Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

   Search:  
validated results only / all results

and or

Filtering options: (leave empty for all results)
By author:     
By work:        
By subject:
By additional keyword:       



Results for
Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.





6 results for "archimedes"
1. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.67 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •archimedes (sphere of) Found in books: Bierl (2017), Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture, 307
2.67. The mother is Ceres, a corruption of 'Geres,' from gero, because she bears the crops; the same accidental change of the first letter is also seen in her Greek name Dēmētēr, a corruption of gē mētēr ('mother earth'). Mavors again is from magna vertere, 'the overturner of the great,' while Minerva is either 'she who minishes' or 'she who is minatory.' Also, as the beginning and the end are the most important parts of all affairs, they held that Janus is the leader in a sacrifice, the name being derived from ire ('to go'), hence the names jani for archways and januae for the front doors of secular buildings. Again, the name Vesta comes from the Greeks, for she is the goddess whom they call Hestia. Her power extends over altars and hearths, and therefore all prayers and all sacrifices end with this goddess, because she is the guardian of the innermost things.
2. Ovid, Fasti, 6.267, 6.277-6.278, 6.299-6.304 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •archimedes (sphere of) Found in books: Bierl (2017), Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture, 307
6.267. Vesta eadem est et terra: subest vigil ignis utrique: 6.277. arte Syracosia suspensus in aere clauso 6.278. stat globus, immensi parva figura poli, 6.299. stat vi terra sua: vi stando Vesta vocatur, 6.300. causaque par Grai nominis esse potest. 6.301. at focus a flammis et quod fovet omnia, dictus; 6.302. qui tamen in primis aedibus ante fuit. 6.303. hinc quoque vestibulum dici reor: inde precando 6.304. praefamur Vestam, quae loca prima tenet. 6.267. Vesta’s identified with Earth: in them both’s unsleeping fire: 6.277. There’s a globe suspended, enclosed by Syracusan art, 6.278. That’s a small replica of the vast heavens, 6.299. The earth’s supported by its energy: Vesta’s so called from ‘depending 6.300. On energy’ (vi stando), and that could be the reason for her Greek name. 6.301. But the hearth (focus) is named from its fire that warms (fovet) all things: 6.302. Formerly it stood in the most important room. 6.303. I think the vestibule was so called from Vesta too: 6.304. In praying we address Vesta first, who holds first place.
3. Plutarch, Numa Pompilius, 11 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •archimedes (sphere of) Found in books: Bierl (2017), Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture, 307
4. Festus Sextus Pompeius, De Verborum Significatione, None (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •archimedes (sphere of) Found in books: Bierl (2017), Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture, 307
6. Servius, Ad Aeniadem, 2.296  Tagged with subjects: •archimedes (sphere of) Found in books: Bierl (2017), Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture, 307