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21 results for "arsinoeia"
1. Homer, Iliad, 18.212, 19.104 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, crown games (periodos) Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 275
18.212. / from their city's walls, and then at set of sun flame forth the beacon-fires one after another and high aloft darteth the glare thereof for dwellers round about to behold, if so be they may come in their ships to be warders off of bane; even so from the head of Achilles went up the gleam toward heaven. 19.104. / Zeus verily spake vauntingly among all the gods: ‘Hearken unto me, all ye gods and goddesses, that I may speak what the heart in my breast biddeth me. This day shall Eileithyia, the goddess of childbirth, bring to the light a man that shall be the lord of all them that dwell round about,
2. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 4.66, 10.8 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, crown games (periodos) Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 275
3. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 10.45-10.46 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, olympic games Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 390
4. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 6.39, 11.19 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, crown games (periodos) Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 275
5. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.112.5 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, pythian (delphic) games •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, crown games (periodos) Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 276
1.112.5. Λακεδαιμόνιοι δὲ μετὰ ταῦτα τὸν ἱερὸν καλούμενον πόλεμον ἐστράτευσαν, καὶ κρατήσαντες τοῦ ἐν Δελφοῖς ἱεροῦ παρέδοσαν Δελφοῖς: καὶ αὖθις ὕστερον Ἀθηναῖοι ἀποχωρησάντων αὐτῶν στρατεύσαντες καὶ κρατήσαντες παρέδοσαν Φωκεῦσιν. 1.112.5. After this the Lacedaemonians marched out on a sacred war, and becoming masters of the temple at Delphi , placed it in the hands of the Delphians. Immediately after their retreat, the Athenians marched out, became masters of the temple, and placed it in the hands of the Phocians.
6. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 439
7. Herodotus, Histories, 1.66-1.68, 1.148, 7.200.2, 8.104 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, olympic games •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, isthmian games •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, nemean games •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, crown games (periodos) Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 274, 275, 388
1.66. Thus they changed their bad laws to good ones, and when Lycurgus died they built him a temple and now worship him greatly. Since they had good land and many men, they immediately flourished and prospered. They were not content to live in peace, but, confident that they were stronger than the Arcadians, asked the oracle at Delphi about gaining all the Arcadian land. ,She replied in hexameter: quote type="oracle" l met="dact" You ask me for Arcadia ? You ask too much; I grant it not. /l l There are many men in Arcadia , eaters of acorns, /l l Who will hinder you. But I grudge you not. /l l I will give you Tegea to beat with your feet in dancing, /l l And its fair plain to measure with a rope. /l /quote ,When the Lacedaemonians heard the oracle reported, they left the other Arcadians alone and marched on Tegea carrying chains, relying on the deceptive oracle. They were confident they would enslave the Tegeans, but they were defeated in battle. ,Those taken alive were bound in the very chains they had brought with them, and they measured the Tegean plain with a rope by working the fields. The chains in which they were bound were still preserved in my day, hanging up at the temple of Athena Alea. 1.67. In the previous war the Lacedaemonians continually fought unsuccessfully against the Tegeans, but in the time of Croesus and the kingship of Anaxandrides and Ariston in Lacedaemon the Spartans had gained the upper hand. This is how: ,when they kept being defeated by the Tegeans, they sent ambassadors to Delphi to ask which god they should propitiate to prevail against the Tegeans in war. The Pythia responded that they should bring back the bones of Orestes, son of Agamemnon. ,When they were unable to discover Orestes' tomb, they sent once more to the god to ask where he was buried. The Pythia responded in hexameter to the messengers: , quote type="oracle" l met="dact" There is a place Tegea in the smooth plain of Arcadia , /l l Where two winds blow under strong compulsion. /l l Blow lies upon blow, woe upon woe. /l l There the life-giving earth covers the son of Agamemnon. /l l Bring him back, and you shall be lord of Tegea . /l /quote ,When the Lacedaemonians heard this, they were no closer to discovery, though they looked everywhere. Finally it was found by Lichas, who was one of the Spartans who are called “doers of good deeds.”. These men are those citizens who retire from the knights, the five oldest each year. They have to spend the year in which they retire from the knights being sent here and there by the Spartan state, never resting in their efforts. 1.68. It was Lichas, one of these men, who found the tomb in Tegea by a combination of luck and skill. At that time there was free access to Tegea , so he went into a blacksmith's shop and watched iron being forged, standing there in amazement at what he saw done. ,The smith perceived that he was amazed, so he stopped what he was doing and said, “My Laconian guest, if you had seen what I saw, then you would really be amazed, since you marvel so at ironworking. ,I wanted to dig a well in the courtyard here, and in my digging I hit upon a coffin twelve feet long. I could not believe that there had ever been men taller than now, so I opened it and saw that the corpse was just as long as the coffin. I measured it and then reburied it.” So the smith told what he had seen, and Lichas thought about what was said and reckoned that this was Orestes, according to the oracle. ,In the smith's two bellows he found the winds, hammer and anvil were blow upon blow, and the forging of iron was woe upon woe, since he figured that iron was discovered as an evil for the human race. ,After reasoning this out, he went back to Sparta and told the Lacedaemonians everything. They made a pretence of bringing a charge against him and banishing him. Coming to Tegea , he explained his misfortune to the smith and tried to rent the courtyard, but the smith did not want to lease it. ,Finally he persuaded him and set up residence there. He dug up the grave and collected the bones, then hurried off to Sparta with them. Ever since then the Spartans were far superior to the Tegeans whenever they met each other in battle. By the time of Croesus' inquiry, the Spartans had subdued most of the Peloponnese . 1.148. The Panionion is a sacred ground in Mykale , facing north; it was set apart for Poseidon of Helicon by the joint will of the Ionians. Mykale is a western promontory of the mainland opposite Samos ; the Ionians used to assemble there from their cities and keep the festival to which they gave the name of date Panionia /date . ,Not only the Ionian festivals, but all those of all the Greeks alike, end in the same letter, just as do the names of the Persians. 7.200.2. Between the river and Thermopylae there is a village named Anthele, past which the Asopus flows out into the sea, and there is a wide space around it in which stand a temple of Amphictyonid Demeter, seats for the Amphictyons, and a temple of Amphictyon himself 8.104. With these sons he sent Hermotimus as guardian. This man was by birth of Pedasa, and the most honored by Xerxes of all his eunuchs. The people of Pedasa dwell above Halicarnassus. The following thing happens among these people: when anything untoward is about to befall those who dwell about their city, the priestess of Athena then grows a great beard. This had already happened to them twice.
8. Strabo, Geography, 8.6.14, 9.2.33, 10.5.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, crown games (periodos) •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, isthmian games •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, pythian (delphic) games Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 275, 277
8.6.14. Troezen is sacred to Poseidon, after whom it was once called Poseidonia. It is situated fifteen stadia above the sea, and it too is an important city. off its harbor, Pogon by name, lies Calauria, an isle with a circuit of about one hundred and thirty stadia. Here was an asylum sacred to Poseidon; and they say that this god made an exchange with Leto, giving her Delos for Calauria, and also with Apollo, giving him Pytho for Taenarum. And Ephorus goes on to tell the oracle: For thee it is the same thing to possess Delos or Calauria, most holy Pytho or windy Taenarum. And there was also a kind of Amphictyonic League connected with this sanctuary, a league of seven cities which shared in the sacrifice; they were Hermion, Epidaurus, Aigina, Athens, Prasieis, Nauplieis, and Orchomenus Minyeius; however, the Argives paid dues for the Nauplians, and the Lacedemonians for the Prasians. The worship of this god was so prevalent among the Greeks that even the Macedonians, whose power already extended as far as the sanctuary, in a way preserved its inviolability, and were afraid to drag away the suppliants who fled for refuge to Calauria; indeed Archias, with soldiers, did not venture to do violence even to Demosthenes, although he had been ordered by Antipater to bring him alive, both him and all the other orators he could find that were under similar charges, but tried to persuade him; he could not persuade him, however, and Demosthenes forestalled him by suiciding with poison. Now Troezen and Pittheus, the sons of Pelops, came originally from Pisatis; and the former left behind him the city which was named after him, and the latter succeeded him and reigned as king. But Anthes, who previously had possession of the place, set sail and founded Halicarnassus; but concerning this I shall speak in my description of Caria and Troy. 9.2.33. Onchestus is where the Amphictyonic Council used to convene, in the territory of Haliartus near Lake Copais and the Teneric Plain; it is situated on a height, is bare of trees, and has a sacred Precinct of Poseidon, which is also bare of trees. But the poets embellish things, calling all sacred precincts sacred groves, even if they are bare of trees. Such, also, is the saying of Pindar concerning Apollo: stirred, he traversed both land and sea, and halted on great lookouts above mountains, and whirled great stones, laying foundations of sacred groves. But Alcaeus is wrong, for just as he perverted the name of the River Cuarius, so he falsified the position of Onchestus, placing it near the extremities of Helicon, although it is at quite a distance from this mountain. 10.5.1. Islands The islands near Crete are Thera, the metropolis of the Cyrenaeans, a colony of the Lacedemonians, and, near Thera, Anaphe, where is the sanctuary of the Aegletan Apollo. Callimachus speaks in one place as follows,Aegletan Anaphe, neighbor to Laconian Thera, and in another, mentioning only Thera,mother of my fatherland, famed for its horses. Thera is a long island, being two hundred stadia in perimeter; it lies opposite Dia, an island near the Cnossian Heracleium, but it is seven hundred stadia distant from Crete. Near it are both Anaphe and Therasia. One hundred stadia distant from the latter is the little island Ios, where, according to some writers, the poet Homer was buried. From Ios towards the west one comes to Sicinos and Lagusa and Pholegandros, which last Aratus calls Iron Island, because of its ruggedness. Near these is Cimolos, whence comes the Cimolian earth. From Cimolos Siphnos is visible, in reference to which island, because of its worthlessness, people say Siphnian knuckle-bone. And still nearer both to Cimolos and to Crete is Melos, which is more notable than these and is seven hundred stadia from the Hermionic promontory, the Scyllaion, and almost the same distance from the Dictynnaion. The Athenians once sent an expedition to Melos and slaughtered most of the inhabitants from youth upwards. Now these islands are indeed in the Cretan Sea, but Delos itself and the Cyclades in its neighborhood and the Sporades which lie close to these, to which belong the aforesaid islands in the neighborhood of Crete, are rather in the Aegean Sea.
9. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 15.49.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, isthmian games •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, nemean games •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, olympic games •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, crown games (periodos) Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 274
15.49.1.  In Ionia nine cities were in the habit of holding sacrifices of great antiquity on a large scale to Poseidon in a lonely region near the place called Mycalê. Later, however, as a result of the outbreak of wars in this neighbourhood, since they were unable to hold the Panionia there, they shifted the festival gathering to a safe place near Ephesus. Having sent an embassy to Delphi, they received an oracle telling them to take copies of the ancient ancestral altars at Helicê, which was situated in what was then known as Ionia, but is now known as Achaïa.
10. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 4.12.65 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, isthmian games •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, pythian (delphic) games •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, crown games (periodos) Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 277
11. Plutarch, Theseus, 36 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, olympic games Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 388
12. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 5.13.1-5.13.7, 10.7.2-10.7.5, 10.8.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 391
13. Athenaeus, The Learned Banquet, None (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, ptolemaian games Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 437
15. Various, Fgrh, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 437
16. Epigraphy, Ig Xii,7, 515.6  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 391
17. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 1126  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, isthmian games •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, pythian (delphic) games •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, crown games (periodos) Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 277
18. Callimachus, Hymns, 4.16-4.22  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, isthmian games •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, pythian (delphic) games •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, crown games (periodos) Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 277
19. Epigraphy, Ngsl, 66-68, 65  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 538
21. Polybios, Timoleon, 18.46  Tagged with subjects: •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, isthmian games •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, pythian (delphic) games •arsinoeia and philadelpheia games, crown games (periodos) Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 277