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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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36 results for "antioch"
1. Philo of Alexandria, On The Embassy To Gaius, 32 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 212
32. But when this first and greatest undertaking had been accomplished by Gaius, there being no longer left any one who had any connexion with the supreme authority, to whom any one who bore him ill-will, and who was suspected by him, could possibly turn his eyes; he now, in the second place, proceeded to compass the death of Macro, a man who had co-operated with him in every thing relating to the empire, not only after he had been appointed emperor, for it is a characteristic of flattery to court those who are in a state of prosperity, but who had previously assisted him in his measures for securing that authority.
2. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 18.8.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 212
3. Ignatius, To The Trallians, 3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 212
4. Ignatius, To The Smyrnaeans, 11, 4, 10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 212
5. Ignatius, To The Philadelphians, 10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 212
6. Ignatius, To The Ephesians, 18, 21, 1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 212
7. Ignatius, To The Philadelphians, 10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 212
8. Ignatius, To Polycarp, 2.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 212
9. Tertullian, Against Praxeas, 1.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya), montanism at? Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 61
10. Tertullian, Prescription Against Heretics, 36.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya), montanism at? Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 61
11. Eusebius of Caesarea, Life of Constantine, 3.64-3.66, 4.24 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 286, 302
3.64. Victor Constantinus, Maximus Augustus, to the heretics. Understand now, by this present statute, you Novatians, Valentinians, Marcionites, Paulians, you who are called Cataphrygians, and all you who devise and support heresies by means of your private assemblies, with what a tissue of falsehood and vanity, with what destructive and venomous errors, your doctrines are inseparably interwoven; so that through you the healthy soul is stricken with disease, and the living becomes the prey of everlasting death. You haters and enemies of truth and life, in league with destruction! All your counsels are opposed to the truth, but familiar with deeds of baseness; full of absurdities and fictions: and by these ye frame falsehoods, oppress the innocent, and withhold the light from them that believe. Ever trespassing under the mask of godliness, you fill all things with defilement: ye pierce the pure and guileless conscience with deadly wounds, while you withdraw, one may almost say, the very light of day from the eyes of men. But why should I particularize, when to speak of your criminality as it deserves demands more time and leisure than I can give? For so long and unmeasured is the catalogue of your offenses, so hateful and altogether atrocious are they, that a single day would not suffice to recount them all. And, indeed, it is well to turn one's ears and eyes from such a subject, lest by a description of each particular evil, the pure sincerity and freshness of one's own faith be impaired. Why then do I still bear with such abounding evil; especially since this protracted clemency is the cause that some who were sound have become tainted with this pestilent disease? Why not at once strike, as it were, at the root of so great a mischief by a public manifestation of displeasure? 3.65. Forasmuch, then, as it is no longer possible to bear with your pernicious errors, we give warning by this present statute that none of you henceforth presume to assemble yourselves together. We have directed, accordingly, that you be deprived of all the houses in which you are accustomed to hold your assemblies: and our care in this respect extends so far as to forbid the holding of your superstitious and senseless meetings, not in public merely, but in any private house or place whatsoever. Let those of you, therefore, who are desirous of embracing the true and pure religion, take the far better course of entering the catholic Church, and uniting with it in holy fellowship, whereby you will be enabled to arrive at the knowledge of the truth. In any case, the delusions of your perverted understandings must entirely cease to mingle with and mar the felicity of our present times: I mean the impious and wretched double-mindedness of heretics and schismatics. For it is an object worthy of that prosperity which we enjoy through the favor of God, to endeavor to bring back those who in time past were living in the hope of future blessing, from all irregularity and error to the right path, from darkness to light, from vanity to truth, from death to salvation. And in order that this remedy may be applied with effectual power, we have commanded, as before said, that you be positively deprived of every gathering point for your superstitious meetings, I mean all the houses of prayer, if such be worthy of the name, which belong to heretics, and that these be made over without delay to the catholic Church; that any other places be confiscated to the public service, and no facility whatever be left for any future gathering; in order that from this day forward none of your unlawful assemblies may presume to appear in any public or private place. Let this edict be made public. 3.66. Thus were the lurking-places of the heretics broken up by the emperor's command, and the savage beasts they harbored (I mean the chief authors of their impious doctrines) driven to flight. of those whom they had deceived, some, intimidated by the emperor's threats, disguising their real sentiments, crept secretly into the Church. For since the law directed that search should be made for their books, those of them who practiced evil and forbidden arts were detected, and these were ready to secure their own safety by dissimulation of every kind. Others, however, there were, who voluntarily and with real sincerity embraced a better hope. Meantime the prelates of the several churches continued to make strict inquiry, utterly rejecting those who attempted an entrance under the specious disguise of false pretenses, while those who came with sincerity of purpose were proved for a time, and after sufficient trial numbered with the congregation. Such was the treatment of those who stood charged with rank heresy: those, however, who maintained no impious doctrine, but had been separated from the one body through the influence of schismatic advisers, were received without difficulty or delay. Accordingly, numbers thus revisited, as it were, their own country after an absence in a foreign land, and acknowledged the Church as a mother from whom they had wandered long, and to whom they now returned with joy and gladness. Thus the members of the entire body became united, and compacted in one harmonious whole; and the one catholic Church, at unity with itself, shone with full luster, while no heretical or schismatic body anywhere continued to exist. And the credit of having achieved this mighty work our Heaven-protected emperor alone, of all who had gone before him, was able to attribute to himself. 4.24. Hence it was not without reason that once, on the occasion of his entertaining a company of bishops, he let fall the expression, that he himself too was a bishop, addressing them in my hearing in the following words: You are bishops whose jurisdiction is within the Church: I also am a bishop, ordained by God to overlook whatever is external to the Church. And truly his measures corresponded with his words: for he watched over his subjects with an episcopal care, and exhorted them as far as in him lay to follow a godly life.
12. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 5.16.3-5.16.5, 5.16.17, 5.18.13, 5.19.1-5.19.4, 5.24.2-5.24.5, 6.3.1, 6.6, 6.12, 6.12.1, 6.12.3-6.12.4, 6.27, 6.41.7, 16.13.1 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 212
6.41.7. But I, God knows, thought at first that they were robbers who had come for spoil and plunder. So I remained upon the bed on which I was, clothed only in a linen garment, and offered them the rest of my clothing which was lying beside me. But they directed me to rise and come away quickly. 6.41.7. Then they seized also that most admirable virgin, Apollonia, an old woman, and, smiting her on the jaws, broke out all her teeth. And they made a fire outside the city and threatened to burn her alive if she would not join with them in their impious cries. And she, supplicating a little, was released, when she leaped eagerly into the fire and was consumed.
13. Eusebius of Caesarea, Martyrs of Palestine, 3.3, 4.8-4.9, 9.4-9.5 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 212
14. Cyprian, Letters, 75.7 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 286
15. Pseudo-Justinus, Letters, 1.5 (3rd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya), montanism at? Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 61
16. Cyprian, Letters, 75.7 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 286
17. Cyprian, Letters, 75.7 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 286
18. Cyprian, Letters To Jovian, 75.7 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 286
19. Cyprian, Letters, 75.7 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 286
20. Basil of Caesarea, Letters, 188.1 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 286
21. Basil of Caesarea, Letters, 188.1 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 286
22. Jerome, Letters, 41.4 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 296
23. Jerome, Letters, 41.4 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 296
24. Jerome, Letters, 41.4 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 296
25. Epigraphy, Cig, 4.8953  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 302
26. Anon., Mart. Just., 1.1-1.2  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 212
27. John of Ephesus, Hist. Eccl., 3.2, 3.13, 3.32, 3.36-3.37  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 279
28. Epigraphy, I. Mont, 2, 1  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 279
29. Michael The Syrian, Chron., 9.3  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 279
30. Anon., Miracula St. Demetrii, 8.19.1  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 53
31. Council of Laodicea [Between Ca.343-381], Can., 7-8, 11  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 302
33. Papyri, Pgurob, 4.8  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 286
35. Anon., Letter of Aristeas, 36.2  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya), montanism at? Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 61
36. Meleager, Ap, 3.3, 4.8-4.9, 9.4-9.5  Tagged with subjects: •antioch (in syria) (antakya) Found in books: Tabbernee (2007) 212