּדוֹרוֹ שֶׁל שְׁמַד, בִּצְבָאוֹת, שֶׁעָשׂוּ צִבְיוֹנִי בָּעוֹלָם וְשֶׁעָשִׂיתִי צִבְיוֹנִי בָּהֶן. אוֹ בְּאַיְלוֹת הַשָֹּׂדֶה, שֶׁשּׁוֹפְכִין דָּמָן עַל קְדֻשַּׁת שְׁמִי כְּדַם הַצְּבִי וְדַם הָאַיָּל, הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב (תהלים מד, כג): כִּי עָלֶיךָ הֹרַגְנוּ כָל הַיּוֹם. אָמַר רַבִּי חִיָּא בַּר אַבָּא אִם יֹאמַר לִי אָדָם תֵּן נַפְשְׁךָ עַל קְדֻשַּׁת שְׁמוֹ שֶׁל הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא, אֲנִי נוֹתֵן, וּבִלְבַד שֶׁיַּהַרְגוּנִי מִיָּד, אֲבָל בְּדוֹרוֹ שֶׁל שְׁמַד אֵינִי יָכוֹל לִסְבֹּל. וּמָה הָיוּ עוֹשִׂים בְּדוֹרוֹ שֶׁל שְׁמַד, הָיוּ מְבִיאִין כַּדּוּרִיּוֹת שֶׁל בַּרְזֶל וּמְלַבְּנִין אוֹתָן בָּאֵשׁ וְנוֹתְנִין אוֹתָן תַּחַת שֵׁיחֵיהֶן וּמַשִֹּׂיאִין נַפְשׁוֹתָם מֵהֶם וּמְבִיאִין קְרוֹמִיּוֹת שֶׁל קָנִים וְנוֹתְנִין אוֹתָן תַּחַת צִפָּרְנָן וּמַשִֹּׂיאִין נַפְשׁוֹתֵיהֶם מֵהֶם, הוּא שֶׁאָמַר דָּוִד (תהלים כה, א): אֵלֶיךָ ה' נַפְשִׁי אֶשָֹּׂא, אַשִֹּׂיא כְּתִיב, שֶׁהָיוּ מַשִֹּׂיאִין נַפְשָׁם עַל קְדֻשַּׁת שְׁמוֹ שֶׁל הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא. אָמַר רַבִּי אוֹשַׁעְיָא אָמַר הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא לְיִשְׂרָאֵל, הַמְתִּינוּ לִי וַאֲנִי עוֹשֶׂה אֶתְכֶם כְּצָבָא שֶׁל מַעְלָה. רַבִּי יוּדָן בְּשֵׁם רַבִּי מֵאִיר אָמַר הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא לְיִשְׂרָאֵל אִם תִּשְׁמְרוּ שְׁבוּעָתִי אֶעֱשֶׂה אֶתְכֶם כְּצָבָא שֶׁל מַעְלָה, וְאִם לָאו אֶעֱשֶׂה אֶתְכֶם כְּצָבָא שֶׁל מַטָּה. רַבִּי יוֹסֵי בַּר חֲנִינָא אָמַר שְׁתֵּי שְׁבוּעוֹת יֵשׁ כָּאן, אַחַת לְיִשְׂרָאֵל וְאַחַת לְאֻמּוֹת הָעוֹלָם, נִשְׁבַּע לְיִשְׂרָאֵל שֶׁלֹא יִמְרְדוּ עֹל הַמַּלְכֻיּוֹת, וְנִשְׁבַּע לַמַּלְכֻיּוֹת שֶׁלֹא יַקְשׁוּ עֹל עַל יִשְׂרָאֵל, שֶׁאִם מַקְשִׁים עֹל עַל יִשְׂרָאֵל הֵן גּוֹרְמִין לַקֵּץ לָבוֹא שֶׁלֹא בְּעוֹנָתוֹ. אָמַר רַבִּי לֵוִי כְּתִיב (ישעיה לב, א): הֵן לְצֶדֶק יִמְלָךְ מֶלֶךְ, אֵין הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא מַעֲמִיד מֶלֶךְ חָנֵף עַל אֻמָּתוֹ עַד שֶׁגּוֹבֶה דִּיקֵי שֶׁלָּהּ וְגוֹמְרָהּ תְּחִלָּה. רַבִּי אַבָּהוּ בְּשֵׁם רַבִּי תַּנְחוּם אָמַר מַה שּׁוֹטְרֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל אוֹמְרִין לְפַרְעֹה הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב (שמות ה, טז): תֶּבֶן אֵין נִתָּן לַעֲבָדֶיךָ וגו' וְחָטָאת עַמֶּךָ, אַתְּ חָטֵי עַל עַמָּךְ וְאַתְּ חָטֵי עַל אֻמָּתָךְ וְאַתְּ גּוֹרֵם לְעַצְמְךָ שֶׁתִּסְתַּלֵּק הַמַּלְכוּת מִמְּךָ וְתִנָּתֵן לְאֻמָּה אַחֶרֶת. רַבִּי חֶלְבּוֹ אוֹמֵר אַרְבַּע שְׁבוּעוֹת יֵשׁ כָּאן, הִשְׁבִּיעַ לְיִשְׂרָאֵל שֶׁלֹא יִמְרְדוּ עֹל הַמַּלְכֻיּוֹת, וְשֶׁלֹא יִדְחֲקוּ עַל הַקֵּץ, וְשֶׁלֹא יְגַלּוּ מַסְטִירִין שֶׁלָּהֶם לְאֻמּוֹת הָעוֹלָם, וְשֶׁלֹא יַעֲלוּ חוֹמָה מִן הַגּוֹלָה. אִם כֵּן לָמָּה מֶלֶךְ הַמָּשִׁיחַ בָּא, לְקַבֵּץ גָּלֻיּוֹתֵיהֶן שֶׁל יִשְׂרָאֵל. רַבִּי אוֹנְיָא אָמַר אַרְבַּע שְׁבוּעוֹת הִשְׁבִּיעָן כְּנֶגֶד אַרְבָּעָה דּוֹרוֹת שֶׁדָּחֲקוּ עַל הַקֵּץ וְנִכְשְׁלוּ, וְאֵלּוּ הֵן: אֶחָד בִּימֵי עַמְרָם, וְאֶחָד בִּימֵי דֵּינַיי, וְאֶחָד בִּימֵי בֶּן כּוֹזֵבָא, וְאֶחָד בִּימֵי שׁוּתֶלַח בֶּן אֶפְרָיִם, הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב (תהלים עח, ט): בְּנֵי אֶפְרַיִם נוֹשְׁקֵי רוֹמֵי קָשֶׁת. וְיֵשׁ אוֹמְרִים אֶחָד בִּימֵי עַמְרָם, וְאֶחָד בְּדוֹרוֹ שֶׁל שְׁמַד, וְאֶחָד בִּימֵי בֶּן כּוֹזֵבָא, וְאֶחָד בִּימֵי שׁוּתֶלַח בֶּן אֶפְרָיִם, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר; בְּנֵי אֶפְרַיִם נוֹשְׁקֵי רוֹמֵי קָשֶׁת, וְהֵן הָיוּ מְחַשְּׁבִין בְּשָׁעָה שֶׁנִּתְגַּזְּרָה גְּזֵרָה כְּשֶׁדִּבֵּר הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא עִם אַבְרָהָם אָבִינוּ בֵּין הַבְּתָרִים וּמִשֶּׁנּוֹלַד יִצְחָק הִתְחִיל, מֶה עָשׂוּ נִתְקַבְּצוּ וְיָצְאוּ לַמִּלְחָמָה וְנָפְלוּ מֵהֶן חֲלָלִים הַרְבֵּה, מִפְּנֵי מָה, שֶׁלֹא הֶאֱמִינוּ בַּה' וְלֹא בָטְחוּ בִּישׁוּעָתוֹ, עַל שֶׁעָבְרוּ עַל הַקֵּץ וְעָבְרוּ עַל הַשְּׁבוּעָה. אִם תָּעִירוּ וְאִם תְּעוֹרְרוּ, רַבִּי יוּדָן וְרַבִּי בֶּרֶכְיָה. רַבִּי יוּדָן אָמַר אַהֲבָה שֶׁאָהַב יִצְחָק אֶת עֵשָׂו, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (בראשית כה, כח): וַיֶּאֱהַב יִצְחָק אֶת עֵשָׂו, מַהוּ עַד שֶׁתֶּחְפָּץ, עַד שֶׁנַּעֲשָׂה חֶפְצוֹ שֶׁל זָקֵן. רַבִּי בֶּרֶכְיָה אָמַר אַהֲבָה שֶׁאָהַב הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא לְיִשְׂרָאֵל, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (מלאכי א, ב): אָהַבְתִּי אֶתְכֶם אָמַר ה', מַהוּ עַד שֶׁתֶּחְפָּץ, מַלְכוּת שֶׁל מַעֲלָן, לִכְשֶׁתַּחְפֹּץ מִדַּת הַדִּין מֵאֵלֶיהָ, אֲנִי הוּא מְבִיאָהּ בְּקוֹלֵי קוֹלוֹת וְלֹא אֶתְעַכֵּב, לְכָךְ נֶאֱמַר: עַד שֶׁתֶּחְפָּץ.
325. Anon., Encomium Therapontis, 15-19, 21, 20  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 797
326. Epigraphy, Duke Coptic Ms., 25  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), cyril of scythopolis, life of st. saba •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), eustratios, life of st. eutychios •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), george of sykeon, life of theodore of sykeon •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), severus of antioch, on the martyr st. leontius Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 758
327. Anon., Miracula S. Ptolemaei, 1-2  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 776
328. Ps.-Ambrose, Passio S. Agnetis, 16, 15  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 788, 789
332. Anon., Vit. Eligii, 2.48, 2.52  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., life of eligius, bishop of noviomagus •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., life of st. maximinus, bishop of trier •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), ps.-ambrose, suffering of st. agnes •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), venantius fortunatus, carmina •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), venantius fortunatus, life of germanus,bishop of paris •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), venantius fortunatus, life of st. radegund Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 788
333. Epigraphy, Aa.Ss., None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: nan nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
334. Anon., Vit. Maximini (Vita De Sancto Maximino Episcopo Trevirensi), 8, 12  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 787, 788, 790
335. Daniel of Sketis, Andronikos The Money-Dealer And His Wife Athanasia, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 766
337. John Rufus, Plerophoria, 90  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), celestine i, [untitled encomium] •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), daniel of sketis, andronikos the money-dealer and his wife athanasia •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), eustratios, life of st. eutychios •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), john rufus, plerophoria •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), mark the deacon, life of saint porphyrius Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 759
338. Cyril of Scythopolis, Vita Euthymi, 50, 54, 2  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 747, 758
340. Anon., Vit. S. Letardi, 6  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., life of st. letardus •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., life of st. maximinus, bishop of trier •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), bede, ecclesiastical history •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), ps.-augustine, on the miracles of st. stephen Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 787
341. Severus of Antioch, Homiliae, 27, 51  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 779
342. Anon., Vita Symeonis Iunioris, 242, 255, 41, 81, 2  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 747, 779, 780
343. Cyril Scyth., Vit. Sabae, 78  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), anon., life of st. symeon stylites the younger •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), cyril of scythopolis, life of st. euthymios •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), cyril of scythopolis, life of st. saba •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), eustratios, life of st. eutychios •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), evagrius scholasticus, ecclesiastical history •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), george of sykeon, life of theodore of sykeon •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), severus of antioch, on the martyr st. leontius Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 747, 758
344. Papyri, Paris, Bibl. Nat., None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: nan nan nan nan
345. George of Sykeon, Vita Theodori Syceotae, 8  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), cyril of scythopolis, life of st. saba •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), eustratios, life of st. eutychios •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), george of sykeon, life of theodore of sykeon •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), severus of antioch, on the martyr st. leontius Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 758
346. Anon., Mir. Bar Sauma, 55  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), cyril of scythopolis, life of st. saba •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), eustratios, life of st. eutychios •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), george of sykeon, life of theodore of sykeon •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), severus of antioch, on the martyr st. leontius Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 758
347. Epigraphy, Horos, 22-25(2010-13)  Tagged with subjects: •dreams (in late antique and medieval christian literature), tatian, against the greeks Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 260
348. Pseudo-Tertullian, Martyrdom of Perpetua And Felicitas, 6  Tagged with subjects: •christianity, early, relationship between early christian and jewish feasting and feasting literature Found in books: König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 127