Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

   Search:  
validated results only / all results

and or

Filtering options: (leave empty for all results)
By author:     
By work:        
By subject:
By additional keyword:       



Results for
Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.


graph

graph

All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
bean, cakes, sacrifices, of Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 120
beans Gardner (2015), The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism, 76, 77, 78, 178
Huffman (2019), A History of Pythagoreanism, 55, 56, 80
beans, amphiaraos, and Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 626
beans, as obstacle to dream-divination Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 626
beans, as prohibited foodstuff Petrovic and Petrovic (2016), Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion, 60, 254
beans, at pyanopsia Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 164, 185
beans, food Richlin (2018), Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy, 126, 440
beans, impeding dream-divination, cicero, on Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 626
beans, incubation, abstention from Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 625, 626
beans, lentils and Blidstein (2017), Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature, 20, 22, 34
beans, lentils, legumes pulse McGowan (1999), Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals, 37, 38, 40
beans, lots Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 113, 116, 119, 120

List of validated texts:
1 validated results for "beans"
1. Porphyry, Life of Pythagoras, 38-41 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • bean taboo • beans

 Found in books: Huffman (2019), A History of Pythagoreanism, 56; Stephens and Winkler (1995), Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary, 112

sup>
38 He ordained that his disciples should speak well and think reverently of the Gods, muses and heroes, and likewise of parents and benefactors; that they should obey the laws; that they should not relegate the worship of the Gods to a secondary position, performing it eagerly, even at home; that to the celestial divinities they should sacrifice uncommon offerings; and ordinary ones to the inferior deities. (The world he Divided into) opposite powers; the "one" was a better monad, light, right, equal, stable and straight; while the "other" was an inferior duad, darkness, left, unequal, unstable and movable. 39 Moreover, he enjoined the following. A cultivated and fruit-bearing plant, harmless to man and beast, should be neither injured nor destroyed. A deposit of money or of teachings should be faithfully preserved by the trustee. There are three kinds of things that deserve to be pursued and acquired; honorable and virtuous things, those that conduce to the use of life, and those that bring pleasures of the blameless, solid and grave kind, of course not the vulgar intoxicating kinds. of pleasures there were two kinds; one that indulges the bellies and lusts by a profusion of wealth, which he compared to the murderous songs of the Sirens; the other kind consists of things honest, just, and necessary to life, which are just as sweet as the first, without being followed by repentance; and these pleasures he compared to the harmony of the Muses. 40 He advised special regard to two times; that when we go to sleep, and that when we awake. At each of these we should consider our past actions, and those that are to come. We ought to require of ourselves an account of our past deeds, while of the future we should have a providential care. Therefore he advised everybody to repeat to himself the following verses before he fell asleep: "Nor suffer sleep to close thine eyes Till thrice thy acts that day thou hast run o\'er;How slipt? What deeds? What duty left undone?" On rising: "As soon as ere thou wakest, in order lay The actions to be done that following day" 41 Such things taught he, though advising above all things to speak the truth, for this alone deifies men. For as he had learned from the Magi, who call God Oremasdes, God's body is light, and his soul is truth. He taught much else, which he claimed to have learned from Aristoclea at Delphi. Certain things he declared mystically, symbolically, most of which were collected by Aristotle, as when he called the sea a tear of Saturn; the two bear (constellations) the hand of Rhea; the Pleiades, the lyre of the Muses; the Planets, the dogs of Persephone; and he called be sound caused by striking on brass the voice of a genius enclosed in the brass.



Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.