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211 results for "augustus"
1. Hebrew Bible, Numbers, 32.36 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus (octavian) Found in books: Faßbeck and Killebrew (2016), Viewing Ancient Jewish Art and Archaeology: VeHinnei Rachel - Essays in honor of Rachel Hachlili, 278
32.36. "וְאֶת־בֵּית נִמְרָה וְאֶת־בֵּית הָרָן עָרֵי מִבְצָר וְגִדְרֹת צֹאן׃", 32.36. "and Beth-nimrah, and Beth-haran; fortified cities, and folds for sheep.",
2. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 34.16 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 45
34.16. "וְלָקַחְתָּ מִבְּנֹתָיו לְבָנֶיךָ וְזָנוּ בְנֹתָיו אַחֲרֵי אֱלֹהֵיהֶן וְהִזְנוּ אֶת־בָּנֶיךָ אַחֲרֵי אֱלֹהֵיהֶן׃", 34.16. "and thou take of their daughters unto thy sons, and their daughters go astray after their gods, and make thy sons go astray after their gods.",
3. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 7.3, 17.14-17.20 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian •augustus (octavian) Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 232; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 45
7.3. "וְלֹא תִתְחַתֵּן בָּם בִּתְּךָ לֹא־תִתֵּן לִבְנוֹ וּבִתּוֹ לֹא־תִקַּח לִבְנֶךָ׃", 17.14. "כִּי־תָבֹא אֶל־הָאָרֶץ אֲשֶׁר יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ נֹתֵן לָךְ וִירִשְׁתָּהּ וְיָשַׁבְתָּה בָּהּ וְאָמַרְתָּ אָשִׂימָה עָלַי מֶלֶךְ כְּכָל־הַגּוֹיִם אֲשֶׁר סְבִיבֹתָי׃", 17.15. "שׂוֹם תָּשִׂים עָלֶיךָ מֶלֶךְ אֲשֶׁר יִבְחַר יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ בּוֹ מִקֶּרֶב אַחֶיךָ תָּשִׂים עָלֶיךָ מֶלֶךְ לֹא תוּכַל לָתֵת עָלֶיךָ אִישׁ נָכְרִי אֲשֶׁר לֹא־אָחִיךָ הוּא׃", 17.16. "רַק לֹא־יַרְבֶּה־לּוֹ סוּסִים וְלֹא־יָשִׁיב אֶת־הָעָם מִצְרַיְמָה לְמַעַן הַרְבּוֹת סוּס וַיהוָה אָמַר לָכֶם לֹא תֹסִפוּן לָשׁוּב בַּדֶּרֶךְ הַזֶּה עוֹד׃", 17.17. "וְלֹא יַרְבֶּה־לּוֹ נָשִׁים וְלֹא יָסוּר לְבָבוֹ וְכֶסֶף וְזָהָב לֹא יַרְבֶּה־לּוֹ מְאֹד׃", 17.18. "וְהָיָה כְשִׁבְתּוֹ עַל כִּסֵּא מַמְלַכְתּוֹ וְכָתַב לוֹ אֶת־מִשְׁנֵה הַתּוֹרָה הַזֹּאת עַל־סֵפֶר מִלִּפְנֵי הַכֹּהֲנִים הַלְוִיִּם׃", 17.19. "וְהָיְתָה עִמּוֹ וְקָרָא בוֹ כָּל־יְמֵי חַיָּיו לְמַעַן יִלְמַד לְיִרְאָה אֶת־יְהוָה אֱלֹהָיו לִשְׁמֹר אֶת־כָּל־דִּבְרֵי הַתּוֹרָה הַזֹּאת וְאֶת־הַחֻקִּים הָאֵלֶּה לַעֲשֹׂתָם׃", 7.3. "neither shalt thou make marriages with them: thy daughter thou shalt not give unto his son, nor his daughter shalt thou take unto thy son.", 17.14. "When thou art come unto the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee, and shalt possess it, and shalt dwell therein; and shalt say: ‘I will set a king over me, like all the nations that are round about me’;", 17.15. "thou shalt in any wise set him king over thee, whom the LORD thy God shall choose; one from among thy brethren shalt thou set king over thee; thou mayest not put a foreigner over thee, who is not thy brother.", 17.16. "Only he shall not multiply horses to himself, nor cause the people to return to Egypt, to the end that he should multiply horses; forasmuch as the LORD hath said unto you: ‘Ye shall henceforth return no more that way.’", 17.17. "Neither shall he multiply wives to himself, that his heart turn not away; neither shall he greatly multiply to himself silver and gold.", 17.18. "And it shall be, when he sitteth upon the throne of his kingdom, that he shall write him a copy of this law in a book, out of that which is before the priests the Levites.", 17.19. "And it shall be with him, and he shall read therein all the days of his life; that he may learn to fear the LORD his God, to keep all the words of this law and these statutes, to do them;", 17.20. "that his heart be not lifted up above his brethren, and that he turn not aside from the commandment, to the right hand, or to the left; to the end that he may prolong his days in his kingdom, he and his children, in the midst of Israel.",
4. Homer, Odyssey, 9.21-9.27 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, as octavian Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 67
5. Homer, Iliad, 11.61-11.67, 22.25-22.29 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, relation with caesar •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Found in books: Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 63
11.61. / and young Acamas, like to the immortals. And Hector amid the foremost bare his shield that was well balanced upon every side. Even as from amid the clouds there gleameth a baneful star, all glittering, and again it sinketh behind the shadowy clouds, even so Hector would now appear amid the foremost 11.62. / and young Acamas, like to the immortals. And Hector amid the foremost bare his shield that was well balanced upon every side. Even as from amid the clouds there gleameth a baneful star, all glittering, and again it sinketh behind the shadowy clouds, even so Hector would now appear amid the foremost 11.63. / and young Acamas, like to the immortals. And Hector amid the foremost bare his shield that was well balanced upon every side. Even as from amid the clouds there gleameth a baneful star, all glittering, and again it sinketh behind the shadowy clouds, even so Hector would now appear amid the foremost 11.64. / and young Acamas, like to the immortals. And Hector amid the foremost bare his shield that was well balanced upon every side. Even as from amid the clouds there gleameth a baneful star, all glittering, and again it sinketh behind the shadowy clouds, even so Hector would now appear amid the foremost 11.65. / and now amid the hindmost giving them commands; and all in bronze he flashed like the lightning of father Zeus that beareth the aegis.And as reapers over against each other drive their swathes in a rich man's field of wheat or barley, and the handfuls fall thick and fast; 11.66. / and now amid the hindmost giving them commands; and all in bronze he flashed like the lightning of father Zeus that beareth the aegis.And as reapers over against each other drive their swathes in a rich man's field of wheat or barley, and the handfuls fall thick and fast; 11.67. / and now amid the hindmost giving them commands; and all in bronze he flashed like the lightning of father Zeus that beareth the aegis.And as reapers over against each other drive their swathes in a rich man's field of wheat or barley, and the handfuls fall thick and fast; 22.25. / Him the old man Priam was first to behold with his eyes, as he sped all-gleaming over the plain, like to the star that cometh forth at harvest-time, and brightly do his rays shine amid the host of stars in the darkness of night, the star that men call by name the Dog of Orion. 22.26. / Him the old man Priam was first to behold with his eyes, as he sped all-gleaming over the plain, like to the star that cometh forth at harvest-time, and brightly do his rays shine amid the host of stars in the darkness of night, the star that men call by name the Dog of Orion. 22.27. / Him the old man Priam was first to behold with his eyes, as he sped all-gleaming over the plain, like to the star that cometh forth at harvest-time, and brightly do his rays shine amid the host of stars in the darkness of night, the star that men call by name the Dog of Orion. 22.28. / Him the old man Priam was first to behold with his eyes, as he sped all-gleaming over the plain, like to the star that cometh forth at harvest-time, and brightly do his rays shine amid the host of stars in the darkness of night, the star that men call by name the Dog of Orion. 22.29. / Him the old man Priam was first to behold with his eyes, as he sped all-gleaming over the plain, like to the star that cometh forth at harvest-time, and brightly do his rays shine amid the host of stars in the darkness of night, the star that men call by name the Dog of Orion.
6. Hebrew Bible, Jeremiah, 26.20-26.23, 42.22, 43.13 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 161
26.21. "וַיִּשְׁמַע הַמֶּלֶךְ־יְהוֹיָקִים וְכָל־גִּבּוֹרָיו וְכָל־הַשָּׂרִים אֶת־דְּבָרָיו וַיְבַקֵּשׁ הַמֶּלֶךְ הֲמִיתוֹ וַיִּשְׁמַע אוּרִיָּהוּ וַיִּרָא וַיִּבְרַח וַיָּבֹא מִצְרָיִם׃", 26.22. "וַיִּשְׁלַח הַמֶּלֶךְ יְהוֹיָקִים אֲנָשִׁים מִצְרָיִם אֵת אֶלְנָתָן בֶּן־עַכְבּוֹר וַאֲנָשִׁים אִתּוֹ אֶל־מִצְרָיִם׃", 26.23. "וַיּוֹצִיאוּ אֶת־אוּרִיָּהוּ מִמִּצְרַיִם וַיְבִאֻהוּ אֶל־הַמֶּלֶךְ יְהוֹיָקִים וַיַּכֵּהוּ בֶּחָרֶב וַיַּשְׁלֵךְ אֶת־נִבְלָתוֹ אֶל־קִבְרֵי בְּנֵי הָעָם׃", 42.22. "וְעַתָּה יָדֹעַ תֵּדְעוּ כִּי בַּחֶרֶב בָּרָעָב וּבַדֶּבֶר תָּמוּתוּ בַּמָּקוֹם אֲשֶׁר חֲפַצְתֶּם לָבוֹא לָגוּר שָׁם׃", 43.13. "וְשִׁבַּר אֶת־מַצְּבוֹת בֵּית שֶׁמֶשׁ אֲשֶׁר בְּאֶרֶץ מִצְרָיִם וְאֶת־בָּתֵּי אֱלֹהֵי־מִצְרַיִם יִשְׂרֹף בָּאֵשׁ׃", 26.20. "And there was also a man that prophesied in the name of the LORD, Uriah the son of Shemaiah of Kiriath-jearim; and he prophesied against this city and against this land according to all the words of Jeremiah;", 26.21. "and when Jehoiakim the king, with all his mighty men, and all the princes, heard his words, the king sought to put him to death; but when Uriah heard it, he was afraid, and fled, and went into Egypt;", 26.22. "and Jehoiakim the king sent men into Egypt, Elnathan the son of Achbor, and certain men with him, into Egypt;", 26.23. "and they fetched forth Uriah out of Egypt, and brought him unto Jehoiakim the king; who slew him with the sword, and cast his dead body into the graves of the children of the people.", 42.22. "Now therefore know certainly that ye shall die by the sword, by the famine, and by the pestilence, in the place whither ye desire to go to sojourn there.’", 43.13. "He shall also break the pillars of Beth-shemesh, that is in the land of Egypt; and the houses of the gods of Egypt shall he burn with fire.’",
7. Aeschylus, Persians, 354 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, as octavian Found in books: Giusti (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 233
354. φανεὶς ἀλάστωρ ἢ κακὸς δαίμων ποθέν.
8. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1280 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, as octavian Found in books: Giusti (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 233
1280. ἥξει γὰρ ἡμῶν ἄλλος αὖ τιμάορος, 1280. The mother-slaying scion, father’s doomsman:
9. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 179
10. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian Found in books: Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 50
11. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 216
12. Isocrates, Evagoras, 12-31, 33-34, 71-73, 32 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 236
13. Herodotus, Histories, 2.59, 3.80-3.82 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus (octavian, emperor) •augustus/octavian Found in books: Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 42; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 45; Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 50
2.59. The Egyptians hold solemn assemblies not once a year, but often. The principal one of these and the most enthusiastically celebrated is that in honor of Artemis at the town of Bubastis , and the next is that in honor of Isis at Busiris. ,This town is in the middle of the Egyptian Delta, and there is in it a very great temple of Isis, who is Demeter in the Greek language. ,The third greatest festival is at Saïs in honor of Athena; the fourth is the festival of the sun at Heliopolis , the fifth of Leto at Buto , and the sixth of Ares at Papremis. 3.80. After the tumult quieted down, and five days passed, the rebels against the Magi held a council on the whole state of affairs, at which sentiments were uttered which to some Greeks seem incredible, but there is no doubt that they were spoken. ,Otanes was for turning the government over to the Persian people: “It seems to me,” he said, “that there can no longer be a single sovereign over us, for that is not pleasant or good. You saw the insolence of Cambyses, how far it went, and you had your share of the insolence of the Magus. ,How can monarchy be a fit thing, when the ruler can do what he wants with impunity? Give this power to the best man on earth, and it would stir him to unaccustomed thoughts. Insolence is created in him by the good things to hand, while from birth envy is rooted in man. ,Acquiring the two he possesses complete evil; for being satiated he does many reckless things, some from insolence, some from envy. And yet an absolute ruler ought to be free of envy, having all good things; but he becomes the opposite of this towards his citizens; he envies the best who thrive and live, and is pleased by the worst of his fellows; and he is the best confidant of slander. ,of all men he is the most inconsistent; for if you admire him modestly he is angry that you do not give him excessive attention, but if one gives him excessive attention he is angry because one is a flatter. But I have yet worse to say of him than that; he upsets the ancestral ways and rapes women and kills indiscriminately. ,But the rule of the multitude has in the first place the loveliest name of all, equality, and does in the second place none of the things that a monarch does. It determines offices by lot, and holds power accountable, and conducts all deliberating publicly. Therefore I give my opinion that we make an end of monarchy and exalt the multitude, for all things are possible for the majority.” 3.81. Such was the judgment of Otanes: but Megabyzus urged that they resort to an oligarchy. “I agree,” said he, “with all that Otanes says against the rule of one; but when he tells you to give the power to the multitude, his judgment strays from the best. Nothing is more foolish and violent than a useless mob; ,for men fleeing the insolence of a tyrant to fall victim to the insolence of the unguided populace is by no means to be tolerated. Whatever the one does, he does with knowledge, but for the other knowledge is impossible; how can they have knowledge who have not learned or seen for themselves what is best, but always rush headlong and drive blindly onward, like a river in flood? ,Let those like democracy who wish ill to Persia ; but let us choose a group of the best men and invest these with the power. For we ourselves shall be among them, and among the best men it is likely that there will be the best counsels.” 3.82. Such was the judgment of Megabyzus. Darius was the third to express his opinion. “It seems to me,” he said, “that Megabyzus speaks well concerning democracy but not concerning oligarchy. For if the three are proposed and all are at their best for the sake of argument, the best democracy and oligarchy and monarchy, I hold that monarchy is by far the most excellent. ,One could describe nothing better than the rule of the one best man; using the best judgment, he will govern the multitude with perfect wisdom, and best conceal plans made for the defeat of enemies. ,But in an oligarchy, the desire of many to do the state good service often produces bitter hate among them; for because each one wishes to be first and to make his opinions prevail, violent hate is the outcome, from which comes faction and from faction killing, and from killing it reverts to monarchy, and by this is shown how much better monarchy is. ,Then again, when the people rule it is impossible that wickedness will not occur; and when wickedness towards the state occurs, hatred does not result among the wicked, but strong alliances; for those that want to do the state harm conspire to do it together. This goes on until one of the people rises to stop such men. He therefore becomes the people's idol, and being their idol is made their monarch; and thus he also proves that monarchy is best. ,But (to conclude the whole matter in one word) tell me, where did freedom come from for us and who gave it, from the people or an oligarchy or a single ruler? I believe, therefore, that we who were liberated through one man should maintain such a government, and, besides this, that we should not alter our ancestral ways that are good; that would not be better.”
14. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.20-1.22, 8.97.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, dio’s view of •augustus/octavian Found in books: Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 12, 50
8.97.2. ἐγίγνοντο δὲ καὶ ἄλλαι ὕστερον πυκναὶ ἐκκλησίαι, ἀφ’ ὧν καὶ νομοθέτας καὶ τἆλλα ἐψηφίσαντο ἐς τὴν πολιτείαν. καὶ οὐχ ἥκιστα δὴ τὸν πρῶτον χρόνον ἐπί γε ἐμοῦ Ἀθηναῖοι φαίνονται εὖ πολιτεύσαντες: μετρία γὰρ ἥ τε ἐς τοὺς ὀλίγους καὶ τοὺς πολλοὺς ξύγκρασις ἐγένετο καὶ ἐκ πονηρῶν τῶν πραγμάτων γενομένων τοῦτο πρῶτον ἀνήνεγκε τὴν πόλιν. 8.97.2. or if he did should be held accursed. Many other assemblies were held afterwards, in which law-makers were elected and all other measures taken to form a constitution. It was during the first period of this constitution that the Athenians appear to have enjoyed the best government that they ever did, at least in my time. For the fusion of the high and the low was effected with judgment, and this was what first enabled the state to raise up her head after her manifold disasters.
15. Antiphanes, Fragments, 145 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 45
16. Theophrastus, Characters, 5.1-5.2 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavian (later emperor augustus) Found in books: Yona (2018), Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire, 6
17. Theocritus, Idylls, 17.3-17.13, 17.114, 17.135-17.137 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus (octavian) Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 221, 232, 236
18. Philodemus, Epigrams, 27.2-27.4, 27.16-27.17 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavian (later emperor augustus) Found in books: Yona (2018), Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire, 167
19. Cicero, Philippicae, 2.110-2.111 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, early self-representations •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Found in books: Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 47
20. Philodemus, De Libertate Dicendi, None (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Yona (2018), Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire, 60
21. Septuagint, 3 Maccabees, 2.29, 4.11 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, temples of upper egpyt Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 141
2.29. those who are registered are also to be branded on their bodies by fire with the ivy-leaf symbol of Dionysus, and they shall also be reduced to their former limited status." 4.11. When these men had been brought to the place called Schedia, and the voyage was concluded as the king had decreed, he commanded that they should be enclosed in the hippodrome which had been built with a monstrous perimeter wall in front of the city, and which was well suited to make them an obvious spectacle to all coming back into the city and to those from the city going out into the country, so that they could neither communicate with the king's forces nor in any way claim to be inside the circuit of the city.
22. Cicero, Academica, 1.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, urban buildings / monuments Found in books: Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 124
1.9. Tum ego Sunt sunt uera *g . an s. vero? inquam “ista Varro. nam nos in nostra urbe peregritis errantisque tamquam hospites tui libri quasi domum deduxerunt, reduxerunt s Aug. ut possemus aliquando qui et ubi essemus agnoscere. tu aetatem patriae tu descriptiones discr. cod. Aug. l Mue. temporum, tu sacrorum iura tu sacerdotum, sacerdotem pm 1 nr tu domesticam tu bellicam bellicam] publicam Aug. disciplinam, tu sedum sedum vel -ium codd. Aug. plerique sedem *g*d regionum locorum tu omnium divinarum humanarumque rerum nomina genera officia causas aperuisti; nos ... aperuisti Aug. civ. 6, 2 plurimum plurimumque s Ald. -que idem p. Gr. quidem poetis a petis *d nostris omninoque Latinis et litteris luminis et verbis attulisti atque ipse varium et elegans omni fere numero poema fecisti, philosophiamque multis locis inchoasti, ad impellendum satis, ad edocendum parum.
23. Cicero, Pro Balbo, 55 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian Found in books: Gorain (2019), Language in the Confessions of Augustine, 11
24. Cicero, Pro Murena, 61, 76 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 65, 106
76. Pauli nepos, P. Publii Africani, ut dixi, sororis filius, his haedinis pelliculis praetura deiectus est. odit populus Romanus privatam luxuriam, publicam magnificentiam diligit; non amat profusas epulas, sordis et inhumanitatem multo minus; distinguit rationem ratione Klotz officiorum ac temporum, vicissitudinem laboris ac voluptatis. nam quod ais nulla re adlici hominum mentis oportere ad magistratum mandandum nisi dignitate, hoc tu ipse in quo summa est dignitas non servas. cur enim quemquam ut studeat tibi, ut te adiuvet rogas? rogas tu me ut mihi praesis, ut committam ego me tibi. quid tandem? istuc istuc ed. Mediol. : istunc (ais an y2 ) mei me rogari oportet abs te, an te potius a me ut pro mea salute laborem periculumque suscipias?
25. Cicero, Pro Sulla, 19 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •julius caesar octavianus, c. (octavian, later augustus) Found in books: Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 112
19. cum vestrorum periculorum, cum huius urbis, cum illorum delubrorum atque templorum, cum puerorum infantium, cum matronarum ac virginum veniebat in mentem, et cum illae infestae ac funestae faces universumque totius urbis incendium, cum tela cum tela om. T , cum caedes, cum civium cruor, cum cinis patriae versari ante oculos atque animum memoria refricare coeperat, tum denique ei resistebam, neque solum illi hosti ac parricidae sed his etiam propinquis illius, Marcellis, patri et filio, quorum alter apud me parentis gravitatem, alter fili suavitatem obtinebat; neque me neque enim me Müller arbitrabar sine summo scelere posse, quod maleficium in aliis vindicassem, idem in illorum socio, cum scirem, defendere.
26. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 1.15.34 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Found in books: Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 53
27. Cicero, In Verrem, 1.17.18, 4.4.146 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, as octavian Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 175
28. Cicero, In Pisonem, 51-52, 7, 70-71 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Yona (2018), Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire, 167
29. Varro, On The Latin Language, 5.1.1, 5.41, 8.5, 9.79 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian •augustus/octavianus Found in books: Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 247; Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 17, 109, 115
30. Cicero, Letters, 14.15.1 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Found in books: Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 40
31. Cicero, Letters, 14.15.1 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Found in books: Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 40
32. Cicero, Letters, 4.16.8, 13.7, 13.12.3, 13.16.1, 14.14.2-14.14.5, 14.15.1, 14.16.2, 16.14.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus •augustus octavianus c. •julius caesar octavianus, c. (octavian, later augustus) •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Found in books: Gorain (2019), Language in the Confessions of Augustine, 22; Maso (2022), CIcero's Philosophy, 19, 77; Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 40; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 105; Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 110; Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 109, 130
33. Cicero, Letters, 14.15.1 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Found in books: Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 40
34. Cicero, Republic, 2.20, 2.43 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods •plutarch, on augustus/octavian and cicero Found in books: Keeline (2018), The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy, 106; Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 41
2.20. us ne pos ei us, ut di xeru nt quidam, e x filia. Quo autem ille mor tuus, e odem est an no na tus Si moni des Ol ympia de se xta et quin qua gesima, ut f acilius intel legi pos sit tu m de Ro mu li inmortalitate creditum, cum iam inveterata vita hominum ac tractata esset et cognita. Sed profecto tanta fuit in eo vis ingenii atque virtutis, ut id de Romulo Proculo Iulio, homini agresti, crederetur, quod multis iam ante saeculis nullo alio de mortali homines credidissent; qui inpulsu patrum, quo illi a se invidiam interitus Romuli pellerent, in contione dixisse fertur a se visum esse in eo colle Romulum, qui nunc Quirinalis vocatur; eum sibi mandasse, ut populum rogaret, ut sibi eo in colle delubrum fieret; se deum esse et Quirinum vocari. 2.43. Nam in qua re publica est unus aliquis perpetua potestate, praesertim regia, quamvis in ea sit et senatus, ut tum fuit Romae, cum erant reges, ut Spartae Lycurgi legibus, et ut sit aliquod etiam populi ius, ut fuit apud nostros reges, tamen illud excellit regium nomen, neque potest eius modi res publica non regnum et esse et vocari. Ea autem forma civitatis mutabilis maxime est hanc ob causam, quod unius vitio praecipitata in perniciosissimam partem facillime decidit. Nam ipsum regale genus civitatis non modo non est reprehendendum, sed haud scio an reliquis simplicibus longe anteponendum, si ullum probarem simplex rei publicae genus, sed ita, quoad statum suum retinet. Is est autem status, ut unius perpetua potestate et iustitia omnique sapientia regatur salus et aequabilitas et otium civium. Desunt omnino ei populo multa, qui sub rege est, in primisque libertas, quae non in eo est, ut iusto utamur domino, sed ut nul lo
35. Cicero, On Duties, 1.53, 2.69, 3.2.7 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian •augustus/octavian, and moral legislation •octavian (later emperor augustus) •augustus octavianus c. Found in books: Maso (2022), CIcero's Philosophy, 77; Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 161; Yona (2018), Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire, 167
1.53. Gradus autem plures sunt societatis hominum. Ut enim ab illa infinita discedatur, propior est eiusdem gentis, nationis, linguae, qua maxime homines coniunguntur; interius etiam est eiusdem esse civitatis; multa enim sunt civibus inter se communia, forum, fana, porticus, viae, leges, iura: iudicia, suffragia, consuetudines praeterea et familiaritates multisque cum multis res rationesque contractae. Artior vero colligatio est societatis propinquorum; ab illa enim immensa societate humani generis in exiguum angustumque concluditur. 2.69. Sed cum in hominibus iuvandis aut mores spectari aut fortuna soleat, dictu quidem est proclive, itaque volgo loquuntur, se in beneficiis collocandis mores hominum, non fortunam sequi. Honesta oratio est; sed quis est tandem, qui inopis et optimi viri causae non anteponat in opera danda gratiam fortunati et potentis? a quo enim expeditior et celerior remuneratio fore videtur, in eum fere est voluntas nostra propensior. Sed animadvertendum est diligentius, quae natura rerum sit. Nimirum enim inops ille, si bonus est vir, etiamsi referre gratiam non potest, habere certe potest. Commode autem, quicumque dixit, pecuniam qui habeat, non reddidisse, qui reddiderit, non habere, gratiam autem et, qui rettulerit, habere et, qui habeat, rettulisse. At qui se locupletes, honoratos, beatos putant, ii ne obligari quidem beneficio volunt; quin etiam beneficium se dedisse arbitrantur, cum ipsi quamvis magnum aliquod acceperint, atque etiam a se aut postulari aut exspectari aliquid suspicantur, patrocinio vero se usos aut clientes appellari mortis instar putant. 1.53.  Then, too, there are a great many degrees of closeness or remoteness in human society. To proceed beyond the universal bond of our common humanity, there is the closer one of belonging to the same people, tribe, and tongue, by which men are very closely bound together; it is a still closer relation to be citizens of the same city-state; for fellow-citizens have much in common — forum, temples colonnades, streets, statutes, laws, courts, rights of suffrage, to say nothing of social and friendly circles and diverse business relations with many. But a still closer social union exists between kindred. Starting with that infinite bond of union of the human race in general, the conception is now confined to a small and narrow circle. 2.69.  Now in rendering helpful service to people, we usually consider either their character or their circumstances. And so it is an easy remark, and one commonly made, to say that in investing kindnesses we look not to people's outward circumstances, but to their character. The phrase is admirable! But who is there, pray, that does not in performing a service set the favour of a rich and influential man above the cause of a poor, though most worthy, person? For, as a rule, our will is more inclined to the one from whom we expect a prompter and speedier return. But we should observe more carefully how the matter really stands: the poor man of whom we spoke cannot return a favour in kind, of course, but if he is a good man he can do it at least in thankfulness of heart. As someone has happily said, "A man has not repaid money, if he still has it; if he has repaid it, he has ceased to have it. But a man still has the sense of favour, if he has returned the favour; and if he has the sense of the favour, he has repaid it." On the other hand, they who consider themselves wealthy, honoured, the favourites of fortune, do not wish even to be put under obligations by our kind services. Why, they actually think that they have conferred a favour by accepting one, however great; and they even suspect that a claim is thereby set up against them or that something is expected in return. Nay more, it is bitter as death to them to have accepted a patron or to be called clients.
36. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.6, 1.42 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus octavianus c. •octavian/augustus Found in books: Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 137; Maso (2022), CIcero's Philosophy, 19
1.6. I observe however that a great deal of talk has been current about the large number of books that I have produced within a short space of time, and that such comment has not been all of one kind; some people have been curious as to the cause of this sudden outburst of philosophical interest on my part, while others have been eager to learn what positive opinions I hold on the various questions. Many also, as I have noticed, are surprised at my choosing to espouse a philosophy that in their view robs the world of daylight and floods it with a darkness as of night; and they wonder at my coming forward so unexpectedly as the champion of a derelict system and one that has long been given up. As a matter of fact however I am no new convert to the study of philosophy. From my earliest youth I have devoted no small amount of time and energy to it, and I pursued it most keenly at the very periods when I least appeared to be doing so, witness the philosophical maxims of which my speeches are full, and my intimacy with the learned men who have always graced my household, as well as those eminent professors, Diodotus, Philo, Antiochus and Posidonius, who were my instructors. 1.42. "I have given a rough account of what are more like the dreams of madmen than the considered opinions of philosophers. For they are little less absurd than the outpourings of the poets, harmful as these have been owing to the mere charm of their style. The poets have represented the gods as inflamed by anger and maddened by lust, and have displayed to our gaze their wars and battles, their fights and wounds, their hatreds, enmities and quarrels, their births and deaths, their complaints and lamentations, the utter and unbridled licence of their passions, their adulteries and imprisonments, their unions with human beings and the birth of mortal progeny from an immortal parent.
37. Cicero, On Laws, 2.59, 2.64 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 105
38. Cicero, On Divination, 1.68, 2.114 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavian, “rebirth” as augustus Found in books: Nelsestuen (2015), Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic. 6
1.68. At ex te ipso non commenticiam rem, sed factam eiusdem generis audivi: C. Coponium ad te venisse Dyrrhachium, cum praetorio imperio classi Rhodiae praeesset, cumprime hominem prudentem atque doctum, eumque dixisse remigem quendam e quinqueremi Rhodiorum vaticinatum madefactum iri minus xxx diebus Graeciam sanguine, rapinas Dyrrhachii et conscensionem in naves cum fuga fugientibusque miserabilem respectum incendiorum fore, sed Rhodiorum classi propinquum reditum ac domum itionem dari; tum neque te ipsum non esse commotum Marcumque Varronem et M. Catonem, qui tum ibi erant, doctos homines, vehementer esse perterritos; paucis sane post diebus ex Pharsalia fuga venisse Labienum; qui cum interitum exercitus nuntiavisset, reliqua vaticinationis brevi esse confecta. 2.114. Quid? inquies, remex ille de classe Coponii nonne ea praedixit, quae facta sunt? Ille vero, et ea quidem, quae omnes eo tempore ne acciderent timebamus. Castra enim in Thessalia castris conlata audiebamus, videbaturque nobis exercitus Caesaris et audaciae plus habere, quippe qui patriae bellum intulisset, et roboris propter vetustatem; casum autem proelii nemo nostrum erat quin timeret, sed, ita ut constantibus hominibus par erat, non aperte. Ille autem Graecus, quid mirum, si magnitudine timoris, ut plerumque fit, a constantia atque a mente atque a se ipse discessit? qua perturbatione animi, quae, sanus cum esset, timebat ne evenirent, ea demens eventura esse dicebat. Utrum tandem, per deos atque homines! magis veri simile est vesanum remigem an aliquem nostrum, qui ibi tum eramus, me, Catonem, Varronem, Coponium ipsum, consilia deorum inmortalium perspicere potuisse? 1.68. I seem to be relying for illustrations on myths drawn from tragic poets. But you yourself are my authority for an instance of the same nature, and yet it is not fiction but a real occurrence. Gaius Coponius, a man of unusual capacity and learning, came to you at Dyrrachium while he, as praetor, was in command of the Rhodian fleet, and told you of a prediction made by a certain oarsman from one of the Rhodian quinqueremes. The prediction was that in less than thirty days Greece would be bathed in blood; Dyrrachium would be pillaged; its defenders would flee to their ships and, as they fled, would see behind them the unhappy spectacle of a great conflagration; but the Rhodian fleet would have a quick passage home. This story gave you some concern, and it caused very great alarm to those cultured men, Marcus Varro and Marcus Cato, who were at Dyrrachium at the time. In fact, a few days later Labienus reached Dyrrachium in flight from Pharsalus, with the news of the loss of the army. The rest of the prophecy was soon fulfilled. 2.114. Oh! but what about that oarsman in Coponiuss fleet, you say, didnt he truly foretell what afterwards came to pass? He did indeed, and the very things that all of us at the time feared would happen. For news was coming to us that the armies of Caesar and Pompey were facing each other in Thessaly. We thought that Caesars troops had more reckless courage because they were fighting against their country and greater strength because of their long military training. Besides there was not one of us who did not dread the outcome of the battle, but our apprehension was not openly shown and was such as not to be discreditable to men of strong character. As for that Greek sailor, is it strange if, in the extremity of his fear, he, as most people do in such cases, lost his courage, reason, and self-control? In his mental excitement and aberration, he merely stated that things would occur, which, when he was himself, he feared would come to pass. In heavens name, pray tell me, then, which you think was more likely to have had the power to interpret the decrees of the immortal gods — that crazy sailor, or someone of our party then on the ground — Cato, Varro, Coponius or I? [56]
39. Cicero, On Friendship, 100, 102-104, 27 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Maso (2022), CIcero's Philosophy, 43
40. Cicero, Brutus, 205, 71 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Roller (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 154
41. Cicero, Brutus, 205 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavian, “rebirth” as augustus Found in books: Nelsestuen (2015), Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic. 6
205. sulpici orationes quae feruntur, eas post mortem eius scripsisse P. Cannutius Canutius vulg. putatur aequalis meus, homo extra nostrum ordinem meo iudicio disertissimus. Ipsius Sulpici nulla oratio est, saepeque ex eo audivi, cum se scribere neque consuesse neque posse diceret. Cottae pro se lege Varia quae inscribitur, eam L. Aelius scripsit Cottae rogatu. Fuit is omnino vir egregius et eques Romanus cum primis honestus idemque eruditissimus et Graecis litteris et Latinis, antiquitatisque nostrae et in inventis rebus et in actis scriptorumque veterum litterate peritus. Quam scientiam Varro noster acceptam ab illo auctamque per sese, vir ingenio praestans omnique doctrina, pluribus et inlustrioribus litteris explicavit.
42. Polybius, Histories, 6.11.11, 6.53-6.55, 6.56.6-6.56.12 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian •augustus/octavian, as object of public gaze •augustus/octavian, as performer of a public image •augustus/octavian, death and will •octavian/augustus Found in books: Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 137; Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 246; Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 50
6.11.11. ἦν μὲν δὴ τρία μέρη τὰ κρατοῦντα τῆς πολιτείας, ἅπερ εἶπα πρότερον ἅπαντα· οὕτως δὲ πάντα κατὰ μέρος ἴσως καὶ πρεπόντως συνετέτακτο καὶ διῳκεῖτο διὰ τούτων ὥστε μηδένα ποτʼ ἂν εἰπεῖν δύνασθαι βεβαίως μηδὲ τῶν ἐγχωρίων πότερʼ ἀριστοκρατικὸν τὸ πολίτευμα σύμπαν ἢ δημοκρατικὸν ἢ μοναρχικόν. 6.56.6. μεγίστην δέ μοι δοκεῖ διαφορὰν ἔχειν τὸ Ῥωμαίων πολίτευμα πρὸς βέλτιον ἐν τῇ περὶ θεῶν διαλήψει. 6.56.7. καί μοι δοκεῖ τὸ παρὰ τοῖς ἄλλοις ἀνθρώποις ὀνειδιζόμενον, τοῦτο συνέχειν τὰ Ῥωμαίων πράγματα, λέγω δὲ τὴν δεισιδαιμονίαν· 6.56.8. ἐπὶ τοσοῦτον γὰρ ἐκτετραγῴδηται καὶ παρεισῆκται τοῦτο τὸ μέρος παρʼ αὐτοῖς εἴς τε τοὺς κατʼ ἰδίαν βίους καὶ τὰ κοινὰ τῆς πόλεως ὥστε μὴ καταλιπεῖν ὑπερβολήν. ὃ καὶ δόξειεν ἂν πολλοῖς εἶναι θαυμάσιον. 6.56.9. ἐμοί γε μὴν δοκοῦσι τοῦ πλήθους χάριν τοῦτο πεποιηκέναι. 6.56.10. εἰ μὲν γὰρ ἦν σοφῶν ἀνδρῶν πολίτευμα συναγαγεῖν, ἴσως οὐδὲν ἦν ἀναγκαῖος ὁ τοιοῦτος τρόπος· 6.56.11. ἐπεὶ δὲ πᾶν πλῆθός ἐστιν ἐλαφρὸν καὶ πλῆρες ἐπιθυμιῶν παρανόμων, ὀργῆς ἀλόγου, θυμοῦ βιαίου, λείπεται τοῖς ἀδήλοις φόβοις καὶ τῇ τοιαύτῃ τραγῳδίᾳ τὰ πλήθη συνέχειν. 6.56.12. διόπερ οἱ παλαιοὶ δοκοῦσί μοι τὰς περὶ θεῶν ἐννοίας καὶ τὰς ὑπὲρ τῶν ἐν ᾅδου διαλήψεις οὐκ εἰκῇ καὶ ὡς ἔτυχεν εἰς τὰ πλήθη παρεισαγαγεῖν, πολὺ δὲ μᾶλλον οἱ νῦν εἰκῇ καὶ ἀλόγως ἐκβάλλειν αὐτά. 6.11.11.  The three kinds of government that I spoke of above all shared in the control of the Roman state. And such fairness and propriety in all respects was shown in the use of these three elements for drawing up the constitution and in its subsequent administration that it was impossible even for a native to pronounce with certainty whether the whole system was aristocratic, democratic, or monarchical. This was indeed only natural. 6.53. 1.  Whenever any illustrious man dies, he is carried at his funeral into the forum to the so‑called rostra, sometimes conspicuous in an upright posture and more rarely reclined.,2.  Here with all the people standing round, a grown-up son, if he has left one who happens to be present, or if not some other relative mounts the rostra and discourses on the virtues and success­ful achievements of the dead.,3.  As a consequence the multitude and not only those who had a part in these achievements, but those also who had none, when the facts are recalled to their minds and brought before their eyes, are moved to such sympathy that the loss seems to be not confined to the mourners, but a public one affecting the whole people.,4.  Next after the interment and the performance of the usual ceremonies, they place the image of the departed in the most conspicuous position in the house, enclosed in a wooden shrine.,5.  This image is a mask reproducing with remarkable fidelity both the features and complexion of the deceased.,6.  On the occasion of public sacrifices they display these images, and decorate them with much care, and when any distinguished member of the family dies they take them to the funeral, putting them on men who seem to them to bear the closest resemblance to the original in stature and carriage.,7.  These representatives wear togas, with a purple border if the deceased was a consul or praetor, whole purple if he was a censor, and embroidered with gold if he had celebrated a triumph or achieved anything similar.,8.  They all ride in chariots preceded by the fasces, axes, and other insignia by which the different magistrates are wont to be accompanied according to the respective dignity of the offices of state held by each during his life;,9.  and when they arrive at the rostra they all seat themselves in a row on ivory chairs. There could not easily be a more ennobling spectacle for a young man who aspires to fame and virtue.,10.  For who would not be inspired by the sight of the images of men renowned for their excellence, all together and as if alive and breathing? What spectacle could be more glorious than this? 6.54. 1.  Besides, he who makes the oration over the man about to be buried, when he has finished speaking of him recounts the successes and exploits of the rest whose images are present, beginning with the most ancient.,2.  By this means, by this constant renewal of the good report of brave men, the celebrity of those who performed noble deeds is rendered immortal, while at the same time the fame of those who did good service to their country becomes known to the people and a heritage for future generations.,3.  But the most important result is that young men are thus inspired to endure every suffering for public welfare in the hope of winning the glory that attends on brave men.,4.  What I say is confirmed by the facts. For many Romans have voluntarily engaged in single combat in order to decide a battle, not a few have faced certain death, some in war to save the lives of the rest, and others in peace to save the republic.,5.  Some even when in office have put their own sons to death contrary to every law or custom, setting a higher value on the interest of their country than on the ties of nature that bound them to their nearest and dearest.,6.  Many such stories about many men are related in Roman history, but one told of a certain person will suffice for the present as an example and as a confirmation of what I say. 6.55. 1.  It is narrated that when Horatius Cocles was engaged in combat with two of the enemy at the far end of the bridge over the Tiber that lies in the front of the town, he saw large reinforcements coming up to help the enemy, and fearing lest they should force the passage and get into town, he turned round and called to those behind him to retire and cut the bridge with all speed.,2.  His order was obeyed, and while they were cutting the bridge, he stood to his ground receiving many wounds, and arrested the attack of the enemy who were less astonished at his physical strength than at his endurance and courage.,3.  The bridge once cut, the enemy were prevented from attacking; and Cocles, plunging into the river in full armour as he was, deliberately sacrificed his life, regarding the safety of his country and the glory which in future would attach to his name as of more importance than his present existence and the years of life which remained to him.,4.  Such, if I am not wrong, is the eager emulation of achieving noble deeds engendered in the Roman youth by their institutions. 6.56.6.  But the quality in which the Roman commonwealth is most distinctly superior is in my opinion the nature of their religious convictions. 6.56.7.  I believe that it is the very thing which among other peoples is an object of reproach, I mean superstition, which maintains the cohesion of the Roman State. 6.56.8.  These matters are clothed in such pomp and introduced to such an extent into their public and private life that nothing could exceed it, a fact which will surprise many. 6.56.9.  My own opinion at least is that they have adopted this course for the sake of the common people. 6.56.10.  It is a course which perhaps would not have been necessary had it been possible to form a state composed of wise men, 6.56.11.  but as every multitude is fickle, full of lawless desires, unreasoned passion, and violent anger, the multitude must be held in by invisible terrors and suchlike pageantry. 6.56.12.  For this reason I think, not that the ancients acted rashly and at haphazard in introducing among the people notions concerning the gods and beliefs in the terrors of hell, but that the moderns are most rash and foolish in banishing such beliefs.
43. Cicero, Letters To His Friends, 7.23, 9.8, 9.14.1, 12.1.1, 12.3.1-12.3.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian •julius caesar octavianus, c. (octavian, later augustus) Found in books: Gorain (2019), Language in the Confessions of Augustine, 22; Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 110; Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 109
9.8. de mandatis quod tibi curae fuit est mihi gratum ; sed peto a te ut quam celerrime mihi librarius mittatur, maxime quidem Graecus ; multum enim mihi eripitur operae in exscribendis hypomnematis. tu velim in primis cures ut valeas, ut una sumfilologei=n possimus. Anterum tibi commendo. Scr. Asturae vi K. Sext. a. 709 (45). TVLLIVS TIRONI SVO S.
44. Varro, On Agriculture, 1.1.1, 1.1.3, 1.4.5 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavian, “rebirth” as augustus Found in books: Nelsestuen (2015), Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic. 6
45. Horace, Odes, 1.1.36, 1.8, 1.11-1.12, 1.20, 2.1.6-2.1.8, 2.12, 2.17, 2.17.17-2.17.25, 2.17.27-2.17.30, 3.2.13, 3.3.9-3.3.16, 3.4.9-3.4.16, 3.11, 3.13.13-3.13.16, 3.30, 3.30.10-3.30.14, 4.5, 4.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, relation with caesar •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods •augustus/octavian, as performer of a public image •augustus / octavian, and capricorn •augustus / octavian, and libra •augustus/octavian, as pater patriae •octavian (later emperor augustus) •augustus/octavian •augustus, as octavian •augustus / octavian •augustus/octavian, as author and builder •augustus/octavian, as reader •augustus/octavian, early self-representations •augustus (octavian) Found in books: Giusti (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 25, 26; Gorain (2019), Language in the Confessions of Augustine, 185; Green (2014), Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus, 98, 123, 124, 125; Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 67; Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 54, 55, 56, 108, 109, 110, 130, 158, 174, 183, 205, 248; Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 232; Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 43; Yona (2018), Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire, 167
46. Ovid, Epistulae (Heroides), 1.54, 1.87-1.89 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 62
47. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.31-1.34, 1.67-1.263, 1.360, 1.569-1.574, 2.277, 3.119-3.122 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, power of •augustus/octavian, as author and builder •augustus/octavian, as performer of a public image •augustus/octavian, relation with caesar •augustus/octavian, as collective construction •augustus/octavian, as pater patriae •augustus/octavian, as reader •augustus/octavian, constitutional status of •augustus/octavian, need for presence across empire •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Found in books: Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 117, 122, 173, 174, 177, 179, 180, 181, 183, 211, 212, 214, 215, 223; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 58, 62
1.31. Este procul, vittae tenues, insigne pudoris, 1.32. rend= 1.33. Nos venerem tutam concessaque furta canemus, 1.34. rend= 1.67. Tu modo Pompeia lentus spatiare sub umbra, 1.68. rend= 1.69. Aut ubi muneribus nati sua munera mater 1.70. rend= 1.71. Nec tibi vitetur quae, priscis sparsa tabellis, 1.72. rend= 1.73. Quaque parare necem miseris patruelibus ausae 1.74. rend= 1.75. Nec te praetereat Veneri ploratus Adonis, 1.76. rend= 1.77. Nec fuge linigerae Memphitica templa iuvencae: 1.78. rend= 1.79. Et fora conveniunt (quis credere possit?) amori: 1.80. rend= 1.81. Subdita qua Veneris facto de marmore templo 1.82. rend= 1.83. Illo saepe loco capitur consultus Amori, 1.84. rend= 1.85. Illo saepe loco desunt sua verba diserto, 1.86. rend= 1.87. Hunc Venus e templis, quae sunt confinia, ridet: 1.88. rend= 1.89. Sed tu praecipue curvis venare theatris: 1.90. rend= 1.91. Illic invenies quod ames, quod ludere possis, 1.92. rend= 1.93. Ut redit itque frequens longum formica per agmen, 1.94. rend= 1.95. Aut ut apes saltusque suos et olentia nactae 1.96. rend= 1.97. Sic ruit ad celebres cultissima femina ludos: 1.98. rend= 1.99. Spectatum veniunt, veniunt spectentur ut ipsae: 1.100. rend= 1.101. Primus sollicitos fecisti, Romule, ludos, 1.102. rend= 1.103. Tunc neque marmoreo pendebant vela theatro, 1.104. rend= 1.105. Illic quas tulerant nemorosa Palatia, frondes 1.106. rend= 1.107. In gradibus sedit populus de caespite factis, 1.108. rend= 1.109. Respiciunt, oculisque notant sibi quisque puellam 1.110. rend= 1.111. Dumque, rudem praebente modum tibicine Tusco, 1.112. rend= 1.113. In medio plausu (plausus tunc arte carebant) 1.114. rend= 1.115. Protinus exiliunt, animum clamore fatentes, 1.116. rend= 1.117. Ut fugiunt aquilas, timidissima turba, columbae, 1.118. rend= 1.119. Sic illae timuere viros sine more ruentes; 1.120. rend= 1.121. Nam timor unus erat, facies non una timoris: 1.122. rend= 1.123. Altera maesta silet, frustra vocat altera matrem: 1.124. rend= fugit; 1.125. Ducuntur raptae, genialis praeda, puellae, 1.126. rend= 1.127. Siqua repugnarat nimium comitemque negabat, 1.128. rend= 1.129. Atque ita 'quid teneros lacrimis corrumpis ocellos? 1.130. rend= 1.131. Romule, militibus scisti dare commoda solus: 1.132. rend= 1.133. Scilicet ex illo sollemnia more theatra 1.134. rend= 1.135. Nec te nobilium fugiat certamen equorum; 1.136. rend= 1.137. Nil opus est digitis, per quos arcana loquaris, 1.138. rend= 1.139. Proximus a domina, nullo prohibente, sedeto, 1.140. rend= 1.141. Et bene, quod cogit, si nolis, linea iungi, 1.142. rend= 1.143. Hic tibi quaeratur socii sermonis origo, 1.144. rend= 1.145. Cuius equi veniant, facito, studiose, requiras: 1.146. rend= 1.147. At cum pompa frequens caelestibus ibit eburnis, 1.148. rend= 1.149. Utque fit, in gremium pulvis si forte puellae 1.150. rend= 1.151. Etsi nullus erit pulvis, tamen excute nullum: 1.152. rend= 1.153. Pallia si terra nimium demissa iacebunt, 1.154. rend= 1.155. Protinus, officii pretium, patiente puella 1.156. rend= 1.157. Respice praeterea, post vos quicumque sedebit, 1.158. rend= 1.159. Parva leves capiunt animos: fuit utile multis 1.160. rend= 1.161. Profuit et tenui ventos movisse tabella, 1.162. rend= 1.163. Hos aditus Circusque novo praebebit amori, 1.164. rend= 1.165. Illa saepe puer Veneris pugnavit harena, 1.166. rend= 1.167. Dum loquitur tangitque manum poscitque libellum 1.168. rend= 1.169. Saucius ingemuit telumque volatile sensit, 1.170. rend= 1.171. Quid, modo cum belli navalis imagine Caesar 1.172. rend= 1.173. Nempe ab utroque mari iuvenes, ab utroque puellae 1.174. rend= 1.175. Quis non invenit turba, quod amaret, in illa? 1.176. rend= 1.177. Ecce, parat Caesar domito quod defuit orbi 1.178. rend= 1.179. Parthe, dabis poenas: Crassi gaudete sepulti, 1.180. rend= 1.181. Ultor adest, primisque ducem profitetur in annis, 1.182. rend= 1.183. Parcite natales timidi numerare deorum: 1.184. rend= 1.185. Ingenium caeleste suis velocius annis 1.186. rend= 1.187. Parvus erat, manibusque duos Tirynthius angues 1.188. rend= 1.189. Nunc quoque qui puer es, quantus tum, Bacche, fuisti, 1.190. rend= 1.191. Auspiciis annisque patris, puer, arma movebis, 1.192. rend= 1.193. Tale rudimentum tanto sub nomine debes, 1.194. rend= 1.195. Cum tibi sint fratres, fratres ulciscere laesos: 1.196. rend= 1.197. Induit arma tibi genitor patriaeque tuusque: 1.198. rend= 1.199. Tu pia tela feres, sceleratas ille sagittas: 1.200. rend= 1.201. Vincuntur causa Parthi: vincantur et armis; 1.202. rend= 1.203. Marsque pater Caesarque pater, date numen eunti: 1.204. rend= 1.205. Auguror, en, vinces; votivaque carmina reddam, 1.206. rend= 1.207. Consistes, aciemque meis hortabere verbis; 1.208. rend= 1.209. Tergaque Parthorum Romanaque pectora dicam, 1.210. rend= 1.211. Qui fugis ut vincas, quid victo, Parthe, relinquis? 1.212. rend= 1.213. Ergo erit illa dies, qua tu, pulcherrime rerum, 1.214. rend= 1.215. Ibunt ante duces onerati colla catenis, 1.216. rend= 1.217. Spectabunt laeti iuvenes mixtaeque puellae, 1.218. rend= 1.219. Atque aliqua ex illis cum regum nomina quaeret, 1.220. rend= 1.221. Omnia responde, nec tantum siqua rogabit; 1.222. rend= 1.223. Hic est Euphrates, praecinctus harundine frontem: 1.224. rend= 1.225. Hos facito Armenios; haec est Danaëia Persis: 1.226. rend= 1.227. Ille vel ille, duces; et erunt quae nomina dicas, 1.228. rend= 1.229. Dant etiam positis aditum convivia mensis: 1.230. rend= 1.231. Saepe illic positi teneris adducta lacertis 1.232. rend= 1.233. Vinaque cum bibulas sparsere Cupidinis alas, 1.234. rend= 1.235. Ille quidem pennas velociter excutit udas: 1.236. rend= 1.237. Vina parant animos faciuntque caloribus aptos: 1.238. rend= 1.239. Tunc veniunt risus, tum pauper cornua sumit, 1.240. rend= 1.241. Tunc aperit mentes aevo rarissima nostro 1.242. rend= 1.243. Illic saepe animos iuvenum rapuere puellae, 1.244. rend= 1.245. Hic tu fallaci nimium ne crede lucernae: 1.246. rend= 1.247. Luce deas caeloque Paris spectavit aperto, 1.248. rend= 1.249. Nocte latent mendae, vitioque ignoscitur omni, 1.250. rend= 1.251. Consule de gemmis, de tincta murice lana, 1.252. rend= 1.253. Quid tibi femineos coetus venatibus aptos 1.254. rend= 1.255. Quid referam Baias, praetextaque litora velis, 1.256. rend= 1.257. Hinc aliquis vulnus referens in pectore dixit 1.258. rend= 1.259. Ecce suburbanae templum nemorale Dianae 1.260. rend= 1.261. Illa, quod est virgo, quod tela Cupidinis odit, 1.262. rend= 1.263. Hactenus, unde legas quod ames, ubi retia ponas, 1.360. rend= 1.569. Hic tibi multa licet sermone latentia tecto 1.570. rend= 1.571. Blanditiasque leves tenui perscribere vino, 1.572. rend= 1.573. Atque oculos oculis spectare fatentibus ignem: 1.574. rend= 2.277. Aurea sunt vere nunc saecula: plurimus auro 3.119. Quae nunc sub Phoebo ducibusque Palatia fulgent, 3.120. rend= 3.121. Prisca iuvent alios: ego me nunc denique natum 3.122. rend=
48. Ovid, Amores, 1.1.6, 1.2, 1.4, 1.13, 2.2, 2.12, 3.15 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, as octavian •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods •augustus/octavian, as author and builder •augustus/octavian, as reader •augustus/octavian, power of •augustus/octavian, as collective construction Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 172; Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 19, 133, 211, 212, 214
1.1.6. Pieridum vates, non tua turba sumus.
49. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.51, 5.19.5, 17.52.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus (octavian) •augustus/octavian Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 232; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 15
1.51. 1.  The founder of Memphis, after constructing the mound and the lake, erected a palace, which, while not inferior to those of other nations, yet was no match for the grandeur of design and love of the beautiful shown by the kings who preceded him.,2.  For the inhabitants of Egypt consider the period of this life to be of no account whatever, but place the greatest value on the time after death when they will be remembered for their virtue, and while they give the name of "lodgings" to the dwellings of the living, thus intimating that we dwell in them but a brief time, they call the tombs of the dead "eternal homes," since the dead spend endless eternity in Hades; consequently they give less thought to the furnishings of their houses, but on the manner of their burials they do not forgo any excess of zeal.,3.  The aforementioned city was named, according to some, after the daughter of the king who founded it. They tell the story that she was loved by the river Nile, who had assumed the form of a bull, and gave birth to Egyptus, a man famous among the natives for his virtue, from whom the entire land received its name.,4.  For upon succeeding to the throne he showed himself to be a kindly king, just, and, in a word, upright in all matters and so, since he was held by all to merit great approbation because of his goodwill, he received the honour mentioned.,5.  Twelve generations after the king just named, Moeris succeeded to the throne of Egypt and built in Memphis itself the north propylaea, which far surpasses the others in magnificence, while ten schoeni above the city he excavated a lake which was remarkable for its utility and an undertaking of incredible magnitude.,6.  For its circumference, they say, is three thousand six hundred stades and its depth in most parts fifty fathoms; what man, accordingly, in trying to estimate the magnitude of the work, would not reasonably inquire how many myriads of men labouring for how many years were required for its completion?,7.  And as for the utility of this lake and its contribution to the welfare of all the inhabitants of Egypt, as well as for the ingenuity of the king, no man may praise them highly enough to do justice to the truth. 5.19.5.  And, speaking generally, the climate of the island is so altogether mild that it produces in abundance the fruits of the trees and the other seasonal fruits for the larger part of the year, so that it would appear that the island, because of its exceptional felicity, were a dwelling-place of a race of gods and not of men. 17.52.3.  Alexander also laid out the walls so that they were at once exceedingly large and marvellously strong. Lying between a great marsh and the sea, it affords by land only two approaches, both narrow and very easily blocked. In shape, it is similar to a chlamys, and it is approximately bisected by an avenue remarkable for its size and beauty. From gate to gate it runs a distance of forty furlongs; it is a plethron in width, and is bordered throughout its length with rich façades of houses and temples.
50. Nepos, Hannibal, 13.55-13.56 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, as imitator of fabius cunctator Found in books: Roller (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 189
51. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.72-1.75, 2.20-2.39, 5.48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, as author and builder •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Found in books: Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 223; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 57
1.72. ergo vivida vis animi pervicit et extra 1.73. processit longe flammantia moenia mundi 1.74. atque omne immensum peragravit mente animoque, 1.75. unde refert nobis victor quid possit oriri, 2.20. ergo corpoream ad naturam pauca videmus 2.21. esse opus omnino: quae demant cumque dolorem, 2.22. delicias quoque uti multas substernere possint 2.23. gratius inter dum, neque natura ipsa requirit, 2.24. si non aurea sunt iuvenum simulacra per aedes 2.25. lampadas igniferas manibus retinentia dextris, 2.26. lumina nocturnis epulis ut suppeditentur, 2.27. nec domus argento fulget auroque renidet 2.28. nec citharae reboant laqueata aurataque templa, 2.29. cum tamen inter se prostrati in gramine molli 2.30. propter aquae rivum sub ramis arboris altae 2.31. non magnis opibus iucunde corpora curant, 2.32. praesertim cum tempestas adridet et anni 2.33. tempora conspergunt viridantis floribus herbas. 2.34. nec calidae citius decedunt corpore febres, 2.35. textilibus si in picturis ostroque rubenti 2.36. iacteris, quam si in plebeia veste cubandum est. 2.37. quapropter quoniam nihil nostro in corpore gazae 2.38. proficiunt neque nobilitas nec gloria regni, 2.39. quod super est, animo quoque nil prodesse putandum; 5.48. efficiunt clades! quid luxus desidiaeque?
52. Livy, Per., 121 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian •augustus/octavian, memoirs of Found in books: Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 42
53. Livy, History, 1.11-1.12, 1.12.3-1.12.6, 1.16, 1.19.2-1.19.3, 1.39, 1.49.1, 2.21.5-2.21.6, 2.48.3, 3.26.11, 3.33.2, 3.64.1, 4.20.5-4.20.11, 6.20.1-6.20.12, 7.3.2, 9.3.8, 10.40.4-10.40.5, 10.40.11-10.40.13, 21.1, 22.57.6, 22.58.8, 22.61.4, 23.11.1, 23.12.12, 24.9.6, 30.38.10, 35.9.3, 35.21.6, 38.28.4, 39.44.1, 42.20.4, 43.13, 43.13.5-43.13.6, 45.38.40 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Giusti (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 233
54. Germanicus Caesar, Aratea, None (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Green (2014), Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus, 99, 144, 145
55. Grattius, Cynegetica, 338 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavianus Found in books: Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 522
56. Sallust, Historiarum Frr. Ampliora, 1.9-1.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian Found in books: Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 54
57. Propertius, Elegies, None (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Green (2014), Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus, 98
58. Horace, Sermones, 1.2.69-1.2.70, 1.3.107-1.3.108, 1.6.1-1.6.5, 1.10.81-1.10.86, 2.2.116, 2.3.254-2.3.255 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavianus •octavian (later emperor augustus) •octavian (later emperor augustus), appearance in satires Found in books: Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 314, 522; Yona (2018), Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire, 2, 6, 167
59. Horace, Letters, 1.1, 1.7, 2.2.51, 2.2.183-2.2.189 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavian (later emperor augustus) •octavian (later emperor augustus), appearance in satires •augustus / octavian Found in books: Green (2014), Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus, 125; Yona (2018), Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire, 2, 167
60. Ovid, Epistulae Ex Ponto, 2.1, 2.8, 3.4, 4.8 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, as collective construction •augustus/octavian, as object of public gaze •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods •augustus/octavian, as performer of a public image •augustus/octavian, power of •augustus/octavian, as author and builder •augustus/octavian, as reader •augustus/octavian, relation with caesar Found in books: Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 24, 76, 228, 231, 232, 233, 237, 238, 239, 247
2.1. Huc quoque Caesarei pervenit fama triumphi, 2.1. Ille domus vestrae primis venerator ab annis, 2.1. Maxime, qui claris nomen virtutibus aequas, 2.1. Accipe conloquium gelido Nasonis ab Histro, 2.1. Condita disparibus numeris ego Naso Salano 2.1. Carmine Graecinum, qui praesens voce solebat, 2.1. Esse salutatum vult te mea littera primum 2.1. Redditus est nobis Caesar cum Caesare nuper, 2.1. Regia progenies, cui nobilitatis origo 2.1. Ecquid ab impressae cognoscis imagine cerae 2.1. Hoc tibi, Rufe, brevi properatum tempore mittit 2.8. velle potest cuivis haec tamen una dari. 2.8. urbe licet vestra versibus esse meis. 2.8. vulgus amicitias utilitate probat, 2.8. et videor vultus mente videre tuos. 2.8. diceris exiliis indoluisse meis, 2.8. aspera confesso verba remitte reo. 2.8. tranquillas etiam naufragus horret aquas. 2.8. caelitibus missis nostra sub ora tribus, 2.8. tradidit, hoc uno non inimica mihi. 2.8. exciderit tantum ne tibi cura mei. 2.8. quam fiat meriti gratia vana tui. 3.4. in minus hostili iussus abesse loco? 3.4. atque sit in ut sit vel sit ut nobis pars bona salva facis. 3.4. seu veri species seu fuit ille sopor. 3.4. in vestras venit si tamen ille manus. 3.4. laesus ab ingenio Naso poeta suo. 3.4. forsitan officio parta querella foret. 3.4. quidque petam cunctos edidicisse reor. 3.4. sed te, cum donas, ista iuvare solent. 3.4. et quam sim denso cinctus ab hoste loqui. 4.8. sit precor officio non gravis ira pio. 4.8. non data sunt. quid enim, quae facis ipse, darem? 4.8. auxilio postquam scis opus esse tuo. 4.8. naufragus in Getici litoris actus aquas, 4.8. ut festinatum non faciatis iter. 4.8. opponit nostris insidiosa 4.8. ipse vides rigido stantia vina gelu; 4.8. neve malis pietas sit tua lassa meis. 4.8. officium iusso littera nostra die. 4.8. cessat duritia mors quoque victa mea. 4.8. coniuge crudeles non habuere nefas. 4.8. desinat ut prior hoc incipiatque minor. 4.8. quod sit opus, videor dicere posse, tuum. 4.8. hac quia, quam video, gratior omnis erit. 4.8. Punica sub lento cortice grana rubent, 4.8. Iunonis si iam non gener ille foret,
61. Sallust, Iugurtha, 6.1, 95.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 215
62. Catullus, Poems, 109, 62, 16 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 64
63. Julius Caesar, De Bello Civli, 1.38, 2.17-2.21 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavian, “rebirth” as augustus Found in books: Nelsestuen (2015), Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic. 6
64. Ovid, Fasti, 1.156, 1.223-1.226, 1.689-1.690, 2.138-2.144, 2.571-2.580, 4.949-4.954, 5.279, 6.172, 6.473-6.648 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus •augustus/octavian, as author and builder •augustus/octavian, as collective construction •augustus/octavian, as object of public gaze •augustus/octavian, power of •augustus/octavian, relation with caesar •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods •augustus (octavian, emperor) •augustus/octavian, constitutional status of •augustus/octavian, urban buildings / monuments Found in books: Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 72, 121, 122, 233; Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 175, 197; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 58, 62, 64, 65; Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 174
1.156. ludit et in pratis luxuriatque pecus, 1.223. nos quoque templa iuvant, quamvis antiqua probemus, 1.224. aurea: maiestas convenit ista deo. 1.225. laudamus veteres, sed nostris utimur annis: 1.226. mos tamen est aeque dignus uterque coli.’ 1.689. et neque deficiat macie neque pinguior aequo 1.690. divitiis pereat luxuriosa suis. 2.138. quodcumque est alto sub Iove, Caesar habet, 2.139. tu rapis, hic castas duce se iubet esse maritas: 2.140. tu recipis luco, reppulit ille nefas. 2.141. vis tibi grata fuit, florent sub Caesare leges. 2.142. tu domini nomen, principis ille tenet, 2.143. te Remus incusat, veniam dedit hostibus ille. 2.144. caelestem fecit te pater, ille patrem. 2.571. ecce anus in mediis residens annosa puellis 2.572. sacra facit Tacitae (nec tamen ipsa tacet), 2.573. et digitis tria tura tribus sub limine ponit, 2.574. qua brevis occultum mus sibi fecit iter; 2.575. tunc cantata ligat cum fusco licia plumbo 2.576. et septem nigras versat in ore fabas, 2.577. quodque pice adstrinxit, quod acu traiecit aena, 2.578. obsutum maenae torret in igne caput; 2.579. vina quoque instillat: vini quodcumque relictum est, 2.580. aut ipsa aut comites, plus tamen ipsa, bibit. 4.949. aufer Vesta diem! cognati Vesta recepta est 4.950. limine: sic iusti constituere patres. 4.951. Phoebus habet partem, Vestae pars altera cessit; 4.952. quod superest illis, tertius ipse tenet, 4.953. state Palatinae laurus, praetextaque quercu 4.954. stet domus: aeternos tres habet una deos. 5.279. ‘cetera luxuriae nondum instrumenta vigebant, 6.172. nec petit ascitas luxuriosa dapes, 6.473. Iam, Phryx, a nupta quereris, Tithone, relinqui, 6.474. et vigil Eois Lucifer exit aquis: 6.475. ite, bonae matres (vestrum Matralia festum) 6.476. flavaque Thebanae reddite liba deae. 6.477. pontibus et magno iuncta est celeberrima Circo 6.478. area, quae posito de bove nomen habet: 6.479. hac ibi luce ferunt Matutae sacra parenti 6.480. sceptriferas Servi templa dedisse manus, 6.481. quae dea sit, quare famulas a limine templi 6.482. arceat (arcet enim) libaque tosta petat, 6.483. Bacche, racemiferos hedera redimite capillos, 6.484. si domus illa tua est, dirige vatis opus. 6.485. arserat obsequio Semele Iovis: accipit Ino 6.486. te, puer, et summa sedula nutrit ope. 6.487. intumuit Iuno, raptum quod paelice natum 6.488. educet: at sanguis ille sororis erat. 6.489. hinc agitur furiis Athamas et imagine falsa, 6.490. tuque cadis patria, parve Learche, manu. 6.491. maesta Learcheas mater tumulaverat umbras 6.492. et dederat miseris omnia iusta rogis. 6.493. haec quoque, funestos ut erat laniata capillos, 6.494. prosilit et cunis te, Melicerta, rapit. 6.495. est spatio contracta brevi, freta bina repellit 6.496. unaque pulsatur terra duabus aquis: 6.497. huc venit insanis natum complexa lacertis 6.498. et secum e celso mittit in alta iugo. 6.499. excipit illaesos Panope centumque sorores, 6.500. et placido lapsu per sua regna ferunt. 6.501. nondum Leucothea, nondum puer ille Palaemon 6.502. verticibus densi Thybridis ora tenent, 6.503. lucus erat; dubium Semelae Stimulaene vocetur: 6.504. Maenadas Ausonias incoluisse ferunt. 6.505. quaerit ab his Ino, quae gens foret: Arcadas esse 6.506. audit et Evandrum sceptra tenere loci. 6.507. dissimulata deam Latias Saturnia Bacchas 6.508. instimulat fictis insidiosa sonis: 6.509. ‘o nimium faciles, o toto pectore captae! 6.510. non venit haec nostris hospes amica choris, 6.511. fraude petit sacrique parat cognoscere ritum; 6.512. quo possit poenas pendere, pignus habet.’ 6.513. vix bene desierat, complent ululatibus auras 6.514. Thyades effusis per sua colla comis, 6.515. iniciuntque manus puerumque revellere pugt, 6.516. quos ignorat adhuc, invocat illa deos: 6.517. dique virique loci, miserae succurrite matri! 6.518. clamor Aventini saxa propinqua ferit, 6.519. appulerat ripae vaccas Oetaeus Hiberas: 6.520. audit et ad vocem concitus urget iter. 6.521. Herculis adventu, quae vim modo ferre parabant, 6.522. turpia femineae terga dedere fugae. 6.523. quid petis hinc (cognorat enim) ‘matertera Bacchi? 6.524. an numen, quod me, te quoque vexat?’ ait. 6.525. illa docet partim, partim praesentia nati 6.526. continet, et furiis in scelus isse pudet, 6.527. rumor, ut est velox, agitatis pervolat alis, 6.528. estque frequens, Ino, nomen in ore tuum. 6.529. hospita Carmentis fidos intrasse penates 6.530. diceris et longam deposuisse famem; 6.531. liba sua properata manu Tegeaca sacerdos 6.532. traditur in subito cocta dedisse foco. 6.533. nunc quoque liba iuvant festis Matralibus illam: 6.534. rustica sedulitas gratior arte fuit. 6.535. nunc, ait ‘o vates, venientia fata resigna, 6.536. qua licet, hospitiis hoc, precor, adde meis.’ 6.537. parva mora est, caelum vates ac numina sumit 6.538. fitque sui toto pectore plena dei; 6.539. vix illam subito posses cognoscere, tanto 6.540. sanctior et tanto, quam modo, maior erat. 6.541. laeta canam, gaude, defuncta laboribus Ino, 6.542. dixit ‘et huic populo prospera semper ades. 6.543. numen eris pelagi, natum quoque pontus habebit. 6.544. in vestris aliud sumite nomen aquis: 6.545. Leucothea Grais, Matuta vocabere nostris; 6.546. in portus nato ius erit omne tuo, 6.547. quem nos Portunum, sua lingua Palaemona dicet. 6.548. ite, precor, nostris aequus uterque locis!’ 6.549. annuerat, promissa fides, posuere labores, 6.550. nomina mutarunt: hic deus, illa dea est. 6.551. cur vetet ancillas accedere, quaeritis? odit, 6.552. principiumque odii, si sinat illa, canam, 6.553. una ministrarum solita est, Cadmei, tuarum 6.554. saepe sub amplexus coniugis ire tui. 6.555. improbus hanc Athamas furtim dilexit; ab illa 6.556. comperit agricolis semina tosta dari. 6.557. ipsa quidem fecisse negat, sed fama recepit. 6.558. hoc est, cur odio sit sibi serva manus, 6.559. non tamen hanc pro stirpe sua pia mater adoret: 6.560. ipsa parum felix visa fuisse parens, 6.561. alterius prolem melius mandabitis illi: 6.562. utilior Baccho quam fuit ipsa suis. 6.563. hanc tibi, quo properas? memorant dixisse, Rutili, 6.564. luce mea Marso consul ab hoste cades. 6.565. exitus accessit verbis, numenque Toleni 6.566. purpureum mixtis sanguine fluxit aquis, 6.567. proximus annus erat: Pallantide caesus eadem 6.568. Didius hostiles ingeminavit opes. 6.569. Lux eadem, Fortuna, tua est auctorque locusque; 6.570. sed superiniectis quis latet iste togis? 6.571. Servius est, hoc constat enim, sed causa latendi 6.572. discrepat et dubium me quoque mentis habet, 6.573. dum dea furtivos timide profitetur amores, 6.574. caelestemque homini concubuisse pudet 6.575. (arsit enim magno correpta cupidine regis 6.576. caecaque in hoc uno non fuit illa viro), 6.577. nocte domum parva solita est intrare fenestra; 6.578. unde Fenestellae nomina porta tenet, 6.579. nunc pudet, et voltus velamine celat amatos, 6.580. oraque sunt multa regia tecta toga. 6.581. an magis est verum post Tulli funera plebem 6.582. confusam placidi morte fuisse ducis, 6.583. nec modus ullus erat, crescebat imagine luctus, 6.584. donec eum positis occuluere togis? 6.585. tertia causa mihi spatio maiore canenda est, 6.586. nos tamen adductos intus agemus equos. 6.587. Tullia coniugio sceleris mercede parato 6.588. his solita est dictis extimulare virum: 6.589. ‘quid iuvat esse pares, te nostrae caede sororis 6.590. meque tui fratris, si pia vita placet? 6.591. vivere debuerant et vir meus et tua coniunx, 6.592. si nullum ausuri maius eramus opus. 6.593. et caput et regnum facio dictale parentis: 6.594. si vir es, i, dictas exige dotis opes. 6.595. regia res scelus est. socero cape regna necato, 6.596. et nostras patrio sanguine tingue manus.’ 6.597. talibus instinctus solio privatus in alto 6.598. sederat: attonitum volgus ad arma ruit. 6.599. hinc cruor et caedes, infirmaque vincitur aetas: 6.600. sceptra gener socero rapta Superbus habet. 6.601. ipse sub Esquiliis, ubi erat sua regia, caesus 6.602. concidit in dura sanguinulentus humo, 6.603. filia carpento patrios initura penates 6.604. ibat per medias alta feroxque vias. 6.605. corpus ut aspexit, lacrimis auriga profusis 6.606. restitit, hunc tali corripit illa sono: 6.607. ‘vadis, an expectas pretium pietatis amarum? 6.608. duc, inquam, invitas ipsa per ora rotas.’ 6.609. certa fides facti: dictus Sceleratus ab illa 6.610. vicus, et aeterna res ea pressa nota. 6.611. post tamen hoc ausa est templum, monumenta parentis, 6.612. tangere: mira quidem, sed tamen acta loquar, 6.613. signum erat in solio residens sub imagine Tulli; 6.614. dicitur hoc oculis opposuisse manum, 6.615. et vox audita est ‘voltus abscondite nostros, 6.616. ne natae videant ora nefanda meae.’ 6.617. veste data tegitur, vetat hanc Fortuna moveri 6.618. et sic e templo est ipsa locuta suo: 6.619. ‘ore revelato qua primum luce patebit 6.620. Servius, haec positi prima pudoris erit.’ 6.621. parcite, matronae, vetitas attingere vestes: 6.622. sollemni satis est voce movere preces, 6.623. sitque caput semper Romano tectus amictu, 6.624. qui rex in nostra septimus urbe fuit. 6.625. arserat hoc templum, signo tamen ille pepercit 6.626. ignis: opem nato Mulciber ipse tulit, 6.627. namque pater Tulli Volcanus, Ocresia mater 6.628. praesignis facie Corniculana fuit. 6.629. hanc secum Tanaquil sacris de more peractis 6.630. iussit in ornatum fundere vina focum: 6.631. hic inter cineres obsceni forma virilis 6.632. aut fuit aut visa est, sed fuit illa magis, 6.633. iussa foco captiva sedet: conceptus ab illa 6.634. Servius a caelo semina gentis habet. 6.635. signa dedit genitor tunc cum caput igne corusco 6.636. contigit, inque comis flammeus arsit apex. 6.637. Te quoque magnifica, Concordia, dedicat aede 6.638. Livia, quam caro praestitit ipsa viro. 6.639. disce tamen, veniens aetas, ubi Livia nunc est 6.640. porticus, immensae tecta fuisse domus; 6.641. urbis opus domus una fuit, spatiumque tenebat, 6.642. quo brevius muris oppida multa tenent, 6.643. haec aequata solo est, nullo sub crimine regni, 6.644. sed quia luxuria visa nocere sua, 6.645. sustinuit tantas operum subvertere moles 6.646. totque suas heres perdere Caesar opes, 6.647. sic agitur censura et sic exempla parantur, 6.648. cum iudex, alios quod monet, ipse facit. 1.156. And the herds frisk and gambol in the fields. 1.223. We too delight in golden temples, however much 1.224. We approve the antique: such splendour suits a god. 1.225. We praise the past, but experience our own times: 1.226. Yet both are ways worthy of being cultivated.’ 1.689. And ruined by its own rich exuberance. 1.690. May the fields be free of darnel that harms the eyesight, 2.138. Caesar possesses all beneath Jupiter’s heavens. 2.139. You raped married women: under Caesar they are ordered 2.140. To be chaste: you permitted the guilty your grove: he forbids them. 2.141. Force was acceptable to you: under Caesar the laws flourish. 2.142. You had the title Master: he bears the name of Prince. 2.143. Remus accused you, while he pardons his enemies. 2.144. Your father deified you: he deified his father. 2.571. See, an old woman sitting amongst the girls performs the rite 2.572. of Tacita, the Silent (though she herself is not silent), 2.573. With three fingers, she sets three lumps of incense 2.574. Under the sill, where the little mouse makes its secret path: 2.575. Then she fastens enchanted threads together with dark lead, 2.576. And turns seven black beans over and over in her mouth, 2.577. And bakes the head of a sprat in the fire, mouth sewn up 2.578. With pitch, pierced right through with a bronze needle. 2.579. She drops wine on it too, and she or her friend 2.580. Drink the wine that’s left, though she gets most. 4.949. At her kinsman’s threshold: so the Senators justly decreed. 4.950. Phoebus takes part of the space there: a further part remain 4.951. For Vesta, and the third part that’s left, Caesar occupies. 4.952. Long live the laurels of the Palatine: long live that house 4.953. Decked with branches of oak: one place holds three eternal gods. 5.279. ‘Goddess’, I replied: ‘What’s the origin of the games?’ 6.172. No epicure to seek out alien dainties. 6.473. Now you complain, Phrygian Tithonus, abandoned by your bride, 6.474. And the vigilant Morning Star leaves the Eastern waters. 6.475. Good mothers (since the Matralia is your festival), 6.476. Go, offer the Theban goddess the golden cakes she’s owed. 6.477. Near the bridges and mighty Circus is a famous square, 6.478. One that takes its name from the statue of an ox: 6.479. There, on this day, they say, Servius with his own 6.480. Royal hands, consecrated a temple to Mother Matruta. 6.481. Bacchus, whose hair is twined with clustered grapes, 6.482. If the goddess’ house is also yours, guide the poet’s work, 6.483. Regarding who the goddess is, and why she exclude 6.484. (Since she does) female servants from the threshold 6.485. of her temple, and why she calls for toasted cakes. 6.486. Semele was burnt by Jove’s compliance: Ino 6.487. Received you as a baby, and nursed you with utmost care. 6.488. Juno swelled with rage, that Ino should raise a child 6.489. Snatched from Jove’s lover: but it was her sister’s son. 6.490. So Athamas was haunted by the Furies, and false visions, 6.491. And little Learchus died by his father’s hand. 6.492. His grieving mother committed his shade to the tomb. 6.493. And paid the honours due to the sad pyre. 6.494. Then tearing her hair in sorrow, she leapt up 6.495. And snatched you from your cradle, Melicertes. 6.496. There’s a narrow headland between two seas, 6.497. A single space attacked by twofold waves: 6.498. There Ino came, clutching her son in her frenzied grasp, 6.499. And threw herself, with him, from a high cliff into the sea. 6.500. Panope and her hundred sisters received them unharmed, 6.501. And gliding smoothly carried them through their realm. 6.502. They reached the mouth of densely eddying Tiber, 6.503. Before they became Leucothea and Palaemon. 6.504. There was a grove: known either as Semele’s or Stimula’s: 6.505. Inhabited, they say, by Italian Maenads. 6.506. Ino, asking them their nation, learned they were Arcadians, 6.507. And that Evander was the king of the place. 6.508. Hiding her divinity, Saturn’s daughter cleverly 6.509. Incited the Latian Bacchae with deceiving words: 6.510. ‘O too-easy-natured ones, caught by every feeling! 6.511. This stranger comes, but not as a friend, to our gathering. 6.512. She’s treacherous, and would learn our sacred rites: 6.513. But she has a child on whom we can wreak punishment.’ 6.514. She’d scarcely ended when the Thyiads, hair streaming 6.515. Over their necks, filled the air with their howling, 6.516. Laid hands on Ino, and tried to snatch the boy. 6.517. She invoked gods with names as yet unknown to her: 6.518. ‘Gods, and men, of this land, help a wretched mother!’ 6.519. Her cry carried to the neighbouring Aventine. 6.520. Oetaean Hercules having driven the Iberian cattle 6.521. To the riverbank, heard and hurried towards the voice. 6.522. As he arrived, the women who’d been ready for violence, 6.523. Shamefully turned their backs in cowardly flight. 6.524. ‘What are you doing here,’ said Hercules (recognising her), 6.525. ‘Sister of Bacchus’ mother? Does Juno persecute you too?’ 6.526. She told him part of her tale, suppressing the rest because of her son: 6.527. Ashamed to have been goaded to crime by the Furies. 6.528. Rumour, so swift, flew on beating wings, 6.529. And your name was on many a lip, Ino. 6.530. It’s said you entered loyal Carmentis’ home 6.531. As a guest, and assuaged your great hunger: 6.532. They say the Tegean priestess quickly made cake 6.533. With her own hands, and baked them on the hearth. 6.534. Now cakes delight the goddess at the Matralia: 6.535. Country ways pleased her more than art’s attentions. 6.536. ‘Now, O prophetess,’ she said, ‘reveal my future fate, 6.537. As far as is right. Add this, I beg, to your hospitality.’ 6.538. A pause ensued. Then the prophetess assumed divine powers, 6.539. And her whole breast filled with the presence of the god: 6.540. You’d hardly have known her then, so much taller 6.541. And holier she’d become than a moment before. 6.542. ‘I sing good news, Ino,’ she said, ‘your trials are over, 6.543. Be a blessing to your people for evermore. 6.544. You’ll be a sea goddess, and your son will inhabit ocean. 6.545. Take different names now, among your own waves: 6.546. Greeks will call you Leucothea, our people Matuta: 6.547. Your son will have complete command of harbours, 6.548. We’ll call him Portunus, Palaemon in his own tongue. 6.549. Go, and both be friends, I beg you, of our country!’ 6.550. Ino nodded, and gave her promise. Their trials were over, 6.551. They changed their names: he’s a god and she’s a goddess. 6.552. You ask why she forbids the approach of female servants? 6.553. She hates them: by her leave I’ll sing the reason for her hate. 6.554. Daughter of Cadmus, one of your maid 6.555. Was often embraced by your husband. 6.556. Faithless Athamas secretly enjoyed her: he learned 6.557. From her that you gave the farmers parched seed. 6.558. You yourself denied it, but rumour confirmed it. 6.559. That’s why you hate the service of a maid. 6.560. But let no loving mother pray to her, for her child: 6.561. She herself proved an unfortunate parent. 6.562. Better command her to help another’s child: 6.563. She was more use to Bacchus than her own. 6.564. They say she asked you, Rutilius, ‘Where are you rushing? 6.565. As consul you’ll fall to the Marsian enemy on my day.’ 6.566. Her words were fulfilled, the Tolenu 6.567. Flowed purple, its waters mixed with blood. 6.568. The following year, Didius, killed on the same 6.569. Day, doubled the enemy’s strength. 6.570. Fortuna, the same day is yours, your temple 6.571. Founded by the same king, in the same place. 6.572. And whose is that statue hidden under draped robes? 6.573. It’s Servius, that’s for sure, but different reason 6.574. Are given for the drapes, and I’m in doubt. 6.575. When the goddess fearfully confessed to a secret love, 6.576. Ashamed, since she’s immortal, to mate with a man 6.577. (For she burned, seized with intense passion for the king, 6.578. And he was the only man she wasn’t blind to), 6.579. She used to enter his palace at night by a little window: 6.580. So that the gate bears the name Fenestella. 6.581. She’s still ashamed, and hides the beloved feature 6.582. Under cloth: the king’s face being covered by a robe. 6.583. Or is it rather that, after his murder, the people 6.584. Were bewildered by their gentle leader’s death, 6.585. Their grief swelling, endlessly, at the sight 6.586. of the statue, until they hid him under robes? 6.587. I must sing at greater length of a third reason, 6.588. Though I’ll still keep my team on a tight rein. 6.589. Having secured her marriage by crime, Tullia 6.590. Used to incite her husband with words like these: 6.591. ‘What use if we’re equally matched, you by my sister’ 6.592. Murder, I by your brother’s, in leading a virtuous life? 6.593. Better that my husband and your wife had lived, 6.594. Than that we shrink from greater achievement. 6.595. I offer my father’s life and realm as my dower: 6.596. If you’re a man, go take the dower I speak of. 6.597. Crime is the mark of kingship. Kill your wife’s father, 6.598. Seize the kingdom, dip our hands in my father’s blood.’ 6.599. Urged on be such words, though a private citizen 6.600. He usurped the high throne: the people, stunned, took up arms. 6.601. With blood and slaughter the weak old man was defeated: 6.602. Tarquin the Proud snatched his father-in-law’s sceptre. 6.603. Servius himself fell bleeding to the hard earth, 6.604. At the foot of the Esquiline, site of his palace. 6.605. His daughter, driving to her father’s home, 6.606. Rode through the streets, erect and haughty. 6.607. When her driver saw the king’s body, he halted 6.608. In tears. She reproved him in these terms: 6.609. ‘Go on, or do you seek the bitter fruits of virtue? 6.610. Drive the unwilling wheels, I say, over his face.’ 6.611. A certain proof of this is Evil Street, named 6.612. After her, while eternal infamy marks the deed. 6.613. Yet she still dared to visit her father’s temple, 6.614. His monument: what I tell is strange but true. 6.615. There was a statue enthroned, an image of Servius: 6.616. They say it put a hand to its eyes, 6.617. And a voice was heard: ‘Hide my face, 6.618. Lest it view my own wicked daughter.’ 6.619. It was veiled by cloth, Fortune refused to let the robe 6.620. Be removed, and she herself spoke from her temple: 6.621. ‘The day when Servius’ face is next revealed, 6.622. Will be a day when shame is cast aside.’ 6.623. Women, beware of touching the forbidden cloth, 6.624. (It’s sufficient to utter prayers in solemn tones) 6.625. And let him who was the City’s seventh king 6.626. Keep his head covered, forever, by this veil. 6.627. The temple once burned: but the fire spared 6.628. The statue: Mulciber himself preserved his son. 6.629. For Servius’ father was Vulcan, and the lovely 6.630. Ocresia of Corniculum his mother. 6.631. Once, performing sacred rites with her in the due manner, 6.632. Tanaquil ordered her to pour wine on the garlanded hearth: 6.633. There was, or seemed to be, the form of a male organ 6.634. In the ashes: the shape was really there in fact. 6.635. The captive girl sat on the hearth, as commanded: 6.636. She conceived Servius, born of divine seed. 6.637. His father showed his paternity by touching the child’ 6.638. Head with fire, and a cap of flames glowed on his hair. 6.639. And Livia, this day dedicated a magnificent shrine to you, 6.640. Concordia, that she offered to her dear husband. 6.641. Learn this, you age to come: where Livia’s Colonnade 6.642. Now stands, there was once a vast palace. 6.643. A site that was like a city: it occupied a space 6.644. Larger than that of many a walled town. 6.645. It was levelled to the soil, not because of its owner’s treason, 6.646. But because its excess was considered harmful. 6.647. Caesar counteced the demolition of such a mass, 6.648. Destroying its great wealth to which he was heir.
65. Sallust, Catiline, 1.1, 25.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 64, 156
66. Sallust, Historiae, 1.9-1.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian Found in books: Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 54
67. Tibullus, Elegies, 1.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus (octavian, emperor) Found in books: Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 229
68. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 22 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, temple of augustus in alexandria Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 113
69. Philo of Alexandria, On The Embassy To Gaius, 122, 131-146, 148, 150-151, 165, 346, 147 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 216
147. This is he who gave freedom to every city, who brought disorder into order, who civilized and made obedient and harmonious, nations which before his time were unsociable, hostile, and brutal. This is he who increased Greece by many Greeces, and who Greecised the regions of the barbarians in their most important divisions: the guardian of peace, the distributor to every man of what was suited to him, the man who proffered to all the citizens favours with the most ungrudging liberality, who never once in his whole life concealed or reserved for himself any thing that was good or excellent. XXII.
70. Philo of Alexandria, Against Flaccus, 122-123, 173-174, 29, 34-53, 55-56, 74-75, 84-85, 95-96, 64 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 216
64. being no longer able to support their want, some, though they had never been used to do so before, came to the houses of their friends and relations to beg them to contribute such food as was absolutely necessary as a charity; others, who from their high and free-born spirit could not endure the condition of beggars, as being a slavish state unbecoming the dignity of a freeman, came down into the market with no other object than, miserable men that they were, to buy food for their families and for themselves.
71. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 1.151, 2.9, 2.26-2.30, 2.32 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus (octavian) Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 232, 236
1.151. for he kept one most invariable object always steadily before him, namely, that of benefiting those who were subjected to his authority, and of doing everything both in word and deed, with a view to their advantage, never omitting any opportunity of doing anything that might tend to their prosperity. 2.9. Now these four qualities are closely connected with and related to the legislative power, namely, humility, the love of justice, the love of virtue, and the hatred of iniquity; for every individual who has any desire for exercising his talents as a lawgiver is under the influence of each of these feelings. It is the province of humanity to prepare for adoption such opinions as will benefit the common weal, and to teach the advantages which will proceed from them. It is the part of justice to point out how we ought to honour equality, and to assign to every man his due according to his deserts. It is the part of the love of virtue to embrace those things which are by nature good, and to give to every one who deserves them facilities without limit for the most unrestrained enjoyment of happiness. It is also the province of the hatred of iniquity to reject all those who dishonour virtue, and to look upon them as common enemies of the human race. 2.26. In olden time the laws were written in the Chaldaean language, and for a long time they remained in the same condition as at first, not changing their language as long as their beauty had not made them known to other nations; 2.27. but when, from the daily and uninterrupted respect shown to them by those to whom they had been given, and from their ceaseless observance of their ordices, other nations also obtained an understanding of them, their reputation spread over all lands; for what was really good, even though it may through envy be overshadowed for a short time, still in time shines again through the intrinsic excellence of its nature. Some persons, thinking it a scandalous thing that these laws should only be known among one half portion of the human race, namely, among the barbarians, and that the Greek nation should be wholly and entirely ignorant of them, turned their attention to their translation. 2.28. And since this undertaking was an important one, tending to the general advantage, not only of private persons, but also of rulers, of whom the number was not great, it was entrusted to kings and to the most illustrious of all kings. 2.29. Ptolemy, surnamed Philadelphus, was the third in succession after Alexander, the monarch who subdued Egypt; and he was, in all virtues which can be displayed in government, the most excellent sovereign, not only of all those of his time, but of all that ever lived; so that even now, after the lapse of so many generations, his fame is still celebrated, as having left many instances and monuments of his magimity in the cities and districts of his kingdom, so that even now it is come to be a sort of proverbial expression to call excessive magnificence, and zeal, for honour and splendour in preparation, Philadelphian, from his name; 2.30. and, in a word, the whole family of the Ptolemies was exceedingly eminent and conspicuous above all other royal families, and among the Ptolemies, Philadelphus was the most illustrious; for all the rest put together scarcely did as many glorious and praiseworthy actions as this one king did by himself, being, as it were, the leader of the herd, and in a manner the head of all the kings. 2.32. And having explained his wishes, and having requested him to pick him out a number of men, of perfect fitness for the task, who should translate the law, the high-priest, as was natural, being greatly pleased, and thinking that the king had only felt the inclination to undertake a work of such a character from having been influenced by the providence of God, considered, and with great care selected the most respectable of the Hebrews whom he had about him, who in addition to their knowledge of their national scriptures, had also been well instructed in Grecian literature, and cheerfully sent them.
72. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, None (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Faßbeck and Killebrew (2016), Viewing Ancient Jewish Art and Archaeology: VeHinnei Rachel - Essays in honor of Rachel Hachlili, 366; Gorain (2019), Language in the Confessions of Augustine, 11; Green (2014), Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus, 110; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 58; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 114
73. Philo of Alexandria, On The Contemplative Life, 21-53, 55-90, 54 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 326
54. Accordingly, seven tables, and often more, are brought in, full of every kind of delicacy which earth, and sea, and rivers, and air produce, all procured with great pains, and in high condition, composed of terrestrial, and acquatic, and flying creatures, every one of which is different both in its mode of dressing and in its seasoning. And that no description of thing existing in nature may be omitted, at the last dishes are brought in full of fruits, besides those which are kept back for the more luxurious portion of the entertainment, and for what is called the dessert;
74. Seneca The Elder, Controversies, None (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 44
75. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 63-64 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 236
64. But the mind, having first laid a claim to the faculties of the outward sense, and by means of them having conceived every idea of bodily substance, became filled with unreasonable pride and was puffed up, so as to think everything in the world its own property, and that nothing at all belonged to any one else. XX. 64. Let us, therefore, reject all such impious dishonesty, and not worship those who are our brothers by nature, even though they may have received a purer and more immortal essence than ourselves (for all created things are brothers to one another, inasmuch as they are created; since the Father of them all is one, the Creator of the universe); but let us rather, with our mind and reason, and with all our strength, gird ourselves up vigorously and energetically to the service of that Being who is uncreated and everlasting, and the maker of the universe, never shrinking or turning aside from it, nor yielding to a desire of pleasing the multitude, by which even those who might be saved are often destroyed.
76. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.175-1.176, 1.185-1.205, 1.452-1.567, 6.1-6.145, 7.292, 9.266-9.267, 9.666-9.797, 14.629, 15.745-15.879 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, as author and builder •augustus/octavian, as reader •augustus/octavian, conspiracies against •augustus/octavian, power of •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods •augustus/octavian, as performer of a public image •augustus/octavian, as pater patriae •augustus/octavian, early self-representations •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus •augustus (octavian, emperor) •augustus/octavian, as collective construction •augustus/octavian, as spin-master •augustus/octavian, relation with caesar •augustus/octavian Found in books: Gorain (2019), Language in the Confessions of Augustine, 186; Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 4, 21, 22, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 122, 123, 124, 127, 204, 205, 241, 250; Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 42, 46; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 62
1.175. Hic locus est, quem, si verbis audacia detur, 1.176. haud timeam magni dixisse Palatia caeli. 1.185. Nam quamquam ferus hostis erat, tamen illud ab uno 1.186. corpore et ex una pendebat origine bellum. 1.187. Nunc mihi, qua totum Nereus circumsonat orbem, 1.188. perdendum est mortale genus: per flumina iuro 1.189. infera, sub terras Stygio labentia luco! 1.190. cuncta prius temptata: sed inmedicabile corpus 1.191. ense recidendum est, ne pars sincera trahatur. 1.192. Sunt mihi semidei, sunt rustica numina, nymphae 1.193. faunique satyrique et monticolae silvani: 1.194. quos quoniam caeli nondum dignamur honore, 1.195. quas dedimus certe terras habitare sinamus. 1.196. An satis, o superi, tutos fore creditis illos, 1.197. cum mihi, qui fulmen, qui vos habeoque regoque, 1.198. struxerit insidias notus feritate Lycaon?” 1.199. Confremuere omnes studiisque ardentibus ausum 1.200. talia deposcunt. Sic, cum manus inpia saevit 1.201. sanguine Caesareo Romanum exstinguere nomen, 1.202. attonitum tanto subitae terrore ruinae 1.203. humanum genus est totusque perhorruit orbis: 1.204. nec tibi grata minus pietas, Auguste, tuorum est, 1.205. quam fuit illa Iovi. Qui postquam voce manuque 1.452. Primus amor Phoebi Daphne Peneia, quem non 1.453. fors ignara dedit, sed saeva Cupidinis ira. 1.454. Delius hunc, nuper victa serpente superbus, 1.455. viderat adducto flectentem cornua nervo 1.456. “quid” que “tibi, lascive puer, cum fortibus armis?” 1.457. dixerat, “ista decent umeros gestamina nostros, 1.458. qui dare certa ferae, dare vulnera possumus hosti, 1.459. qui modo pestifero tot iugera ventre prementem 1.460. stravimus innumeris tumidum Pythona sagittis. 1.461. Tu face nescio quos esto contentus amores 1.462. inritare tua, nec laudes adsere nostras.” 1.463. Filius huic Veneris “figat tuus omnia, Phoebe, 1.464. te meus arcus:” ait “quantoque animalia cedunt 1.465. cuncta deo tanto minor est tua gloria nostra.” 1.466. Dixit et eliso percussis aere pennis 1.467. inpiger umbrosa Parnasi constitit arce 1.468. eque sagittifera prompsit duo tela pharetra 1.469. diversorum operum: fugat hoc, facit illud amorem. 1.470. Quod facit, auratum est et cuspide fulget acuta; 1.471. quod fugat, obtusum est et habet sub harundine plumbum. 1.472. Hoc deus in nympha Peneide fixit, at illo 1.473. laesit Apollineas traiecta per ossa medullas. 1.474. Protinus alter amat, fugit altera nomen amantis 1.475. silvarum tenebris captivarumque ferarum 1.476. exuviis gaudens innuptaeque aemula Phoebes. 1.477. Vitta coercebat positos sine lege capillos. 1.478. Multi illam petiere, illa aversata petentes 1.479. inpatiens expersque viri nemora avia lustrat, 1.480. nec quid Hymen, quid Amor, quid sint conubia curat. 1.481. Saepe pater dixit “generum mihi, filia, debes,” 1.482. saepe pater dixit “debes mihi nata, nepotes:” 1.483. illa, velut crimen taedas exosa iugales, 1.484. pulchra verecundo suffunditur ora rubore, 1.485. inque patris blandis haerens cervice lacertis 1.486. “da mihi perpetua, genitor carissime,” dixit 1.487. “virginitate frui: dedit hoc pater ante Dianae.” 1.488. Ille quidem obsequitur, sed te decor iste quod optas 1.489. esse vetat. Votoque tuo tua forma repugnat: 1.490. Phoebus amat visaeque cupit conubia Daphnes, 1.491. quodque cupit, sperat, suaque illum oracula fallunt. 1.492. Utque leves stipulae demptis adolentur aristis, 1.493. ut facibus saepes ardent, quas forte viator 1.494. vel nimis admovit vel iam sub luce reliquit, 1.495. sic deus in flammas abiit, sic pectore toto 1.496. uritur et sterilem sperando nutrit amorem. 1.497. Spectat inornatos collo pendere capillos 1.498. et “quid, si comantur?” ait. Videt igne micantes 1.499. sideribus similes oculos, videt oscula, quae non 1.500. est vidisse satis; laudat digitosque manusque 1.501. bracchiaque et nudos media plus parte lacertos. 1.502. Siqua latent, meliora putat. Fugit ocior aura 1.503. illa levi neque ad haec revocantis verba resistit: 1.504. “Nympha, precor, Penei, mane! Non insequor hostis: 1.505. nympha, mane! sic agna lupum, sic cerva leonem, 1.506. sic aquilam penna fugiunt trepidante columbae, 1.507. hostes quaeque suos: amor est mihi causa sequendi. 1.508. Me miserum! ne prona cadas indignave laedi 1.509. crura notent sentes et sim tibi causa doloris. 1.510. Aspera, qua properas, loca sunt. Moderatius, oro, 1.511. curre fugamque inhibe; moderatius insequar ipse. 1.512. Cui placeas, inquire tamen. Non incola montis, 1.513. non ego sum pastor, non hic armenta gregesque 1.514. horridus observo. Nescis, temeraria, nescis 1.515. quem fugias, ideoque fugis. Mihi Delphica tellus 1.516. et Claros et Tenedos Patareaque regia servit, 1.517. Iuppiter est genitor; per me quod eritque fuitque 1.518. estque patet; per me concordant carmina nervis. 1.519. Certa quidem nostra est, nostra tamen una sagitta 1.520. certior, in vacuo quae vulnera pectore fecit. 1.521. Inventum medicina meum est, opiferque per orbem 1.522. dicor, et herbarum subiecta potentia nobis: 1.523. ei mihi, quod nullis amor est sanabilis herbis 1.524. nec prosunt domino, quae prosunt omnibus, artes.” 1.525. Plura locuturum timido Peneia cursu 1.526. fugit cumque ipso verba inperfecta reliquit, 1.527. tum quoque visa decens. Nudabant corpora venti, 1.528. obviaque adversas vibrabant flamina vestes, 1.529. et levis inpulsos retro dabat aura capillos, 1.530. auctaque forma fuga est. Sed enim non sustinet ultra 1.531. perdere blanditias iuvenis deus, utque monebat 1.532. ipse Amor, admisso sequitur vestigia passu. 1.533. Ut canis in vacuo leporem cum Gallicus arvo 1.534. vidit, et hic praedam pedibus petit, ille salutem: 1.535. alter inhaesuro similis iam iamque tenere 1.536. sperat et extento stringit vestigia rostro, 1.537. alter in ambiguo est, an sit conprensus, et ipsis 1.538. morsibus eripitur tangentiaque ora relinquit: 1.539. sic deus et virgo est hic spe celer, illa timore. 1.540. Qui tamen insequitur pennis adiutus Amoris, 1.541. ocior est requiemque negat tergoque fugacis 1.542. inminet et crinem sparsum cervicibus adflat. 1.543. Viribus absumptis expalluit illa citaeque 1.544. victa labore fugae spectans Peneidas undas 1.545. “fer pater” inquit “opem si flumina numen habetis. vulg. 1.546. qua nimium placui, tellus aut hisce vel istam, 1.547. quae facit ut laedar, mutando perde figuram. 1.547. Qua nimium placui, mutando perde figuram!” 1.548. Vix prece finita torpor gravis occupat artus: 1.549. mollia cinguntur tenui praecordia libro, 1.550. in frondem crines, in ramos bracchia crescunt, 1.551. pes modo tam velox pigris radicibus haeret, 1.552. ora cacumen habet; remanet nitor unus in illa. 1.553. Hanc quoque Phoebus amat, positaque in stipite dextra 1.554. sentit adhuc trepidare novo sub cortice pectus 1.555. conplexusque suis ramos, ut membra, lacertis 1.556. oscula dat ligno: refugit tamen oscula lignum. 1.557. Cui deus “at quoniam coniunx mea non potes esse, 1.558. arbor eris certe” dixit “mea. Semper habebunt 1.559. te coma, te citharae, te nostrae, laure, pharetrae: 1.560. tu ducibus Latiis aderis, cum laeta triumphum 1.561. vox canet et visent longas Capitolia pompas: 1.562. postibus Augustis eadem fidissima custos 1.563. ante fores stabis mediamque tuebere quercum, 1.564. utque meum intonsis caput est iuvenale capillis, 1.565. tu quoque perpetuos semper gere frondis honores.” 1.566. Finierat Paean: factis modo laurea ramis 1.567. adnuit utque caput visa est agitasse cacumen. 6.1. Praebuerat dictis Tritonia talibus aures 6.2. carminaque Aonidum iustamque probaverat iram. 6.3. Tum secum “laudare parum est; laudemur et ipsae 6.4. numina nec sperni sine poena nostra sinamus” 6.5. Maeoniaeque animum fatis intendit Arachnes, 6.6. quam sibi lanificae non cedere laudibus artis 6.7. audierat. Non illa loco neque origine gentis 6.8. clara, sed arte fuit. Pater huic Colophonius Idmon 6.9. Phocaico bibulas tingebat murice lanas. 6.10. Occiderat mater; sed et haec de plebe suoque 6.11. aequa viro fuerat. Lydas tamen illa per urbes 6.12. quaesierat studio nomen memorabile, quamvis 6.13. orta domo parva parvis habitabat Hypaepis. 6.14. Huius ut adspicerent opus admirabile, saepe 6.15. deseruere sui nymphae vineta Timoli, 6.16. deseruere suas nymphae Pactolides undas. 6.17. Nec factas solum vestes spectare iuvabat; 6.18. tum quoque, cum fierent: tantus decor adfuit arti. 6.19. Sive rudem primos lanam glomerabat in orbes, 6.20. seu digitis subigebat opus repetitaque longo 6.21. vellera mollibat nebulas aequantia tractu, 6.22. sive levi teretem versabat pollice fusum, 6.23. seu pingebat acu, scires a Pallade doctam. 6.24. Quod tamen ipsa negat, tantaque offensa magistra 6.25. “certet” ait “mecum: nihil est, quod victa recusem.” 6.26. Pallas anum simulat falsosque in tempora canos 6.27. addit et infirmos, baculo quos sustinet, artus. 6.28. Tum sic orsa loqui: “Non omnia grandior aetas, 6.29. quae fugiamus, habet: seris venit usus ab annis. 6.30. Consilium ne sperne meum. Tibi fama petatur 6.31. inter mortales faciendae maxima lanae: 6.32. cede deae veniamque tuis, temeraria, dictis 6.33. supplice voce roga: veniam dabit illa roganti.” 6.34. Adspicit hanc torvis inceptaque fila relinquit, 6.35. vixque manum retinens confessaque vultibus iram 6.36. talibus obscuram resecuta est Pallada dictis: 6.37. “Mentis inops longaque venis confecta senecta. 6.38. Et nimium vixisse diu nocet. Audiat istas, 6.39. siqua tibi nurus est, siqua est tibi filia, voces. 6.40. Consilii satis est in me mihi. Neve monendo 6.41. profecisse putes, eadem est sententia nobis. 6.42. Cur non ipsa venit? cur haec certamina vitat?” 6.43. Tum dea “venit” ait, formamque removit anilem 6.44. Palladaque exhibuit. Venerantur numina nymphae 6.45. Mygdonidesque nurus: sola est non territa virgo. 6.46. Sed tamen erubuit, subitusque invita notavit 6.47. ora rubor rursusque evanuit, ut solet aer 6.48. purpureus fieri, cum primum aurora movetur, 6.49. et breve post tempus candescere solis ab ortu. 6.50. Perstat in incepto stolidaeque cupidine palmae 6.51. in sua fata ruit: neque enim Iove nata recusat, 6.52. nec monet ulterius, nec iam certamina differt. 6.53. Haud mora, constituunt diversis partibus ambae 6.54. et gracili geminas intendunt stamine telas 6.55. (tela iugo iuncta est, stamen secernit harundo); 6.56. inseritur medium radiis subtemen acutis, 6.57. quod digiti expediunt, atque inter stamina ductum 6.58. percusso paviunt insecti pectine dentes. 6.59. Utraque festit cinctaeque ad pectora vestes 6.60. bracchia docta movent, studio fallente laborem. 6.61. Illic et Tyrium quae purpura sensit aenum 6.62. texitur et tenues parvi discriminis umbrae, 6.63. qualis ab imbre solet percussis solibus arcus 6.64. inficere ingenti longum curvamine caelum: 6.65. in quo diversi niteant cum mille colores, 6.66. transitus ipse tamen spectantia lumina fallit; 6.67. usque adeo quod tangit idem est, tamen ultima distant. 6.68. Illic et lentum filis inmittitur aurum 6.69. et vetus in tela deducitur argumentum. 6.70. Cecropia Pallas scopulum Mavortis in arce 6.71. pingit et antiquam de terrae nomine litem. 6.72. Bis sex caelestes medio Iove sedibus altis 6.73. augusta gravitate sedent. Sua quemque deorum 6.74. inscribit facies: Iovis est regalis imago. 6.75. Stare deum pelagi longoque ferire tridente 6.76. aspera saxa facit, medioque e vulnere saxi 6.77. exsiluisse fretum, quo pignore vindicet urbem; 6.78. at sibi dat clipeum, dat acutae cuspidis hastam, 6.79. dat galeam capiti, defenditur aegide pectus, 6.80. percussamque sua simulat de cuspide terram 6.81. edere cum bacis fetum canentis olivae 6.82. mirarique deos: operis Victoria finis. 6.83. Ut tamen exemplis intellegat aemula laudis, 6.84. quod pretium speret pro tam furialibus ausis, 6.85. quattuor in partes certamina quattuor addit, 6.86. clara colore suo, brevibus distincta sigillis. 6.87. Threiciam Rhodopen habet angulus unus et Haemum 6.88. (nunc gelidi montes, mortalia corpora quondam !), 6.89. nomina summorum sibi qui tribuere deorum. 6.90. Altera Pygmaeae fatum miserabile matris 6.91. pars habet: hanc Iuno victam certamine iussit 6.92. esse gruem populisque suis indicere bella. 6.93. Pinxit et Antigonen ausam contendere quondam 6.94. cum magni consorte Iovis, quam regia Iuno 6.95. in volucrem vertit; nec profuit Ilion illi 6.96. Laomedonve pater, sumptis quin candida pennis 6.97. ipsa sibi plaudat crepitante ciconia rostro. 6.98. Qui superest solus, Cinyran habet angulus orbum; 6.99. isque gradus templi, natarum membra suarum, 6.100. amplectens saxoque iacens lacrimare videtur. 6.101. Circuit extremas oleis pacalibus oras: 6.102. is modus est, operisque sua facit arbore finem. 6.103. Maeonis elusam designat imagine tauri 6.104. Europam: verum taurum, freta vera putares. 6.105. Ipsa videbatur terras spectare relictas 6.106. et comites clamare suas tactumque vereri 6.107. adsilientis aquae timidasque reducere plantas. 6.108. Fecit et Asterien aquila luctante teneri, 6.109. fecit olorinis Ledam recubare sub alis; 6.110. addidit, ut satyri celatus imagine pulchram 6.111. Iuppiter implerit gemino Nycteida fetu, 6.112. Amphitryon fuerit, cum te, Tirynthia, cepit, 6.113. aureus ut Danaen, Asopida luserit ignis, 6.114. Mnemosynen pastor, varius Deoida serpens. 6.115. Te quoque mutatum torvo, Neptune, iuvenco 6.116. virgine in Aeolia posuit. Tu visus Enipeus 6.117. gignis Aloidas, aries Bisaltida fallis; 6.118. et te flava comas frugum mitissima mater 6.119. sensit equum, sensit volucrem crinita colubris 6.120. mater equi volucris, sensit delphina Melantho. 6.121. Omnibus his faciemque suam faciemque locorum 6.122. reddidit. Est illic agrestis imagine Phoebus, 6.123. utque modo accipitris pennas, modo terga leonis 6.124. gesserit, ut pastor Macareida luserit Issen; 6.125. Liber ut Erigonen falsa deceperit uva, 6.126. ut Saturnus equo geminum Chirona crearit. 6.127. Ultima pars telae, tenui circumdata limbo, 6.128. nexilibus flores hederis habet intertextos. 6.129. Non illud Pallas, non illud carpere Livor 6.130. possit opus. Doluit successu flava virago 6.131. et rupit pictas, caelestia crimina, vestes. 6.132. Utque Cytoriaco radium de monte tenebat, 6.133. ter quater Idmoniae frontem percussit Arachnes. 6.134. Non tulit infelix laqueoque animosa ligavit 6.135. guttura. Pendentem Pallas miserata levavit 6.136. atque ita “vive quidem, pende tamen, improba” dixit: 6.137. “lexque eadem poenae, ne sis secura futuri, 6.138. dicta tuo generi serisque nepotibus esto.” 6.139. Post ea discedens sucis Hecateidos herbae 6.140. sparsit; et extemplo tristi medicamine tactae 6.141. defluxere comae, cum quis et naris et aures, 6.142. fitque caput minimum, toto quoque corpore parva est: 6.143. in latere exiles digiti pro cruribus haerent, 6.144. cetera venter habet: de quo tamen illa remittit 6.145. stamen et antiquas exercet aranea telas. 7.292. membraque luxuriant. Aeson miratur et olim 9.266. Utque novus serpens posita cum pelle senecta 9.267. luxuriare solet squamaque nitere recenti, 9.666. Fama novi centum Cretaeas forsitan urbes 9.667. implesset monstri, si non miracula nuper 9.668. Iphide mutata Crete propiora tulisset. 9.669. Proxima Cnosiaco nam quondam Phaestia regno 9.670. progenuit tellus ignotum nomine Ligdum, 9.671. ingenua de plebe virum. Nec census in illo 9.672. nobilitate sua maior, sed vita fidesque 9.673. inculpata fuit. Gravidae qui coniugis aures 9.674. vocibus his monuit, cum iam prope partus adesset: 9.675. “Quae voveam, duo sunt; minimo ut relevere dolore, 9.676. utque marem parias; onerosior altera sors est, 9.677. et vires fortuna negat. Quod abominor, ergo 9.678. edita forte tuo fuerit si femina partu, 9.679. (invitus mando: pietas, ignosce!) necetur.” 9.680. Dixerat, et lacrimis vultus lavere profusis, 9.681. tam qui mandabat, quam cui mandata dabantur. 9.682. Sed tamen usque suum vanis Telethusa maritum 9.683. sollicitat precibus, ne spem sibi ponat in arto. 9.684. Certa sua est Ligdo sententia. Iamque ferendo 9.685. vix erat illa gravem maturo pondere ventrem, 9.686. cum medio noctis spatio sub imagine somni 9.687. Inachis ante torum, pompa comitata sacrorum, 9.688. aut stetit aut visa est. Inerant lunaria fronti 9.689. cornua cum spicis nitido flaventibus auro 9.690. et regale decus. Cum qua latrator Anubis 9.691. sanctaque Bubastis variusque coloribus Apis, 9.692. quique premit vocem digitoque silentia suadet, 9.693. sistraque erant numquamque satis quaesitus Osiris 9.694. plenaque somniferis serpens peregrina venenis. 9.695. Tum velut excussam somno et manifesta videntem 9.696. sic adfata dea est: “Pars o Telethusa mearum, 9.697. pone graves curas mandataque falle mariti. 9.698. Nec dubita, cum te partu Lucina levarit, 9.699. tollere quidquid erit. Dea sum auxiliaris opemque 9.700. exorata fero, nec te coluisse quereris 9.701. ingratum numen.” Monuit thalamoque recessit. 9.702. Laeta toro surgit purasque ad sidera supplex 9.703. Cressa manus tollens, rata sint sua visa, precatur. 9.704. Ut dolor increvit, seque ipsum pondus in auras 9.705. expulit et nata est ignaro femina patre, 9.706. iussit ali mater puerum mentita: fidemque 9.707. res habuit, neque erat ficti nisi conscia nutrix. 9.708. Vota pater solvit nomenque inponit avitum: 9.709. Iphis avus fuerat. Gavisa est nomine mater, 9.710. quod commune foret nec quemquam falleret illo. 9.711. Inde incepta pia mendacia fraude latebant: 9.712. cultus erat pueri, facies, quam sive puellae, 9.713. sive dares puero, fuerat formosus uterque. 9.714. Tertius interea decimo successerat annus, 9.715. cum pater, Iphi, tibi flavam despondet Ianthen, 9.716. inter Phaestiadas quae laudatissima formae 9.717. dote fuit virgo, Dictaeo nata Teleste. 9.718. Par aetas, par forma fuit, primasque magistris 9.719. accepere artes, elementa aetatis, ab isdem. 9.720. Hinc amor ambarum tetigit rude pectus et aequum 9.721. vulnus utrique dedit. Sed erat fiducia dispar: 9.722. coniugium pactaeque exspectat tempora taedae 9.723. quamque virum putat esse, virum fore credit Ianthe; 9.724. Iphis amat, qua posse frui desperat, et auget 9.725. hoc ipsum flammas, ardetque in virgine virgo; 9.726. vixque tenens lacrimas “quis me manet exitus” inquit, 9.727. “cognita quam nulli, quam prodigiosa novaeque 9.728. cura tenet Veneris? Si di mihi parcere vellent, 9.729. parcere debuerant; si non, et perdere vellent, 9.730. naturale malum saltem et de more dedissent. 9.731. Nec vaccam vaccae, nec equas amor urit equarum: 9.732. urit oves aries, sequitur sua femina cervum. 9.733. Sic et aves coeunt, interque animalia cuncta 9.734. femina femineo conrepta cupidine nulla est. 9.735. Vellem nulla forem! Ne non tamen omnia Crete 9.736. monstra ferat, taurum dilexit filia Solis, 9.737. femina nempe marem: meus est furiosior illo, 9.738. si verum profitemur, amor! Tamen illa secuta est 9.739. spem Veneris, tamen illa dolis et imagine vaccae 9.740. passa bovem est, et erat, qui deciperetur adulter! 9.741. Huc licet e toto sollertia confluat orbe, 9.742. ipse licet revolet ceratis Daedalus alis, 9.743. quid faciet? Num me puerum de virgine doctis 9.744. artibus efficiet? num te mutabit, Ianthe? 9.745. Quin animum firmas, teque ipsa reconligis, Iphi, 9.746. consiliique inopes et stultos excutis ignes? 9.747. Quid sis nata, vide, nisi te quoque decipis ipsa, 9.748. et pete quod fas est, et ama quod femina debes! 9.749. Spes est, quae capiat, spes est, quae pascit amorem: 9.750. hanc tibi res adimit. Non te custodia caro 9.751. arcet ab amplexu nec cauti cura mariti, 9.752. non patris asperitas, non se negat ipsa roganti: 9.753. nec tamen est potienda tibi, nec, ut omnia fiant, 9.754. esse potes felix, ut dique hominesque laborent. 9.755. Nunc quoque votorum nulla est pars vana meorum, 9.756. dique mihi faciles, quidquid valuere, dederunt; 9.757. quodque ego, vult genitor, vult ipsa socerque futurus. 9.758. At non vult natura, potentior omnibus istis, 9.759. quae mihi sola nocet. Venit ecce optabile tempus, 9.760. luxque iugalis adest, et iam mea fiet Ianthe— 9.761. nec mihi continget: mediis sitiemus in undis. 9.762. Pronuba quid Iuno, quid ad haec, Hymenaee, venitis 9.763. sacra, quibus qui ducat abest, ubi nubimus ambae?” 9.764. Pressit ab his vocem. Nec lenius altera virgo 9.765. aestuat, utque celer venias, Hymenaee, precatur. 9.766. Quod petit haec, Telethusa timens modo tempora differt, 9.767. nunc ficto languore moram trahit, omina saepe 9.768. visaque causatur. Sed iam consumpserat omnem 9.769. materiam ficti, dilataque tempora taedae 9.770. institerant, unusque dies restabat. At illa 9.771. crinalem capiti vittam nataeque sibique 9.772. detrahit et passis aram complexa capillis 9.773. “Isi, Paraetonium Mareoticaque arva Pharonque 9.774. quae colis et septem digestum in cornua Nilum: 9.775. fer, precor” inquit “opem nostroque medere timori! 9.776. Te, dea, te quondam tuaque haec insignia vidi 9.777. cunctaque cognovi, sonitum comitantiaque aera 9.778. sistrorum, memorique animo tua iussa notavi. 9.779. Quod videt haec lucem, quod non ego punior, ecce 9.780. consilium munusque tuum est. Miserere duarum 9.781. auxilioque iuva!” Lacrimae sunt verba secutae. 9.782. Visa dea est movisse suas (et moverat) aras, 9.783. et templi tremuere fores, imitataque lunam 9.784. cornua fulserunt, crepuitque sonabile sistrum. 9.785. Non secura quidem, fausto tamen omine laeta 9.786. mater abit templo: sequitur comes Iphis euntem, 9.787. quam solita est, maiore gradu, nec candor in ore 9.788. permanet, et vires augentur, et acrior ipse est 9.789. vultus, et incomptis brevior mensura capillis, 9.790. plusque vigoris adest, habuit quam femina. Nam quae 9.791. femina nuper eras, puer es. Date munera templis 9.792. nec timida gaudete fide! Dant munera templis, 9.793. addunt et titulum; titulus breve carmen habebat: 9.794. DONA PUER SOLVIT QUAE FEMINA VOVERAT IPHIS 9.795. Postera lux radiis latum patefecerat orbem, 9.796. cum Venus et Iuno sociosque Hymenaeus ad ignes 9.797. conveniunt, potiturque sua puer Iphis Ianthe. 14.629. qua modo luxuriem premit et spatiantia passim 15.745. Hic tamen accessit delubris advena nostris: 15.746. Caesar in urbe sua deus est; quem Marte togaque 15.747. praecipuum non bella magis finita triumphis 15.748. resque domi gestae properataque gloria rerum 15.749. in sidus vertere novum stellamque comantem, 15.750. quam sua progenies; neque enim de Caesaris actis 15.751. ullum maius opus, quam quod pater exstitit huius: 15.752. scilicet aequoreos plus est domuisse Britannos 15.753. perque papyriferi septemflua flumina Nili 15.754. victrices egisse rates Numidasque rebelles 15.755. Cinyphiumque Iubam Mithridateisque tumentem 15.756. nominibus Pontum populo adiecisse Quirini 15.757. et multos meruisse, aliquos egisse triumphos, 15.758. quam tantum genuisse virum? Quo praeside rerum 15.759. humano generi, superi, favistis abunde! 15.760. Ne foret hic igitur mortali semine cretus, 15.761. ille deus faciendus erat. Quod ut aurea vidit 15.762. Aeneae genetrix, vidit quoque triste parari 15.763. pontifici letum et coniurata arma moveri, 15.764. palluit et cunctis, ut cuique erat obvia, divis 15.765. “adspice” dicebat, “quanta mihi mole parentur 15.766. insidiae quantaque caput cum fraude petatur, 15.767. quod de Dardanio solum mihi restat Iulo. 15.768. Solane semper ero iustis exercita curis, 15.769. quam modo Tydidae Calydonia vulneret hasta, 15.770. nunc male defensae confundant moenia Troiae, 15.771. quae videam natum longis erroribus actum 15.772. iactarique freto sedesque intrare silentum 15.773. bellaque cum Turno gerere, aut, si vera fatemur, 15.774. cum Iunone magis? Quid nunc antiqua recordor 15.775. damna mei generis? Timor hic meminisse priorum 15.776. non sinit: en acui sceleratos cernitis enses? 15.777. Quos prohibete, precor, facinusque repellite, neve 15.778. caede sacerdotis flammas exstinguite Vestae!” 15.779. Talia nequiquam toto Venus anxia caelo 15.780. verba iacit superosque movet, qui rumpere quamquam 15.781. ferrea non possunt veterum decreta sororum, 15.782. signa tamen luctus dant haud incerta futuri. 15.783. Arma ferunt inter nigras crepitantia nubes 15.784. terribilesque tubas auditaque cornua caelo 15.785. praemonuisse nefas; solis quoque tristis imago 15.786. lurida sollicitis praebebat lumina terris. 15.787. Saepe faces visae mediis ardere sub astris, 15.788. saepe inter nimbos guttae cecidere cruentae. 15.789. Caerulus et vultum ferrugine Lucifer atra 15.790. sparsus erat, sparsi Lunares sanguine currus. 15.791. Tristia mille locis Stygius dedit omina bubo, 15.792. mille locis lacrimavit ebur, cantusque feruntur 15.793. auditi sanctis et verba mitia lucis. 15.794. Victima nulla litat magnosque instare tumultus 15.795. fibra monet, caesumque caput reperitur in extis. 15.796. Inque foro circumque domos et templa deorum 15.797. nocturnos ululasse canes umbrasque silentum 15.798. erravisse ferunt motamque tremoribus urbem. 15.799. Non tamen insidias venturaque vincere fata 15.800. praemonitus potuere deum, strictique feruntur 15.801. in templum gladii; neque enim locus ullus in urbe 15.802. ad facinus diramque placet nisi curia, caedem. 15.803. Tum vero Cytherea manu percussit utraque 15.804. pectus et Aeneaden molitur condere nube, 15.805. qua prius infesto Paris est ereptus Atridae 15.806. et Diomedeos Aeneas fugerat enses. 15.807. Talibus hanc genitor: “Sola insuperabile fatum, 15.808. nata, movere paras? Intres licet ipsa sororum 15.809. tecta trium: cernes illic molimine vasto 15.810. ex aere et solido rerum tabularia ferro, 15.811. quae neque concussum caeli neque fulminis iram 15.812. nec metuunt ullas tuta atque aeterna ruinas. 15.813. Invenies illic incisa adamante perenni 15.814. fata tui generis: legi ipse animoque notavi 15.815. et referam, ne sis etiamnum ignara futuri. 15.816. Hic sua complevit, pro quo, Cytherea, laboras, 15.817. tempora, perfectis, quos terrae debuit, annis. 15.818. Ut deus accedat caelo templisque colatur, 15.819. tu facies natusque suus, qui nominis heres 15.820. impositum feret unus onus caesique parentis 15.821. nos in bella suos fortissimus ultor habebit. 15.822. Illius auspiciis obsessae moenia pacem 15.823. victa petent Mutinae, Pharsalia sentiet illum. 15.824. Emathiique iterum madefient caede Philippi, 15.825. et magnum Siculis nomen superabitur undis, 15.826. Romanique ducis coniunx Aegyptia taedae 15.827. non bene fisa cadet, frustraque erit illa minata, 15.828. servitura suo Capitolia nostra Canopo. 15.829. Quid tibi barbariem, gentesque ab utroque iacentes 15.830. oceano numerem? Quodcumque habitabile tellus 15.831. sustinet, huius erit: pontus quoque serviet illi! 15.832. Pace data terris animum ad civilia vertet 15.833. iura suum legesque feret iustissimus auctor 15.834. exemploque suo mores reget inque futuri 15.835. temporis aetatem venturorumque nepotum 15.836. prospiciens prolem sancta de coniuge natam 15.837. ferre simul nomenque suum curasque iubebit, 15.838. nec nisi cum senior Pylios aequaverit annos, 15.839. aetherias sedes cognataque sidera tanget. 15.840. Hanc animam interea caeso de corpore raptam 15.841. fac iubar, ut semper Capitolia nostra forumque 15.842. divus ab excelsa prospectet Iulius aede.” 15.843. Vix ea fatus erat, media cum sede senatus 15.844. constitit alma Venus, nulli cernenda, suique 15.845. Caesaris eripuit membris neque in aera solvi 15.846. passa recentem animam caelestibus intulit astris. 15.847. Dumque tulit, lumen capere atque ignescere sensit 15.848. emisitque sinu: luna volat altius illa, 15.849. flammiferumque trahens spatioso limite crinem 15.850. stella micat natique videns bene facta fatetur 15.851. esse suis maiora et vinci gaudet ab illo. 15.852. Hic sua praeferri quamquam vetat acta paternis, 15.853. libera fama tamen nullisque obnoxia iussis 15.854. invitum praefert unaque in parte repugnat: 15.855. sic magni cedit titulis Agamemnonis Atreus, 15.856. Aegea sic Theseus, sic Pelea vicit Achilles; 15.857. denique, ut exemplis ipsos aequantibus utar, 15.858. sic et Saturnus minor est Iove: Iuppiter arces 15.859. temperat aetherias et mundi regna triformis, 15.860. terra sub Augusto est; pater est et rector uterque. 15.861. Di, precor, Aeneae comites, quibus ensis et ignis 15.862. cesserunt, dique Indigetes genitorque Quirine 15.863. urbis et invicti genitor Gradive Quirini, 15.864. Vestaque Caesareos inter sacrata penates, 15.865. et cum Caesarea tu, Phoebe domestice, Vesta, 15.866. quique tenes altus Tarpeias Iuppiter arces, 15.867. quosque alios vati fas appellare piumque est: 15.868. tarda sit illa dies et nostro serior aevo, 15.869. qua caput Augustum, quem temperat, orbe relicto 15.870. accedat caelo faveatque precantibus absens! 15.871. Iamque opus exegi, quod nec Iovis ira nec ignis 15.872. nec poterit ferrum nec edax abolere vetustas. 15.873. Cum volet, illa dies, quae nil nisi corporis huius 15.874. ius habet, incerti spatium mihi finiat aevi: 15.875. parte tamen meliore mei super alta perennis 15.876. astra ferar, nomenque erit indelebile nostrum, 15.877. quaque patet domitis Romana potentia terris, 15.878. ore legar populi, perque omnia saecula fama, 15.879. siquid habent veri vatum praesagia, vivam.
77. Ovid, Tristia, 2.207-2.214, 2.253-2.312, 2.361-2.470, 3.1, 4.2, 4.4.15-4.4.16, 4.10, 5.1.43-5.1.44, 5.3 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, as reader •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods •augustus/octavian, as author and builder •augustus/octavian, as performer of a public image •augustus/octavian, conspiracies against •augustus/octavian, as collective construction •augustus/octavian, as object of public gaze •augustus/octavian, as pater patriae •augustus/octavian, constitutional status of •augustus/octavian, early self-representations •augustus/octavian, power of •augustus/octavian, relation with caesar •augustus/octavian, need for presence across empire •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus •augustus/octavian Found in books: Gorain (2019), Language in the Confessions of Augustine, 177, 178, 179, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190; Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 22, 23, 25, 26, 31, 91, 117, 119, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 130, 131, 133, 154, 183, 199, 204, 205, 223, 233, 249, 253; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 58, 64
2.207. perdiderint cum me duo crimina, carmen et error, 2.208. alterius facti culpa silenda milli'. 2.209. nam non sum tanti, renovem ut tua vulnera. Caesar, 2.210. quem nimio plus est indoluisse semel. 2.211. altera pars superest, qua turpi carmine factus 2.212. arguor obsceni doctor adulterii, 2.213. fas ergo est aliqua caelestia pectora falli, 2.214. et sunt notitia multa minora tua; 2.253. at matrona potest alienis artibus uti, quodque 2.254. trahat, quamvis non doceatur, habet. 2.255. nil igitur matrona legat, quia carmine ab omni 2.256. ad delinquendum doctior esse potest. 2.257. quodcumque attigerit, siqua est studiosa sinistri, 2.258. ad vitium mores instruet inde suos. 2.259. sumpserit Annales—nihil est hirsutius illis— 2.260. facta sit unde parens Ilia, nempe leget, 2.261. sumpserit Aeneadum genetrix ubi prima, requiret, 2.262. Aeneadum genetrix unde sit alma Venus. 2.263. persequar inferius, modo si licet ordine ferri, 2.264. posse nocere animis carminis omne genus. 2.265. non tamen idcirco crimen liber omnis habebit : 2.266. nil prodest, quod non laedere possit idem. 2.267. igne quid utilius? siquis tamen urere tecta 2.268. comparat, audaces instruit igne manus. 2.269. eripit interdum, modo dat medicina salutem, 2.270. quaeque iuvet, monstrat, quaeque sit herba nocens. 2.271. et latro et cautus praecingitur ense viator; 2.272. ille sed insidias, hic sibi portat opem. 2.273. discitur innocuas ut agat facundia causas; 2.274. protegit haec sontes, inmeritosque premit. 2.275. sic igitur carmen, recta si mente legatur, 2.276. constabit nulli posse nocere meum. 2.277. at quasdam vitio. quicumque hoc concipit, errat, 2.278. et nimium scriptis arrogat ille meis. 2.279. ut tamen hoc fatear, ludi quoque semina praebent 2.280. nequitiae: tolli tota theatra iube! 2.281. peccandi causam multis quam note xml:id= 2.282. Martia cum durum sternit harena solum! 2.283. tollatur Circus! non tuta licentia Circi est. 2.284. hic sedet ignoto iuncta puella viro. 2.285. cum quaedam spatientur in hoc, 2.286. conveniat, quare porticus ulla patet . 2.287. quis locus est templis augustior? haec quoque vitet, 2.288. in culpam siqua est ingeniosa suam. 2.289. cum steterit Iovis aede, Iovis succurret in aede 2.290. quam multas matres fecerit ille deus. 2.291. proxima adoranti Iunonis templa subibit, 2.292. paelicibus multis hanc doluisse deam. 2.293. Pallade conspecta, natum de crimine virgo 2.294. sustulerit quare, quaeret, Erichthonium. 2.295. venerit in magni templum, tua munera, Martis, 2.296. stat Venus Ultori iuncta, vir note xml:id= 2.297. Isidis aede sedens, cur hanc Saturnia, quaeret, 2.298. egerit Ionio Bosphorioque mari. 2.299. in Venerem Anchises, in Lunam Latmius heros, 2.300. in Cererem Iasion, qui referatur, erit. 2.301. omnia perversae possunt corrumpere mentes; 2.302. stant tamen illa suis omnia tuta locis, 2.303. et procul a scripta solis meretricibus Arte 2.304. summovet ingenuas pagina prima manus. 2.305. quaecumque erupit, qua non sinit ire sacerdos, 2.306. protinus huic note xml:id= 2.307. nec tamen est facinus versus evolvere mollis; 2.308. multa licet castae non facienda legant. 2.309. saepe supercilii nudas matrona severi 2.310. et veneris stantis ad genus omne videt, 2.311. corpora Vestales oculi meretricia cernunt, 2.312. nec domino poenae res ea causa fuit. 2.361. denique composui teneros non solus amores: 2.362. composito poenas solus amore dedi. 2.363. quid, nisi cum multo Venerem confundere vino 2.364. praecepit lyrici Teia Musa senis? 2.365. Lesbia quid docuit Sappho, nisi amare, puellas? 2.366. tuta tamen Sappho, tutus et ille fuit. 2.367. nec tibi, Battiade, nocuit, quod saepe legenti 2.368. delicias versu fassus es ipse tuas. 2.369. fabula iucundi nulla est sine amore Medri, 2.370. et solet hic pueris virginibusque legi. 2.371. Ilias ipsa quid est aliud nisi adultera, de qua 2.372. inter amatorem pugna virumque fuit? 2.373. quid prius est illi flamma Briseidos, utque 2.374. fecerit iratos rapta puella duces? 2.375. aut quid Odyssea est nisi femina propter amorem, 2.376. dum vir abest, multis una petita procis? 2.377. quis nisi Maeonides, Venerem Martemque ligatos 2.378. narrat, in obsceno corpora prensa toro?. 2.379. unde nisi indicio magni sciremus Homeri 2.380. hospitis igne duas incaluisse- deas? 2.381. omne genus scripti gravitate tragoedia vinci . 2.382. haec quoque materiam semper amoris habet, 2.383. num quid note xml:id= 2.384. nobilis est Canace fratris amore sui. 2.385. quid? non Tantalides, agitante Cupidine currus, 2.386. Pisaeam Phrygiis vexit eburnus equis? 2.387. tingueret ut ferrum natorum sanguine mater, 2.388. concitus a laeso 2.389. fecit amore dolor, fecit amor subitas volucres cum paelice regem, 2.390. quaeque suum luget nunc quoque mater Ityn. 2.391. si non Aëropen frater sceleratus amasset, 2.392. aversos Solis non legeremus equos. 2.393. impia nec tragicos tetigisset Scylla cothurnos, 2.394. ni patrium crinem desecuisset amor. 2.395. qui legis Electran et egentem mentis Oresten, 2.396. Aegisthi crimen Tyndaridosque legis. 2.397. nam quid de tetrico referam domitore Chimaerae, 2.398. quem leto fallax hospita paene dedit? 2.399. quid loquar Hermionen, quid te, Schoeneïa virgo, 2.400. teque, Mycenaeo Phoebas amata duci. 2.401. quid Danaen Danaesque nurum matremque Lyaei 2.402. Haemonaque et noctes cui coiere duae? 2.403. quid Peliae generum, quid Thesea, quique note xml:id= 2.404. Iliacam tetigit de rate primus humum? 2.405. huc Iole Pyrrhique parens, huc Herculis uxor, 2.406. huc accedat Hylas Iliacusque puer. 2.407. tempore deficiar, tragicos si persequar ignes, 2.408. vixque meus capiet nomina nuda Uber. 2.409. est et in obscenos commixta note xml:id= 2.410. multaque praeteriti verba pudoris habet; 2.411. nec nocet auctori, mollem qui fecit Achillem, 2.412. infregisse suis fortia facta modis, 2.413. iunxit Aristides Milesia crimina secum, 2.414. pulsus Aristides nec tamen urbe sua est. 2.415. nec qui descripsit corrumpi semina matrum, 2.416. Eubius, impurae conditor historiae, 2.417. nec qui composuit nuper Sybaritica, fugit, 2.418. nec qui concubitus non tacuere suos. 2.419. suntque ea doctorum monumentis mixta note xml:id= 2.420. muneribusque ducum publica facta patent. 2.421. neve peregrinis tantum defendar ab armis, 2.422. et Romanus habet multa iocosa liber, 2.423. utque suo Martem cecinit gravis 2.424. Ennius ore—Ennius ingenio maximus, arte rudis— 2.425. explicat ut causas rapidi Lucretius ignis, 2.426. casurumque triplex vaticinatur opus, 2.427. sic sua lascivo cantata est saepe Catullo 2.428. femina, cui falsum Lesbia nomen erat; 2.429. nec contentus ea, multos vulgavit amores, 2.430. in quibus ipse suum fassus adulterium est. 2.431. par fuit exigui similisque licentia Calvi, 2.432. detexit variis qui sua furta note xml:id= 2.433. quid referam Ticidae, quid Memmi carmen, apud quos 2.434. rebus adest nomen nominibusque pudor? 2.435. Cinna quoque his comes est, Cinnaque procacior Anser, 2.436. et leve Cornifiei parque Catonis opus. 2.437. et quorum libris modo dissimulata Perillae, 2.438. nomine, nunc legitur dicta, Metelle, tuo. 2.439. is quoque, Phasiacas Argon qui duxit in undas, 2.440. non potuit Veneris furta tacere suae. 2.441. nec minus Hortensi, nec sunt minus improba Servi 2.442. carmina, quis dubitet nomina Planta sequi? 2.443. vertit Aristiden Sisenna, nec obfuit illi 2.444. historiae turpis inseruisse iocos. 2.445. non fuit opprobrio celebrasse Lycorida Gallo, 2.446. sed linguam nimio non tenuisse mero. 2.447. credere iuranti durum putat esse Tibullus, 2.448. sic etiam de se quod neget illa viro. 2.449. fallere custodes idem note xml:id= 2.450. seque sua miserum nunc ait arte premi. 2.451. saepe, velut gemmam dominae signumve probaret, 2.452. per causam meminit se tetigisse manum; 2.453. utque refert, digitis saepe est nutuque locutus, 2.454. et tacitam mensae duxit in orbe notam 2.455. et quibus e sucis abeat de corpore livor, 2.456. impresso fieri qui solet ore, docet: 2.457. denique ab incauto nimium petit ille marito, 2.458. se quoque uti servet, peccet ut illa minus, 2.459. scit, cui latretur, cum solus obambulet, ipsas 2.460. cur totiens clausas exercet ante fores, 2.461. multaque dat furti talis praecepta docetque 2.462. qua nuptae possint fallere ab arte viros, 2.463. non fuit hoc illi fraudi, legiturque Tibullus 2.464. et placet, et iam te principe notus erat. 2.465. invenies eadem blandi praecepta Properti: 2.466. destrictus minima nec tamen ille nota est. 2.467. his ego successi, quoniam praestantia candor 2.468. nomina vivorum dissimulare iubet, 2.469. non timui, fateor, ne, qua tot iere carinae, 2.470. naufraga servatis omnibus una foret. 3.1. ‘Missus in hanc venio timide liber exulis urbem: 3.1. Ergo erat in fatis Scythiam quoque visere nostris, 3.1. Haec mea si casu miraris epistula quare 3.1. O mihi care quidem semper, sed tempore duro 3.1. Usus amicitiae tecum mihi parvus, ut illam 3.1. Foedus amicitiae nec vis, carissime, nostrae, 3.1. VADE salutatum, subito perarata, Perillam, 3.1. Nunc ego Triptolemi cuperem consistere curru, 3.1. Hic quoque sunt igitur Graiae—quis crederet?—urbes 3.1. Siquis adhuc istic meminit Nasonis adempti, 3.1. Si quis es, insultes qui casibus, improbe, nostris, 3.1. Frigora iam Zephyri minuunt, annoque peracto 3.1. Ecce supervacuus—quid enim fuit utile gigni?— 3.1. Cultor et antistes doctorum sancte virorum, 4.2. excusata suo tempore, lector, habe. 4.2. victa potest flexo succubuisse genu, 4.2. altera Sidonias, utraque sicca, rates, 4.2. exsuperas morum nobilitate genus, 4.2. unica fortunis ara reperta meis 4.2. praebet et incurvo colla premenda iugo; 4.2. bisque suum tacto Pisce peregit iter. 4.2. inficit et nigras alba senecta comas, 4.2. et tua Lethaeis acta dabuntur aquis, 4.2. quem legis, ut noris, accipe posteritas. 4.10. in numerum pulsa brachia pulsat aqua. 4.10. perpetuo terras ut domus illa regat, 4.10. sitque memor nostri necne, referte mihi. 4.10. si, quod es, appares, culpa soluta mea est. 4.10. excidit heu nomen quam mihi paene 4.10. vixque merum capiant grana quod intus habent; 4.10. scripta, sed e multis reddita nulla mihi. 4.10. et quae nunc domino rura paterna carent, 4.10. nostra suas istinc note xml:id= 4.10. qui tribus ante quater mensibus ortus erat. 5.3. hic quoque talis erit, qualis fortuna poetae: 5.3. pone metum, valeo; corpusque, quod ante laborum 5.3. festaque odoratis innectunt tempora sertis, 5.3. qui mihi flens dixit 5.3. sic quondam festum Laërtius egerat heros 5.3. tu quoque suscepti curam dimittis amici, 5.3. si tibi contingit cum dulci vita salute, 5.3. quae tibi res animos in me facit, improbe? curve 5.3. te canerem solum, meriti memor, inque libellis 5.3. at mihi iam videor patria procul esse tot annis, 5.3. indolui, non tam mea quod fortuna male audit, 5.3. difficile est quod, amice, mones, quia carmina laetum 5.3. aeger enim traxi contagia corpore mentis, 5.3. detrahat auctori multum fortuna licebit,
78. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 8.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Green (2014), Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus, 106, 107; Roller (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 154
79. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 3.29, 4.170 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian •augustus (octavian) Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 232; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 45
3.29. Again. Moses commands, do not either form a connection of marriage with one of another nation, and do not be seduced into complying with customs inconsistent with your own, and do not stray from the right way and forget the path which leads to piety, turning into a road which is no road. And, perhaps, you will yourself resist, if you have been from your earliest youth trained in the best possible instruction, which your parents have instilled into you, continually filling your mind with the sacred laws. And the anxiety and fear which parents feel for their sons and daughters is not slight; for, perchance, they may be allured by mischievous customs instead of genuine good ones, and so they may be in danger of learning to forget the honour belonging to the one God, which is the beginning and end of extreme unhappiness. 4.170. And it becomes a man who has been thought worthy of the supreme and greatest authority to appoint successors who may govern with him and judge with him, and, in concert with him, may ordain everything which is for the common advantage; for one person would not be sufficient, even if he were ever so willing, and if he were the most powerful man in the world, both in body and soul, to support the weight and number of affairs which would come upon him, as he would faint under the pressure and rapidity of all kinds of business coming in upon him continually every day from all quarters, unless he had a number of persons selected with reference to their excellence who might co-operate with him by their prudence, and power, and justice, and godly piety, men who not only avoid arrogance, but even detest it as an enemy and as the very greatest of evils.
80. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.6-1.7, 3.342-3.348, 4.373-4.378 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, as octavian •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Found in books: Giusti (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 233; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 156
81. Plutarch, Cato The Elder, 18.2-18.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 105
18.2. ὀχήματος, κόσμου γυναικείου, σκευῶν τῶν περὶ δίαιταν, ὧν ἑκάστου τὸ τίμημα δραχμὰς χιλίας καὶ πεντακοσίας ὑπερέβαλλεν, ἀποτιμᾶσθαι τὴν ἀξίαν εἰς τὸ δεκαπλάσιον, βουλόμενος ἀπὸ μειζόνων τιμημάτων αὐτοῖς μείζονας καὶ τὰς εἰσφορὰς εἶναι, καὶ προσετίμησε τρεῖς χαλκοῦς πρὸς τοῖς χιλίοις, ὅπως βαρυνόμενοι ταῖς ἐπιβολαῖς καὶ Τοὺς εὐσταλεῖς καὶ λιτοὺς ὁρῶντες ἀπὸ τῶν ἴσων ἐλάττονα τελοῦντας εἰς τὸ δημόσιον ἀπαγορεύωσιν. 18.3. ἦσαν οὖν αὐτῷ χαλεποὶ μὲν οἱ τὰς εἰσφορὰς διὰ τὴν τρυφὴν ὑπομένοντες, χαλεποὶ δʼ αὖ πάλιν οἱ τὴν τρυφὴν ἀποτιθέμενοι διὰ τὰς εἰσφοράς, πλούτου γὰρ ἀφαίρεσιν οἱ πολλοὶ νομίζουσι τὴν κώλυσιν αὐτοῦ τῆς ἐπιδείξεως, ἐπιδείκνυσθαι δὲ τοῖς περιττοῖς, οὐ τοῖς ἀναγκαίοις. ὃ δὴ καὶ μάλιστά φασι τὸν φιλόσοφον Ἀρίστωνα θαυμάζειν, ὅτι Τοὺς τὰ περιττὰ κεκτημένους μᾶλλον ἡγοῦνται μακαρίους ἢ Τοὺς τῶν ἀναγκαίων καὶ χρησίμων εὐποροῦντας. 18.2. 18.3.
82. Plutarch, Cicero, 43.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, as octavian Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 175
43.3. γενομένης δὲ περὶ τόν πλοῦν διατριβῆς, καί λόγων ἀπὸ Ῥώμης, οἷα φιλεῖ, καινῶν προσπεσόντων, μεταβεβλῆσθαι μὲν Ἀντώνιον θαυμαστὴν μεταβολὴν καί πάντα πράττειν καί πολιτεύεσθαι πρὸς τὴν σύγκλητον, ἐνδεῖν δὲ τῆς ἐκείνου παρουσίας τὰ πράγματα μὴ τὴν ἀρίστην ἔχειν διάθεσιν, καταμεμψάμενος αὐτὸς αὐτοῦ τὴν πολλὴν εὐλάβειαν ἀνέστρεφεν αὖθις εἰς Ῥώμην. 43.3.
83. Juvenal, Satires, 2.95, 5.1-5.5, 6.553-6.591, 10.94 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavianus •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus •augustus / octavian, and capricorn •augustus / octavian, and libra •augustus / octavian •augustus / octavian, res gestae Found in books: Green (2014), Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus, 106, 123; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 254; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 138
84. Josephus Flavius, Life, 362-367, 361 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 41
85. Plutarch, On Isis And Osiris, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus (octavian, emperor) Found in books: Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 42
86. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 1.380-1.385, 1.483, 2.57-2.59, 3.399-3.408, 4.659, 5.205, 7.420-7.436 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus (octavian) •octavian/augustus •augustus/octavian Found in books: Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 137; Faßbeck and Killebrew (2016), Viewing Ancient Jewish Art and Archaeology: VeHinnei Rachel - Essays in honor of Rachel Hachlili, 278; Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 259, 326; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 19
1.380. 5. When Herod had encouraged them by this speech, and he saw with what alacrity they went, he offered sacrifice to God; and after that sacrifice, he passed over the river Jordan with his army, and pitched his camp about Philadelphia, near the enemy, and about a fortification that lay between them. He then shot at them at a distance, and was desirous to come to an engagement presently; 1.381. for some of them had been sent beforehand to seize upon that fortification: but the king sent some who immediately beat them out of the fortification, while he himself went in the forefront of the army, which he put in battle-array every day, and invited the Arabians to fight. But as none of them came out of their camp, for they were in a terrible fright, and their general, Ethemus, was not able to say a word for fear,—so Herod came upon them, and pulled their fortification to pieces, 1.382. by which means they were compelled to come out to fight, which they did in disorder, and so that the horsemen and footmen were mixed together. They were indeed superior to the Jews in number, but inferior in their alacrity, although they were obliged to expose themselves to danger by their very despair of victory. 1.383. 6. Now while they made opposition, they had not a great number slain; but as soon as they turned their backs, a great many were trodden to pieces by the Jews, and a great many by themselves, and so perished, till five thousand were fallen down dead in their flight, while the rest of the multitude prevented their immediate death, by crowding into the fortification. Herod encompassed these around, and besieged them; and while they were ready to be taken by their enemies in arms, they had another additional distress upon them, which was thirst and want of water; 1.384. for the king was above hearkening to their ambassadors; and when they offered five hundred talents, as the price of their redemption, he pressed still harder upon them. And as they were burnt up by their thirst, they came out and voluntarily delivered themselves up by multitudes to the Jews, till in five days’ time four thousand of them were put into bonds; and on the sixth day the multitude that were left despaired of saving themselves, and came out to fight: with these Herod fought, and slew again about seven thousand, 1.385. insomuch that he punished Arabia so severely, and so far extinguished the spirits of the men, that he was chosen by the nation for their ruler. 1.483. 5. When they had thus soon pacified him, as being their father, they got clear of the present fear they were in. Yet did they see occasion for sorrow in some time afterwards; for they knew that Salome, as well as their uncle Pheroras, were their enemies; who were both of them heavy and severe persons, and especially Pheroras, who was a partner with Herod in all the affairs of the kingdom, excepting his diadem. He had also a hundred talents of his own revenue, and enjoyed the advantage of all the land beyond Jordan, which he had received as a gift from his brother, who had asked of Caesar to make him a tetrarch, as he was made accordingly. Herod had also given him a wife out of the royal family, who was no other than his own wife’s sister, and after her death had solemnly espoused to him his own eldest daughter, with a dowry of three hundred talents; 2.57. 2. In Perea also, Simon, one of the servants to the king, relying upon the handsome appearance and tallness of his body, put a diadem upon his own head also; he also went about with a company of robbers that he had gotten together, and burnt down the royal palace that was at Jericho, and many other costly edifices besides, and procured himself very easily spoils by rapine, as snatching them out of the fire. 2.58. And he had soon burnt down all the fine edifices, if Gratus, the captain of the foot of the king’s party, had not taken the Trachonite archers, and the most warlike of Sebaste, and met the man. 2.59. His footmen were slain in the battle in abundance; Gratus also cut to pieces Simon himself, as he was flying along a strait valley, when he gave him an oblique stroke upon his neck, as he ran away, and broke it. The royal palaces that were near Jordan at Betharamptha were also burnt down by some other of the seditious that came out of Perea. 3.399. 9. When Josephus heard him give those orders, he said that he had somewhat in his mind that he would willingly say to himself alone. When therefore they were all ordered to withdraw, excepting Titus and two of their friends, he said, 3.400. “Thou, O Vespasian, thinkest no more than that thou hast taken Josephus himself captive; but I come to thee as a messenger of greater tidings; for had not I been sent by God to thee, I knew what was the law of the Jews in this case? and how it becomes generals to die. 3.401. Dost thou send me to Nero? For why? Are Nero’s successors till they come to thee still alive? Thou, O Vespasian, art Caesar and emperor, thou, and this thy son. 3.402. Bind me now still faster, and keep me for thyself, for thou, O Caesar, are not only lord over me, but over the land and the sea, and all mankind; and certainly I deserve to be kept in closer custody than I now am in, in order to be punished, if I rashly affirm anything of God.” 3.403. When he had said this, Vespasian at present did not believe him, but supposed that Josephus said this as a cunning trick, in order to his own preservation; 3.404. but in a little time he was convinced, and believed what he said to be true, God himself erecting his expectations, so as to think of obtaining the empire, and by other signs foreshowing his advancement. 3.405. He also found Josephus to have spoken truth on other occasions; for one of those friends that were present at that secret conference said to Josephus, “I cannot but wonder how thou couldst not foretell to the people of Jotapata that they should be taken, nor couldst foretell this captivity which hath happened to thyself, unless what thou now sayest be a vain thing, in order to avoid the rage that is risen against thyself.” 3.406. To which Josephus replied, “I did foretell to the people of Jotapata that they would be taken on the forty-seventh day, and that I should be caught alive by the Romans.” 3.407. Now when Vespasian had inquired of the captives privately about these predictions, he found them to be true, and then he began to believe those that concerned himself. 3.408. Yet did he not set Josephus at liberty from his bands, but bestowed on him suits of clothes, and other precious gifts; he treated him also in a very obliging manner, and continued so to do, Titus still joining his interest in the honors that were done him. 4.659. So Titus marched on foot as far as Nicopolis, which is distant twenty furlongs from Alexandria; there he put his army on board some long ships, and sailed upon the river along the Mendesian Nomus, as far as the city Thmuis; 5.205. for its height was fifty cubits; and its doors were forty cubits; and it was adorned after a most costly manner, as having much richer and thicker plates of silver and gold upon them than the other. These nine gates had that silver and gold poured upon them by Alexander, the father of Tiberius. 7.420. 2. Now Lupus did then govern Alexandria, who presently sent Caesar word of this commotion; 7.421. who having in suspicion the restless temper of the Jews for innovation, and being afraid lest they should get together again, and persuade some others to join with them, gave orders to Lupus to demolish that Jewish temple which was in the region called Onion, 7.422. and was in Egypt, which was built and had its denomination from the occasion following: 7.423. Onias, the son of Simon, one of the Jewish high priests, fled from Antiochus the king of Syria, when he made war with the Jews, and came to Alexandria; and as Ptolemy received him very kindly, on account of his hatred to Antiochus, he assured him, that if he would comply with his proposal, he would bring all the Jews to his assistance; 7.424. and when the king agreed to do it so far as he was able, he desired him to give him leave to build a temple somewhere in Egypt, and to worship God according to the customs of his own country; 7.425. for that the Jews would then be so much readier to fight against Antiochus who had laid waste the temple at Jerusalem, and that they would then come to him with greater goodwill; and that, by granting them liberty of conscience, very many of them would come over to him. 7.426. 3. So Ptolemy complied with his proposals, and gave him a place one hundred and eighty furlongs distant from Memphis. That Nomos was called the Nomos of Heliopoli 7.427. where Onias built a fortress and a temple, not like to that at Jerusalem, but such as resembled a tower. He built it of large stones to the height of sixty cubits; 7.428. he made the structure of the altar in imitation of that in our own country, and in like manner adorned with gifts, excepting the make of the candlestick, 7.429. for he did not make a candlestick, but had a [single] lamp hammered out of a piece of gold, which illuminated the place with its rays, and which he hung by a chain of gold; 7.430. but the entire temple was encompassed with a wall of burnt brick, though it had gates of stone. The king also gave him a large country for a revenue in money, that both the priests might have a plentiful provision made for them, and that God might have great abundance of what things were necessary for his worship. 7.431. Yet did not Onias do this out of a sober disposition, but he had a mind to contend with the Jews at Jerusalem, and could not forget the indignation he had for being banished thence. Accordingly, he thought that by building this temple he should draw away a great number from them to himself. 7.432. There had been also a certain ancient prediction made by [a prophet] whose name was Isaiah, about six hundred years before, that this temple should be built by a man that was a Jew in Egypt. And this is the history of the building of that temple. 7.433. 4. And now Lupus, the governor of Alexandria, upon the receipt of Caesar’s letter, came to the temple, and carried out of it some of the donations dedicated thereto, and shut up the temple itself. 7.434. And as Lupus died a little afterward, Paulinus succeeded him. This man left none of those donations there, and threatened the priests severely if they did not bring them all out; nor did he permit any who were desirous of worshipping God there so much as to come near the whole sacred place; 7.435. but when he had shut up the gates, he made it entirely inaccessible, insomuch that there remained no longer the least footsteps of any Divine worship that had been in that place. 7.436. Now the duration of the time from the building of this temple till it was shut up again was three hundred and forty-three years.
87. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 3.7.4, 14.127-14.137, 15.147-15.160, 15.362, 17.273-17.277, 18.27, 18.159-18.160, 18.259, 19.276-19.277, 20.100 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavianus •augustus (octavian) Found in books: Faßbeck and Killebrew (2016), Viewing Ancient Jewish Art and Archaeology: VeHinnei Rachel - Essays in honor of Rachel Hachlili, 278, 285; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 247; Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 259, 265
14.127. 1. Now after Pompey was dead, and after that victory Caesar had gained over him, Antipater, who managed the Jewish affairs, became very useful to Caesar when he made war against Egypt, and that by the order of Hyrcanus; 14.128. for when Mithridates of Pergamus was bringing his auxiliaries, and was not able to continue his march through Pelusium, but obliged to stay at Askelon, Antipater came to him, conducting three thousand of the Jews, armed men. He had also taken care the principal men of the Arabians should come to his assistance; 14.129. and on his account it was that all the Syrians assisted him also, as not willing to appear behindhand in their alacrity for Caesar, viz. Jamblicus the ruler, and Ptolemy his son, and Tholomy the son of Sohemus, who dwelt at Mount Libanus, and almost all the cities. 14.130. So Mithridates marched out of Syria, and came to Pelusium; and when its inhabitants would not admit him, he besieged the city. Now Antipater signalized himself here, and was the first who plucked down a part of the wall, and so opened a way to the rest, whereby they might enter the city, and by this means Pelusium was taken. 14.131. But it happened that the Egyptian Jews, who dwelt in the country called Onion, would not let Antipater and Mithridates, with their soldiers, pass to Caesar; but Antipater persuaded them to come over with their party, because he was of the same people with them, and that chiefly by showing them the epistles of Hyrcanus the high priest, wherein he exhorted them to cultivate friendship with Caesar, and to supply his army with money, and all sorts of provisions which they wanted; 14.132. and accordingly, when they saw Antipater and the high priest of the same sentiments, they did as they were desired. And when the Jews about Memphis heard that these Jews were come over to Caesar, they also invited Mithridates to come to them; so he came and received them also into his army. 14.133. 2. And when Mithridates had gone over all Delta, as the place is called, he came to a pitched battle with the enemy, near the place called the Jewish Camp. Now Mithridates had the right wing, and Antipater the left; 14.134. and when it came to a fight, that wing where Mithridates was gave way, and was likely to suffer extremely, unless Antipater had come running to him with his own soldiers along the shore, when he had already beaten the enemy that opposed him; so he delivered Mithridates, and put those Egyptians who had been too hard for him to flight. 14.135. He also took their camp, and continued in the pursuit of them. He also recalled Mithridates, who had been worsted, and was retired a great way off; of whose soldiers eight hundred fell, but of Antipater’s fifty. 14.136. So Mithridates sent an account of this battle to Caesar, and openly declared that Antipater was the author of this victory, and of his own preservation, insomuch that Caesar commended Antipater then, and made use of him all the rest of that war in the most hazardous undertakings; he happened also to be wounded in one of those engagements. 14.137. 3. However, when Caesar, after some time, had finished that war, and was sailed away for Syria, he honored Antipater greatly, and confirmed Hyrcanus in the high priesthood; and bestowed on Antipater the privilege of a citizen of Rome, and a freedom from taxes every where; 15.147. 4. When the Jews heard this speech, they were much raised in their minds, and more disposed to fight than before. So Herod, when he had offered the sacrifices appointed by the law made haste, and took them, and led them against the Arabians; and in order to that passed over Jordan, 15.148. and pitched his camp near to that of the enemy. He also thought fit to seize upon a certain castle that lay in the midst of them, as hoping it would be for his advantage, and would the sooner produce a battle; and that if there were occasion for delay, he should by it have his camp fortified; 15.149. and as the Arabians had the same intentions upon that place, a contest arose about it; at first they were but skirmishes, after which there came more soldiers, and it proved a sort of fight, and some fell on both sides, till those of the Arabian side were beaten and retreated. 15.150. This was no small encouragement to the Jews immediately; and when Herod observed that the enemy’s army was disposed to any thing rather than to come to an engagement, he ventured boldly to attempt the bulwark itself, and to pull it to pieces, and so to get nearer to their camp, in order to fight them; for when they were forced out of their trenches, they went out in disorder, and had not the least alacrity, or hope of victory; 15.151. yet did they fight hand to hand, because they were more in number than the Jews, and because they were in such a disposition of war that they were under a necessity of coming on boldly; so they came to a terrible battle, while not a few fell on each side. However, at length the Arabians fled; 15.152. and so great a slaughter was made upon their being routed, that they were not only killed by their enemies, but became the authors of their own deaths also, and were trodden down by the multitude, and the great current of people in disorder, and were destroyed by their own armor; so five thousand men lay dead upon the spot, 15.153. while the rest of the multitude soon ran within the bulwark for safety, but had no firm hope of safety, by reason of their want of necessaries, and especially of water. 15.154. The Jews pursued them, but could not get in with them, but sat round about the bulwark, and watched any assistance that would get in to them, and prevented any there, that had a mind to it, from running away. 15.155. 5. When the Arabians were in these circumstances, they sent ambassadors to Herod, in the first place, to propose terms of accommodation, and after that to offer him, so pressing was their thirst upon them, to undergo whatsoever he pleased, if he would free them from their present distress; 15.156. but he would admit of no ambassadors, of no price of redemption, nor of any other moderate terms whatever, being very desirous to revenge those unjust actions which they had been guilty of towards his nation. So they were necessitated by other motives, and particularly by their thirst, to come out, and deliver themselves up to him, to be carried away captives; 15.157. and in five days’ time the number of four thousand were taken prisoners, while all the rest resolved to make a sally upon their enemies, and to fight it out with them, choosing rather, if so it must be, to die therein, than to perish gradually and ingloriously. 15.158. When they had taken this resolution, they came out of their trenches, but could no way sustain the fight, being too much disabled, both in mind and body, and having not room to exert themselves, and thought it an advantage to be killed, and a misery to survive; so at the first onset there fell about seven thousand of them, 15.159. after which stroke they let all the courage they had put on before fall, and stood amazed at Herod’s warlike spirit under his own calamities; so for the future they yielded, and made him ruler of their nation; 15.160. whereupon he was greatly elevated at so seasonable a success, and returned home, taking great authority upon him, on account of so bold and glorious an expedition as he had made. 15.362. And when he had acquired such freedom, he begged of Caesar a tetrarchy for his brother Pheroras, while he did himself bestow upon him a revenue of a hundred talents out of his own kingdom, that in case he came to any harm himself, his brother might be in safety, and that his sons might not have dominion over him. 17.273. 6. There was also Simon, who had been a slave of Herod the king, but in other respects a comely person, of a tall and robust body; he was one that was much superior to others of his order, and had had great things committed to his care. This man was elevated at the disorderly state of things, and was so bold as to put a diadem on his head, 17.274. while a certain number of the people stood by him, and by them he was declared to be a king, and thought himself more worthy of that dignity than any one else. He burnt down the royal palace at Jericho, and plundered what was left in it. He also set fire to many other of the king’s houses in several places of the country, and utterly destroyed them, and permitted those that were with him to take what was left in them for a prey; 17.275. and he would have done greater things, unless care had been taken to repress him immediately; for Gratus, when he had joined himself to some Roman soldiers, took the forces he had with him, and met Simon, 17.276. and after a great and a long fight, no small part of those that came from Perea, who were a disordered body of men, and fought rather in a bold than in a skillful manner, were destroyed; and although Simon had saved himself by flying away through a certain valley, yet Gratus overtook him, and cut off his head. 17.277. The royal palace also at Amathus, by the river Jordan, was burnt down by a party of men that were got together, as were those belonging to Simon. And thus did a great and wild fury spread itself over the nation, because they had no king to keep the multitude in good order, and because those foreigners who came to reduce the seditious to sobriety did, on the contrary, set them more in a flame, because of the injuries they offered them, and the avaricious management of their affairs. 18.27. while Herod and Philip had each of them received their own tetrarchy, and settled the affairs thereof. Herod also built a wall about Sepphoris, (which is the security of all Galilee,) and made it the metropolis of the country. He also built a wall round Betharamphtha, which was itself a city also, and called it Julias, from the name of the emperor’s wife. 18.159. He then pretended that he would do as he bid him; but when night came on, he cut his cables, and went off, and sailed to Alexandria, where he desired Alexander the alabarch to lend him two hundred thousand drachmae; but he said he would not lend it to him, but would not refuse it to Cypros, as greatly astonished at her affection to her husband, and at the other instances of her virtue; 18.160. o she undertook to repay it. Accordingly, Alexander paid them five talents at Alexandria, and promised to pay them the rest of that sum at Dicearchia [Puteoli]; and this he did out of the fear he was in that Agrippa would soon spend it. So this Cypros set her husband free, and dismissed him to go on with his navigation to Italy, while she and her children departed for Judea. 18.259. Many of these severe things were said by Apion, by which he hoped to provoke Caius to anger at the Jews, as he was likely to be. But Philo, the principal of the Jewish embassage, a man eminent on all accounts, brother to Alexander the alabarch, and one not unskillful in philosophy, was ready to betake himself to make his defense against those accusations; 19.276. he also took away from Antiochus that kingdom which he was possessed of, but gave him a certain part of Cilicia and Commagena: he also set Alexander Lysimachus, the alabarch, at liberty, who had been his old friend, and steward to his mother Antonia, but had been imprisoned by Caius, whose son [Marcus] married Bernice, the daughter of Agrippa. 19.277. But when Marcus, Alexander’s son, was dead, who had married her when she was a virgin, Agrippa gave her in marriage to his brother Herod, and begged for him of Claudius the kingdom of Chalcis. 20.100. 2. Then came Tiberius Alexander as successor to Fadus; he was the son of Alexander the alabarch of Alexandria, which Alexander was a principal person among all his contemporaries, both for his family and wealth: he was also more eminent for his piety than this his son Alexander, for he did not continue in the religion of his country.
88. Plutarch, Roman Questions, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nosch, marie louise, octavian (caesar augustus) Found in books: Satlow (2013), The Gift in Antiquity, 81
89. Plutarch, Romulus, 17.3-17.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian •augustus/octavian, urban buildings / monuments Found in books: Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 40, 261, 262, 263, 265
17.3. συνθεμένου δὲ τοῦ Τατίου, νύκτωρ ἀνοίξασα πύλην μίαν, ἐδέξατο τοὺς Σαβίνους. οὐ μόνος οὖν ὡς ἔοικεν Ἀντίγονος ἔφη προδιδόντας μὲν φιλεῖν, προδεδωκότας δὲ μισεῖν, οὐδὲ Καῖσαρ, εἰπὼν ἐπὶ τοῦ Θρᾳκὸς Ῥοιμητάλκου, φιλεῖν μὲν προδοσίαν, προδότην δὲ μισεῖν, ἀλλὰ κοινόν τι τοῦτο πάθος ἐστὶ πρὸς τοὺς πονηροὺς τοῖς δεομένοις αὐτῶν, ὥσπερ ἰοῦ καὶ χολῆς ἐνίων θηρίων δέονται· τὴν γὰρ χρείαν ὅτε λαμβάνουσιν ἀγαπῶντες, ἐχθαίρουσι τὴν κακίαν ὅταν τύχωσι. 17.4. τοῦτο καὶ πρὸς τὴν Ταρπηίαν τότε παθὼν ὁ Τάτιος, ἐκέλευσε μεμνημένους τῶν ὁμολογιῶν τοὺς Σαβίνους μηδενὸς αὐτῇ φθονεῖν ὧν ἐν ταῖς ἀριστεραῖς ἔχουσι, καὶ πρῶτος ἅμα τὸν βραχιονιστῆρα τῆς χειρὸς περιελὼν καὶ τὸν θυρεὸν ἐπέρριψε. πάντων δὲ τὸ αὐτὸ ποιούντων, βαλλομένη τε τῷ χρυσῷ καὶ καταχωσθεῖσα τοῖς θυρεοῖς, ὑπὸ πλήθους καὶ βάρους ἀπέθανεν. 17.5. ἑάλω δὲ καὶ Ταρπήιος προδοσίας ὑπὸ Ῥωμύλου διωχθείς, ὡς Ἰόβας φησὶ Γάλβαν Σουλπίκιον ἱστορεῖν. τῶν δʼ ἄλλα περὶ Ταρπηίας λεγόντων ἀπίθανοι μέν εἰσιν οἱ Τατίου θυγατέρα τοῦ ἡγεμόνος τῶν Σαβίνων οὖσαν αὐτήν, Ῥωμύλῳ δὲ βίᾳ συνοικοῦσαν, ἱστοροῦντες ταῦτα ποιῆσαι καὶ παθεῖν ὑπὸ τοῦ πατρός· ὧν καὶ Ἀντίγονός ἐστι. Σιμύλος δʼ ὁ ποιητὴς καὶ παντάπασι ληρεῖ, μὴ Σαβίνοις οἰόμενος, ἀλλὰ Κελτοῖς τὴν Ταρπηίαν προδοῦναι τὸ Καπιτώλιον, ἐρασθεῖσαν αὐτῶν τοῦ βασιλέως. λέγει δὲ ταῦτα· ἡ δʼ ἀγχοῦ Τάρπεια παραὶ Καπιτώλιον αἶπος ναίουσα Ῥώμης ἔπλετο τειχολέτις, Κελτῶν ἣ στέρξασα γαμήλια λέκτρα γενέσθαι σκηπτούχῳ, πατέρων οὐκ ἐφύλαξε δόμους. καὶ μετʼ ὀλίγα περὶ τῆς τελευτῆς· τὴν δʼ οὔτʼ ἄρʼ Βόιοί τε καὶ ἔθνεα μυρία Κελτῶν χηράμενοι ῥείθρων ἐντὸς ἔθεντο Πάδου, ὅπλα δʼ ἐπιπροβαλόντες ἀρειμανέων ἀπὸ χειρῶν κούρῃ ἐπὶ στυγερῇ κόσμον ἔθεντο φόνον. 17.3. Tatius agreed to this, whereupon she opened one of the gates by night and let the Sabines in. Antigonus was not alone, then, in saying that he loved men who offered to betray, but hated those who had betrayed; nor yet Caesar, in saying of the Thracian Rhoemetalces, that he loved treachery but hated a traitor; but this is a very general feeling towards the base on the part of those who need their services, just as they need certain wild creatures for their venom and gall; for while they feel the need of them, they put up with them, but abhor their vileness when they have obtained from them what they want. 17.4. This, too, was the feeling which Tatius then had towards Tarpeia, when he ordered his Sabines, mindful of their agreement, not to begrudge the girl anything they wore on their left arms. And he was first to take from his arm not only his armlet, but at the same time his shield, and cast them upon her. All his men followed his example, and the girl was smitten by the gold and buried under the shields, and died from the number and weight of them. 17.5. And Tarpeius also was convicted of treason when prosecuted by Romulus, as, according to Juba, Sulpicius Galba relates. of those who write differently about Tarpeia, they are worthy of no belief at all who say that she was a daughter of Tatius, the leader of the Sabines, and was living with Romulus under compulsion, and acted and suffered as she did, at her father’s behest; of these, Antigonus is one. And Simylus the poet is altogether absurd in supposing that Tarpeia betrayed the Capitol, not to the Sabines, but to the Gauls, because she had fallen in love with their king. These are his words:— And Tarpeia, who dwelt hard by the Capitolian steep, Became the destroyer of the walls of Rome; She longed to be the wedded wife of the Gallic chieftain, And betrayed the homes of her fathers. And a little after, speaking of her death:— Her the Boni and the myriad tribes of Gauls Did not, exulting, cast amid the currents of the Po; But hurled the shields from their belligerent arms Upon the hateful maid, and made their ornament her doom.
90. Plutarch, Theseus, 1.3, 6.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian Found in books: Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 265, 273
1.3. εἴη μὲν οὖν ἡμῖν ἐκκαθαιρόμενον λόγῳ τὸ μυθῶδες ὑπακοῦσαι καὶ λαβεῖν ἱστορίας ὄψιν, ὅπου δʼ ἂν αὐθαδῶς τοῦ πιθανοῦ περιφρονῇ καὶ μὴ δέχηται τὴν πρὸς τὸ εἰκὸς μῖξιν, εὐγνωμόνων ἀκροατῶν δεησόμεθα καὶ πρᾴως τὴν ἀρχαιολογίαν προσδεχομένων. 6.4. ὁ γὰρ δὴ χρόνος ἐκεῖνος ἤνεγκεν ἀνθρώπους χειρῶν μὲν ἔργοις καὶ ποδῶν τάχεσι καὶ σωμάτων ῥώμαις, ὡς ἔοικεν, ὑπερφυεῖς καὶ ἀκαμάτους, πρὸς οὐδὲν δὲ τῇ φύσει χρωμένους ἐπιεικὲς οὐδὲ ὠφέλιμον, ἀλλʼ ὕβρει τε χαίροντας ὑπερηφάνῳ, καὶ ἀπολαύοντας τῆς δυνάμεως ὠμότητι καὶ πικρίᾳ, καὶ τῷ κρατεῖν τε καὶ βιάζεσθαι καὶ διαφθείρειν τὸ παραπῖπτον, αἰδῶ δὲ καὶ δικαιοσύνην καὶ τὸ ἴσον καὶ τὸ φιλάνθρωπον, ὡς ἀτολμίᾳ τοῦ ἀδικεῖν καὶ φόβῳ τοῦ ἀδικεῖσθαι τοὺς πολλοὺς ἐπαινοῦντας, οὐδὲν οἰομένους προσήκειν τοῖς πλέον ἔχειν δυναμένοις.
91. Plutarch, Tiberius And Gaius Gracchus, 6.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, as octavian Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 172
92. Seneca The Younger, Natural Questions, 1.2.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, as octavian Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 175
93. Plutarch, Pompey, 26.1, 43.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, as octavian Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 175
26.1. τότε μὲν οὖν διελύθησαν ᾗ δὲ ἡμέρᾳ τὴν ψῆφον ἐποίσειν ἔμελλον, ὑπεξῆλθεν ὁ Πομπήϊος εἰς ἀγρόν. ἀκούσας δὲ κεκυρῶσθαι τὸν νόμον εἰσῆλθε νύκτωρ εἰς τὴν πόλιν, ὡς ἐπιφθόνου τῆς πρὸς αὐτὸν ἀπαντήσεως καὶ συνδρομῆς ἐσομένης. ἅμα δὲ ἡμέρᾳ προελθὼν ἔθυσε· καὶ γενομένης ἐκκλησίας αὐτῷ, διεπράξατο προσλαβεῖν ἕτερα πολλὰ τοῖς ἐψηφισμένοις ἤδη, μικροῦ διπλασιάσας τὴν παρασκευήν. 43.3. ὁρῶσαι γὰρ αἱ πόλεις Πομπήϊον Μάγνον ἄνοπλον καὶ μετʼ ὀλίγων τῶν συνήθων ὥσπερ ἐξ ἄλλης ἀποδημίας διαπορευόμενον, ἐκχεόμεναι διʼ εὔνοιαν καὶ προπέμπουσαι μετὰ μείζονος δυνάμεως συγκατῆγον εἰς τὴν Ῥώμην, εἴ τι κινεῖν διενοεῖτο καὶ νεωτερίζειν τότε, μηδὲν ἐκείνου δεόμενον τοῦ στρατεύματος. 26.1. 43.3.
94. Plutarch, Julius Caesar, 47, 36 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Nelsestuen (2015), Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic. 6
95. Martial, Epigrams, 1.4.8, 4.64 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus •augustus, as octavian Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 67; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 64
96. Martial, Epigrams, 1.4.8, 4.64, 14.145 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus •augustus, as octavian •augustus/octavianus Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 67; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 396; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 64
97. Mishnah, Sotah, 1.6, 3.4, 5.4 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus (caesar octavianus) Found in books: Rosen-Zvi (2012), The Mishnaic Sotah Ritual: Temple, Gender and Midrash, 97
1.6. "הָיְתָה מִתְכַּסָּה בִלְבָנִים, מְכַסָּהּ בִּשְׁחוֹרִים. הָיוּ עָלֶיהָ כְלֵי זָהָב וְקַטְלָיאוֹת, נְזָמִים וְטַבָּעוֹת, מַעֲבִירִים מִמֶּנָּה כְּדֵי לְנַוְּלָהּ. וְאַחַר כָּךְ מֵבִיא חֶבֶל מִצְרִי וְקוֹשְׁרוֹ לְמַעְלָה מִדַּדֶּיהָ. וְכָל הָרוֹצֶה לִרְאוֹת בָּא לִרְאוֹת, חוּץ מֵעֲבָדֶיהָ וְשִׁפְחוֹתֶיהָ, מִפְּנֵי שֶׁלִּבָּהּ גַּס בָּהֶן. וְכָל הַנָּשִׁים מֻתָּרוֹת לִרְאוֹתָהּ, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (יחזקאל כג) וְנִוַּסְּרוּ כָּל הַנָּשִׁים וְלֹא תַעֲשֶׂינָה כְּזִמַּתְכֶנָה: \n", 3.4. "אֵינָהּ מַסְפֶּקֶת לִשְׁתּוֹת עַד שֶׁפָּנֶיהָ מוֹרִיקוֹת וְעֵינֶיהָ בּוֹלְטוֹת וְהִיא מִתְמַלֵּאת גִּידִין, וְהֵם אוֹמְרִים הוֹצִיאוּהָ הוֹצִיאוּהָ, שֶׁלֹּא תְטַמֵּא הָעֲזָרָה. אִם יֶשׁ לָהּ זְכוּת, הָיְתָה תוֹלָה לָהּ. יֵשׁ זְכוּת תּוֹלָה שָׁנָה אַחַת, יֵשׁ זְכוּת תּוֹלָה שְׁתֵּי שָׁנִים, יֵשׁ זְכוּת תּוֹלָה שָׁלשׁ שָׁנִים. מִכָּאן אוֹמֵר בֶּן עַזַּאי, חַיָּב אָדָם לְלַמֵּד אֶת בִּתּוֹ תוֹרָה, שֶׁאִם תִּשְׁתֶּה, תֵּדַע שֶׁהַזְּכוּת תּוֹלָה לָהּ. רַבִּי אֱלִיעֶזֶר אוֹמֵר, כָּל הַמְלַמֵּד אֶת בִּתּוֹ תוֹרָה, כְּאִלּוּ מְלַמְּדָהּ תִּפְלוּת. רַבִּי יְהוֹשֻׁעַ אוֹמֵר, רוֹצָה אִשָּׁה בְקַב וְתִפְלוּת מִתִּשְׁעָה קַבִּין וּפְרִישׁוּת. הוּא הָיָה אוֹמֵר, חָסִיד שׁוֹטֶה, וְרָשָׁע עָרוּם, וְאִשָּׁה פְרוּשָׁה, וּמַכּוֹת פְּרוּשִׁין, הֲרֵי אֵלּוּ מְכַלֵּי עוֹלָם: \n", 5.4. "בּוֹ בַיּוֹם דָּרַשׁ רַבִּי עֲקִיבָא (שמות טו), אָז יָשִׁיר משֶׁה וּבְנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל אֶת הַשִּׁירָה הַזֹּאת לַה' וַיֹּאמְרוּ לֵאמֹר, שֶׁאֵין תַּלְמוּד לוֹמַר לֵאמֹר, וּמַה תַּלְמוּד לוֹמַר לֵאמֹר, מְלַמֵּד שֶׁהָיוּ יִשְׂרָאֵל עוֹנִין אַחֲרָיו שֶׁל משֶׁה עַל כָּל דָּבָר וְדָבָר, כְּקוֹרִין אֶת הַהַלֵּל, לְכָךְ נֶאֱמַר לֵאמֹר. רַבִּי נְחֶמְיָה אוֹמֵר, כְּקוֹרִין אֶת שְׁמַע וְלֹא כְקוֹרִין אֶת הַהַלֵּל: \n", 1.6. "If she was clothed in white, he clothes her in black. If she wore gold jewelry or necklaces, ear-rings and finger-rings, they remove them from her in order to make her repulsive. After that [the priest] takes a rope made of twigs and binds it over her breasts. Whoever wishes to look upon her comes to look with the exception of her male and female slaves, since she has no shame in front of them. All of the women are permitted to look upon her, as it is said, “That all women may be taught not to do after your lewdness” (Ezekiel 23:48).", 3.4. "She had barely finished drinking when her face turns yellow, her eyes protrude and her veins swell. And [those who see her] exclaim, “Remove her! Remove her, so that the temple-court should not be defiled”. If she had merit, it [causes the water] to suspend its effect upon her. Some merit suspends the effect for one year, some merit suspends the effects for two years, and some merit suspends the effect for three years. Hence Ben Azzai said: a person must teach his daughter Torah, so that if she has to drink [the water of bitterness], she should know that the merit suspends its effect. Rabbi Eliezer says: whoever teaches his daughter Torah teaches her lasciviousness. Rabbi Joshua says: a woman prefers one kav (of food) and sexual indulgence to nine kav and sexual separation. He used to say, a foolish pietist, a cunning wicked person, a female separatist, and the blows of separatists bring destruction upon the world.", 5.4. "On that day Rabbi Akiva expounded, “Then Moses and the children of Israel sang this song unto the Lord and said saying” (Exodus 15:. For the Torah did not need to say “saying”, so why did the Torah say “saying”? It teaches that the Israelites responded to every sentence after Moses, in the manner of reading Hallel; that is why it says “saying”. Rabbi Nehemiah says: as is the reading the Shema and not Hallel.",
98. Plutarch, Aristides, 41.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavian/augustus Found in books: Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 103
99. Plutarch, Sayings of The Spartans, 41.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavian/augustus Found in books: Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 103
100. Plutarch, Mark Antony, 54, 74.3-86.5, 75 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 218
101. Plutarch, Aemilius Paulus, 8.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus (octavian) Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 232
8.3. δείσαντες δὲ τὴν ἀναρχίαν οἱ πρῶτοι Μακεδόνων Ἀντίγονον ἐπάγονται τοῦ τεθνηκότος ἀνεψιὸν ὄντα, καὶ συνοικίσαντες αὐτῷ τὴν μητέρα τοῦ Φιλίππου, πρῶτον μὲν ἐπίτροπον καὶ στρατηγόν, εἶτα πειρώμενοι μετρίου καὶ κοινωφελοῦς βασιλέα προσηγόρευσαν. ἐπεκλήθη δὲ Δώσων ὡς ἐπαγγελτικὸς, οὐ τελεσιουργὸς δὲ τῶν ὑποσχέσεων. 8.3. The leading Macedonians, fearing the anarchy which might result, called in Antigonus, a cousin of the dead king, and married him to Philip’s mother, calling him first regent and general, and then, finding his rule moderate and conducive to the general good, giving him the title of King. He received the surname of Doson, which implied that he was given to promising but did not perform his engagements.
102. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 2.23.94, 5.62, 8.82, 10.35, 15.136-15.137, 16.132-16.133, 17.241-17.245, 22.6.13, 34.57-34.58, 35.4, 35.199, 36.64, 36.69, 36.72 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, as author and builder •augustus/octavian, as reader •augustus/octavian, as spin-master •augustus/octavian, relation with caesar •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods •augustus/octavian •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus •octavian/augustus •augustus/octavian, as pater patriae •augustus/octavian, as performer of a public image •augustus / octavian •augustus/octavian, temple of augustus in alexandria •augustus / octavian, and apollo Found in books: Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 135, 139, 140, 145, 164; Green (2014), Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus, 11, 102; Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 35, 36, 37, 68, 82, 97, 99, 167; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 105, 137; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 15, 115
103. Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria, 11.144 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavianus Found in books: Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 522
104. Phlegon of Tralles, On Miraculous Things, 6.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavian/augustus Found in books: Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 164
105. Persius, Satires, 6.46 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavianus Found in books: Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 396
106. Persius, Saturae, 6.46 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavianus Found in books: Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 396
107. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 21.2, 28.2, 35.6, 40.5, 46.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavianus •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Found in books: Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 396, 522; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 137
108. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 35.6, 46.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 137
109. Philippus Thessalonicensis, Epigrams, 1.5, 1.30, 2.6, 2.17, 2.30-2.31, 2.43, 2.72, 2.101, 2.107, 2.109, 3.4, 3.6, 3.10, 4.5, 4.10-4.11, 5.6, 5.22, 6.4, 8.8, 9.5-9.7, 11.14, 11.21, 11.27, 11.29, 12.13, 12.15, 12.19, 13.8, 13.20-13.25, 13.39, 13.42, 13.49, 14.4, 14.27, 14.32, 14.35 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •julius caesar octavianus, c. (octavian, later augustus) Found in books: Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 110, 112
110. Manetho, Apotelesmatica, 22 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •julius caesar octavianus, c. (octavian, later augustus) Found in books: Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 112
111. Plutarch, Alexander The Great, 26.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 15
26.5. καὶ γῆ μὲν οὐ παρῆν λευκή, τῶν δὲ ἀλφίτων λαμβάνοντες ἐν πεδίῳ μελαγγείῳ κυκλοτερῆ κόλπον ἦγον, οὗ τὴν ἐντὸς περιφέρειαν εὐθεῖαι βάσεις ὥσπερ ἀπὸ κρασπέδων εἰς σχῆμα χλαμύδος ὑπελάμβανον, ἐξ ἴσου συνάγουσαι τὸ μέγεθος, ἡσθέντος δὲ τῇ διαθέσει τοῦ βασιλέως αἰφνίδιον ὄρνιθες ἀπὸ τοῦ ποταμοῦ καὶ τῆς λίμνης, πλήθει τε ἄπειροι καὶ κατὰ γένος παντοδαποὶ καὶ μέγεθος, ἐπὶ τὸν τόπον καταίροντες νέφεσιν ἐοικότες οὐδὲ μικρὸν ὑπέλιπον τῶν ἀλφίτων, ὥστε καὶ τὸν Ἀλέξανδρον διαταραχθῆναι πρὸς τὸν οἰωνόν. 26.5. There was no chalk at hand, so they took barley-meal Cf. Arrian, Anab. iii. 2, 1 . and marked out with it on the dark soil a rounded area, to whose inner arc straight lines extended so as to produce the figure of a chlamys, or military cloak, the lines beginning from the skirts (as one may say), and narrowing the breadth of the area uniformly. See Tarbell, The Form of the Chlamys, Classical Philology , 1906, p. 285. The king was delighted with the design; but suddenly birds from the river and the lagoon, infinite in number and of every sort and size, settled down upon the place like clouds and devoured every particle of the barley-meal, so that even Alexander was greatly disturbed at the omen.
112. Seneca The Younger, Phaedra, 517-520 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 179
520. captasse fontem! certior somnus premit
113. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 6.3.77, 11.144 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavian/augustus •augustus/octavianus Found in books: Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 138; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 522
114. Seneca The Younger, On Anger, 3.23 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Found in books: Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 131
115. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 18.4, 28.2, 50.2, 51.5, 60.4, 62.2-62.3, 77.16, 83.14, 83.25, 89.22, 90.7, 94.62, 95.18-95.19, 97.15, 114.2-114.4, 114.21-114.22, 122.1, 122.14, 122.18-122.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 137, 138, 155, 156, 179, 180, 216, 217
116. Appian, Civil Wars, 2.144, 4.110, 5.48-5.49 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •julius caesar octavianus, c. (octavian, later augustus) •octavian/augustus •augustus/octavian •augustus/octavian, censorship, use of •augustus/octavian, memoirs of Found in books: Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 103; Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 44; Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 110
117. Tacitus, Histories, 1.1, 1.2.3, 1.22, 1.86, 1.88, 2.91.1, 2.95.2, 2.101, 3.58.3, 3.83.2, 4.26.2, 5.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, maiestas and •augustus (octavian) •augustus / octavian •augustus / octavian, res gestae •augustus (octavian), signs at death •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus •augustus (octavian), imperial cult Found in books: Davies (2004), Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods, 161, 165, 181, 185; Faßbeck and Killebrew (2016), Viewing Ancient Jewish Art and Archaeology: VeHinnei Rachel - Essays in honor of Rachel Hachlili, 278; Green (2014), Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus, 2, 107, 108; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 215, 217; Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 45
1.86.  Prodigies which were reported on various authorities also contributed to the general terror. It was said that in the vestibule of the Capitol the reins of the chariot in which Victory stood had fallen from the goddess's hands, that a superhuman form had rushed out of Juno's chapel, that a statue of the deified Julius on the island of the Tiber had turned from west to east on a bright calm day, that an ox had spoken in Etruria, that animals had given birth to strange young, and that many other things had happened which in barbarous ages used to be noticed even during peace, but which now are only heard of in seasons of terror. Yet the chief anxiety which was connected with both present disaster and future danger was caused by a sudden overflow of the Tiber which, swollen to a great height, broke down the wooden bridge and then was thrown back by the ruins of the bridge which dammed the stream, and overflowed not only the low-lying level parts of the city, but also parts which are normally free from such disasters. Many were swept away in the public streets, a larger number cut off in shops and in their beds. The common people were reduced to famine by lack of employment and failure of supplies. Apartment houses had their foundations undermined by the standing water and then collapsed when the flood withdrew. The moment people's minds were relieved of this danger, the very fact that when Otho was planning a military expedition, the Campus Martius and the Flaminian Way, over which he was to advance, were blocked against him was interpreted as a prodigy and an omen of impending disaster rather than as the result of chance or natural causes. 1.88.  About this time Cornelius Dolabella was banished to the colony of Aquinum. He was not kept under close or secret watch, and no charge was made against him; but he had been made prominent by his ancient name and his close relationship to Galba. Many of the magistrates and a large part of the ex-consuls Otho directed to join his expedition, not to share or help in the war but simply as a suite. Among these was Lucius Vitellius, who was treated in the same way as the others and not at all as the brother of an emperor or as an enemy. This action caused anxiety at Rome. No class was free from fear or danger. The leading men of the senate were weak from old age and had grown inactive through a long peace; the nobility was indolent and had forgotten the art of war; the knights were ignorant of military service; the more all tried to hide and conceal their fear, the more evident they made their terror. Yet, on the other hand, there were some who with absurd ostentation brought splendid arms and fine horses; some made extravagant preparations for banquets and provided incentives to their lust as equipment for war. The wise had thought for peace and for the state; the foolish, careless of the future, were puffed up with idle hopes; many who had been distressed by loss of credit during peace were now enthusiastic in this time of disturbance and felt safest in uncertainty. 5.9.  The first Roman to subdue the Jews and set foot in their temple by right of conquest was Gnaeus Pompey; thereafter it was a matter of common knowledge that there were no representations of the gods within, but that the place was empty and the secret shrine contained nothing. The walls of Jerusalem were razed, but the temple remained standing. Later, in the time of our civil wars, when these eastern provinces had fallen into the hands of Mark Antony, the Parthian prince, Pacorus, seized Judea, but he was slain by Publius Ventidius, and the Parthians were thrown back across the Euphrates: the Jews were subdued by Gaius Sosius. Antony gave the throne to Herod, and Augustus, after his victory, increased his power. After Herod's death, a certain Simon assumed the name of king without waiting for Caesar's decision. He, however, was put to death by Quintilius Varus, governor of Syria; the Jews were repressed; and the kingdom was divided into three parts and given to Herod's sons. Under Tiberius all was quiet. Then, when Caligula ordered the Jews to set up his statue in their temple, they chose rather to resort to arms, but the emperor's death put an end to their uprising. The princes now being dead or reduced to insignificance, Claudius made Judea a province and entrusted it to Roman knights or to freedmen; one of the latter, Antonius Felix, practised every kind of cruelty and lust, wielding the power of king with all the instincts of a slave; he had married Drusilla, the grand-daughter of Cleopatra and Antony, and so was Antony's grandson-in‑law, while Claudius was Antony's grandson.
118. Tacitus, Annals, 1.1.2, 1.1.3, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3.1, 1.3, 1.7.1, 1.8, 1.9.1, 1.10.5, 1.10.6, 1.10, 1.11.1, 1.11-1.14, 1.12, 1.13, 1.14, 1.28.2, 1.28.3, 1.29.3, 1.31, 1.43.3, 1.62.2, 1.72, 1.73.5, 1.76.3, 1.76, 1.78.1, 2.8.1, 2.22.1, 2.24.4, 2.27, 2.27.1, 2.28, 2.29, 2.30, 2.31, 2.32, 2.32.2, 2.32.4, 2.33.3, 2.33.4, 2.41.1, 2.41, 2.44.1, 2.49, 2.49.1, 2.50.2, 2.83.4, 2.83.1, 2.87.2, 3.2.5, 3.9, 3.18.2, 3.24.3, 3.30.3, 3.33.2, 3.34.5, 3.37.1, 3.54.2, 3.56.1, 3.64.3, 3.64.4, 3.65.3, 3.65.2, 3.65, 3.66, 3.76, 4.6.6, 4.6.4, 4.6, 4.9.2, 4.17.1, 4.30.5, 4.34, 4.36.2, 4.36.5, 4.37.1, 4.37.2, 4.37, 4.38.6, 4.42.3, 4.57.1, 4.64.1, 4.67.3, 4.74.2, 4.74.4, 5.2.1, 6.6.2, 6.7.1, 6.20, 6.21, 6.23, 6.25.5, 6.26.1, 6.38.3, 6.49.1, 6.49.2, 11.4.3, 11.4.1, 11.4.2, 11.4.5, 11.4.4, 11.5.6, 11.31.2, 12.5.3, 12.8.2, 12.43.1, 12.43, 12.49.1, 12.59.1, 13.12.2, 13.17.2, 13.20, 13.30.1, 13.34.1, 14.15.2, 14.22.4, 14.22, 14.22.1, 14.22.3, 14.22.2, 14.31.6, 14.64.6, 15.34.2, 15.34.1, 15.37.3, 15.37.4, 15.37.2, 15.37.1, 15.42.2, 15.42.1, 15.48.2, 15.49.3, 15.74.3, 15.74.4, 16.6.2, 16.6.3, 16.21.2, 16.21.3, 16.22, 16.22.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Green (2014), Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus, 105
2.28. Vt satis testium et qui servi eadem noscerent repperit, aditum ad principem postulat, demonstrato crimine et reo per Flaccum Vescularium equitem Romanum, cui propior cum Tiberio usus erat. Caesar indicium haud aspernatus congressus abnuit: posse enim eodem Flacco internuntio sermones commeare. atque interim Libonem ornat praetura, convictibus adhibet, non vultu alienatus, non verbis commotior (adeo iram condiderat); cunctaque eius dicta factaque, cum prohibere posset, scire malebat, donec Iunius quidam, temptatus ut infernas umbras carminibus eliceret, ad Fulcinium Trionem indicium detulit. celebre inter accusatores Trionis ingenium erat avidumque famae malae. statim corripit reum, adit consules, cognitionem senatus poscit. et vocantur patres, addito consultandum super re magna et atroci. 2.28.  When he had found witnesses enough, and slaves to testify in the same tenor, he asked for an interview with the sovereign, to whom the charge and the person implicated had been notified by Vescularius Flaccus, a Roman knight on familiar terms with Tiberius. The Caesar, without rejecting the information, declined a meeting, as "their conversations might be carried on through the same intermediate, Flaccus." In the interval, he distinguished Libo with a praetorship and several invitations to dinner. There was no estrangement on his brow, no hint of asperity in his speech: he had buried his anger far too deep. He could have checked every word and action of Libo: he preferred, however, to know them. At length, a certain Junius, solicited by Libo to raise departed spirits by incantations, carried his tale to Fulcinius Trio. Trio's genius, which was famous among the professional informers, hungered after notoriety. He swooped immediately on the accused, approached the consuls, and demanded a senatorial inquiry. The Fathers were summoned, to deliberate (it was added) on a case of equal importance and atrocity.
119. Suetonius, Vespasianus, 2.1, 5.6-5.7, 16.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 137; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 205
120. Suetonius, Tiberius, 14.4, 21.5, 61.3, 61.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Green (2014), Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus, 105; Roller (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 189; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 138; Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 43
121. Apollonius of Tyana, Letters, 65 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •roman emperors, augustus/octavian Found in books: Immendörfer (2017), Ephesians and Artemis : The Cult of the Great Goddess of Ephesus As the Epistle's Context 140
122. Suetonius, Nero, 27.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 155, 156
123. Suetonius, Iulius, 45.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 143; Nelsestuen (2015), Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic. 6
124. Suetonius, Galba, 1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavian/augustus Found in books: Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 139, 140
125. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 2-4, 1 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 60
126. Seneca The Younger, De Consolatione Ad Polybium (Ad Polybium De Consolatione) (Dialogorum Liber Xi), 4.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, as octavian Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 172
127. Suetonius, Domitianus, 4.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 138
128. Suetonius, De Rhetoribus, 4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavian/augustus Found in books: Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 135
129. Suetonius, Claudius, 2.1, 41.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 109; Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 44, 45
130. Seneca The Younger, De Brevitate Vitae (Dialogorum Liber X ), 2.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, as octavian Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 172
131. Seneca The Younger, De Clementia, 1.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian •augustus/octavian, censorship, use of •augustus/octavian, memoirs of Found in books: Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 44
132. Suetonius, Caligula, 16.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, maiestas and Found in books: Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 45
133. Silius Italicus, Punica, 13.862-13.864 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, as author and builder •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Found in books: Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 82
134. Seneca The Younger, De Constantia Sapientis, 3.1, 11.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 111, 138
135. Suetonius, Augustus, 15.1, 18.1, 29.3, 31.1, 31.5, 34.1, 35.2, 70.2, 76.1-76.2, 82.1, 89.2, 92.1-92.2, 94.10-94.11 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 146, 159, 163; Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 247, 254, 521; Roller (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 117, 154; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 58, 62, 205; Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 219; Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 43, 44
136. Gellius, Attic Nights, None (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 108, 109
137. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 5.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 15
138. Cassius Dio, Roman History, None (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Green (2014), Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus, 72, 73, 74, 103, 104
56.25.5.  Besides these events at that time, the seers were forbidden to prophesy to any person alone or to prophesy regarding death even if others should be present. Yet so far was Augustus from caring about such matters in his own case that he set forth to all in an edict the aspect of the stars at the time of his own birth.
139. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.20.3, 1.25.2, 2.19, 7.2.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian •augustus, as octavian •augustus/octavian, as author and builder •roman emperors, augustus/octavian Found in books: Giusti (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 42; Gorain (2019), Language in the Confessions of Augustine, 98; Immendörfer (2017), Ephesians and Artemis : The Cult of the Great Goddess of Ephesus As the Epistle's Context 140; Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 110
1.20.3. τοῦ Διονύσου δέ ἐστι πρὸς τῷ θεάτρῳ τὸ ἀρχαιότατον ἱερόν· δύο δέ εἰσιν ἐντὸς τοῦ περιβόλου ναοὶ καὶ Διόνυσοι, ὅ τε Ἐλευθερεὺς καὶ ὃν Ἀλκαμένης ἐποίησεν ἐλέφαντος καὶ χρυσοῦ. γραφαὶ δὲ αὐτόθι Διόνυσός ἐστιν ἀνάγων Ἥφαιστον ἐς οὐρανόν· λέγεται δὲ καὶ τάδε ὑπὸ Ἑλλήνων, ὡς Ἥρα ῥίψαι γενόμενον Ἥφαιστον, ὁ δέ οἱ μνησικακῶν πέμψαι δῶρον χρυσοῦν θρόνον ἀφανεῖς δεσμοὺς ἔχοντα, καὶ τὴν μὲν ἐπεί τε ἐκαθέζετο δεδέσθαι, θεῶν δὲ τῶν μὲν ἄλλων οὐδενὶ τὸν Ἥφαιστον ἐθέλειν πείθεσθαι, Διόνυσος δὲ— μάλιστα γὰρ ἐς τοῦτον πιστὰ ἦν Ἡφαίστῳ—μεθύσας αὐτὸν ἐς οὐρανὸν ἤγαγε· ταῦτά τε δὴ γεγραμμένα εἰσὶ καὶ Πενθεὺς καὶ Λυκοῦργος ὧν ἐς Διόνυσον ὕβρισαν διδόντες δίκας, Ἀριάδνη δὲ καθεύδουσα καὶ Θησεὺς ἀναγόμενος καὶ Διόνυσος ἥκων ἐς τῆς Ἀριάδνης τὴν ἁρπαγήν. 1.25.2. πρὸς δὲ τῷ τείχει τῷ Νοτίῳ γιγάντων, οἳ περὶ Θρᾴκην ποτὲ καὶ τὸν ἰσθμὸν τῆς Παλλήνης ᾤκησαν, τούτων τὸν λεγόμενον πόλεμον καὶ μάχην πρὸς Ἀμαζόνας Ἀθηναίων καὶ τὸ Μαραθῶνι πρὸς Μήδους ἔργον καὶ Γαλατῶν τὴν ἐν Μυσίᾳ φθορὰν ἀνέθηκεν Ἄτταλος, ὅσον τε δύο πηχῶν ἕκαστον. ἕστηκε δὲ καὶ Ὀλυμπιόδωρος, μεγέθει τε ὧν ἔπραξε λαβὼν δόξαν καὶ οὐχ ἥκιστα τῷ καιρῷ, φρόνημα ἐν ἀνθρώποις παρασχόμενος συνεχῶς ἐπταικόσι καὶ διʼ αὐτὸ οὐδὲ ἓν χρηστὸν οὐδὲ ἐς τὰ μέλλοντα ἐλπίζουσι. 7.2.7. οὐ μὴν πάντα γε τὰ ἐς τὴν θεὸν ἐπύθετο ἐμοὶ δοκεῖν Πίνδαρος, ὃς Ἀμαζόνας τὸ ἱερὸν ἔφη τοῦτο ἱδρύσασθαι στρατευομένας ἐπὶ Ἀθήνας τε καὶ Θησέα. αἱ δὲ ἀπὸ Θερμώδοντος γυναῖκες ἔθυσαν μὲν καὶ τότε τῇ Ἐφεσίᾳ θεῷ, ἅτε ἐπιστάμεναι τε ἐκ παλαιοῦ τὸ ἱερόν, καὶ ἡνίκα Ἡρακλέα ἔφυγον, αἱ δὲ καὶ Διόνυσον τὰ ἔτι ἀρχαιότερα, ἱκέτιδες ἐνταῦθα ἐλθοῦσαι· οὐ μὴν ὑπὸ Ἀμαζόνων γε ἱδρύθη, Κόρησος δὲ αὐτόχθων καὶ Ἔφεσος—Καΰστρου δὲ τοῦ ποταμοῦ τὸν Ἔφεσον παῖδα εἶναι νομίζουσιν—, οὗτοι τὸ ἱερόν εἰσιν οἱ ἱδρυσάμενοι, καὶ ἀπὸ τοῦ Ἐφέσου τὸ ὄνομά ἐστι τῇ πόλει. 1.20.3. The oldest sanctuary of Dionysus is near the theater. Within the precincts are two temples and two statues of Dionysus, the Eleuthereus (Deliverer) and the one Alcamenes made of ivory and gold. There are paintings here—Dionysus bringing Hephaestus up to heaven. One of the Greek legends is that Hephaestus, when he was born, was thrown down by Hera. In revenge he sent as a gift a golden chair with invisible fetters. When Hera sat down she was held fast, and Hephaestus refused to listen to any other of the gods save Dionysus—in him he reposed the fullest trust—and after making him drunk Dionysus brought him to heaven. Besides this picture there are also represented Pentheus and Lycurgus paying the penalty of their insolence to Dionysus, Ariadne asleep, Theseus putting out to sea, and Dionysus on his arrival to carry off Ariadne. 1.25.2. By the south wall are represented the legendary war with the giants, who once dwelt about Thrace and on the isthmus of Pallene , the battle between the Athenians and the Amazons, the engagement with the Persians at Marathon and the destruction of the Gauls in Mysia . See Paus. 1.4.5 . Each is about two cubits, and all were dedicated by Attalus. There stands too Olympiodorus, who won fame for the greatness of his achievements, especially in the crisis when he displayed a brave confidence among men who had met with continuous reverses, and were therefore in despair of winning a single success in the days to come. 7.2.7. Pindar, however, it seems to me, did not learn everything about the goddess, for he says that this sanctuary was founded by the Amazons during their campaign against Athens and Theseus. See Pind. fr. 174. It is a fact that the women from the Thermodon, as they knew the sanctuary from of old, sacrificed to the Ephesian goddess both on this occasion and when they had fled from Heracles; some of them earlier still, when they had fled from Dionysus, having come to the sanctuary as suppliants. However, it was not by the Amazons that the sanctuary was founded, but by Coresus, an aboriginal, and Ephesus , who is thought to have been a son of the river Cayster, and from Ephesus the city received its name.
140. Athenaeus, The Learned Banquet, 13.593 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •roman emperors, augustus/octavian Found in books: Immendörfer (2017), Ephesians and Artemis : The Cult of the Great Goddess of Ephesus As the Epistle's Context 140
141. Apuleius, On Plato, 2.15.241-2.15.242 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 216
142. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 5.8.12-5.8.13, 10.5-10.10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian •augustus (octavian) Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 265; Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 41
10.5. To Trajan. Last year, Sir, when I was in serious ill-health and was in some danger of my life I called in an ointment-doctor {iatroliptes}, and I can only adequately repay him for the pains and interest he took in my case if you are kind enough to help me. Let me, therefore, entreat you to bestow on him the Roman citizenship, for he belongs to a foreign race and was manumitted by a foreign lady. His name is Harpocras, his patroness being Thermuthis, the daughter of Theon, but she has been dead for some years. I also beg you to give full Roman citizenship * to the freedwomen of Antonia Maximilla, a lady of great distinction, Hedia, and Antonia Harmeris. It is at the request of their patroness that I beg this favour. 10.6. To Trajan. I thank you, Sir, for having so promptly granted my request and for your bestowal of full citizenship on the freedwomen of a lady who is my intimate friend, and the Roman citizenship upon Harpocras, my ointment-doctor. But though I gave particulars, in accordance with your wishes, of his age and ficial position, I have been reminded by those more skilled in such matters than I am that as Harpocras is an Egyptian, I ought first to have obtained for him the Egyptian citizenship before asking for the Roman. For my own part, I thought that no distinction was drawn between Egyptians and all other foreigners, and so was satisfied with merely informing you that he had received his freedom at the hands of a foreign lady, and that his patroness had been dead for some time. I do not regret my ignorance in this matter, inasmuch as it has enabled me to owe you a deeper debt of gratitude for the same individual. So I beg that you will bestow upon him both the Alexandrine and the Roman citizenship, that I may lawfully enjoy the full extent of your kindness. I have sent particulars of his age and income to your freedmen, according to your instructions, so as to prevent any further accidental delay of your goodness. 10.7. Trajan to Pliny. I make a practice of following the rules of my predecessors in not making promiscuous grants of the Alexandrine citizenship, but since you have already obtained the Roman citizenship for Harpocras, your ointment-doctor, I cannot very well refuse this further request of yours. You must let me know to what district he belongs, so that I may write to my friend Pompeius Planta, who is praefect of Egypt. 10.8. To Trajan. When, Sir, your late father, * both by a very fine speech and by setting them a most honourable example himself, urged every citizen to deeds of liberality, I sought permission from him to transfer to a neighbouring township all the statues of the emperors which had come into my possession by various bequests and were kept just as I had received them ill my distant estates, and to add thereto a statue of himself. He granted the request and made most flattering references to myself, and I immediately wrote to the decurions asking them to assign me a plot of ground upon which I might erect a temple ** at my own cost, and they offered to let me choose the site myself as a mark of appreciation of the task I had undertaken. But first my own ill-health, then your father's illness, and subsequently the anxieties of the office you bestowed upon me, have prevented my proceeding with the work. However, I think the present is a convenient opportunity for getting on with it, for my month of duty ends on the Kalends of September and the following month contains a number of holidays. I ask, therefore, as a special favour, that you will allow me to adorn with your statue the work which I am about to begin ; and secondly, that in order to complete it as soon as possible, you will grant me leave of absence. It would be alien to my frank disposition if I were to conceal from your goodness the fact that you will, if you grant me leave, be incidentally aiding very materially my private fices. The rent of my estates in that district exceeds 400,000 sesterces, and if the new tets are to be settled in time for the next pruning, the letting of the farms must not be any further delayed. Besides, the succession of bad vintages we have had forces me to consider the question of making certain abatements, and I cannot enter into that question unless I am on the spot. So, Sir, if for these reasons you grant me leave for thirty days, I shall owe to your kindness the speedy fulfilment of a work of loyalty and the settlement of my private fices. I cannot reduce the length of leave I ask for to narrower limits, inasmuch as the township and the estates I have spoken of are more than a hundred and fifty miles from Rome. 0 10.9. Trajan to Pliny. You have given me an abundance of private and all the public reasons I could desire for asking leave of absence, but, personally, I should have been quite content to accept the mere expression of your wish, for I have not the slightest doubt that you will return as early as you possibly can to resume your busy post. I give you permission to erect a statue of mine in the place you ask - although I am very loath to accept such honours - so as to avoid appearing to check the flow of your loyalty towards me. 10.10. To Trajan. I cannot express, Sir, in words the joy I experienced when I received your letter telling me that you had granted the Alexandrine as well as the Roman citizenship upon my ointment-doctor Harpocras, although you have made it a rule to follow the practice of your predecessors and not grant it promiscuously. I beg to inform you that Harpocras belongs to the district of Memphis. Let me beg of your great kindness, Sir, to send me a letter, as you promised, for your friend Pompeius Planta, the praefect of Egypt. As, Sir, I shall come to meet you that I may enjoy the pleasure at the earliest moment of welcoming you on your long-hoped-for return, * I pray that you will permit me to join you on the road as far out from Rome as possible.
143. Pliny The Younger, Panegyric, 5.3-5.4, 53.3-53.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavian/augustus •augustus/octavian, dio’s view of •augustus/octavian, cruelty of •augustus/octavian, plebs, people, relationship with Found in books: Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 137; Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 128
144. Lucian, The Carousal, Or The Lapiths, 18-19 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 138
145. Lucian, How To Write History, 13, 2, 38, 61, 9, 7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 26
146. Festus Sextus Pompeius, De Verborum Significatione, None (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, urban buildings / monuments Found in books: Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 40
147. Aelius Aristides, Hymn To Serapis, 17.1, 21.3, 23.2, 28.3, 29.2, 31.5, 53.1, 56.1, 79.2, 94.4, 99.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 1, 2, 5, 21, 86, 125, 126, 127, 163, 167, 173, 181, 244, 250
148. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 5.8.12-5.8.13, 10.5-10.10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian •augustus (octavian) Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 265; Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 41
10.5. To Trajan. Last year, Sir, when I was in serious ill-health and was in some danger of my life I called in an ointment-doctor {iatroliptes}, and I can only adequately repay him for the pains and interest he took in my case if you are kind enough to help me. Let me, therefore, entreat you to bestow on him the Roman citizenship, for he belongs to a foreign race and was manumitted by a foreign lady. His name is Harpocras, his patroness being Thermuthis, the daughter of Theon, but she has been dead for some years. I also beg you to give full Roman citizenship * to the freedwomen of Antonia Maximilla, a lady of great distinction, Hedia, and Antonia Harmeris. It is at the request of their patroness that I beg this favour. 10.6. To Trajan. I thank you, Sir, for having so promptly granted my request and for your bestowal of full citizenship on the freedwomen of a lady who is my intimate friend, and the Roman citizenship upon Harpocras, my ointment-doctor. But though I gave particulars, in accordance with your wishes, of his age and ficial position, I have been reminded by those more skilled in such matters than I am that as Harpocras is an Egyptian, I ought first to have obtained for him the Egyptian citizenship before asking for the Roman. For my own part, I thought that no distinction was drawn between Egyptians and all other foreigners, and so was satisfied with merely informing you that he had received his freedom at the hands of a foreign lady, and that his patroness had been dead for some time. I do not regret my ignorance in this matter, inasmuch as it has enabled me to owe you a deeper debt of gratitude for the same individual. So I beg that you will bestow upon him both the Alexandrine and the Roman citizenship, that I may lawfully enjoy the full extent of your kindness. I have sent particulars of his age and income to your freedmen, according to your instructions, so as to prevent any further accidental delay of your goodness. 10.7. Trajan to Pliny. I make a practice of following the rules of my predecessors in not making promiscuous grants of the Alexandrine citizenship, but since you have already obtained the Roman citizenship for Harpocras, your ointment-doctor, I cannot very well refuse this further request of yours. You must let me know to what district he belongs, so that I may write to my friend Pompeius Planta, who is praefect of Egypt. 10.8. To Trajan. When, Sir, your late father, * both by a very fine speech and by setting them a most honourable example himself, urged every citizen to deeds of liberality, I sought permission from him to transfer to a neighbouring township all the statues of the emperors which had come into my possession by various bequests and were kept just as I had received them ill my distant estates, and to add thereto a statue of himself. He granted the request and made most flattering references to myself, and I immediately wrote to the decurions asking them to assign me a plot of ground upon which I might erect a temple ** at my own cost, and they offered to let me choose the site myself as a mark of appreciation of the task I had undertaken. But first my own ill-health, then your father's illness, and subsequently the anxieties of the office you bestowed upon me, have prevented my proceeding with the work. However, I think the present is a convenient opportunity for getting on with it, for my month of duty ends on the Kalends of September and the following month contains a number of holidays. I ask, therefore, as a special favour, that you will allow me to adorn with your statue the work which I am about to begin ; and secondly, that in order to complete it as soon as possible, you will grant me leave of absence. It would be alien to my frank disposition if I were to conceal from your goodness the fact that you will, if you grant me leave, be incidentally aiding very materially my private fices. The rent of my estates in that district exceeds 400,000 sesterces, and if the new tets are to be settled in time for the next pruning, the letting of the farms must not be any further delayed. Besides, the succession of bad vintages we have had forces me to consider the question of making certain abatements, and I cannot enter into that question unless I am on the spot. So, Sir, if for these reasons you grant me leave for thirty days, I shall owe to your kindness the speedy fulfilment of a work of loyalty and the settlement of my private fices. I cannot reduce the length of leave I ask for to narrower limits, inasmuch as the township and the estates I have spoken of are more than a hundred and fifty miles from Rome. 0 10.9. Trajan to Pliny. You have given me an abundance of private and all the public reasons I could desire for asking leave of absence, but, personally, I should have been quite content to accept the mere expression of your wish, for I have not the slightest doubt that you will return as early as you possibly can to resume your busy post. I give you permission to erect a statue of mine in the place you ask - although I am very loath to accept such honours - so as to avoid appearing to check the flow of your loyalty towards me. 10.10. To Trajan. I cannot express, Sir, in words the joy I experienced when I received your letter telling me that you had granted the Alexandrine as well as the Roman citizenship upon my ointment-doctor Harpocras, although you have made it a rule to follow the practice of your predecessors and not grant it promiscuously. I beg to inform you that Harpocras belongs to the district of Memphis. Let me beg of your great kindness, Sir, to send me a letter, as you promised, for your friend Pompeius Planta, the praefect of Egypt. As, Sir, I shall come to meet you that I may enjoy the pleasure at the earliest moment of welcoming you on your long-hoped-for return, * I pray that you will permit me to join you on the road as far out from Rome as possible.
149. Anon., Sifre Numbers, 20 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus (caesar octavianus) Found in books: Rosen-Zvi (2012), The Mishnaic Sotah Ritual: Temple, Gender and Midrash, 97
150. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.5, 1.6.101-1.6.103, 10.4-10.5 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, as octavian •octavian (later emperor augustus) Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 172; Yona (2018), Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire, 167
10.4. They are followed by Posidonius the Stoic and his school, and Nicolaus and Sotion in the twelfth book of his work entitled Dioclean Refutations, consisting of twenty-four books; also by Dionysius of Halicarnassus. They allege that he used to go round with his mother to cottages and read charms, and assist his father in his school for a pitiful fee; further, that one of his brothers was a pander and lived with Leontion the courtesan; that he put forward as his own the doctrines of Democritus about atoms and of Aristippus about pleasure; that he was not a genuine Athenian citizen, a charge brought by Timocrates and by Herodotus in a book On the Training of Epicurus as a Cadet; that he basely flattered Mithras, the minister of Lysimachus, bestowing on him in his letters Apollo's titles of Healer and Lord. 10.5. Furthermore that he extolled Idomeneus, Herodotus, and Timocrates, who had published his esoteric doctrines, and flattered them for that very reason. Also that in his letters he wrote to Leontion, O Lord Apollo, my dear little Leontion, with what tumultuous applause we were inspired as we read your letter. Then again to Themista, the wife of Leonteus: I am quite ready, if you do not come to see me, to spin thrice on my own axis and be propelled to any place that you, including Themista, agree upon; and to the beautiful Pythocles he writes: I will sit down and await thy divine advent, my heart's desire. And, as Theodorus says in the fourth book of his work, Against Epicurus, in another letter to Themista he thinks he preaches to her.
151. Babylonian Talmud, Bava Metzia, 49.3-49.4 (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •plutarch, on augustus/octavian and cicero Found in books: Keeline (2018), The Cambridge Companion to Cicero's Philosophy, 108
152. Lactantius, Divine Institutes, 1.15, 54.39.8, 54.39.13, 54.39.15 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, early self-representations •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods •augustus/octavian Found in books: Gorain (2019), Language in the Confessions of Augustine, 147; Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 47
1.15. Now, since it is evident from these things that they were men, it is not difficult to see in what manner they began to be called gods. For if there were no kings before Saturn or Uranus, on account of the small number of men who lived a rustic life without any ruler, there is no doubt but in those times men began to exalt the king himself, and his whole family, with the highest praises and with new honours, so that they even called them gods; whether on account of their wonderful excellence, men as yet rude and simple really entertained this opinion, or, as is commonly the case, in flattery of present power, or on account of the benefits by which they were set in order and reduced to a civilized state. Afterwards the kings themselves, since they were beloved by those whose life they had civilized, after their death left regret of themselves. Therefore men formed images of them, that they might derive some consolation from the contemplation of their likenesses; and proceeding further through love of their worth, they began to reverence the memory of the deceased, that they might appear to be grateful for their services, and might attract their successors to a desire of ruling well. And this Cicero teaches in his treatise on the Nature of the Gods, saying But the life of men and common intercourse led to the exalting to heaven by fame and goodwill men who were distinguished by their benefits. On this account Hercules, on this Castor and Pollux, Æsculapius and Liber were ranked with the gods. And in another passage: And in most states it may be understood, that for the sake of exciting valour, or that the men most distinguished for bravery might more readily encounter danger on account of the state, their memory was consecrated with the honour paid to the immortal gods. It was doubtless on this account that the Romans consecrated their C sars, and the Moors their kings. Thus by degrees religious honours began to be paid to them; while those who had known them, first instructed their own children and grandchildren, and afterwards all their posterity, in the practice of this rite. And yet these great kings, on account of the celebrity of their name, were honoured in all provinces. But separate people privately honoured the founders of their nation or city with the highest veneration, whether they were men distinguished for bravery, or women admirable for chastity; as the Egyptians honoured Isis, the Moors Juba, the Macedonians Cabirus, the Carthaginians Uranus, the Latins Faunus, the Sabines Sancus, the Romans Quirinus. In the same manner truly Athens worshipped Minerva, Samos Juno, Paphos Venus, Lemnos Vulcan, Naxos Liber, and Delos Apollo. And thus various sacred rites have been undertaken among different peoples and countries, inasmuch as men desire to show gratitude to their princes, and cannot find out other honours which they may confer upon the dead. Moreover, the piety of their successors contributed in a great degree to the error; for, in order that they might appear to be born from a divine origin, they paid divine honours to their parents, and ordered that they should be paid by others. Can any one doubt in what way the honours paid to the gods were instituted, when he reads in Virgil the words of Æneas giving commands to his friends: - Now with full cups libation pour To mighty Jove, whom all adore, Invoke Anchises' blessed soul.And he attributes to him not only immortality, but also power over the winds: - Invoke the winds to speed our flight, And pray that he we hold so dear May take our offerings year by year, Soon as our promised town we raise, In temples sacred to his praise.In truth, Liber and Pan, and Mercury and Apollo, acted in the same way respecting Jupiter, and afterwards their successors did the same respecting them. The poets also added their influence, and by means of poems composed to give pleasure, raised them to the heaven; as is the case with those who flatter kings, even though wicked, with false panegyrics. And this evil originated with the Greeks, whose levity being furnished with the ability and copiousness of speech, excited in an incredible degree mists of falsehoods. And thus from admiration of them they first undertook their sacred rites, and handed them down to all nations. On account of this vanity the Sibyl thus rebukes them:- Why do you trust, O Greece, to princely men? Why do you offer empty gifts to the dead? You offer to idols; this error who suggested, That you should leave the presence of the mighty God, And make these offerings?Marcus Tullius, who was not only an accomplished orator, but also a philosopher, since he alone was an imitator of Plato, in that treatise in which he consoled himself concerning the death of his daughter, did not hesitate to say that those gods who were publicly worshipped were men. And this testimony of his ought to be esteemed the more weighty, because he held the priesthood of the augurs, and testifies that he worships and venerates the same gods. And thus within the compass of a few verses he has presented us with two facts. For while he declared his intention of consecrating the image of his daughter in the same manner in which they were consecrated by the ancients, he both taught that they were dead, and showed the origin of a vain superstition. Since, in truth, he says, we see many men and women among the number of the gods, and venerate their shrines, held in the greatest honour in cities and in the country, let us assent to the wisdom of those to whose talents and inventions we owe it that life is altogether adorned with laws and institutions, and established on a firm basis. And if any living being was worthy of being consecrated, assuredly it was this. If the offspring of Cadmus, or Amphitryon, or Tyndarus, was worthy of being extolled by fame to the heaven, the same honour ought undoubtedly to be appropriated to her. And this indeed I will do; and with the approbation of the gods, I will place you the best and most learned of all women in their assembly, and will consecrate you to the estimation of all men. Some one may perhaps say that Cicero raved through excessive grief. But, in truth, the whole of that speech, which was perfect both in learning and in its examples, and in the very style of expression, gave no indications of a distempered mind, but of constancy and judgment; and this very sentence exhibits no sign of grief. For I do not think that he could have written with such variety, and copiousness, and ornament, had not his grief been mitigated by reason itself, and the consolation of his friends and length of time. Why should I mention what he says in his books concerning the Republic, and also concerning glory? For in his treatise on the Laws, in which work, following the example of Plato, he wished to set forth those laws which he thought that a just and wise state would employ, he thus decreed concerning religion: Let them reverence the gods, both those who have always been regarded as gods of heaven, and those whose services to men have placed them in heaven: Hercules, Liber, Æsculapius, Castor, Pollux, and Quirinus. Also in his Tusculan Disputations, when he said that heaven was almost entirely filled with the human race, he said: If, indeed, I should attempt to investigate ancient accounts, and to extract from them those things which the writers of Greece have handed down, even those who are held in the highest rank as gods will be found to have gone from us into heaven. Inquire whose sepulchres are pointed out in Greece: remember, since you are initiated, what things are handed down in the mysteries; and then at length you will understand how widely this persuasion is spread. He appealed, as it is plain, to the conscience of Atticus, that it might be understood from the very mysteries that all those who are worshipped were men; and when he acknowledged this without hesitation in the case of Hercules, Liber, Æsculapius, Castor and Pollux, he was afraid openly to make the same admission respecting Apollo and Jupiter their fathers, and likewise respecting Neptune, Vulcan, Mars, and Mercury, whom he termed the greater gods; and therefore he says that this opinion is widely spread, that we may understand the same concerning Jupiter and the other more ancient gods: for if the ancients consecrated their memory in the same manner in which he says that he will consecrate the image and the name of his daughter, those who mourn may be pardoned, but those who believe it cannot be pardoned. For who is so infatuated as to believe that heaven is opened to the dead at the consent and pleasure of a senseless multitude? Or that any one is able to give to another that which he himself does not possess? Among the Romans, Julius was made a god, because it pleased a guilty man, Antony; Quirinus was made a god, because it seemed good to the shepherds, though one of them was the murderer of his twin brother, the other the destroyer of his country. But if Antony had not been consul, in return for his services towards the state Caius C sar would have been without the honour even of a dead man, and that, too, by the advice of his father-in-law Piso, and of his relative Lucius C sar, who opposed the celebration of the funeral, and by the advice of Dolabella the consul, who overthrew the column in the forum, that is, his monuments, and purified the forum. For Ennius declares that Romulus was regretted by his people, since he represents the people as thus speaking, through grief for their lost king: O Romulus, Romulus, say what a guardian of your country the gods produced you? You brought us forth within the regions of light. O father, O sire, O race, descended from the gods. On account of this regret they more readily believed Julius Proculus uttering falsehoods, who was suborned by the fathers to announce to the populace that he had seen the king in a form more majestic than that of a man; and that he had given command to the people that a temple should be built to his honour, that he was a god, and was called by the name of Quirinus. By which deed he at once persuaded the people that Romulus had gone to the gods, and freed the senate from the suspicion of having slain the king.
153. Servius, In Vergilii Bucolicon Librum, 9.46 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus / octavian Found in books: Green (2014), Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus, 71
154. Servius, Commentary On The Aeneid, 6.790, 8.681 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus / octavian Found in books: Green (2014), Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus, 71
155. Ammianus Marcellinus, History, 17.4.5, 22.16.7, 29.5.32 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian •augustus/octavian, and forum augustum exempla •augustus/octavian, as imitator of fabius cunctator Found in books: Roller (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 190; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 15, 122
17.4.5. Again, long afterwards, when Octavian was ruling Rome, Cornelius Gallus, procurator Gallus was praefectus Aegypti (not procurator ) from 30 to 26 B.C. of Egypt, drained the city by extensive embezzlements; and when on his return he was accused of peculation and the robbery of the province, in his fear of the bitterly exasperated nobility, to whom the emperor had committed the investigation of the case, he drew his sword and fell upon it. He was (if I am right in so thinking) the poet Gallus, whom Vergil laments in a way in the latter part of the Bucolics Eclogue , x. and celebrates in gentle verse. 22.16.7. But the crown of all cities is Alexandria, which is made famous by many splendid things, through the wisdom of its mighty founder and by the cleverness of the architect Dinocrates. The latter, when laying out its extensive and beautiful walls, for lack of lime, of which too little could at the time be found, sprinkled the whole line of its circuit with flour, Cf. Strabo, xvii. 1, 6 (at end); Plutarch, Alex. 26, 5 f. which chanced to be a sign that later the city would abound with a plentiful store of food. 29.5.32. There he made a long halt, and after the manner of the famous Lingerer Q. Fabius Maximus in the Hannibalic war, nicknamed Cunctator because of his policy of caution. of old took counsel with himself as the circumstances demanded, planning, if chance gave the opportunity, rather through strategy and discretion than by the danger of battle, to overthrow an enemy who was pugnacious and effective in the use of missiles.
156. Augustine, De Octo Dulcitii Quaestionibus Liber, 1.4 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 106
157. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 1.17.63, 2.4.21, 3.17, 3.17.1-3.17.3, 3.17.6, 3.17.11-3.17.12, 3.17.14-3.17.18 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, temple of augustus in alexandria •augustus, as octavian •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Found in books: Giusti (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 2; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 105, 109; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 115
158. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 1.17.63, 2.4.21, 3.17, 3.17.1-3.17.3, 3.17.6, 3.17.11-3.17.12, 3.17.14-3.17.18 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, temple of augustus in alexandria •augustus, as octavian •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Found in books: Giusti (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 2; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 105, 109; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 115
159. Jerome, Letters, 61.1 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavianus Found in books: Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 522
160. Justinian, Digest, 34.2.25.4 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavianus Found in books: Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 522
162. Porphyrio, Ad Hor. Sat., 2.35  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavianus Found in books: Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 314
163. Sextus Turpilius, Hetaera, None  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavianus Found in books: Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 633
164. Epigraphy, I.Ephesos, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Immendörfer (2017), Ephesians and Artemis : The Cult of the Great Goddess of Ephesus As the Epistle's Context 142
165. Aristides, Leg., 37.2, 49.4  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 121, 231, 237
166. Manilius, Astronomica, 1.898-1.903, 3.160-3.202, 4.542-4.546, 4.773-4.777, 4.791-4.796  Tagged with subjects: •augustus / octavian •augustus / octavian, and capricorn •augustus / octavian, and libra Found in books: Green (2014), Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus, 11, 97, 98
167. Suidas Thessalius, Fragments, ἡμίεργον  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, temple of augustus in alexandria Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 113
168. Epigraphy, Ils, 418, 420-421, 425, 422  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 125
170. Anon., Sifre Zuta Numbers, 5.12  Tagged with subjects: •augustus (caesar octavianus) Found in books: Rosen-Zvi (2012), The Mishnaic Sotah Ritual: Temple, Gender and Midrash, 97
171. Libanius, De Mort. Pers., 1534.4  Tagged with subjects: •octavian/augustus Found in books: Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 103
173. Arch., Att., 1.18.1, 4.1.5  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, as octavian Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 172, 175
175. Cat., Poems, 64.144, 64.251-64.262  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian Found in books: Gorain (2019), Language in the Confessions of Augustine, 106
176. Philo of Alexandria, De Animalibus, 8  Tagged with subjects: •augustus (octavian) Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 259
177. Quint.Inst., Inst., 3.7.10-3.7.18, 10.1.52-10.1.58  Tagged with subjects: •augustus (octavian) Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 221, 236
178. Strabo, Geography, 2.4.14, 2.4.18, 4.192, 5.3.7, 14.1.23, 14.1.26, 16.1.28, 17.1.8-17.1.10, 17.1.53, 17.54  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus •roman emperors, augustus/octavian •augustus/octavian, as pater patriae •augustus (octavian) •augustus/octavian, temple of augustus in alexandria •augustus/octavian, as object of public gaze Found in books: Immendörfer (2017), Ephesians and Artemis : The Cult of the Great Goddess of Ephesus As the Epistle's Context 140, 142; Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 181, 253; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 58; Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 218, 219; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 15, 19, 109, 113, 122
5.3.7. In the interior, the first city above Ostia is Rome; it is the only city built on the Tiber. It has been remarked above, that its position was fixed, not by choice, but necessity; to this must be added, that those who afterwards enlarged it, were not at liberty to select a better site, being prevented by what was already built. The first [kings] fortified the Capitol, the Palatium, and the Collis Quirinalis, which was so easy of access, that when Titus Tatius came to avenge the rape of the [Sabine] virgins, he took it on the first assault. Ancus Marcius, who added Mount Caelius and the Aventine Mount with the intermediate plain, separated as these places were both from each other and from what had been formerly fortified, was compelled to do this of necessity; since he did not consider it proper to leave outside his walls, heights so well protected by nature, to whomsoever might have a mind to fortify themselves upon them, while at the same time he was not capable of enclosing the whole as far as Mount Quirinus. Servius perceived this defect, and added the Esquiline and Viminal hills. As these were both of easy access from without, a deep trench was dug outside them and the earth thrown up on the inside, thus forming a terrace of 6 stadia in length along the inner side of the trench. This terrace he surmounted with a wall flanked with towers, and extending from the Colline to the Esquiline gate. Midway along the terrace is a third gate, named after the Viminal hill. Such is the Roman rampart, which seems to stand in need of other ramparts itself. But it seems to me that the first [founders] were of opinion, both in regard to themselves and their successors, that Romans had to depend not on fortifications, but on arms and their individual valour, both for safety and for wealth, and that walls were not a defence to men, but men were a defence to walls. At the period of its commencement, when the large and fertile districts surrounding the city belonged to others, and while it lay easily open to assault, there was nothing in its position which could be looked upon as favourable; but when by valour and labour these districts became its own, there succeeded a tide of prosperity surpassing the advantages of every other place. Thus, notwithstanding the prodigious increase of the city, there has been plenty of food, and also of wood and stone for ceaseless building, rendered necessary by the falling down of houses, and on account of conflagrations, and of the sales, which seem never to cease. These sales are a kind of voluntary falling down of houses, each owner knocking down and rebuilding one part or another, according to his individual taste. For these purposes the numerous quarries, the forests, and the rivers which convey the materials, offer wonderful facilities. of these rivers, the first is the Teverone, which flows from Alba, a city of the Latins near to the country of the Marsi, and from thence through the plain below this [city], till it unites with the Tiber. After this come the Nera (Nar) and the Timia, which passing through Ombrica fall into the Tiber, and the Chiana, which flows through Tyrrhenia and the territory of Clusiumn. Augustus Caesar endeavoured to avert from the city damages of the kind alluded to, and instituted a company of freedmen, who should be ready to lend their assistance in cases of conflagration; whilst, as a preventive against the falling of houses, he decreed that all new buildings should not be carried so high as formerly, and that those erected along the public ways should not exceed seventy feet in height. But these improvements must have ceased only for the facilities afforded by the quarries, the forests, and the ease of transport. 14.1.23. After the completion of the temple of Artemis, which, he says, was the work of Cheirocrates (the same man who built Alexandreia and the same man who proposed to Alexander to fashion Mt. Athos into his likeness, representing him as pouring a libation from a kind of ewer into a broad bowl, and to make two cities, one on the right of the mountain and the other on the left, and a river flowing from one to the other) — after the completion of the temple, he says, the great number of dedications in general were secured by means of the high honor they paid their artists, but the whole of the altar was filled, one might say, with the works of Praxiteles. They showed me also some of the works of Thrason, who made the chapel of Hecate, the waxen image of Penelope, and the old woman Eurycleia. They had eunuchs as priests, whom they called Megabyzi. And they were always in quest of persons from other places who were worthy of this preferment, and they held them in great honor. And it was obligatory for maidens to serve as colleagues with them in their priestly office. But though at the present some of their usages are being preserved, yet others are not; but the sanctuary remains a place of refuge, the same as in earlier times, although the limits of the refuge have often been changed; for example, when Alexander extended them for a stadium, and when Mithridates shot an arrow from the corner of the roof and thought it went a little farther than a stadium, and when Antony doubled this distance and included within the refuge a part of the city. But this extension of the refuge proved harmful, and put the city in the power of criminals; and it was therefore nullified by Augustus Caesar. 14.1.26. After the outlet of the Cayster River comes a lake that runs inland from the sea, called Selinusia; and next comes another lake that is confluent with it, both affording great revenues. of these revenues, though sacred, the kings deprived the goddess, but the Romans gave them back; and again the tax-gatherers forcibly converted the tolls to their own use; but when Artemidorus was sent on an embassy, as he says, he got the lakes back for the goddess, and he also won the decision over Heracleotis, which was in revolt, his case being decided at Rome; and in return for this the city erected in the sanctuary a golden image of him. In the innermost recess of the lake there is a sanctuary of a king, which is said to have been built by Agamemnon. 16.1.28. The Euphrates and its eastern banks are the boundaries of the Parthian empire. The Romans and the chiefs of the Arabian tribes occupy the parts on this side the Euphrates as far as Babylonia. Some of the chiefs attach themselves in preference to the Parthians, others to the Romans, to whom they adjoin. The Scenitae nomads, who live near the river, are less friendly to the Romans than those tribes who are situated at a distance near Arabia Felix. The Parthians were once solicitous of conciliating the friendship of the Romans, but having repulsed Crassus, who began the war with them, they suffered reprisals, when they themselves commenced hostilities, and sent Pacorus into Asia. But Antony, following the advice of the Armenian, was betrayed, and was unsuccessful (against them). Phraates, his successor, was so anxious to obtain the friendship of Augustus Caesar, that he even sent the trophies, which the Parthians had set up as memorials of the defeat of the Romans. He also invited Titius to a conference, who was at that time prefect of Syria, and delivered into his hands, as hostages, four of his legitimate sons, Seraspadanes, Rhodaspes, Phraates, and Bonones, with two of their wives and four of their sons; for he was apprehensive of conspiracy and attempts on his life. He knew that no one could prevail against him, unless he was opposed by one of the Arsacian family, to which race the Parthians were strongly attached. He therefore removed the sons out of his way, with a view of annihilating the hopes of the disaffected.The surviving sons, who live at Rome, are entertained as princes at the public expense. The other kings (his successors) have continued to send ambassadors (to Rome), and to hold conferences (with the Roman prefects). 17.1.8. The shape of the site of the city is that of a chlamys or military cloak. The sides, which determine the length, are surrounded by water, and are about thirty stadia in extent; but the isthmuses, which determine the breadth of the sides, are each of seven or eight stadia, bounded on one side by the sea, and on the other by the lake. The whole city is intersected by roads for the passage of horsemen and chariots. Two of these are very broad, exceeding a plethrum in breadth, and cut one another at right angles. It contains also very beautiful public grounds and royal palaces, which occupy a fourth or even a third part of its whole extent. For as each of the kings was desirous of adding some embellishment to the places dedicated to the public use, so, besides the buildings already existing, each of them erected a building at his own expense; hence the expression of the poet may be here applied, one after the other springs. All the buildings are connected with one another and with the harbour, and those also which are beyond it.The Museum is a part of the palaces. It has a public walk and a place furnished with seats, and a large hall, in which the men of learning, who belong to the Museum, take their common meal. This community possesses also property in common; and a priest, formerly appointed by the kings, but at present by Caesar, presides over the Museum.A part belonging to the palaces consists of that called Sema, an enclosure, which contained the tombs of the kings and that of Alexander (the Great). For Ptolemy the son of Lagus took away the body of Alexander from Perdiccas, as he was conveying it down from Babylon; for Perdiccas had turned out of his road towards Egypt, incited by ambition and a desire of making himself master of the country. When Ptolemy had attacked [and made him prisoner], he intended to [spare his life and] confine him in a desert island, but he met with a miserable end at the hand of his own soldiers, who rushed upon and despatched him by transfixing him with the long Macedonian spears. The kings who were with him, Aridaeus, and the children of Alexander, and Roxana his wife, departed to Macedonia. Ptolemy carried away the body of Alexander, and deposited it at Alexandreia in the place where it now lies; not indeed in the same coffin, for the present one is of hyalus (alabaster ?) whereas Ptolemy had deposited it in one of gold: it was plundered by Ptolemy surnamed Cocce's son and Pareisactus, who came from Syria and was quickly deposed, so that his plunder was of no service to him. 17.1.9. In the great harbour at the entrance, on the right hand, are the island and the Pharos tower; on the left are the reef of rocks and the promontory Lochias, with a palace upon it: at the entrance, on the left hand, are the inner palaces, which are continuous with those on the Lochias, and contain numerous painted apartments and groves. Below lies the artificial and close harbour, appropriated to the use of the kings; and Antirrhodus a small island, facing the artificial harbour, with a palace on it, and a small port. It was called Antirrhodus, a rival as it were of Rhodes.Above this is the theatre, then the Poseidium, a kind of elbow projecting from the Emporium, as it is called, with a temple of Neptune upon it. To this Antony added a mound, projecting still further into the middle of the harbour, and built at the extremity a royal mansion, which he called Timonium. This was his last act, when, deserted by his partisans, he retired to Alexandreia after his defeat at Actium, and intended, being forsaken by so many friends, to lead the [solitary] life of Timon for the rest of his days.Next are the Caesarium, the Emporium, and the Apostaseis, or magazines: these are followed by docks, extending to the Heptastadium. This is the description of the great harbour. 17.1.10. Next after the Heptastadium is the harbour of Eunostus, and above this the artificial harbour, called Cibotus (or the Ark), which also has docks. At the bottom of this harbour is a navigable canal, extending to the lake Mareotis. Beyond the canal there still remains a small part of the city. Then follows the suburb Necropolis, in which are numerous gardens, burial-places, and buildings for carrying on the process of embalming the dead.On this side the canal is the Sarapium and other ancient sacred places, which are now abandoned on account of the erection of the temples at Nicopolis; for [there are situated] an amphitheatre and a stadium, and there are celebrated quinquennial games; but the ancient rites and customs are neglected.In short, the city of Alexandreia abounds with public and sacred buildings. The most beautiful of the former is the Gymnasium, with porticos exceeding a stadium in extent. In the middle of it are the court of justice and groves. Here also is a Paneium, an artificial mound of the shape of a fir-cone, resembling a pile of rock, to the top of which there is an ascent by a spiral path. From the summit may be seen the whole city lying all around and beneath it.The wide street extends in length along the Gymnasium from the Necropolis to the Canobic gate. Next is the Hippodromos (or race-course), as it is called, and other buildings near it, and reaching to the Canobic canal. After passing through the Hippodromos is the Nicopolis, which contains buildings fronting the sea not less numerous than a city. It is 30 stadia distant from Alexandreia. Augustus Caesar distinguished this place, because it was here that he defeated Antony and his party of adherents. He took the city at the first onset, and compelled Antony to put himself to death, but Cleopatra to surrender herself alive. A short time afterwards, however, she also put an end to her life secretly, in prison, by the bite of an asp, or (for there are two accounts) by the application of a poisonous ointment. Thus the empire of the Lagidae, which had subsisted many years, was dissolved. 17.1.53. Egypt was from the first disposed to peace, from having resources within itself, and because it was difficult of access to strangers. It was also protected on the north by a harbourless coast and the Egyptian Sea; on the east and west by the desert mountains of Libya and Arabia, as I have said before. The remaining parts towards the south are occupied by Troglodytae, Blemmyes, Nubae, and Megabari, Ethiopians above Syene. These are nomads, and not numerous nor warlike, but accounted so by the ancients, because frequently, like robbers, they attacked defenceless persons. Neither are the Ethiopians, who extend towards the south and Meroe, numerous nor collected in a body; for they inhabit a long, narrow, and winding tract of land on the riverside, such as we have before described; nor are they well prepared either for war or the pursuit of any other mode of life.At present the whole country is in the same pacific state, a proof of which is, that the upper country is sufficiently guarded by three cohorts, and these not complete. Whenever the Ethiopians have ventured to attack them, it has been at the risk of danger to their own country. The rest of the forces in Egypt are neither very numerous, nor did the Romans ever once employ them collected into one army. For neither are the Egyptians themselves of a warlike disposition, nor the surrounding nations, although their numbers are very large.Cornelius Gallus, the first governor of the country appointed by (Augustus) Caesar, attacked the city Heroopolis, which had revolted, and took it with a small body of men. He suppressed also in a short time an insurrection in the Thebais, which originated as to the payment of tribute. At a later period Petronius resisted, with the soldiers about his person, a mob of myriads of Alexandrines, who attacked him by throwing stones. He killed some, and compelled the rest to desist.We have before related how Aelius Gallus, when he invaded Arabia with a part of the army stationed in Egypt, exhibited a proof of the unwarlike disposition of the people; and if Syllaeus had not betrayed him, he would have conquered the whole of Arabia Felix.
181. Pausanias, Nat., 13.44, 36.69  Tagged with subjects: •augustus (octavian) Found in books: Faßbeck and Killebrew (2016), Viewing Ancient Jewish Art and Archaeology: VeHinnei Rachel - Essays in honor of Rachel Hachlili, 285, 365
182. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 217
184. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 2.59, 2.70, 2.79.2-2.79.3, 2.81.3, 2.86.3, 2.88, 2.94-2.100, 2.113.2  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, as octavian •octavian/augustus •augustus/octavian •augustus/octavian, as pater patriae •augustus/octavian, as imitator of fabius cunctator Found in books: Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019), Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience, 103, 138, 159; Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 67, 175; Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 181; Roller (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 189; Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 43
185. Vergil, Eclogues, 1.6-1.10, 7.12-7.13, 9.46-9.50  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, constitutional status of •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods •augustus, as octavian •augustus/octavian, urban buildings / monuments Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 67; Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 51, 52; Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 199
190. Caes., Fr., 85  Tagged with subjects: •julius caesar octavianus, c. (octavian, later augustus) Found in books: Walters (2020), Imagery of the Body Politic in Ciceronian Rome, 110
195. Papyri, P.Mich., 3.166, 7.433  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian •augustus/octavian, temple of augustus in alexandria •augustus/octavian, temples of upper egpyt Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 117
196. Papyri, P.Mil., 9  Tagged with subjects: •augustus (octavian) Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 259
197. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.39-1.41, 1.289-1.290, 1.462, 1.637, 2.681-2.704, 4.193, 4.215-4.217, 4.622-4.629, 5.604-5.699, 6.14-6.41, 6.333-6.547, 6.605, 6.752-6.892, 7.73-7.80, 7.785-7.788, 8.306-8.369, 8.620, 8.671-8.731, 9.590-9.665, 10.205-10.206, 10.495-10.505, 11.497, 12.940-12.952  Tagged with subjects: •augustus, as octavian •augustus/octavian, as author and builder •augustus/octavian, power of •augustus/octavian, relation with caesar •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus •augustus (octavian, emperor) •augustus/octavian, as pater patriae •augustus/octavian, as performer of a public image •augustus/octavian, as collective construction •augustus/octavian, as reader •augustus/octavian, conspiracies against •augustus/octavian, as object of public gaze •augustus/octavian, early self-representations Found in books: Giusti (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 10, 41, 233; Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 67; Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 53, 55, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 70, 79, 80, 93, 114, 119, 125, 126, 154, 155, 156, 158, 160, 162, 163, 165, 169, 198, 199, 200, 201, 203, 204, 205, 243, 251; Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 197, 229; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 57, 58
1.39. its griefs and wrongs: the choice by Paris made; 1.40. her scorned and slighted beauty; a whole race 1.41. rebellious to her godhead; and Jove's smile 1.289. on seasoned wine and succulent haunch of game. 1.290. But hunger banished and the banquet done, 1.462. honors divine. We Tyrian virgins oft 1.637. now told upon men's lips the whole world round. 2.681. hattered, and in his very hearth and home 2.682. th' exulting foe, the aged King did bind 2.683. his rusted armor to his trembling thews,— 2.684. all vainly,— and a useless blade of steel 2.685. he girded on; then charged, resolved to die 2.686. encircled by the foe. Within his walls 2.687. there stood, beneath the wide and open sky, 2.688. a lofty altar; an old laurel-tree 2.689. leaned o'er it, and enclasped in holy shade 2.690. the statues of the tutelary powers. 2.691. Here Hecuba and all the princesses 2.692. took refuge vain within the place of prayer. 2.693. Like panic-stricken doves in some dark storm, 2.694. close-gathering they sate, and in despair 2.695. embraced their graven gods. But when the Queen 2.696. aw Priam with his youthful harness on, 2.697. “What frenzy, O my wretched lord,” she cried, 2.698. “Arrayed thee in such arms? O, whither now? 2.699. Not such defences, nor such arm as thine, 2.700. the time requires, though thy companion were 2.701. our Hector's self. O, yield thee, I implore! 2.702. This altar now shall save us one and all, 2.703. or we must die together.” With these words 2.704. he drew him to her side, and near the shrine 4.193. and fiercely champs the foam-flecked bridle-rein. 4.215. of woodland creatures; the wild goats are seen, 4.216. from pointed crag descending leap by leap 4.217. down the steep ridges; in the vales below 4.622. mite with alternate wrath: Ioud is the roar, 4.623. and from its rocking top the broken boughs 4.624. are strewn along the ground; but to the crag 4.625. teadfast it ever clings; far as toward heaven 4.626. its giant crest uprears, so deep below 4.627. its roots reach down to Tartarus:—not less 4.628. the hero by unceasing wail and cry 4.629. is smitten sore, and in his mighty heart 5.604. in soothing words: “Ill-starred! What mad attempt 5.605. is in thy mind? Will not thy heart confess 5.606. thy strength surpassed, and auspices averse? 5.607. Submit, for Heaven decrees!” With such wise words 5.608. he sundered the fell strife. But trusty friends 5.609. bore Dares off: his spent limbs helpless trailed, 5.610. his head he could not lift, and from his lips 5.611. came blood and broken teeth. So to the ship 5.612. they bore him, taking, at Aeneas' word, 5.613. the helmet and the sword—but left behind 5.614. Entellus' prize of victory, the bull. 5.615. He, then, elate and glorying, spoke forth: 5.616. “See, goddess-born, and all ye Teucrians, see, 5.617. what strength was mine in youth, and from what death 5.618. ye have clelivered Dares.” Saying so, 5.619. he turned him full front to the bull, who stood 5.620. for reward of the fight, and, drawing back 5.621. his right hand, poising the dread gauntlet high, 5.622. wung sheer between the horns and crushed the skull; 5.623. a trembling, lifeless creature, to the ground 5.624. the bull dropped forward dead. Above the fallen 5.625. Entellus cried aloud, “This victim due 5.626. I give thee, Eryx , more acceptable 5.627. than Dares' death to thy benigt shade. 5.628. For this last victory and joyful day, 5.630. Forthwith Aeneas summons all who will 5.631. to contest of swift arrows, and displays 5.632. reward and prize. With mighty hand he rears 5.633. a mast within th' arena, from the ship 5.634. of good Sergestus taken; and thereto 5.635. a fluttering dove by winding cord is bound 5.636. for target of their shafts. Soon to the match 5.637. the rival bowmen came and cast the lots 5.638. into a brazen helmet. First came forth 5.639. Hippocoon's number, son of Hyrtacus, 5.640. by cheers applauded; Mnestheus was the next, 5.641. late victor in the ship-race, Mnestheus crowned 5.642. with olive-garland; next Eurytion, 5.643. brother of thee, O bowman most renowned, 5.644. Pandarus, breaker of the truce, who hurled 5.645. his shaft upon the Achaeans, at the word 5.646. the goddess gave. Acestes' Iot and name 5.647. came from the helmet last, whose royal hand 5.648. the deeds of youth dared even yet to try. 5.649. Each then with strong arm bends his pliant bow, 5.650. each from the quiver plucks a chosen shaft. 5.651. First, with loud arrow whizzing from the string, 5.652. the young Hippocoon with skyward aim 5.653. cuts through the yielding air; and lo! his barb 5.654. pierces the very wood, and makes the mast 5.655. tremble; while with a fluttering, frighted wing 5.656. the bird tugs hard,—and plaudits fill the sky. 5.657. Boldly rose Mnestheus, and with bow full-drawn 5.658. aimed both his eye and shaft aloft; but he 5.659. failing, unhappy man, to bring his barb 5.660. up to the dove herself, just cut the cord 5.661. and broke the hempen bond, whereby her feet 5.662. were captive to the tree: she, taking flight, 5.663. clove through the shadowing clouds her path of air. 5.664. But swiftly—for upon his waiting bow 5.665. he held a shaft in rest—Eurytion 5.666. invoked his brother's shade, and, marking well 5.667. the dove, whose happy pinions fluttered free 5.668. in vacant sky, pierced her, hard by a cloud; 5.669. lifeless she fell, and left in light of heaven 5.670. her spark of life, as, floating down, she bore 5.671. the arrow back to earth. Acestes now 5.672. remained, last rival, though the victor's palm 5.673. to him was Iost; yet did the aged sire, 5.674. to show his prowess and resounding bow, 5.675. hurl forth one shaft in air; then suddenly 5.676. all eyes beheld such wonder as portends 5.677. events to be (but when fulfilment came, 5.678. too late the fearful seers its warning sung): 5.679. for, soaring through the stream of cloud, his shaft 5.680. took fire, tracing its bright path in flame, 5.681. then vanished on the wind,—as oft a star 5.682. will fall unfastened from the firmament, 5.683. while far behind its blazing tresses flow. 5.684. Awe-struck both Trojan and Trinacrian stood, 5.685. calling upon the gods. Nor came the sign 5.686. in vain to great Aeneas. But his arms 5.687. folded the blest Acestes to his heart, 5.688. and, Ioading him with noble gifts, he cried: 5.689. “Receive them, sire! The great Olympian King 5.690. ome peerless honor to thy name decrees 5.691. by such an omen given. I offer thee 5.692. this bowl with figures graven, which my sire, 5.693. good gray Anchises, for proud gift received 5.694. of Thracian Cisseus, for their friendship's pledge 5.695. and memory evermore.” Thereon he crowned 5.696. his brows with garland of the laurel green, 5.697. and named Acestes victor over all. 5.698. Nor could Eurytion, noble youth, think ill 5.699. of honor which his own surpassed, though he, 6.14. The templed hill where lofty Phoebus reigns, 6.15. And that far-off, inviolable shrine 6.16. of dread Sibylla, in stupendous cave, 6.17. O'er whose deep soul the god of Delos breathes 6.18. Prophetic gifts, unfolding things to come. 6.20. Here Daedalus, the ancient story tells, 6.21. Escaping Minos' power, and having made 6.22. Hazard of heaven on far-mounting wings, 6.23. Floated to northward, a cold, trackless way, 6.24. And lightly poised, at last, o'er Cumae 's towers. 6.25. Here first to earth come down, he gave to thee 6.26. His gear of wings, Apollo! and ordained 6.27. Vast temples to thy name and altars fair. 6.28. On huge bronze doors Androgeos' death was done; 6.29. And Cecrops' children paid their debt of woe, 6.30. Where, seven and seven,—0 pitiable sight!— 6.31. The youths and maidens wait the annual doom, 6.32. Drawn out by lot from yonder marble urn. 6.33. Beyond, above a sea, lay carven Crete :— 6.34. The bull was there; the passion, the strange guile; 6.35. And Queen Pasiphae's brute-human son, 6.36. The Minotaur—of monstrous loves the sign. 6.37. Here was the toilsome, labyrinthine maze, 6.38. Where, pitying love-lorn Ariadne's tears, 6.39. The crafty Daedalus himself betrayed 6.40. The secret of his work; and gave the clue 6.41. To guide the path of Theseus through the gloom. 6.333. An altar dark, and piled upon the flames 6.334. The ponderous entrails of the bulls, and poured 6.335. Free o'er the burning flesh the goodly oil. 6.336. Then lo! at dawn's dim, earliest beam began 6.337. Beneath their feet a groaning of the ground : 6.338. The wooded hill-tops shook, and, as it seemed, 6.339. She-hounds of hell howled viewless through the shade , 6.340. To hail their Queen. “Away, 0 souls profane! 6.341. Stand far away!” the priestess shrieked, “nor dare 6.342. Unto this grove come near! Aeneas, on! 6.343. Begin thy journey! Draw thy sheathed blade! 6.344. Now, all thy courage! now, th' unshaken soul!” 6.345. She spoke, and burst into the yawning cave 6.346. With frenzied step; he follows where she leads, 6.348. Ye gods! who rule the spirits of the dead! 6.349. Ye voiceless shades and silent lands of night! 6.350. 0 Phlegethon! 0 Chaos! let my song, 6.351. If it be lawful, in fit words declare 6.352. What I have heard; and by your help divine 6.353. Unfold what hidden things enshrouded lie 6.355. They walked exploring the unpeopled night, 6.356. Through Pluto's vacuous realms, and regions void, 6.357. As when one's path in dreary woodlands winds 6.358. Beneath a misty moon's deceiving ray, 6.359. When Jove has mantled all his heaven in shade, 6.360. And night seals up the beauty of the world. 6.361. In the first courts and entrances of Hell 6.362. Sorrows and vengeful Cares on couches lie : 6.363. There sad Old Age abides, Diseases pale, 6.364. And Fear, and Hunger, temptress to all crime; 6.365. Want, base and vile, and, two dread shapes to see, 6.366. Bondage and Death : then Sleep, Death's next of kin; 6.367. And dreams of guilty joy. Death-dealing War 6.368. Is ever at the doors, and hard thereby 6.369. The Furies' beds of steel, where wild-eyed Strife 6.371. There in the middle court a shadowy elm 6.372. Its ancient branches spreads, and in its leaves 6.373. Deluding visions ever haunt and cling. 6.374. Then come strange prodigies of bestial kind : 6.375. Centaurs are stabled there, and double shapes 6.376. Like Scylla, or the dragon Lerna bred, 6.377. With hideous scream; Briareus clutching far 6.378. His hundred hands, Chimaera girt with flame, 6.379. A crowd of Gorgons, Harpies of foul wing, 6.380. And giant Geryon's triple-monstered shade. 6.381. Aeneas, shuddering with sudden fear, 6.382. Drew sword and fronted them with naked steel; 6.383. And, save his sage conductress bade him know 6.384. These were but shapes and shadows sweeping by, 6.386. Hence the way leads to that Tartarean stream 6.387. of Acheron, whose torrent fierce and foul 6.388. Disgorges in Cocytus all its sands. 6.389. A ferryman of gruesome guise keeps ward 6.390. Upon these waters,—Charon, foully garbed, 6.391. With unkempt, thick gray beard upon his chin, 6.392. And staring eyes of flame; a mantle coarse, 6.393. All stained and knotted, from his shoulder falls, 6.394. As with a pole he guides his craft, tends sail, 6.395. And in the black boat ferries o'er his dead;— 6.396. Old, but a god's old age looks fresh and strong. 6.397. To those dim shores the multitude streams on— 6.398. Husbands and wives, and pale, unbreathing forms 6.399. of high-souled heroes, boys and virgins fair, 6.400. And strong youth at whose graves fond parents mourned. 6.401. As numberless the throng as leaves that fall 6.402. When autumn's early frost is on the grove; 6.403. Or like vast flocks of birds by winter's chill 6.404. Sent flying o'er wide seas to lands of flowers. 6.405. All stood beseeching to begin their voyage 6.406. Across that river, and reached out pale hands, 6.407. In passionate yearning for its distant shore. 6.408. But the grim boatman takes now these, now those, 6.409. Or thrusts unpitying from the stream away. 6.410. Aeneas, moved to wonder and deep awe, 6.411. Beheld the tumult; “Virgin seer!” he cried, . 6.412. “Why move the thronging ghosts toward yonder stream? 6.413. What seek they there? Or what election holds 6.414. That these unwilling linger, while their peers 6.415. Sweep forward yonder o'er the leaden waves?” 6.416. To him, in few, the aged Sibyl spoke : 6.417. “Son of Anchises, offspring of the gods, 6.418. Yon are Cocytus and the Stygian stream, 6.419. By whose dread power the gods themselves do fear 6.420. To take an oath in vain. Here far and wide 6.421. Thou seest the hapless throng that hath no grave. 6.422. That boatman Charon bears across the deep 6.423. Such as be sepulchred with holy care. 6.424. But over that loud flood and dreadful shore 6.425. No trav'ler may be borne, until in peace 6.426. His gathered ashes rest. A hundred years 6.427. Round this dark borderland some haunt and roam, 6.428. Then win late passage o'er the longed-for wave.” 6.429. Aeneas lingered for a little space, 6.430. Revolving in his soul with pitying prayer 6.431. Fate's partial way. But presently he sees 6.432. Leucaspis and the Lycian navy's lord, 6.433. Orontes; both of melancholy brow, 6.434. Both hapless and unhonored after death, 6.435. Whom, while from Troy they crossed the wind-swept seas, 6.437. There, too, the helmsman Palinurus strayed : 6.438. Who, as he whilom watched the Libyan stars, 6.439. Had fallen, plunging from his lofty seat 6.440. Into the billowy deep. Aeneas now 6.441. Discerned his sad face through the blinding gloom, 6.442. And hailed him thus : “0 Palinurus, tell 6.443. What god was he who ravished thee away 6.444. From me and mine, beneath the o'crwhelming wave? 6.445. Speak on! for he who ne'er had spoke untrue, 6.446. Apollo's self, did mock my listening mind, 6.447. And chanted me a faithful oracle 6.448. That thou shouldst ride the seas unharmed, and touch 6.449. Ausonian shores. Is this the pledge divine?” 6.450. Then he, “0 chieftain of Anchises' race, 6.451. Apollo's tripod told thee not untrue. 6.452. No god did thrust me down beneath the wave, 6.453. For that strong rudder unto which I clung, 6.454. My charge and duty, and my ship's sole guide, 6.455. Wrenched from its place, dropped with me as I fell. 6.456. Not for myself—by the rude seas I swear— 6.457. Did I have terror, but lest thy good ship, 6.458. Stripped of her gear, and her poor pilot lost, 6.459. Should fail and founder in that rising flood. 6.460. Three wintry nights across the boundless main 6.461. The south wind buffeted and bore me on; 6.462. At the fourth daybreak, lifted from the surge, 6.463. I looked at last on Italy , and swam 6.464. With weary stroke on stroke unto the land. 6.465. Safe was I then. Alas! but as I climbed 6.466. With garments wet and heavy, my clenched hand 6.467. Grasping the steep rock, came a cruel horde 6.468. Upon me with drawn blades, accounting me— 6.469. So blind they were!—a wrecker's prize and spoil. 6.470. Now are the waves my tomb; and wandering winds 6.471. Toss me along the coast. 0, I implore, 6.472. By heaven's sweet light, by yonder upper air, 6.473. By thy lost father, by lulus dear, 6.474. Thy rising hope and joy, that from these woes, 6.475. Unconquered chieftain, thou wilt set me free! 6.476. Give me a grave where Velia 's haven lies, 6.477. For thou hast power! Or if some path there be, 6.478. If thy celestial mother guide thee here 6.479. (For not, I ween, without the grace of gods 6.480. Wilt cross yon rivers vast, you Stygian pool) 6.481. Reach me a hand! and bear with thee along! 6.482. Until (least gift!) death bring me peace and calm.” 6.483. Such words he spoke: the priestess thus replied: 6.484. “Why, Palinurus, these unblest desires? 6.485. Wouldst thou, unsepulchred, behold the wave 6.486. of Styx, stern river of th' Eumenides? 6.487. Wouldst thou, unbidden, tread its fearful strand? 6.488. Hope not by prayer to change the laws of Heaven! 6.489. But heed my words, and in thy memory 6.490. Cherish and keep, to cheer this evil time. 6.491. Lo, far and wide, led on by signs from Heaven, 6.492. Thy countrymen from many a templed town 6.493. Shall consecrate thy dust, and build thy tomb, 6.494. A tomb with annual feasts and votive flowers, 6.495. To Palinurus a perpetual fame!” 6.496. Thus was his anguish stayed, from his sad heart 6.497. Grief ebbed awhile, and even to this day, 6.499. The twain continue now their destined way 6.500. Unto the river's edge. The Ferryman, 6.501. Who watched them through still groves approach his shore, 6.502. Hailed them, at distance, from the Stygian wave, 6.503. And with reproachful summons thus began: 6.504. “Whoe'er thou art that in this warrior guise 6.505. Unto my river comest,—quickly tell 6.506. Thine errand! Stay thee where thou standest now! 6.507. This is ghosts' land, for sleep and slumbrous dark. 6.508. That flesh and blood my Stygian ship should bear 6.509. Were lawless wrong. Unwillingly I took 6.510. Alcides, Theseus, and Pirithous, 6.511. Though sons of gods, too mighty to be quelled. 6.512. One bound in chains yon warder of Hell's door, 6.513. And dragged him trembling from our monarch's throne: 6.514. The others, impious, would steal away 6.515. Out of her bride-bed Pluto's ravished Queen.” 6.516. Briefly th' Amphrysian priestess made reply: 6.517. “Not ours, such guile: Fear not! This warrior's arms 6.518. Are innocent. Let Cerberus from his cave 6.519. Bay ceaselessly, the bloodless shades to scare; 6.520. Let Proserpine immaculately keep 6.521. The house and honor of her kinsman King. 6.522. Trojan Aeneas, famed for faithful prayer 6.523. And victory in arms, descends to seek 6.524. His father in this gloomy deep of death. 6.525. If loyal goodness move not such as thee, 6.526. This branch at least” (she drew it from her breast) 6.527. “Thou knowest well.” 6.528. Then cooled his wrathful heart; 6.529. With silent lips he looked and wondering eyes 6.530. Upon that fateful, venerable wand, 6.531. Seen only once an age. Shoreward he turned, 6.532. And pushed their way his boat of leaden hue. 6.533. The rows of crouching ghosts along the thwarts 6.534. He scattered, cleared a passage, and gave room 6.535. To great Aeneas. The light shallop groaned 6.536. Beneath his weight, and, straining at each seam, 6.537. Took in the foul flood with unstinted flow. 6.538. At last the hero and his priestess-guide 6.539. Came safe across the river, and were moored 6.541. Here Cerberus, with triple-throated roar, 6.542. Made all the region ring, as there he lay 6.543. At vast length in his cave. The Sibyl then, 6.544. Seeing the serpents writhe around his neck, 6.545. Threw down a loaf with honeyed herbs imbued 6.546. And drowsy essences: he, ravenous, 6.547. Gaped wide his three fierce mouths and snatched the bait, 6.605. Would soothe her angry soul. But on the ground 6.752. Came on my view; their hands made stroke at Heaven 6.753. And strove to thrust Jove from his seat on high. 6.754. I saw Salmoneus his dread stripes endure, 6.755. Who dared to counterfeit Olympian thunder 6.756. And Jove's own fire. In chariot of four steeds, 6.757. Brandishing torches, he triumphant rode 6.758. Through throngs of Greeks, o'er Elis ' sacred way, 6.759. Demanding worship as a god. 0 fool! 6.760. To mock the storm's inimitable flash— 6.761. With crash of hoofs and roll of brazen wheel! 6.762. But mightiest Jove from rampart of thick cloud 6.763. Hurled his own shaft, no flickering, mortal flame, 6.764. And in vast whirl of tempest laid him low. 6.765. Next unto these, on Tityos I looked, 6.766. Child of old Earth, whose womb all creatures bears: 6.767. Stretched o'er nine roods he lies; a vulture huge 6.768. Tears with hooked beak at his immortal side, 6.769. Or deep in entrails ever rife with pain 6.770. Gropes for a feast, making his haunt and home 6.771. In the great Titan bosom; nor will give 6.772. To ever new-born flesh surcease of woe. 6.773. Why name Ixion and Pirithous, 6.774. The Lapithae, above whose impious brows 6.775. A crag of flint hangs quaking to its fall, 6.776. As if just toppling down, while couches proud, 6.777. Propped upon golden pillars, bid them feast 6.778. In royal glory: but beside them lies 6.779. The eldest of the Furies, whose dread hands 6.780. Thrust from the feast away, and wave aloft 6.781. A flashing firebrand, with shrieks of woe. 6.782. Here in a prison-house awaiting doom 6.783. Are men who hated, long as life endured, 6.784. Their brothers, or maltreated their gray sires, 6.785. Or tricked a humble friend; the men who grasped 6.786. At hoarded riches, with their kith and kin 6.787. Not sharing ever—an unnumbered throng; 6.788. Here slain adulterers be; and men who dared 6.789. To fight in unjust cause, and break all faith 6.790. With their own lawful lords. Seek not to know 6.791. What forms of woe they feel, what fateful shape 6.792. of retribution hath o'erwhelmed them there. 6.793. Some roll huge boulders up; some hang on wheels, 6.794. Lashed to the whirling spokes; in his sad seat 6.795. Theseus is sitting, nevermore to rise; 6.796. Unhappy Phlegyas uplifts his voice 6.797. In warning through the darkness, calling loud, 6.798. ‘0, ere too late, learn justice and fear God!’ 6.799. Yon traitor sold his country, and for gold 6.800. Enchained her to a tyrant, trafficking 6.801. In laws, for bribes enacted or made void; 6.802. Another did incestuously take 6.803. His daughter for a wife in lawless bonds. 6.804. All ventured some unclean, prodigious crime; 6.805. And what they dared, achieved. I could not tell, 6.806. Not with a hundred mouths, a hundred tongues, 6.807. Or iron voice, their divers shapes of sin, 6.809. So spake Apollo's aged prophetess. 6.810. “Now up and on!” she cried. “Thy task fulfil! 6.811. We must make speed. Behold yon arching doors 6.812. Yon walls in furnace of the Cyclops forged! 6.813. 'T is there we are commanded to lay down 6.814. Th' appointed offering.” So, side by side, 6.815. Swift through the intervening dark they strode, 6.816. And, drawing near the portal-arch, made pause. 6.817. Aeneas, taking station at the door, 6.818. Pure, lustral waters o'er his body threw, 6.820. Now, every rite fulfilled, and tribute due 6.821. Paid to the sovereign power of Proserpine, 6.822. At last within a land delectable 6.823. Their journey lay, through pleasurable bowers 6.824. of groves where all is joy,—a blest abode! 6.825. An ampler sky its roseate light bestows 6.826. On that bright land, which sees the cloudless beam 6.827. of suns and planets to our earth unknown. 6.828. On smooth green lawns, contending limb with limb, 6.829. Immortal athletes play, and wrestle long 6.830. 'gainst mate or rival on the tawny sand; 6.831. With sounding footsteps and ecstatic song, 6.832. Some thread the dance divine: among them moves 6.833. The bard of Thrace , in flowing vesture clad, 6.834. Discoursing seven-noted melody, 6.835. Who sweeps the numbered strings with changeful hand, 6.836. Or smites with ivory point his golden lyre. 6.837. Here Trojans be of eldest, noblest race, 6.838. Great-hearted heroes, born in happier times, 6.839. Ilus, Assaracus, and Dardanus, 6.840. Illustrious builders of the Trojan town. 6.841. Their arms and shadowy chariots he views, 6.842. And lances fixed in earth, while through the fields 6.843. Their steeds without a bridle graze at will. 6.844. For if in life their darling passion ran 6.845. To chariots, arms, or glossy-coated steeds, 6.846. The self-same joy, though in their graves, they feel. 6.847. Lo! on the left and right at feast reclined 6.848. Are other blessed souls, whose chorus sings 6.849. Victorious paeans on the fragrant air 6.850. of laurel groves; and hence to earth outpours 6.851. Eridanus, through forests rolling free. 6.852. Here dwell the brave who for their native land 6.853. Fell wounded on the field; here holy priests 6.854. Who kept them undefiled their mortal day; 6.855. And poets, of whom the true-inspired song 6.856. Deserved Apollo's name; and all who found 6.857. New arts, to make man's life more blest or fair; 6.858. Yea! here dwell all those dead whose deeds bequeath 6.859. Deserved and grateful memory to their kind. 6.860. And each bright brow a snow-white fillet wears. 6.861. Unto this host the Sibyl turned, and hailed 6.862. Musaeus, midmost of a numerous throng, 6.863. Who towered o'er his peers a shoulder higher: 6.864. “0 spirits blest! 0 venerable bard! 6.865. Declare what dwelling or what region holds 6.866. Anchises, for whose sake we twain essayed 6.867. Yon passage over the wide streams of hell.” 6.868. And briefly thus the hero made reply: 6.869. “No fixed abode is ours. In shadowy groves 6.870. We make our home, or meadows fresh and fair, 6.871. With streams whose flowery banks our couches be. 6.872. But you, if thitherward your wishes turn, 6.873. Climb yonder hill, where I your path may show.” 6.874. So saying, he strode forth and led them on, 6.875. Till from that vantage they had prospect fair 6.876. of a wide, shining land; thence wending down, 6.877. They left the height they trod; for far below 6.878. Father Anchises in a pleasant vale 6.879. Stood pondering, while his eyes and thought surveyed 6.880. A host of prisoned spirits, who there abode 6.881. Awaiting entrance to terrestrial air. 6.882. And musing he reviewed the legions bright 6.883. of his own progeny and offspring proud— 6.884. Their fates and fortunes, virtues and great deeds. 6.885. Soon he discerned Aeneas drawing nigh 6.886. o'er the green slope, and, lifting both his hands 6.887. In eager welcome, spread them swiftly forth. 6.888. Tears from his eyelids rained, and thus he spoke: 6.889. “Art here at last? Hath thy well-proven love 6.890. of me thy sire achieved yon arduous way? 6.891. Will Heaven, beloved son, once more allow 6.892. That eye to eye we look? and shall I hear 7.73. Him the queen mother chiefly loved, and yearned 7.74. to call him soon her son. But omens dire 7.75. and menaces from Heaven withstood her will. 7.76. A laurel-tree grew in the royal close, 7.77. of sacred leaf and venerated age, 7.78. which, when he builded there his wall and tower, 7.79. Father Latinus found, and hallowed it 7.80. to Phoebus' grace and power, wherefrom the name 7.785. my bark away! O wretches, your own blood 7.786. hall pay the forfeit for your impious crime. 7.787. O Turnus! O abominable deed! 7.788. Avenging woes pursue thee; to deaf gods 8.306. rolling this way and that his wrathful eyes, 8.307. gnashing his teeth. Three times his ire surveyed 8.308. the slope of Aventine ; three times he stormed 8.309. the rock-built gate in vain; and thrice withdrew 8.310. to rest him in the vale. But high above 8.311. a pointed peak arose, sheer face of rock 8.312. on every side, which towered into view 8.313. from the long ridge above the vaulted cave, 8.314. fit haunt for birds of evil-boding wing. 8.315. This peak, which leftward toward the river leaned, 8.316. he smote upon its right—his utmost blow — 8.317. breaking its bases Ioose; then suddenly 8.318. thrust at it: as he thrust, the thunder-sound 8.319. filled all the arching sky, the river's banks 8.320. asunder leaped, and Tiber in alarm 8.321. reversed his flowing wave. So Cacus' lair 8.322. lay shelterless, and naked to the day 8.323. the gloomy caverns of his vast abode 8.324. tood open, deeply yawning, just as if 8.325. the riven earth should crack, and open wide 8.326. th' infernal world and fearful kingdoms pale, 8.327. which gods abhor; and to the realms on high 8.328. the measureless abyss should be laid bare, 8.329. and pale ghosts shrink before the entering sun. 8.330. Now upon Cacus, startled by the glare, 8.331. caged in the rocks and howling horribly, 8.332. Alcides hurled his weapons, raining down 8.333. all sorts of deadly missiles—trunks of trees, 8.334. and monstrous boulders from the mountain torn. 8.335. But when the giant from his mortal strait 8.336. no refuge knew, he blew from his foul jaws 8.337. a storm of smoke—incredible to tell — 8.338. and with thick darkness blinding every eye, 8.339. concealed his cave, uprolling from below 8.340. one pitch-black night of mingled gloom and fire. 8.341. This would Alcides not endure, but leaped 8.342. headlong across the flames, where densest hung 8.343. the rolling smoke, and through the cavern surged 8.344. a drifting and impenetrable cloud. 8.345. With Cacus, who breathed unavailing flame, 8.346. he grappled in the dark, locked limb with limb, 8.347. and strangled him, till o'er the bloodless throat 8.348. the starting eyeballs stared. Then Hercules 8.349. burst wide the doorway of the sooty den, 8.350. and unto Heaven and all the people showed 8.351. the stolen cattle and the robber's crimes, 8.352. and dragged forth by the feet the shapeless corpse 8.353. of the foul monster slain. The people gazed 8.354. insatiate on the grewsome eyes, the breast 8.355. of bristling shag, the face both beast and man, 8.356. and that fire-blasted throat whence breathed no more 8.357. the extinguished flame. 'T is since that famous day 8.358. we celebrate this feast, and glad of heart 8.359. each generation keeps the holy time. 8.360. Potitius began the worship due, 8.361. and our Pinarian house is vowed to guard 8.362. the rites of Hercules. An altar fair 8.363. within this wood they raised; 't is called ‘the Great,’ 8.364. and Ara Maxima its name shall be. 8.365. Come now, my warriors, and bind your brows 8.366. with garlands worthy of the gift of Heaven. 8.367. Lift high the cup in every thankful hand, 8.368. and praise our people's god with plenteous wine.” 8.369. He spoke; and of the poplar's changeful sheen, 8.620. Pallas was at his side; Achates too 8.671. Seek ye a king from far!’ So in the field 8.672. inert and fearful lies Etruria's force, 8.673. disarmed by oracles. Their Tarchon sent 8.674. envoys who bore a sceptre and a crown 8.675. even to me, and prayed I should assume 8.676. the sacred emblems of Etruria's king, 8.677. and lead their host to war. But unto me 8.678. cold, sluggish age, now barren and outworn, 8.679. denies new kingdoms, and my slow-paced powers 8.680. run to brave deeds no more. Nor could I urge 8.681. my son, who by his Sabine mother's line 8.682. is half Italian-born. Thyself art he, 8.683. whose birth illustrious and manly prime 8.684. fate favors and celestial powers approve. 8.685. Therefore go forth, O bravest chief and King 8.686. of Troy and Italy ! To thee I give 8.687. the hope and consolation of our throne, 8.688. pallas, my son, and bid him find in thee 8.689. a master and example, while he learns 8.690. the soldier's arduous toil. With thy brave deeds 8.691. let him familiar grow, and reverence thee 8.692. with youthful love and honor. In his train 8.693. two hundred horsemen of Arcadia , 8.694. our choicest men-at-arms, shall ride; and he 8.695. in his own name an equal band shall bring 8.696. to follow only thee.” Such the discourse. 8.697. With meditative brows and downcast eyes 8.698. Aeneas and Achates, sad at heart, 8.699. mused on unnumbered perils yet to come. 8.700. But out of cloudless sky Cythera's Queen 8.701. gave sudden signal: from th' ethereal dome 8.702. a thunder-peal and flash of quivering fire 8.703. tumultuous broke, as if the world would fall, 8.704. and bellowing Tuscan trumpets shook the air. 8.705. All eyes look up. Again and yet again 8.706. crashed the terrible din, and where the sky 8.707. looked clearest hung a visionary cloud, 8.708. whence through the brightness blazed resounding arms. 8.709. All hearts stood still. But Troy 's heroic son 8.710. knew that his mother in the skies redeemed 8.711. her pledge in sound of thunder: so he cried, 8.712. “Seek not, my friend, seek not thyself to read 8.713. the meaning of the omen. 'T is to me 8.714. Olympus calls. My goddess-mother gave 8.715. long since her promise of a heavenly sign 8.716. if war should burst; and that her power would bring 8.717. a panoply from Vulcan through the air, 8.718. to help us at our need. Alas, what deaths 8.719. over Laurentum's ill-starred host impend! 8.720. O Turnus, what a reckoning thou shalt pay 8.721. to me in arms! O Tiber , in thy wave 8.722. what helms and shields and mighty soldiers slain 8.723. hall in confusion roll! Yea, let them lead 8.725. He said: and from the lofty throne uprose. 8.726. Straightway he roused anew the slumbering fire 8.727. acred to Hercules, and glad at heart 8.728. adored, as yesterday, the household gods 8.729. revered by good Evander, at whose side 8.730. the Trojan company made sacrifice 8.731. of chosen lambs, with fitting rites and true. 9.590. look on the man who slew them! Draw on me 9.591. your swords, Rutulians! The whole stratagem 9.592. was mine, mine only, and the lad ye slay 9.593. dared not, and could not. O, by Heaven above 9.594. and by the all-beholding stars I swear, 9.595. he did but love his hapless friend too well.” 9.596. But while he spoke, the furious-thrusting sword 9.597. had pierced the tender body, and run through 9.598. the bosom white as snow. Euryalus 9.599. ank prone in death; upon his goodly limbs 9.600. the life-blood ran unstopped, and low inclined 9.601. the drooping head; as when some purpled flower, 9.602. cut by the ploughshare, dies, or poppies proud 9.603. with stem forlorn their ruined beauty bow 9.604. before the pelting storm. Then Nisus flew 9.605. traight at his foes; but in their throng would find 9.606. Volscens alone, for none but Volscens stayed: 9.607. they gathered thickly round and grappled him 9.608. in shock of steel with steel. But on he plunged, 9.609. winging in ceaseless circles round his head 9.610. his lightning-sword, and thrust it through the face 9.611. of shrieking Volscens, with his own last breath 9.612. triking his foeman down; then cast himself 9.613. upon his fallen comrade's breast; and there, 9.615. Heroic pair and blest! If aught I sing 9.616. have lasting music, no remotest age 9.617. hall blot your names from honor's storied scroll: 9.618. not while the altars of Aeneas' line 9.619. hall crown the Capitol's unshaken hill, 9.620. nor while the Roman Father's hand sustains 9.622. The Rutules seized the spoils of victory, 9.623. and slowly to their camp, with wail and cry, 9.624. bore Volscens' corse; and in the eamp they made 9.625. like wailing over Rhamnes lifeless found, 9.626. o'er Numa and Serranus, and a throng 9.627. of princes dead. The gazing people pressed 9.628. around the slain, the dying, where the earth 9.629. ran red with slaughter and full many a stream 9.630. of trickling gore; nor did they fail to know 9.631. Messapus' glittering helm, his baldric fair, 9.633. Now, from Tithonus' saffron couch set free, 9.634. Aurora over many a land outpoured 9.635. the rising morn; the sun's advancing beam 9.636. unveiled the world; and Turnus to his host 9.637. gave signal to stand forth, while he arrayed 9.638. himself in glorious arms. Then every chief 9.639. awoke his mail-clad company, and stirred 9.640. their slumbering wrath with tidings from the foe. 9.641. Tumultuously shouting, they impaled 9.642. on lifted spears—O pitiable sight! — 9.643. the heads of Nisus and Euryalus. 9.644. Th' undaunted Trojans stood in battle-line 9.645. along the wall to leftward (for the right 9.646. the river-front defended) keeping guard 9.647. on the broad moat; upon the ramparts high 9.648. ad-eyed they stood, and shuddered as they saw 9.649. the hero-faces thrust aloft; too well 9.651. On restless pinions to the trembling town 9.652. had voiceful Rumor hied, and to the ears 9.653. of that lone mother of Euryalus 9.654. relentless flown. Through all her feeble frame 9.655. the chilling sorrow sped. From both her hands 9.656. dropped web and shuttle; she flew shrieking forth, 9.657. ill-fated mother! and with tresses torn, 9.658. to the wide ramparts and the battle-line 9.659. ran frantic, heeding naught of men-at-arms, 9.660. nor peril nor the rain of falling spears; 9.661. and thus with loud and lamentable cry 9.662. filled all the air: “Is it in yonder guise, 9.663. Euryalus, thou comest? Art thou he, 9.664. last comfort of my life? O cruel one! 9.665. Couldst thou desert me? When they thrust thee forth 10.206. While these in many a shock of grievous war 10.495. who also for the roughness of the ground 10.496. were all unmounted: he (the last resource 10.497. of men in straits) to wild entreaty turned 10.498. and taunts, enkindling their faint hearts anew: 10.499. “Whither, my men! O, by your own brave deeds, 10.500. O, by our lord Evander's happy wars, 10.501. the proud hopes I had to make my name 10.502. a rival glory,—think not ye can fly! 10.503. Your swords alone can carve ye the safe way 10.504. traight through your foes. Where yonder warrior-throng 10.505. is fiercest, thickest, there and only there 11.497. if there be mettle in thee and some drops 12.941. But Sire Aeneas, hearing Turnus' name, 12.942. down the steep rampart from the citadel 12.943. unlingering tried, all lesser task laid by, 12.944. with joy exultant and dread-thundering arms. 12.945. Like Athos ' crest he loomed, or soaring top 12.946. of Eryx , when the nodding oaks resound, 12.947. or sovereign Apennine that lifts in air 12.948. his forehead of triumphant snow. All eyes 12.949. of Troy , Rutulia, and Italy 12.950. were fixed his way; and all who kept a guard 12.951. on lofty rampart, or in siege below 12.952. were battering the foundations, now laid by
198. Papyri, P.Oxy., 25.2435  Tagged with subjects: •augustus (octavian) Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 259
200. Epigraphy, Cil, 6.1033, 6.40952-6.40953  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian, civil wars and •augustus/octavian, and forum augustum exempla •augustus/octavian, as imitator of fabius cunctator Found in books: Roller (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 151, 190; Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 23
201. Veliterna, F1 Stephanus, None  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavianus Found in books: Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 633
203. Papyri, Cpj, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 259; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 141
204. Phaedrus, Fables, 5.7.36-5.7.39  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavianus Found in books: Radicke (2022), Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development, 522
205. Photius, Bibliotheca (Library, Bibl.), 71  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian •augustus/octavian, dio’s view of Found in books: Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 73
206. Anon., Letter of Aristeas, 19, 4, 45  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 236
45. (ways). Immediately therefore I offered sacrifices on behalf of you, your sister, your children, and your friends, and all the people prayed that your plans might prosper continually, and that Almighty God might preserve your kingdom in peace with honour, and that the translation of the
207. Various, Anthologia Palatina, 16.289-16.290  Tagged with subjects: •augustus/octavian Found in books: Gorain (2019), Language in the Confessions of Augustine, 48
208. John Malalas, History, 217.5, 217.12, 338.19  Tagged with subjects: •augustus (octavian) •augustus/octavian, temple of augustus in alexandria Found in books: Faßbeck and Killebrew (2016), Viewing Ancient Jewish Art and Archaeology: VeHinnei Rachel - Essays in honor of Rachel Hachlili, 366; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 113
209. Vergil, Georgics, 1.32-1.35, 1.112, 1.191, 1.488, 3.1-3.48, 3.81, 3.135, 4.559-4.566  Tagged with subjects: •augustus / octavian •augustus / octavian, and capricorn •augustus / octavian, and libra •augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus •augustus/octavian, relation with the gods •augustus/octavian, as author and builder •augustus/octavian, as collective construction •augustus/octavian, as object of public gaze •augustus/octavian, as performer of a public image •augustus/octavian, as reader •augustus/octavian, conspiracies against •augustus/octavian, death and will •augustus/octavian, need for presence across empire •augustus/octavian, power of •augustus, as octavian Found in books: Green (2014), Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus, 97; Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 67; Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 2, 52, 53, 54, 197, 199, 200, 201, 203, 204, 205, 206, 211, 212, 214, 215, 216, 223, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 237, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243; Romana Berno (2023), Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History, 57, 58
1.32. anne novum tardis sidus te mensibus addas, 1.33. qua locus Erigonen inter Chelasque sequentis 1.34. panditur—ipse tibi iam bracchia contrahit ardens 1.35. Scorpius et caeli iusta plus parte reliquit— 1.112. luxuriem segetum tenera depascit in herba, 1.191. at si luxuria foliorum exuberat umbra, 1.488. fulgura nec diri totiens arsere cometae. 3.1. Te quoque, magna Pales, et te memorande canemus 3.2. pastor ab Amphryso, vos, silvae amnesque Lycaei. 3.3. Cetera, quae vacuas tenuissent carmine mentes, 3.4. omnia iam volgata: quis aut Eurysthea durum 3.5. aut inlaudati nescit Busiridis aras? 3.6. Cui non dictus Hylas puer et Latonia Delos 3.7. Hippodameque umeroque Pelops insignis eburno, 3.8. acer equis? Temptanda via est, qua me quoque possim 3.9. tollere humo victorque virum volitare per ora. 3.10. Primus ego in patriam mecum, modo vita supersit, 3.11. Aonio rediens deducam vertice Musas; 3.12. primus Idumaeas referam tibi, Mantua, palmas, 3.13. et viridi in campo templum de marmore ponam 3.14. propter aquam. Tardis ingens ubi flexibus errat 3.15. Mincius et tenera praetexit arundine ripas. 3.16. In medio mihi Caesar erit templumque tenebit: 3.17. illi victor ego et Tyrio conspectus in ostro 3.18. centum quadriiugos agitabo ad flumina currus. 3.19. Cuncta mihi Alpheum linquens lucosque Molorchi 3.20. cursibus et crudo decernet Graecia caestu. 3.21. Ipse caput tonsae foliis ornatus olivae 3.22. dona feram. Iam nunc sollemnis ducere pompas 3.23. ad delubra iuvat caesosque videre iuvencos, 3.24. vel scaena ut versis discedat frontibus utque 3.25. purpurea intexti tollant aulaea Britanni. 3.26. In foribus pugnam ex auro solidoque elephanto 3.27. Gangaridum faciam victorisque arma Quirini, 3.28. atque hic undantem bello magnumque fluentem 3.29. Nilum ac navali surgentis aere columnas. 3.30. Addam urbes Asiae domitas pulsumque Niphaten 3.31. fidentemque fuga Parthum versisque sagittis, 3.32. et duo rapta manu diverso ex hoste tropaea 3.33. bisque triumphatas utroque ab litore gentes. 3.34. Stabunt et Parii lapides, spirantia signa, 3.35. Assaraci proles demissaeque ab Iove gentis 3.36. nomina, Trosque parens et Troiae Cynthius auctor. 3.37. Invidia infelix Furias amnemque severum 3.38. Cocyti metuet tortosque Ixionis anguis 3.39. immanemque rotam et non exsuperabile saxum. 3.40. Interea Dryadum silvas saltusque sequamur 3.41. intactos, tua, Maecenas, haud mollia iussa. 3.42. Te sine nil altum mens incohat; en age segnis 3.43. rumpe moras; vocat ingenti clamore Cithaeron 3.44. Taygetique canes domitrixque Epidaurus equorum 3.45. et vox adsensu nemorum ingeminata remugit. 3.46. Mox tamen ardentis accingar dicere pugnas 3.47. Caesaris et nomen fama tot ferre per annos, 3.48. Tithoni prima quot abest ab origine Caesar. 3.81. luxuriatque toris animosum pectus. Honesti 3.135. Hoc faciunt, nimio ne luxu obtunsior usus 4.559. Haec super arvorum cultu pecorumque canebam 4.560. et super arboribus, Caesar dum magnus ad altum 4.561. fulminat Euphraten bello victorque volentes 4.562. per populos dat iura viamque adfectat Olympo. 4.563. Illo Vergilium me tempore dulcis alebat 4.564. Parthenope studiis florentem ignobilis oti, 4.565. carmina qui lusi pastorum audaxque iuventa, 4.566. Tityre, te patulae cecini sub tegmine fagi.
210. Papyri, P.Yadin, 21.10, 22.11  Tagged with subjects: •augustus (octavian) Found in books: Faßbeck and Killebrew (2016), Viewing Ancient Jewish Art and Archaeology: VeHinnei Rachel - Essays in honor of Rachel Hachlili, 278
211. Augustus, Geography, 5.1, 89.2, 94.12, 98.4  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Green (2014), Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus, 72, 73, 74, 97, 105, 110