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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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24 results for "aurelius"
1. Herodotus, Histories, 3.80-83.1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emperors and egypt, marcus aurelius Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 267
2. Strabo, Geography, 17.1.46 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emperors and egypt, marcus aurelius Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 232
17.1.46. Next to the city of Apollo is Thebes, now called Diospolis, with her hundred gates, through each of which issue two hundred men, with horses and chariots, according to Homer, who mentions also its wealth; not all the wealth the palaces of Egyptian Thebes contain.Other writers use the same language, and consider Thebes as the metropolis of Egypt. Vestiges of its magnitude still exist, which extend 80 stadia in length. There are a great number of temples, many of which Cambyses mutilated. The spot is at present occupied by villages. One part of it, in which is the city, lies in Arabia; another is in the country on the other side of the river, where is the Memnonium. Here are two colossal figures near one another, each consisting of a single stone. One is entire; the upper parts of the other, from the chair, are fallen down, the effect, it is said, of an earthquake. It is believed, that once a day a noise as of a slight blow issues from the part of the statue which remains in the seat and on its base. When I was at those places with Aelius Gallus, and numerous friends and soldiers about him, I heard a noise at the first hour (of the day), but whether proceeding from the base or from the colossus, or produced on purpose by some of those standing around the base, I cannot confidently assert. For from the uncertainty of the cause, I am disposed to believe anything rather than that stones disposed in that manner could send forth sound.Above the Memnonium are tombs of kings in caves, and hewn out of the stone, about forty in number; they are executed with singular skill, and are worthy of notice. Among the tombs are obelisks with inscriptions, denoting the wealth of the kings of that time, and the extent of their empire, as reaching to the Scythians, Bactrians, Indians, and the present Ionia; the amount of tribute also, and the number of soldiers, which composed an army of about a million of men.The priests there are said to be, for the most part, astronomers and philosophers. The former compute the days, not by the moon, but by the sun, introducing into the twelve months of thirty days each five days every year. But in order to complete the whole year, because there is (annually) an excess of a part of a day, they form a period from out of whole days and whole years, the supernumerary portions of which in that period, when collected together, amount to a day. They ascribe to Mercury all knowledge of this kind. To Jupiter, whom they worship above all other deities, a virgin of the greatest beauty and of the most illustrious family (such persons the Greeks call pallades) is dedicated. She prostitutes herself with whom she pleases, until the time occurs for the natural purification of the body; she is afterwards married; but before her marriage, and after the period of prostitution, they mourn for her as for one dead.
3. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 3.3.9 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •emperors and egypt, marcus aurelius Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 248
4. Suetonius, Augustus, 45 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •marcus aurelius (emperor), and pantomime Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 110
5. Tacitus, Annals, 2.59-2.61 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emperors and egypt, marcus aurelius Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 232
2.59. M. Silano L. Norbano consulibus Germanicus Aegyptum proficiscitur cognoscendae antiquitatis. sed cura provinciae praetendebatur, levavitque apertis horreis pretia frugum multaque in vulgus grata usurpavit: sine milite incedere, pedibus intectis et pari cum Graecis amictu, P. Scipionis aemulatione, quem eadem factitavisse apud Siciliam, quamvis flagrante adhuc Poenorum bello, accepimus. Tiberius cultu habituque eius lenibus verbis perstricto, acerrime increpuit quod contra instituta Augusti non sponte principis Alexandriam introisset. nam Augustus inter alia dominationis arcana, vetitis nisi permissu ingredi senatoribus aut equitibus Romanis inlustribus, seposuit Aegyptum ne fame urgeret Italiam quisquis eam provinciam claustraque terrae ac maris quamvis levi praesidio adversum ingentis exercitus insedisset. 2.61. Ceterum Germanicus aliis quoque miraculis intendit animum, quorum praecipua fuere Memnonis saxea effigies, ubi radiis solis icta est, vocalem sonum reddens, disiectasque inter et vix pervias arenas instar montium eductae pyramides certamine et opibus regum, lacusque effossa humo, superfluentis Nili receptacula; atque alibi angustiae et profunda altitudo, nullis inquirentium spatiis penetrabilis. exim ventum Elephantinen ac Syenen, claustra olim Romani imperii, quod nunc rubrum ad mare patescit. 2.60.  Not yet aware, however, that his itinerary was disapproved, Germanicus sailed up the Nile, starting from the town of Canopus — founded by the Spartans in memory of the helmsman so named, who was buried there in the days when Menelaus, homeward bound for Greece, was blown to a distant sea and the Libyan coast. From Canopus he visited the next of the river-mouths, which is sacred to Hercules (an Egyptian born, according to the local account, and the eldest of the name, the others of later date and equal virtue being adopted into the title); then, the vast remains of ancient Thebes. On piles of masonry Egyptian letters still remained, embracing the tale of old magnificence, and one of the senior priests, ordered to interpret his native tongue, related that "once the city contained seven hundred thousand men of military age, and with that army King Rhamses, after conquering Libya and Ethiopia, the Medes and the Persians, the Bactrian and the Scyth, and the lands where the Syrians and Armenians and neighbouring Cappadocians dwell, had ruled over all that lies between the Bithynian Sea on the one hand and the Lycian on the other." The tribute-lists of the subject nations were still legible: the weight of silver and gold, the number of weapons and horses, the temple-gifts of ivory and spices, together with the quantities of grain and other necessaries of life to be paid by the separate countries; revenues no less imposing than those which are now exacted by the might of Parthia or by Roman power. 2.61.  But other marvels, too, arrested the attention of Germanicus: in especial, the stone colossus of Memnon, which emits a vocal sound when touched by the rays of the sun; the pyramids reared mountain high by the wealth of emulous kings among wind-swept and all but impassable sands; the excavated lake which receives the overflow of Nile; and, elsewhere, narrow gorges and deeps impervious to the plummet of the explorer. Then he proceeded to Elephantine and Syene, once the limits of the Roman Empire, which now stretches to the Persian Gulf.
6. Appian, Civil Wars, 2.362 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emperors and egypt, marcus aurelius Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 232
7. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, 1.26 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •marcus aurelius (emperor), and pantomime Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 110
8. Lucan, Pharsalia, 8.609, 10.9-10.52 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emperors and egypt, marcus aurelius Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 232, 267
9. Philostratus The Athenian, On Heroes, 26.16-26.18 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emperors and egypt, marcus aurelius Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 232
10. Marcus Aurelius Emperor of Rome, Meditations, 4.43, 5.23, 7.51, 7.59 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emperors and egypt, marcus aurelius Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 248
11. Lucian, Toxaris Or Friendship, 12 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emperors and egypt, marcus aurelius Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 232
12. Lucian, The Lover of Lies, 35-37, 34 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 230
13. Pliny The Younger, Panegyric, 30-32 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 247
14. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 2.25.1, 2.26.1, 2.27.2, 2.34, 3.18-3.20, 3.27.3, 4.6, 4.35.1, 5.27.2-5.27.3, 5.35.1, 7.14.8, 7.30.1-7.30.2, 8.7.33 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 263
15. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 69.11.1-69.11.4, 69.22.1, 71.8-71.10, 71.28, 73.15.3, 75.13.1-75.13.2, 7271.6.1-7271.6.2, 7271.8.1-7271.8.4, 7271.10.1-7271.10.5, 7271.13.1, 7271.16.1, 7271.17.1, 7271.22.2, 7271.24.1-7271.24.4, 7271.26.1-7271.26.4, 7271.27.32, 7271.28.3, 7271.32.3, 7271.36, 7372.5.3-7372.5.4, 7473.3.4, 7473.7, 7776.7, 7776.14, 7776.14.4-7776.14.6, 7776.15.2, 7978.16.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emperors and egypt, marcus aurelius •marcus aurelius (roman emperor), quadi and •marcus aurelius (roman emperor), iazyges and •marcus aurelius (roman emperor), marcomanni and •marcus aurelius (roman emperor), scythians and •marcus aurelius (roman emperor), dreams/portents and •marcus aurelius (roman emperor), political consensus/balance and Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 228, 230, 232; Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 89, 91, 93, 95, 145, 146
69.11.1.  On coming to Greece he was admitted to the highest grade at the Mysteries. After this he passed through Judaea into Egypt and offered sacrifice to Pompey, concerning whom he is said to have uttered this verse: "Strange lack of tomb for one with shrines o'erwhelmed!" Antinous: a bust in the Vatican Museums. And he restored his monument, which had fallen in ruin. 69.22.1.  By certain charms and magic rites Hadrian would be relieved for a time of his dropsy, but would soon be filled with water again. Since, therefore, he was constantly growing worse and might be said to be dying day by day, he began to long for death; and often he would ask for poison or a sword, but no one would give them to him.
16. Papyri, Papyri Graecae Magicae, 4.2449-4.2455 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emperors and egypt, marcus aurelius Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 230
17. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Marcus Antoninus, 5.2, 13.1, 26.1, 27.11-27.12 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •marcus aurelius (roman emperor), dreams/portents and •emperors and egypt, marcus aurelius •marcus aurelius (roman emperor), iazyges and •marcus aurelius (roman emperor), marcomanni and •marcus aurelius (roman emperor), quadi and Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 228, 229, 264; Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 95, 145
18. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Hadrian, 14.4-14.7, 16.7, 19.6, 25.1-25.4, 26.4 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 110; Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 230, 232
19. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Commodus, 9.4 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emperors and egypt, marcus aurelius Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 230
20. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Commodus, 9.4 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •emperors and egypt, marcus aurelius Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 230
21. Fronto, Ad M. Antoninum Imp. Epist., 1.3, 2.1.1, 2.3.5, 4.2.2  Tagged with subjects: •emperors and egypt, marcus aurelius Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 19, 247, 248, 249, 250
22. Fronto, Ad Antoninum Imperatorem Epistulae, 1.4.1-1.4.2  Tagged with subjects: •emperors and egypt, marcus aurelius Found in books: Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 247
23. Epigraphy, Seg, 33.770  Tagged with subjects: •marcus aurelius (emperor), and pantomime Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 110
24. Epigraphy, Magnesia, 192  Tagged with subjects: •marcus aurelius (emperor), and pantomime Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 110