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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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10 results for "art"
1. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 38 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •priests, jewish, depiction in medieval jewish art Found in books: Ashbrook Harvey et al (2015) 97
2. Hebrew Bible, Leviticus, 21.5 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •priests, jewish, depiction in medieval jewish art Found in books: Ashbrook Harvey et al (2015) 97
21.5. "לֹא־יקרחה [יִקְרְחוּ] קָרְחָה בְּרֹאשָׁם וּפְאַת זְקָנָם לֹא יְגַלֵּחוּ וּבִבְשָׂרָם לֹא יִשְׂרְטוּ שָׂרָטֶת׃", 21.5. "They shall not make baldness upon their head, neither shall they shave off the corners of their beard, nor make any cuttings in their flesh.",
3. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 2.117 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •priests, jewish, depiction in medieval jewish art Found in books: Ashbrook Harvey et al (2015) 97
2.117. Such, then, is the dress of the high priest. But we must not omit to mention the signification which it conceals beneath both in its whole and in its parts. In its whole it is a copy and representation of the world; and the parts are a representation of the separate parts of the world.
4. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 3.181-3.186 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •priests, jewish, depiction in medieval jewish art Found in books: Ashbrook Harvey et al (2015) 97
3.181. When Moses distinguished the tabernacle into three parts, and allowed two of them to the priests, as a place accessible and common, he denoted the land and the sea, these being of general access to all; but he set apart the third division for God, because heaven is inaccessible to men. 3.182. And when he ordered twelve loaves to be set on the table, he denoted the year, as distinguished into so many months. By branching out the candlestick into seventy parts, he secretly intimated the Decani, or seventy divisions of the planets; and as to the seven lamps upon the candlesticks, they referred to the course of the planets, of which that is the number. 3.183. The veils, too, which were composed of four things, they declared the four elements; for the fine linen was proper to signify the earth, because the flax grows out of the earth; the purple signified the sea, because that color is dyed by the blood of a sea shell-fish; the blue is fit to signify the air; and the scarlet will naturally be an indication of fire. 3.184. Now the vestment of the high priest being made of linen, signified the earth; the blue denoted the sky, being like lightning in its pomegranates, and in the noise of the bells resembling thunder. And for the ephod, it showed that God had made the universe of four elements; and as for the gold interwoven, I suppose it related to the splendor by which all things are enlightened. 3.185. He also appointed the breastplate to be placed in the middle of the ephod, to resemble the earth, for that has the very middle place of the world. And the girdle which encompassed the high priest round, signified the ocean, for that goes round about and includes the universe. Each of the sardonyxes declares to us the sun and the moon; those, I mean, that were in the nature of buttons on the high priest’s shoulders. 3.186. And for the twelve stones, whether we understand by them the months, or whether we understand the like number of the signs of that circle which the Greeks call the Zodiac, we shall not be mistaken in their meaning. And for the mitre, which was of a blue color, it seems to me to mean heaven;
5. New Testament, Hebrews, 7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •priests, jewish, depiction in medieval jewish art Found in books: Ashbrook Harvey et al (2015) 97
6. New Testament, Luke, 3.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •priests, jewish, depiction in medieval jewish art Found in books: Ashbrook Harvey et al (2015) 97
3.2. ἐπὶ ἀρχιερέως Ἅννα καὶ Καιάφα, ἐγένετο ῥῆμα θεοῦ ἐπὶ Ἰωάνην τὸν Ζαχαρίου υἱὸν ἐν τῇ ἐρήμῳ. 3.2. in the high priesthood of Annas and Caiaphas, the word of God came to John, the son of Zacharias, in the wilderness.
7. Augustine, Confessions, 6.2.2 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •priests, jewish, depiction in medieval jewish art Found in books: Ashbrook Harvey et al (2015) 97
8. Augustine, The City of God, 18.46 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •priests, jewish, depiction in medieval jewish art Found in books: Ashbrook Harvey et al (2015) 97
18.46. While Herod, therefore, reigned in Judea, and C sar Augustus was emperor at Rome, the state of the republic being already changed, and the world being set at peace by him, Christ was born in Bethlehem of Judah, man manifest out of a human virgin, God hidden out of God the Father. For so had the prophet foretold: Behold, a virgin shall conceive in the womb, and bring forth a Son, and they shall call His name Immanuel, which, being interpreted, is, God with us. He did many miracles that He might commend God in Himself, some of which, even as many as seemed sufficient to proclaim Him, are contained in the evangelic Scripture. The first of these is, that He was so wonderfully born, and the last, that with His body raised up again from the dead He ascended into heaven. But the Jews who slew Him, and would not believe in Him, because it behooved Him to die and rise again, were yet more miserably wasted by the Romans, and utterly rooted out from their kingdom, where aliens had already ruled over them, and were dispersed through the lands (so that indeed there is no place where they are not), and are thus by their own Scriptures a testimony to us that we have not forged the prophecies about Christ. And very many of them, considering this, even before His passion, but chiefly after His resurrection, believed on Him, of whom it was predicted, Though the number of the children of Israel be as the sand of the sea, the remt shall be saved. But the rest are blinded, of whom it was predicted, Let their table be made before them a trap, and a retribution, and a stumbling-block. Let their eyes be darkened lest they see, and bow down their back always. Therefore, when they do not believe our Scriptures, their own, which they blindly read, are fulfilled in them, lest perchance any one should say that the Christians have forged these prophecies about Christ which are quoted under the name of the sibyl, or of others, if such there be, who do not belong to the Jewish people. For us, indeed, those suffice which are quoted from the books of our enemies, to whom we make our acknowledgment, on account of this testimony which, in spite of themselves, they contribute by their possession of these books, while they themselves are dispersed among all nations, wherever the Church of Christ is spread abroad. For a prophecy about this thing was sent before in the Psalms, which they also read, where it is written, My God, His mercy shall prevent me. My God has shown me concerning mine enemies, that You shall not slay them, lest they should at last forget Your law: disperse them in Your might. Therefore God has shown the Church in her enemies the Jews the grace of His compassion, since, as says the apostle, their offense is the salvation of the Gentiles. Romans 11:11 And therefore He has not slain them, that is, He has not let the knowledge that they are Jews be lost in them, although they have been conquered by the Romans, lest they should forget the law of God, and their testimony should be of no avail in this matter of which we treat. But it was not enough that he should say, Slay them not, lest they should at last forget Your law, unless he had also added, Disperse them; because if they had only been in their own land with that testimony of the Scriptures, and not every where, certainly the Church which is everywhere could not have had them as witnesses among all nations to the prophecies which were sent before concerning Christ.
9. Leo I Pope, Sermons, 5.3 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •priests, jewish, depiction in medieval jewish art Found in books: Ashbrook Harvey et al (2015) 97
10. Justinian, Codex Justinianus, 1.3 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •priests, jewish, depiction in medieval jewish art Found in books: Ashbrook Harvey et al (2015) 97