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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.


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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
catilinarian Poulsen (2021), Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography, 301
catilinarian, cicero, second Bua (2019), Roman Political Culture: Seven Studies of the Senate and City Councils of Italy from the First to the Sixth Century AD, 256, 257
catilinarian, conspiracy Gilbert, Graver and McConnell (2023), Power and Persuasion in Cicero's Philosophy. 59, 215, 232
Gunderson (2022), The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 180
Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 28, 44, 47, 92, 93, 155, 165, 182, 183, 190
Nijs (2023), The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus. 162
catilinarian, lentulus conspirator Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 92, 93
catilinarians, cicero Ker and Wessels (2020), The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn, 210, 211, 212, 214, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230
catilinarians, of murdering state, tullius cicero, m., cicero, accuses Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 82
catilinarians, res publica, killed the Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 80
catilinarians, tullius cicero, m., cicero, deflects blame for death of Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 80

List of validated texts:
14 validated results for "catilinarian"
1. Cicero, On Divination, 1.17-1.22 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Catiline • Cicero, Catilinarians • Tullius Cicero, M. (Cicero), deflects blame for death of Catilinarians • res publica, killed the Catilinarians

 Found in books: Ker and Wessels (2020), The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn, 218; Santangelo (2013), Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond, 26; Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 80

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1.17 Sed quo potius utar aut auctore aut teste quam te? cuius edidici etiam versus, et lubenter quidem, quos in secundo de consulatu Urania Musa pronuntiat: Principio aetherio flammatus Iuppiter igni Vertitur et totum conlustrat lumine mundum Menteque divina caelum terrasque petessit, Quae penitus sensus hominum vitasque retentat Aetheris aeterni saepta atque inclusa cavernis. Et, si stellarum motus cursusque vagantis Nosse velis, quae sint signorum in sede locatae, Quae verbo et falsis Graiorum vocibus erant, Re vera certo lapsu spatioque feruntur, Omnia iam cernes divina mente notata. 1.18 Nam primum astrorum volucris te consule motus Concursusque gravis stellarum ardore micantis Tu quoque, cum tumulos Albano in monte nivalis Lustrasti et laeto mactasti lacte Latinas, Vidisti et claro tremulos ardore cometas, Multaque misceri nocturna strage putasti, Quod ferme dirum in tempus cecidere Latinae, Cum claram speciem concreto lumine luna Abdidit et subito stellanti nocte perempta est. Quid vero Phoebi fax, tristis nuntia belli, Quae magnum ad columen flammato ardore volabat, Praecipitis caeli partis obitusque petessens? Aut cum terribili perculsus fulmine civis Luce sereti vitalia lumina liquit? Aut cum se gravido tremefecit corpore tellus? Iam vero variae nocturno tempore visae Terribiles formae bellum motusque monebant, Multaque per terras vates oracla furenti Pectore fundebant tristis minitantia casus, 1.19 Atque ea, quae lapsu tandem cecidere vetusto, Haec fore perpetuis signis clarisque frequentans Ipse deum genitor caelo terrisque canebat. Nunc ea, Torquato quae quondam et consule Cotta Lydius ediderat Tyrrhenae gentis haruspex, Omnia fixa tuus glomerans determinat annus. Nam pater altitos stellanti nixus Olympo Ipse suos quondam tumulos ac templa petivit Et Capitolinis iniecit sedibus ignis. Tum species ex aere vetus venerataque Nattae Concidit, elapsaeque vetusto numine leges, Et divom simulacra peremit fulminis ardor. 1.21 Haec tardata diu species multumque morata Consule te tandem celsa est in sede locata, Atque una fixi ac signati temporis hora Iuppiter excelsa clarabat sceptra columna, Et clades patriae flamma ferroque parata Vocibus Allobrogum patribus populoque patebat. Rite igitur veteres, quorum monumenta tenetis, Qui populos urbisque modo ac virtute regebant, Rite etiam vestri, quorum pietasque fidesque Praestitit et longe vicit sapientia cunctos, Praecipue coluere vigenti numine divos. Haec adeo penitus cura videre sagaci, Otia qui studiis laeti tenuere decoris, 1.22 Inque Academia umbrifera nitidoque Lyceo Fuderunt claras fecundi pectoris artis. E quibus ereptum primo iam a flore iuventae Te patria in media virtutum mole locavit. Tu tamen anxiferas curas requiete relaxans, Quod patriae vacat, id studiis nobisque sacrasti. Tu igitur animum poteris inducere contra ea, quae a me disputantur de divinatione, dicere, qui et gesseris ea, quae gessisti, et ea, quae pronuntiavi, accuratissume scripseris?' ' None
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1.17 But what authority or what witness can I better employ than yourself? I have even learned by heart and with great pleasure the following lines uttered by the Muse, Urania, in the second book of your poem entitled, My Consulship:First of all, Jupiter, glowing with fire from regions celestial,Turns, and the whole of creation is filled with the light of his glory;And, though the vaults of aether eternal begird and confine him,Yet he, with spirit divine, ever searching the earth and the heavens,Sounds to their innermost depths the thoughts and the actions of mortals.When one has learned the motions and variant paths of the planets,Stars that abide in the seat of the signs, in the Zodiacs girdle,(Spoken of falsely as vagrants or rovers in Greek nomenclature,Whereas in truth their distance is fixed and their speed is determined,)Then will he know that all are controlled by an Infinite Wisdom. 1.18 You, being consul, at once did observe the swift constellations,Noting the glare of luminous stars in direful conjunction:Then you beheld the tremulous sheen of the Northern aurora,When, on ascending the mountainous heights of snowy Albanus,You offered joyful libations of milk at the Feast of the Latins;Ominous surely the time wherein fell that Feast of the Latins;Many a warning was given, it seemed, of slaughter nocturnal;Then, of a sudden, the moon at her full was blotted from heaven —Hidden her features resplendent, though night was bejewelled with planets;Then did that dolorous herald of War, the torch of Apollo,Mount all aflame to the dome of the sky, where the sun has its setting;Then did a Roman depart from these radiant abodes of the living,Stricken by terrible lightning from heavens serene and unclouded.Then through the fruit-laden body of earth ran the shock of an earthquake;Spectres at night were observed, appalling and changeful of figure,Giving their warning that war was at hand, and internal commotion;Over all lands there outpoured, from the frenzied bosoms of prophets,Dreadful predictions, gloomy forecasts of impending disaster. 1.19 And the misfortunes which happened at last and were long in their passing —These were foretold by the Father of Gods, in earth and in heaven,Through unmistakable signs that he gave and often repeated.12 Now, of those prophecies made when Torquatus and Cotta were consuls, —Made by a Lydian diviner, by one of Etruscan extraction —All, in the round of your crowded twelve months, were brought to fulfilment.For high-thundering Jove, as he stood on starry Olympus,Hurled forth his blows at the temples and monuments raised in his honour,And on the Capitols site he unloosed the bolts of his lightning.Then fell the brazen image of Natta, ancient and honoured:Vanished the tablets of laws long ago divinely enacted;Wholly destroyed were the statues of gods by the heat of the lightning. 1.21 Long was the statue delayed and much was it hindered in making.Finally, you being consul, it stood in its lofty position.Just at the moment of time, which the gods had set and predicted,When on column exalted the sceptre of Jove was illumined,Did Allobrogian voices proclaim to Senate and peopleWhat destruction by dagger and torch was prepared for our country.13 Rightly, therefore, the ancients whose monuments you have in keeping,Romans whose rule over peoples and cities was just and courageous,Rightly your kindred, foremost in honour and pious devotion,Far surpassing the rest of their fellows in shrewdness and wisdom,Held it a duty supreme to honour the Infinite Godhead.Such were the truths they beheld who painfully searching for wisdomGladly devoted their leisure to study of all that was noble, 1.22 Who, in Academys shade and Lyceums dazzling effulgence,Uttered the brilliant reflections of minds abounding in culture.Torn from these studies, in youths early dawn, your country recalled you,Giving you place in the thick of the struggle for public preferment;Yet, in seeking surcease from the worries and cares that oppress you,Time, that the State leaves free, you devote to us and to learning.In view, therefore, of your acts, and in view too of your own verses which I have quoted and which were composed with the utmost care, could you be persuaded to controvert the position which I maintain in regard to divination?' ' None
2. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Catiline • Cicero, Catilinarians • Tullius Cicero, M. (Cicero), deflects blame for death of Catilinarians • res publica, killed the Catilinarians

 Found in books: Ker and Wessels (2020), The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn, 229; Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 80

3. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Catilina • Catilina, L. Sergius

 Found in books: Maso (2022), CIcero's Philosophy, 65; Pausch and Pieper (2023), The Scholia on Cicero’s Speeches: Contexts and Perspectives, 35

4. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Catilinarian conspiracy

 Found in books: Gilbert, Graver and McConnell (2023), Power and Persuasion in Cicero's Philosophy. 232; Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 182

5. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Catilina, L. Sergius • Sergius Catilina, L. (Catiline), plotting the murder of the state • Tullius Cicero, M. (Cicero), accuses Catilinarians of murdering state

 Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 69; Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 82

6. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Catilina, followers of • Catiline • CatilineLucius Sergius Catilina • Cicero, Catilinarians • Cicero, Second Catilinarian • M. Tullius Cicero,and Catiline • Sergius Catilina, L. (Catiline), as pestilence and disease • Sergius Catilina, L. (Catiline), plotting the murder of the state • Sergius Catilina, Lucius (Catiline) • Tullius Cicero, M. (Cicero), accuses Catilinarians of murdering state • Tullius Cicero, M. (Cicero), attacks on Catiline as disease • Tullius Cicero, M. (Cicero), attacks on Catiline as parricide • Tullius Cicero, M. (Cicero), deflects blame for death of Catilinarians • res publica, killed the Catilinarians

 Found in books: Bua (2019), Roman Political Culture: Seven Studies of the Senate and City Councils of Italy from the First to the Sixth Century AD, 256; Clark (2007), Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome, 174; Fletcher (2023), The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature, 74; Kaster(2005), Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome, 94; Ker and Wessels (2020), The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn, 210, 218, 223, 225, 226; Mowat (2021), Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic, 28; Oksanish (2019), Benedikt Eckhardt, and Meret Strothmann, Law in the Roman Provinces, 174, 175; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 260, 267; Rosa and Santangelo (2020), Cicero and Roman Religion: Eight Studies, 49; Santangelo (2013), Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond, 26, 144, 186; Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 31, 32, 80, 82, 106

7. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Catilina • Catilinarian conspiracy

 Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 47; Maso (2022), CIcero's Philosophy, 65

8. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Catilina, L. Sergius • Sergius Catilina, L. (Catiline), as pestilence and disease • Tullius Cicero, M. (Cicero), attacks on Catiline as disease

 Found in books: Pausch and Pieper (2023), The Scholia on Cicero’s Speeches: Contexts and Perspectives, 35; Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 31

9. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Catilina, L. Sergius • Catiline • CatilineLucius Sergius Catilina

 Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Benedikt Eckhardt, and Meret Strothmann, Law in the Roman Provinces, 175; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 45, 46; Santangelo (2013), Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond, 182, 184

10. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Catilina, L. Sergius • Catiline, Lucius Sergius Catilina, as Hannibal

 Found in books: Giusti (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 16; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 47

11. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Catilinarian conspiracy • L. Sergius Catilina

 Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 155; Poulsen (2021), Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography, 10

12. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Catilinarian conspiracy • Catiline

 Found in books: Gunderson (2022), The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 180; König (2012), Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture, 297

13. None, None, nan (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Catiline • Tullius Cicero, M. (Cicero), deflects blame for death of Catilinarians • res publica, killed the Catilinarians

 Found in books: Santangelo (2013), Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond, 185; Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 80

14. Vergil, Aeneis, 5.134-5.135
 Tagged with subjects: • Catiline (Lucius Sergius Catilina • CatilineLucius Sergius Catilina

 Found in books: Farrell (2021), Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity, 229; Oksanish (2019), Benedikt Eckhardt, and Meret Strothmann, Law in the Roman Provinces, 175

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5.134 cetera populea velatur fronde iuventus, 5.135 nudatosque umeros oleo perfilsa nitescit.'' None
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5.134 the wonted way, two swine, and, sable-hued, 5.135 the yoke of bulls; from shallow bowl he poured '' None



Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.