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16 results for "aristippus"
1. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •aristippus the younger Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 382
64d. βίαιον γιγνόμενον ἁθρόον παρʼ ἡμῖν πάθος ἀλγεινόν, τὸ δʼ εἰς φύσιν ἀπιὸν πάλιν ἁθρόον ἡδύ, τὸ δὲ ἡρέμα καὶ κατὰ σμικρὸν ἀναίσθητον, τὸ δʼ ἐναντίον τούτοις ἐναντίως. τὸ δὲ μετʼ εὐπετείας γιγνόμενον ἅπαν αἰσθητὸν μὲν ὅτι μάλιστα, λύπης δὲ καὶ ἡδονῆς οὐ μετέχον, οἷον τὰ περὶ τὴν ὄψιν αὐτὴν παθήματα, ἣ δὴ σῶμα ἐν τοῖς πρόσθεν ἐρρήθη καθʼ ἡμέραν συμφυὲς ἡμῶν γίγνεσθαι. ταύτῃ γὰρ τομαὶ μὲν καὶ καύσεις καὶ ὅσα ἄλλα πάσχει λύπας οὐκ ἐμποιοῦσιν, οὐδὲ 64d. When an affection which is against nature and violent occurs within us with intensity it is painful, whereas the return back to the natural condition, when intense, is pleasant; and an affection which is mild and gradual is imperceptible, while the converse is of a contrary character. And the affection which, in its entirety, takes place with ease is eminently perceptible, but it does not involve pain or pleasure; such, for example, are the affections of the visual stream itself, which, as we said before, becomes in the daylight a body substantially one with our own. For no pains are produced therein by cuttings or burning
2. Aristotle, Rhetoric, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 403
3. Cicero, De Finibus, 2.39 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •aristippus the younger Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 382
2.39.  "Guided by the authority of Reason I will now adopt a similar procedure myself. As far as possible I will narrow the issue, and will assume that all the simple theories, of those who include no admixture of virtue, are to be eliminated from philosophy altogether. First among these comes the system of Aristippus and the Cyrenaic school in general, who did not shrink from finding their Chief Good in pleasure of the sort that excites the highest amount of actively agreeable sensation, and who despised your freedom from pain.
4. Cicero, On The Ends of Good And Evil, 2.39 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •aristippus the younger Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 382
2.39. Huius ego nunc auctoritatem sequens idem faciam. quantum enim potero, minuam contentiones omnesque simplices sententias sententias simplices A eorum, in quibus nulla inest inest est BE virtutis adiunctio, omnino adiunctio omnino omnino adiunctio E omnis adiunctio B a philosophia semovendas putabo, primum Aristippi Cyrenaicorumque omnium, quos non est veritum in ea voluptate, quae maxima dulcedine sensum moveret, summum bonum ponere primum ... bonum ponere Macrob. (gramm. Lat. ex rec. H. Keil V 648) contemnentis istam vacuitatem doloris. 2.39.  "Guided by the authority of Reason I will now adopt a similar procedure myself. As far as possible I will narrow the issue, and will assume that all the simple theories, of those who include no admixture of virtue, are to be eliminated from philosophy altogether. First among these comes the system of Aristippus and the Cyrenaic school in general, who did not shrink from finding their Chief Good in pleasure of the sort that excites the highest amount of actively agreeable sensation, and who despised your freedom from pain.
5. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 3.77 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •aristippus the younger Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 403
3.77. These are fables of the poets, whereas we aim at being philosophers, who set down facts, not fictions. And all the same, even these gods of poetry would be held guilty of mistaken kindness if they knew that their gifts would bring their sons disaster. Just as, if a favourite saying of Aristo of Chios was true, that philosophers are harmful to their hearers when the hearers put a bad interpretation on doctrines good in themselves (for he allowed it was possible to leave the school of Aristippus a profligate, or that of Zeno cantankerous), then clearly, if their pupils were likely to go away depraved because they misinterpreted the philosophers' discourses, it would be better for the philosophers to keep silence than to do harm to those who heard them:
6. Cicero, De Oratore, 3.61 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •aristippus the younger Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 403
3.61. Hinc discidium illud exstitit quasi linguae atque cordis, absurdum sane et inutile et reprehendendum, ut alii nos sapere, alii dicere docerent. Nam cum essent plures orti fere a Socrate, quod ex illius variis et diversis et in omnem partem diffusis disputationibus alius aliud apprehenderat, proseminatae sunt quasi familiae dissentientes inter se et multum disiunctae et dispares, cum tamen omnes se philosophi Socraticos et dici vellent et esse arbitrarentur.
7. Plutarch, Against Colotes, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 409
8. Sextus, Against The Mathematicians, 7.191-7.192, 7.199 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aristippus the younger Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 382, 383
9. Sextus, Outlines of Pyrrhonism, 1.215 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aristippus the younger Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 382
10. Apuleius, Florida, 2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aristippus the younger Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 403
11. Athenaeus, The Learned Banquet, None (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 403
12. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, 2.20.106 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aristippus the younger Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 382
13. Aelian, Varia Historia, 14.6 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aristippus the younger Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 385
14. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 2.9, 2.66, 2.85-2.86, 2.89, 10.136-10.137 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aristippus the younger Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 382, 385, 403
2.9. In the beginning the stars moved in the sky as in a revolving dome, so that the celestial pole which is always visible was vertically overhead; but subsequently the pole took its inclined position. He held the Milky Way to be a reflection of the light of stars which are not shone upon by the sun; comets to be a conjunction of planets which emit flames; shooting-stars to be a sort of sparks thrown off by the air. He held that winds arise when the air is rarefied by the sun's heat; that thunder is a clashing together of the clouds, lightning their violent friction; an earthquake a subsidence of air into the earth.Animals were produced from moisture, heat, and an earthy substance; later the species were propagated by generation from one another, males from the right side, females from the left. 2.66. He was capable of adapting himself to place, time and person, and of playing his part appropriately under whatever circumstances. Hence he found more favour than anybody else with Dionysius, because he could always turn the situation to good account. He derived pleasure from what was present, and did not toil to procure the enjoyment of something not present Hence Diogenes called him the king's poodle Timon, too, sneered at him for luxury in these words:Such was the delicate nature of Aristippus, who groped after error by touch.He is said to have ordered a partridge to be bought at a cost of fifty drachmae, and, when someone censured him, he inquired, Would not you have given an obol for it? and, being answered in the affirmative, rejoined, Fifty drachmae are no more to me. 2.85. According to Sotion in his second book, and Panaetius, the following treatises are his:On Education.On Virtue.Introduction to Philosophy.Artabazus.The Ship-wrecked.The Exiles.Six books of Essays.Three books of Occasional Writings (χρεῖαι).To Lais.To Porus.To Socrates.On Fortune.He laid down as the end the smooth motion resulting in sensation.Having written his life, let me now proceed to pass in review the philosophers of the Cyrenaic school which sprang from him, although some call themselves followers of Hegesias, others followers of Anniceris, others again of Theodorus. Not but what we shall notice further the pupils of Phaedo, the chief of whom were called the school of Eretria. 2.86. The case stands thus. The disciples of Aristippus were his daughter Arete, Aethiops of Ptolemais, and Antipater of Cyrene. The pupil of Arete was Aristippus, who went by the name of mother-taught, and his pupil was Theodorus, known as the atheist, subsequently as god. Antipater's pupil was Epitimides of Cyrene, his was Paraebates, and he had as pupils Hegesias, the advocate of suicide, and Anniceris, who ransomed Plato.Those then who adhered to the teaching of Aristippus and were known as Cyrenaics held the following opinions. They laid down that there are two states, pleasure and pain, the former a smooth, the latter a rough motion, and that pleasure does not differ from pleasure nor is one pleasure more pleasant than another. 2.89. The removal of pain, however, which is put forward in Epicurus, seems to them not to be pleasure at all, any more than the absence of pleasure is pain. For both pleasure and pain they hold to consist in motion, whereas absence of pleasure like absence of pain is not motion, since painlessness is the condition of one who is, as it were, asleep. They assert that some people may fail to choose pleasure because their minds are perverted; not all mental pleasures and pains, however, are derived from bodily counterparts. For instance, we take disinterested delight in the prosperity of our country which is as real as our delight in our own prosperity. Nor again do they admit that pleasure is derived from the memory or expectation of good, which was a doctrine of Epicurus. 10.136. He differs from the Cyrenaics with regard to pleasure. They do not include under the term the pleasure which is a state of rest, but only that which consists in motion. Epicurus admits both; also pleasure of mind as well as of body, as he states in his work On Choice and Avoidance and in that On the Ethical End, and in the first book of his work On Human Life and in the epistle to his philosopher friends in Mytilene. So also Diogenes in the seventeenth book of his Epilecta, and Metrodorus in his Timocrates, whose actual words are: Thus pleasure being conceived both as that species which consists in motion and that which is a state of rest. The words of Epicurus in his work On Choice are: Peace of mind and freedom from pain are pleasures which imply a state of rest; joy and delight are seen to consist in motion and activity. 10.137. He further disagrees with the Cyrenaics in that they hold that pains of body are worse than mental pains; at all events evil-doers are made to suffer bodily punishment; whereas Epicurus holds the pains of the mind to be the worse; at any rate the flesh endures the storms of the present alone, the mind those of the past and future as well as the present. In this way also he holds mental pleasures to be greater than those of the body. And as proof that pleasure is the end he adduces the fact that living things, so soon as they are born, are well content with pleasure and are at enmity with pain, by the prompting of nature and apart from reason. Left to our own feelings, then, we shun pain; as when even Heracles, devoured by the poisoned robe, cries aloud,And bites and yells, and rock to rock resounds,Headlands of Locris and Euboean cliffs.
15. Eusebius of Caesarea, Preparation For The Gospel, 14.18.32 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •aristippus the younger Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 383
16. Aristippus of Cyrene, Ssr Iv A, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 383, 385