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30 results for "alban"
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.311, 13.3 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 30
6.311. / on Troy and the Trojans' wives and their little children. So spake she praying, but Pallas Athene denied the prayer.Thus were these praying to the daughter of great Zeus, but Hector went his way to the palace of Alexander, the fair palace that himself had builded with the men 13.3. / Now Zeus, when he had brought the Trojans and Hector to the ships, left the combatants there to have toil and woe unceasingly, but himself turned away his bright eyes, and looked afar, upon the land of the Thracian horsemen,
2. Cicero, Pro Milone, 85 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 31
3. Cicero, On Laws, 2.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 270
4. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.2.7 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 124
5. Cicero, Philippicae, 8.9, 13.11 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 124
6. Cicero, Pro Lege Manilia, 7 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 124
7. praeter ceteras gentis atque avidi laudis fuistis, delenda vobis est est vobis Eb1 illa macula Mithridatico bello superiore concepta concepta HE : suscepta cett. quae penitus iam iam om. H insedit ac nimis inveteravit in populi Romani nomine, quod is qui uno die tota in Asia tot in civitatibus uno nuntio atque una significatione significatione H : significatione litterarum cett. omnis omnis scripsi : om. codd. ( post -one) curavit HE : denotavit cett. civis Romanos necandos trucidandosque curavit, non modo adhuc poenam nullam suo dignam scelere scelere dignam H suscepit sed ab illo tempore annum iam tertium et vicesimum regnat et ita regnat om. t p , et ita regnat ut se non Ponti Ponti E p : Ponto cett. neque Cappadociae latebris occultare velit sed emergere ex ex Ht : et E : e dp patrio regno atque in vestris vectigalibus, hoc est in Asiae luce, versari. 7. ac ne illud quidem vobis neglegendum est quod mihi ego extremum proposueram, cum essem de belli genere genere belli H dicturus, quod ad multorum bona civium Romanorum pertinet; quorum vobis pro vestra sapientia, Quirites, habenda est ratio diligenter. nam et publicani, homines honestissimi atque atque HE : et cett. ornatissimi, suas rationes et copias in illam provinciam contulerunt, quorum ipsorum per se res et fortunae vobis curae esse debent. etenim, si vectigalia nervos esse rei publicae semper duximus, eum certe ordinem qui exercet illa firmamentum ceterorum ordinum recte esse recte esse necesse H dicemus.
7. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 1.89, 2.17, 3.10.4-3.10.5, 3.11.4, 3.47 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 270
1.89. 1.  Such, then, are the facts concerning the origin of the Romans which I have been able to discover a reading very diligently many works written by both Greek and Roman authors. Hence, from now on let the reader forever renounce the views of those who make Rome a retreat of barbarians, fugitives and vagabonds, and let him confidently affirm it to be a Greek city, — which will be easy when he shows that it is at once the most hospitable and friendly of all cities, and when he bears in mind that the Aborigines were Oenotrians, and these in turn Arcadians,,2.  and remembers those who joined with them in their settlement, the Pelasgians who were Argives by descent and came into Italy from Thessaly; and recalls, moreover, the arrival of Evander and the Arcadians, who settled round the Palatine hill, after the Aborigines had granted the place to them; and also the Peloponnesians, who, coming along with Hercules, settled upon the Saturnian hill; and, last of all, those who left the Troad and were intermixed with the earlier settlers. For one will find no nation that is more ancient or more Greek than these.,3.  But the admixtures of the barbarians with the Romans, by which the city forgot many of its ancient institutions, happened at a later time. And it may well seem a cause of wonder to many who reflect on the natural course of events that Rome did not become entirely barbarized after receiving the Opicans, the Marsians, the Samnites, the Tyrrhenians, the Bruttians and many thousands of Umbrians, Ligurians, Iberians and Gauls, besides innumerable other nations, some of whom came from Italy itself and some from other regions and differed from one another both in their language and habits; for their very ways of life, diverse as they were and thrown into turmoil by such dissoce, might have been expected to cause many innovations in the ancient order of the city.,4.  For many others by living among barbarians have in a short time forgotten all their Greek heritage, so that they neither speak the Greek language nor observe the customs of the Greeks nor acknowledge the same gods nor have the same equitable laws (by which most of all the spirit of the Greeks differs from that of the barbarians) nor agree with them in anything else whatever that relates to the ordinary intercourse of life. Those Achaeans who are settled near the Euxine sea are a sufficient proof of my contention; for, though originally Eleans, of a nation the most Greek of any, they are now the most savage of all barbarians. 2.17. 1.  When I compare the customs of the Greeks with these, I can find no reason to extol either those of the Lacedaemonians or of the Thebans or of the Athenians, who pride themselves most on their wisdom; all of whom, jealous of their noble birth and granting citizenship to none or to very few (I say nothing of the fact that some even expelled foreigners), not only received no advantage from this haughty attitude, but actually suffered the greatest harm because of it.,2.  Thus, the Spartans after their defeat at Leuctra, where they lost seventeen hundred men, were no longer able to restore their city to its former position after that calamity, but shamefully abandoned their supremacy. And the Thebans and Athenians through the single disaster at Chaeronea were deprived by the Macedonians not only of the leadership of Greece but at the same time of the liberty they had inherited from their ancestors.,3.  But Rome, while engaged in great wars both in Spain and Italy and employed in recovering Sicily and Sardinia, which had revolted, at a time when the situation in Macedonia and Greece had become hostile to her and Carthage was again contending for the supremacy, and when all but a small portion of Italy was not only in open rebellion but was also drawing upon her the Hannibalic war, as it was called, — though surrounded, I say, by so many dangers at one and the same time, Rome was so far from being overcome by these misfortunes that she derived from them a strength even greater than she had had before, being enabled to meet every danger, thanks to the number of her soldiers, and not, as some imagine, to the favour of Fortune;,4.  since for all of Fortune's assistance the city might have been utterly submerged by the single disaster at Cannae, where of six thousand horse only three hundred and seventy survived, and of eighty thousand foot enrolled in the army of the commonwealth little more than three thousand escaped. 3.10.4.  This, then, is one argument we offer in support of our claim, in virtue of which we will never willingly yield the command to you. Another argument — and do not take this as said by way of censure or reproach of you Romans, but only from necessity — is the fact that the Alban race has to this day continued the same that it was under the founders of the city, and one cannot point to any race of mankind, except the Greeks and Latins, to whom we have granted citizenship; whereas you have corrupted the purity of your body politic by admitting Tyrrhenians, Sabines, and some others who were homeless, vagabonds and barbarians, and that in great numbers too, so that the true-born element among you that went out from our midst is become small, or rather a tiny fraction, in comparison with those who have been brought in and are of alien race. 3.10.5.  And if we should yield the command to you, the base-born will rule over the true-born, barbarians over Greeks, and immigrants over the native-born. For you cannot even say this much for yourself, that you have not permitted this immigrant mob to gain any control of public affairs but that you native-born citizens are yourselves the rulers and councillors of the commonwealth. Why, even for your kings you choose outsiders, and the greatest part of your senate consists of these newcomers; and to none of these conditions can you assert that you submit willingly. For what man of superior rank willingly allows himself to be ruled by an inferior? It would be great folly and baseness, therefore, on our part to accept willingly those evils which you must own you submit to through necessity. 3.11.4.  For we are so far from being ashamed of having made the privileges of our city free to all who desired them that we even take the greatest pride in this course; moreover, we are not the originators of this admirable practice, but took the example from the city of Athens, which enjoys the greatest reputation among the Greeks, due in no small measure, if indeed not chiefly, to this very policy. 3.47. 1.  Not long afterward the elder of his sons died without acknowledged issue, and a few days later Demaratus himself died of grief, leaving his surviving son Lucumo heir to his entire fortune. Lucumo, having thus inherited the great wealth of his father, had aspired to public life and a part in the administration of the commonwealth and to be one of its foremost citizens.,2.  But being repulsed on every side by the native-born citizens and excluded, not only from the first, but even from the middle rank, he resented his disfranchisement. And hearing that the Romans gladly received all strangers and made them citizens, he resolved to get together all his riches and remove thither, taking with him his wife and such of his friends and household as wished to go along; and those who were eager to depart with him were many.,3.  When they were come to the hill called Janiculum, from which Rome is first discerned by those who come from Tyrrhenia, an eagle, descending on a sudden, snatched his cap from his head and flew up again with it, and rising in a circular flight, hid himself in the depths of the circumambient air, then of a sudden replaced the cap on his head, fitting it on as it had been before.,4.  This prodigy appearing wonderful and extraordinary to them all, the wife of Lucumo, Tanaquil by name, who had a good understanding standing, through her ancestors, of the Tyrrhenians' augural science, took him aside from the others and, embracing him, filled him with great hopes of rising from his private station to the royal power. She advised him, however, to consider by what means he might render himself worthy to receive the sovereignty by the free choice of the Romans.
8. Ovid, Tristia, 1.5.69-1.5.70, 3.7.51-3.7.52, 3.12.17-3.12.24 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 31, 107
9. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 10.696 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 30
10.696. Sacra retorserunt oculos; turritaque Mater
10. Ovid, Fasti, 1.85-1.86 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 31
1.85. Iuppiter arce sua totum cum spectat in orbem, 1.86. nil nisi Romanum, quod tueatur, habet, 1.85. When Jupiter watches the whole world from his hill, 1.86. Everything that he sees belongs to Rome.
11. Ovid, Epistulae Ex Ponto, 1.8.29, 1.8.33-1.8.38, 1.8.41-1.8.48, 1.8.65-1.8.68 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 107
12. Livy, History, 1.29.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 270
13. Horace, Odes, 1.2.33, 1.12.1-1.12.8, 1.16.5, 1.21.5-1.21.8, 1.22.5-1.22.8, 3.4.21-3.4.22, 3.29.6-3.29.12 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 68; Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 156
14. Propertius, Elegies, 2.1.29, 8.1-8.2 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 31, 270
15. Vergil, Georgics, 2.495-2.498, 2.513, 2.532-2.538 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 270
2.495. illum non populi fasces, non purpura regum 2.496. flexit et infidos agitans discordia fratres 2.497. aut coniurato descendens Dacus ab Histro, 2.498. non res Romanae perituraque regna; neque ille 2.513. Agricola incurvo terram dimovit aratro: 2.532. Hanc olim veteres vitam coluere Sabini, 2.533. hanc Remus et frater, sic fortis Etruria crevit 2.534. scilicet et rerum facta est pulcherrima Roma, 2.535. septemque una sibi muro circumdedit arces. 2.536. Ante etiam sceptrum Dictaei regis et ante 2.537. inpia quam caesis gens est epulata iuvencis, 2.538. aureus hanc vitam in terris Saturnus agebat;
16. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.482, 10.473, 12.134-12.137 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 30
1.482. blinded by greed, and reckless utterly 10.473. the warrior's fallen forehead smote the dust; 12.134. which leaned its weight against a column tall 12.135. in the mid-court, Auruncan Actor's spoil, 12.136. and waved it wide in air with mighty cry: 12.137. “O spear, that ne'er did fail me when I called,
17. Plutarch, Marius, 11.5-11.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 124
11.5. διὸ καὶ πολλὰς κατὰ μέρος ἐπικλήσεις ἐχόντων κοινῇ Κελτοσκύθας τὸν στρατὸν ὠνόμαζον. ἄλλοι δέ φασι Κιμμερίων τὸ μὲν πρῶτον ὑφʼ Ἑλλήνων τῶν πάλαι γνωσθὲν οὐ μέγα γενέσθαι τοῦ παντὸς μόριον, ἀλλὰ φυγὴν ἢ στάσιν τινὰ βιασθεῖσαν ὑπὸ Σκυθῶν εἰς Ἀσίαν ἀπὸ τῆς Μαιώτιδος διαπερᾶσαι Λυγδάμιος ἡγουμένου, τὸ δὲ πλεῖστον αὐτῶν καὶ μαχιμώτατον ἐπʼ ἐσχάτοις οἰκοῦν παρὰ τὴν ἔξω θάλασσαν γῆν μὲν νέμεσθαι σύσκιον καὶ ὑλώδη καὶ δυσήλιον πάντῃ διὰ βάθος καὶ πυκνότητα δρυμῶν, 11.6. οὓς μέχρι τῶν Ἑρκυνίων εἴσω διήκειν, οὐρανοῦ δὲ εἰληχέναι καθʼ ὃ δοκεῖ μέγα λαμβάνων ὁ πόλος ἔξαρμα διὰ τὴν ἔγκλισιν τῶν παραλλήλων ὀλίγον ἀπολείπειν τοῦ κατὰ κορυφὴν ἱσταμένου σημείου πρὸς τὴν οἴκησιν, αἵ τε ἡμέραι βραχύτητι καὶ μήκει πρὸς τὰς νύκτας ἴσαι κατανέμεσθαι τὸν χρόνον· διὸ καὶ τὴν εὐπορίαν τοῦ μυθεύματος Ὁμήρῳ γενέσθαι πρὸς τὴν νεκυίαν. 11.7. ἔνθεν οὖν τὴν ἔφοδον εἶναι τῶν βαρβάρων τούτων ἐπὶ τὴν Ἰταλίαν, Κιμμερίων μὲν ἐξ ἀρχῆς, τότε δὲ Κίμβρων οὐκ ἀπὸ τρόπου προσαγορευομένων. ἀλλὰ ταῦτα μὲν εἰκασμῷ μᾶλλον ἢ κατὰ βέβαιον ἱστορίαν λέγεται. 11.5. 11.6. 11.7.
18. Juvenal, Satires, 2.21-2.22, 3.60-3.62, 3.84-3.85, 3.171-3.179, 3.183-3.184 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 68, 270
19. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 6.2.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 270
20. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.195-1.200, 1.508 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 30
21. Martial, Epigrams, 4.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 68
22. Martial, Epigrams, 4.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 68
23. Tacitus, Histories, 1.27 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 31
24. Statius, Siluae, 1.3, 2.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 68
25. Silius Italicus, Punica, 6.598, 9.303-9.304, 12.607-12.611, 12.707-12.721 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 30
26. Seneca The Younger, Phaedra, 483-484, 486-500, 485 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 68
485. quam quae relictis moenibus silvas amat.
27. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 11.3.66 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 124
28. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 26.6, 26.12, 26.30, 26.59-26.61 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 31, 124
29. Arch., Att., 8.2.3  Tagged with subjects: •alban hills Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 124