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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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18 results for "agents"
1. Cicero, De Oratore, 3.221-3.223 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •agents, definition of Found in books: Mackey (2022), Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion, 14, 15
3.221. Sed in ore sunt omnia, in eo autem ipso dominatus est omnis oculorum; quo melius nostri illi senes, qui personatum ne Roscium quidem magno opere laudabant; animi est enim omnis actio et imago animi vultus, indices oculi: nam haec est una pars corporis, quae, quot animi motus sunt, tot significationes et commutationes possit efficere; neque vero est quisquam qui eadem conivens efficiat. Theophrastus quidem Tauriscum quendam dicit actorem aversum solitum esse dicere, qui in agendo contuens aliquid pronuntiaret. 3.222. Qua re oculorum est magna moderatio; nam oris non est nimium mutanda species, ne aut ad ineptias aut ad pravitatem aliquam deferamur; oculi sunt, quorum tum intentione, tum remissione, tum coniectu, tum hilaritate motus animorum significemus apte cum genere ipso orationis; est enim actio quasi sermo corporis, quo magis menti congruens esse debet; oculos autem natura nobis, ut equo aut leoni saetas, caudam, auris, ad motus animorum declarandos dedit, 3.223. qua re in hac nostra actione secundum vocem vultus valet; is autem oculis gubernatur. Atque in eis omnibus, quae sunt actionis, inest quaedam vis a natura data; qua re etiam hac imperiti, hac vulgus, hac denique barbari maxime commoventur: verba enim neminem movent nisi eum, qui eiusdem linguae societate coniunctus est, sententiaeque saepe acutae non acutorum hominum sensus praetervolant: actio, quae prae se motum animi fert, omnis movet; isdem enim omnium animi motibus concitantur et eos isdem notis et in aliis agnoscunt et in se ipsi indicant.
2. Cicero, In Pisonem, 1.1 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •agents, definition of Found in books: Mackey (2022), Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion, 14
3. Cicero, Republic, 6.28 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •agents, definition of Found in books: Mackey (2022), Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion, 11
6.28. Cum pateat igitur aeternum id esse, quod a se ipso moveatur, quis est, qui hanc naturam animis esse tributam neget? Iimum est enim omne, quod pulsu agitatur externo; quod autem est animal, id motu cietur interiore et suo; nam haec est propria natura animi atque vis; quae si est una ex omnibus, quae sese moveat, neque nata certe est et aeterna est.
4. Cicero, On Laws, 1.26-1.27 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •agents, definition of Found in books: Mackey (2022), Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion, 15
5. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 10.250-10.251 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •agents, definition of Found in books: Mackey (2022), Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion, 13
10.250. Virginis est verae facies, quam vivere credas, 10.251. et, si non obstet reverentia, velle moveri:
6. Ovid, Amores, 3.1.1-3.1.4 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •agents, definition of Found in books: Mackey (2022), Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion, 7
3.1.1. Stat vetus et multos incaedua silva per annos; 3.1.2. Credibile est illi numen inesse loco. 3.1.3. Fons sacer in medio speluncaque pumice pendens, 3.1.4. Et latere ex omni dulce queruntur aves.
7. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 52.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •agents, definition of Found in books: Mackey (2022), Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion, 13
8. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 35.95 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •agents, definition of Found in books: Mackey (2022), Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion, 13
9. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 11.3.66 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •agents, definition of Found in books: Mackey (2022), Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion, 15
10. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 41.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •agents, definition of Found in books: Mackey (2022), Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion, 8
11. Seneca The Younger, On Anger, 2.26.2-2.26.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •agents, definition of Found in books: Mackey (2022), Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion, 14
12. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 11.17 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •agents, definition of Found in books: Mackey (2022), Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion, 13
11.17. When we had come to the temple, the great priest and those who were assigned to carry the divine images (but especially those who had long been worshippers of the religion) went into the secret chamber of the goddess where they placed the images in order. This done, one of the company, who was a scribe or interpreter of letters, in the manner of a preacher stood up on a chair before the holy college and began to read out of a book. He began pronounce benedictions upon the great emperor, the senate, the knights, and generally to all the Roman people, and to all who are under the jurisdiction of Rome. These words following signified the end of their divine service and that it was lawful for every man to depart. Whereupon all the people gave a great shout and, filled with much joy, bore all kind of herbs and garlands of flowers home to their houses, kissing and embracing the steps where the goddess had passed. However, I could not do as the rest did, for my mind would not allow me to depart one foot away. This was how eager I was to behold the beauty of the goddess, remembering the great misery I had endured.
13. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 3.6.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •agents, definition of Found in books: Mackey (2022), Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion, 13
14. Lactantius, Divine Institutes, 1.6.4, 1.22.13-1.22.14 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •agents, definition of Found in books: Mackey (2022), Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion, 9, 12, 13
15. Augustine, The City of God, 14.15 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •agents, definition of Found in books: Mackey (2022), Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion, 14
14.15. Therefore, because the sin was a despising of the authority of God - who had created man; who had made him in His own image; who had set him above the other animals; who had placed him in Paradise; who had enriched him with abundance of every kind and of safety; who had laid upon him neither many, nor great, nor difficult commandments, but, in order to make a wholesome obedience easy to him, had given him a single very brief and very light precept by which He reminded that creature whose service was to be free that He was Lord, - it was just that condemnation followed, and condemnation such that man, who by keeping the commandments should have been spiritual even in his flesh, became fleshly even in his spirit; and as in his pride he had sought to be his own satisfaction, God in His justice abandoned him to himself, not to live in the absolute independence he affected, but instead of the liberty he desired, to live dissatisfied with himself in a hard and miserable bondage to him to whom by sinning he had yielded himself, doomed in spite of himself to die in body as he had willingly become dead in spirit, condemned even to eternal death (had not the grace of God delivered him) because he had forsaken eternal life. Whoever thinks such punishment either excessive or unjust shows his inability to measure the great iniquity of sinning where sin might so easily have been avoided. For as Abraham's obedience is with justice pronounced to be great, because the thing commanded, to kill his son, was very difficult, so in Paradise the disobedience was the greater, because the difficulty of that which was commanded was imperceptible. And as the obedience of the second Man was the more laudable because He became obedient even unto death, Philippians 2:8 so the disobedience of the first man was the more detestable because he became disobedient even unto death. For where the penalty annexed to disobedience is great, and the thing commanded by the Creator is easy, who can sufficiently estimate how great a wickedness it is, in a matter so easy, not to obey the authority of so great a power, even when that power deters with so terrible a penalty? In short, to say all in a word, what but disobedience was the punishment of disobedience in that sin? For what else is man's misery but his own disobedience to himself, so that in consequence of his not being willing to do what he could do, he now wills to do what he cannot? For though he could not do all things in Paradise before he sinned, yet he wished to do only what he could do, and therefore he could do all things he wished. But now, as we recognize in his offspring, and as divine Scripture testifies, Man is like to vanity. For who can count how many things he wishes which he cannot do, so long as he is disobedient to himself, that is, so long as his mind and his flesh do not obey his will? For in spite of himself his mind is both frequently disturbed, and his flesh suffers, and grows old, and dies; and in spite of ourselves we suffer whatever else we suffer, and which we would not suffer if our nature absolutely and in all its parts obeyed our will. But is it not the infirmities of the flesh which hamper it in its service? Yet what does it matter how its service is hampered, so long as the fact remains, that by the just retribution of the sovereign God whom we refused to be subject to and serve, our flesh, which was subjected to us, now torments us by insubordination, although our disobedience brought trouble on ourselves, not upon God? For He is not in need of our service as we of our body's; and therefore what we did was no punishment to Him, but what we receive is so to us. And the pains which are called bodily are pains of the soul in and from the body. For what pain or desire can the flesh feel by itself and without the soul? But when the flesh is said to desire or to suffer, it is meant, as we have explained, that the man does so, or some part of the soul which is affected by the sensation of the flesh, whether a harsh sensation causing pain, or gentle, causing pleasure. But pain in the flesh is only a discomfort of the soul arising from the flesh, and a kind of shrinking from its suffering, as the pain of the soul which is called sadness is a shrinking from those things which have happened to us in spite of ourselves. But sadness is frequently preceded by fear, which is itself in the soul, not in the flesh; while bodily pain is not preceded by any kind of fear of the flesh, which can be felt in the flesh before the pain. But pleasure is preceded by a certain appetite which is felt in the flesh like a craving, as hunger and thirst and that generative appetite which is most commonly identified with the name lust, though this is the generic word for all desires. For anger itself was defined by the ancients as nothing else than the lust of revenge; although sometimes a man is angry even at iimate objects which cannot feel his vengeance, as when one breaks a pen, or crushes a quill that writes badly. Yet even this, though less reasonable, is in its way a lust of revenge, and is, so to speak, a mysterious kind of shadow of [the great law of] retribution, that they who do evil should suffer evil. There is therefore a lust for revenge, which is called anger; there is a lust of money, which goes by the name of avarice; there is a lust of conquering, no matter by what means, which is called opinionativeness; there is a lust of applause, which is named boasting. There are many and various lusts, of which some have names of their own, while others have not. For who could readily give a name to the lust of ruling, which yet has a powerful influence in the soul of tyrants, as civil wars bear witness?
16. Vergil, Georgics, 3.34  Tagged with subjects: •agents, definition of Found in books: Mackey (2022), Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion, 13
3.34. Stabunt et Parii lapides, spirantia signa,
17. Vergil, Aeneis, 6.847-6.848, 8.349-8.354  Tagged with subjects: •agents, definition of Found in books: Mackey (2022), Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion, 7, 8, 13
6.847. Lo! on the left and right at feast reclined 6.848. Are other blessed souls, whose chorus sings 8.349. burst wide the doorway of the sooty den, 8.350. and unto Heaven and all the people showed 8.351. the stolen cattle and the robber's crimes, 8.352. and dragged forth by the feet the shapeless corpse 8.353. of the foul monster slain. The people gazed 8.354. insatiate on the grewsome eyes, the breast
18. Lucil., Ass, 15.526-15.528  Tagged with subjects: •agents, definition of Found in books: Mackey (2022), Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion, 12