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11 results for "cassius"
1. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cassius longinus, gaius Found in books: Gilbert, Graver and McConnell (2023), Power and Persuasion in Cicero's Philosophy. 106
2. Cicero, De Finibus, 2.70 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cassius longinus, gaius Found in books: Gilbert, Graver and McConnell (2023), Power and Persuasion in Cicero's Philosophy. 113
2.70.  "But Epicurus, you will tell me (for this is your strong point), denies that anyone who does not live morally can live pleasantly. As if I cared what Epicurus says or denies! What I ask is, what is it consistent for a man to say who places the Chief Good in pleasure? What reason can you give for thinking that Thorius, or Postumius of Chios, or the master of them all, Orata, did not live extremely pleasant lives? Epicurus himself says that the life of sensualists is blameless, if they are not utter fools — for that is what his proviso, 'if they are free from fear and from desire,' amounts to. And, as he offers an antidote for both desire and fear, he virtually offers free indulgence for sensuality. Eliminate those passions, he says, and he cannot find anything to blame in a life of profligacy.
3. Cicero, On The Ends of Good And Evil, 2.70 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cassius longinus, gaius Found in books: Gilbert, Graver and McConnell (2023), Power and Persuasion in Cicero's Philosophy. 113
2.70. At negat Epicurus Epicurus negat BE —hoc enim vestrum lumen est— quemquam, qui honeste non vivat, iucunde posse vivere. quasi ego id curem, quid quid quod Non. ille aiat aiat NV Non. alat aut neget. quasi ... neget Non. p. 70 illud quaero, quid ei, qui in voluptate summum bonum ponat, consentaneum sit dicere. quid affers, cur Thorius, cur Caius cur Caius Se. cur chius (curehius B) Postumius, cur Postumius cur postumus cur BE cur postumus V omnium horum magister, Orata, non iucundissime vixerit? ipse negat, ut ante dixi, luxuriosorum vitam reprehendendam, nisi plane fatui sint, id est nisi aut cupiant aut metuant. quarum ambarum rerum cum medicinam cum medicina V medicinam cum BE pollicetur, luxuriae licentiam pollicetur. his enim rebus detractis negat se reperire in asotorum vita quod reprehendat. 2.70.  "But Epicurus, you will tell me (for this is your strong point), denies that anyone who does not live morally can live pleasantly. As if I cared what Epicurus says or denies! What I ask is, what is it consistent for a man to say who places the Chief Good in pleasure? What reason can you give for thinking that Thorius, or Postumius of Chios, or the master of them all, Orata, did not live extremely pleasant lives? Epicurus himself says that the life of sensualists is blameless, if they are not utter fools — for that is what his proviso, 'if they are free from fear and from desire,' amounts to. And, as he offers an antidote for both desire and fear, he virtually offers free indulgence for sensuality. Eliminate those passions, he says, and he cannot find anything to blame in a life of profligacy.
4. Cicero, On Duties, 3.38-3.39 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cassius longinus, gaius Found in books: Gilbert, Graver and McConnell (2023), Power and Persuasion in Cicero's Philosophy. 106
3.38. Hinc ille Gyges inducitur a Platone, qui, cum terra discessisset magnis quibusdam imbribus, descendit in illum hiatum aeneumque equum, ut ferunt fabulae, animadvertit, cuius in lateribus fores essent; quibus apertis corpus hominis mortui vidit magnitudine invisitata anulumque aureum in digito; quem ut detraxit, ipse induit (erat autem regius pastor), tum in concilium se pastorum recepit. Ibi cum palam eius anuli ad palmam converterat, a nullo videbatur, ipse autem omnia videbat; idem rursus videbatur, cum in locum anulum inverterat. Itaque hac opportunitate anuli usus reginae stuprum intulit eaque adiutrice regem dominum interemit, sustulit, quos obstare arbitrabatur, nec in his eum facinoribus quisquam potuit videre. Sic repente anuli beneficio rex exortus est Lydiae. Hunc igitur ipsum anulum si habeat sapiens, nihilo plus sibi licere putet peccare, quam si non haberet; honesta enim bonis viris, non occulta quaeruntur. 3.39. Atque hoc loco philosoplis quidam, minime mali illi quidem, sed non satis acuti, fictam et commenticiam fabulam prolatam dicunt a Platone; quasi vero ille aut factum id esse aut fieri potuisse defendat! Ilaec est vis huius anuli et huius exempli: si nemo sciturus, nemo ne suspicaturus quidemn sit, cum aliquid divitiarum, potentiae, dominationis, libidinis causa feceris, si id dis hominibusque futurum sit semper ignotuml, sisne facturus. Negant id fieri posse. Nequaquam potest id quidem; sed quaero, quod negant posse, id si posset, quidnam facerent. Urguent rustice sane; negant enim posse et in eo perstant; hoc verbum quid valeat, non vident. Cum enim quaerimus, si celare possint, quid facturi sint, non quaerimus, possintne celare, sed tamquam tormenta quaedam adhibemus, ut, si responderint se impunitate proposita facturos, quod expediat, facinorosos se esse fateantur, si negent, omnia turpia per se ipsa fugienda esse concedant. Sed iam ad propositum revertamur. 3.38.  By way of illustrating this truth Plato introduces the familiar story of Gyges: Once upon a time the earth opened in consequence of heavy rains; Gyges went down into the chasm and saw, so the story goes, a horse of bronze; in its side was a door. On opening this door he saw the body of a dead man of enormous size with a gold ring upon his finger. He removed this and put it on his own hand and then repaired to an assembly of the shepherds, for he was a shepherd of the king. As often as he turned the bezel of the ring inwards toward the palm of his hand, he became invisible to everyone, while he himself saw everything; but as often as he turned it back to its proper position, he became visible again. And so, with the advantage which the ring gave him, he debauched the queen, and with her assistance he murdered his royal master and removed all those who he thought stood in his way, without anyone's being able to detect him in his crimes. Thus, by virtue of the ring, he shortly rose to be king of Lydia. Now, suppose a wise man had just such a ring, he would not imagine that he was free to do wrongly any more than if he did not have it; for good men aim to secure not secrecy but the right. 3.39.  And yet on this point certain philosophers, who are not at all vicious but who are not very discerning, declare that the story related by Plato is fictitious and imaginary. As if he affirmed that it was actually true or even possible! But the force of the illustration of the ring is this: if nobody were to know or even to suspect the truth, when you do anything to gain riches or power or sovereignty or sensual gratification — if your act should be hidden for ever from the knowledge of gods and men, would you do it? The condition, they say, is impossible. of course it is. But my question is, if that were possible which they declare to be impossible, what, pray, would one do? They press their point with right boorish obstinacy, they assert that it is impossible and insist upon it; they refuse to see the meaning of my words, "if possible." For when we ask what they would do, if they could escape detection, we are not asking whether they can escape detection; but we put them as it were upon the rack: should they answer that, if impunity were assured, they would do what was most to their selfish interest, that would be a confession that they are criminally minded; should they say that they would not do so they would be granting that all things in and of themselves immoral should be avoided. But let us now return to our theme.
5. Cicero, Letters To His Friends, 15.17, 15.19 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cassius longinus, gaius Found in books: Gilbert, Graver and McConnell (2023), Power and Persuasion in Cicero's Philosophy. 109, 110, 111
6. Cicero, Pro Marcello, 27 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cassius longinus, gaius Found in books: Gilbert, Graver and McConnell (2023), Power and Persuasion in Cicero's Philosophy. 215
7. Horace, Odes, 1.37.5-1.37.6, 2.7.13-2.7.16, 3.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cassius, gaius cassius longinus Found in books: Rohland (2022), Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature, 104
8. Horace, Epodes, 9.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cassius, gaius cassius longinus Found in books: Rohland (2022), Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature, 104
9. Ovid, Fasti, 6.201 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cassius, gaius cassius longinus Found in books: Rohland (2022), Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature, 104
6.201. hac sacrata die Tusco Bellona duello 6.201. On that day, they say, during the Tuscan War, Bellona’
10. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 10.132 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cassius longinus, gaius Found in books: Gilbert, Graver and McConnell (2023), Power and Persuasion in Cicero's Philosophy. 113
10.132. It is not an unbroken succession of drinking-bouts and of revelry, not sexual love, not the enjoyment of the fish and other delicacies of a luxurious table, which produce a pleasant life; it is sober reasoning, searching out the grounds of every choice and avoidance, and banishing those beliefs through which the greatest tumults take possession of the soul. of all this the beginning and the greatest good is prudence. Wherefore prudence is a more precious thing even than philosophy; from it spring all the other virtues, for it teaches that we cannot lead a life of pleasure which is not also a life of prudence, honour, and justice; nor lead a life of prudence, honour, and justice, which is not also a life of pleasure. For the virtues have grown into one with a pleasant life, and a pleasant life is inseparable from them.
11. Epicurus, Kuriai Doxai, 5  Tagged with subjects: •cassius longinus, gaius Found in books: Gilbert, Graver and McConnell (2023), Power and Persuasion in Cicero's Philosophy. 106, 113